Tag Archives: device

Faulty Corsair Commander (Mini or Pro)

Strange request here, but I am looking for a duff Commander Pro or Mini.

Preferably one that is not recognized by the PC (ie no USB device appears).

Obviously dont want to pay much for it – let me know if you have one before you chuck it out!

David

Location: Sunny Scotland

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Faulty Corsair Commander (Mini or Pro)

Comparing the leading mobile device management products

The mobile device management space is growing at a rapid pace, and MDM is widely used across the enterprise to manage and secure smartphones and tablets. Investing in this technology enables organizations to not just secure mobile devices themselves, but the data on them and the corporate networks they connect to, as well.

The market for MDM software is saturated now, and there are new vendors arriving in this vertical on a consistent basis. Many of the larger names in mobile security, meanwhile, have been buying up smaller vendors and integrating their technology into their mobile management offerings, while others have remained pure mobile device management companies from the beginning. So what are the best mobile device management products available today?

Since the mobile security market has become so crowded, it is harder than ever to determine what the best mobile device management products are for an organization’s environment.

To make choosing easier for readers, this article evaluates five leading EMM companies offering MDM as a part of their bundles and their products against the most important criteria to consider when procuring and deploying mobile security in the enterprise. These criteria include MDM implementation, app integration, containerization vs. non-containerization, licensing models and policy management. The mobile management vendors covered are Good Technology Inc., VMware AirWatch, MobileIron Inc., IBM MaaS360, Sophos and Citrix.

That being said, there are also niche players — such as BlackBerry — that are attempting to move into the broader MDM market outside of just securing and managing their own hardware, in addition to free offerings from the likes of Google that have attempted to compete with the above list of MDM vendors by providing tools to assist in Android device management. Even Microsoft has a small amount of MDM built into its operating systems to manage mobile devices.

Today, the vast majority of mobile devices in use — both smartphones and tablets — run on either Apple’s iOS or Google’s Android OS. So while many of today’s MDM products are also capable of managing Windows Phones, BlackBerry devices and so on, this article focuses mostly on their Apple and Android management and security capabilities.

Selecting the best mobile device management product for your organization isn’t easy. By using the criteria presented in this feature and asking six crucial questions before buying MDM software, an organization will find it easier to procure the right mobile management and security products to satisfy its enterprise needs.

Criteria #1: Implementation of MDM

Organizations should understand and plan out their mobile device deployment and MDM requirements before looking at vendors. The installation criteria for MDM are normally based on a few things: resources, money and hardware. With that being said, there are two distinct installation possibilities when deploying an MDM product.

The first is an on-premises implementation that needs dedicated resources, both from a hardware and technical perspective, to assist with installing the system or application on a network. Vendors like Good Technology with it’s Good For Enterprise suite require the installation of servers within an organization’s DMZ. This will necessitate firewall changes and operating system resources to implement.

These systems will then need to be managed appropriately to verify that they’re consistently patched and scanned for vulnerabilities, among other issues. In essence, this type of MDM deployment is treated as an additional server on an organization’s network.

It’s possible that a smaller business might shy away from an install of this nature due to the requirements and technical know-how it would take to get off the ground. On the other hand, if businesses are able to manage this type of mobile management and security product, it gives them complete ownership of these systems and the data that’s on them.

The second installation type is a cloud-based service that enables an off premises installation of MDM, removing any concerns regarding management, technical resources and hardware. Vendors like VMware AirWatch and Sophos have the ability to let customers provision their entire MDM product in the cloud and manage the system from any internet connection. This is both a pro and a con: It provides companies with resource constraints — like not having the experience or headcount — with the ability to get an MDM product set up quickly, but it does so at the risk of having data reside outside the complete control of these organizations — within the cloud.

Depending on an organization’s resource availability, technical experience and risk appetite, these are the two options — on-premises and cloud — currently available for installing MDM.

Criteria #2: App integration

Apps are a major reason mobile device popularity and demand has increased exponentially over the years. Without the ability to have apps work properly and yet securely, the power of mobile devices and the ability for users to take full advantage of these tools becomes severely limited.

MDM companies have realized this need for functionality and security, so they’ve created business-grade apps that enable productivity without compromising the integrity of mobile devices, the data on them and the networks to which they connect.

Citrix XenMobile has created XenMobile Apps that are tied together and save data in a secure sandbox on mobile devices, so users don’t need to use unapproved apps to send business data to potentially insecure apps out of an enterprise’s control. The sandboxing technology works by securing, and even at times partitioning, the MDM app separately from the rest of the mobile OS — essentially isolating it from the rest of the device, while allowing a user to have the ability to work securely and efficiently.

There are also third-party app vendors that MDM vendors have partnered with to create branded apps. Good Technology has, for example, partnered with many large vendors to accommodate the need to use their apps with a specific MDM environment. This integration between vendors is extremely helpful and adds to the synergy between both vendors to create better security and more productive users. Sophos also allows this with their Secure Workspace feature, which enables users to access files within a container while securing the access to these documents.

Whether you’re using apps created by an MDM vendor for additional security, or apps that have been developed through the collaboration of an MDM vendor and a third-party vendor, it’s important to know that most of the work on a mobile device is done via these apps, and securing the data that flows through them and is created on them is important.

Criteria #3: Container vs. non-container

There are two major operational options available when researching MDM products: MDM that uses the container approach and MDM that uses the non-container approach. This is a major decision that needs to be made before selecting a mobile management product, as most vendors only subscribe to one of these methods.

This decision, whether to go with the container or non-container method of mobile management, will guide the device policy, app installation policy, BYOD plans and data security for the mobile devices that an organization is looking to manage.

A containerized approach is one that keeps all the data and access to corporate resources contained within an app on a mobile device. This app normally won’t allow access to the app from outside the mobile device and vice versa.

Both the Good for Enterprise suite and MaaS360 offer MDM products that enable customers to use a containerized approach. Large companies tend to benefit from this approach — as do government agencies and financial institutions — as it tends to offer the highest degree of protection for sensitive data.

Once a container is removed from a mobile device, all organizational data is gone, and the organization can be sure there was no data leakage onto the mobile device

In contrast to the restricted tactic used by containerization, the non-container approach creates a more fluid and seamless user experience on mobile devices. Companies like VMware AirWatch, Sophos and MobileIron are the leaders in this approach, which enables security on mobile devices via policies and integrated apps. This means these systems rely on pushing policies to the native OS to control their mobile devices. They also support multiple integrated apps — supplied by trusted vendors the MDM companies have partnered with — that assist in adding an additional layer of security to their data. These companies also allow the use of containers and help bridge the gap between customer needs.

Many organizations, including startups and those in retail, lean toward the non-container approach for mobile management and security due to the speed and native familiarity that end users already have with their mobile devices — with OS-bundled calendaring and mail apps, for example. However, keep in mind, in order to completely secure all the data on mobile devices, the non-container approach requires the aforementioned tight MDM policies and integrated apps to enforce the protection of data.

Criteria #4: License models

The licensing model for MDMs has changed slightly in recent years. In the past, there was only a per device license model, which meant organizations were pushed into using licensing models that weren’t very effective for them financially. Due to the emergence of tablets and users carrying multiple smartphones, there became the need to have a license model based on the user — and not the individual device.

All the MDM products covered in this article offer similar, if not identical, pricing models. MDM vendors have listened to the customers and realized that end users in this day and age don’t always have one device. Which licensing model an organization chooses — per device or user based — depends on the company’s mobile device inventory.

The per-device model normally works well for small companies. In this model, every user gets a device that counts against the organization’s total license count. If a user has three devices, all of these go against the total license count of the business. These licenses are normally cheaper per seat, but can quickly become expensive if there are multiple devices per user requiring coverage.

The user-based pricing model, by contrast, takes into account the need for users to have multiple devices that all require MDM coverage. With this model, the user name is the basis of the license, and the user can have multiple devices attached to his one license. This is the reason many larger organizations lean toward this model, or at least a hybrid approach of the two licensing models — to account for users who use multiple mobile devices.

MDM criteria #5: Policy management

This is an important feature of mobile device management, and one that organizations need to review with either a request for proposal (RFP) or something that outlines the details of what mobile device policies they require. Mobile policies enable organizations to make granular changes to a mobile device to limit certain features — the camera and apps, among others — push wireless networks, create VPN tunnels and whitelist apps. This is the nuts and bolts of MDM, and a criterion that should be reviewed heavily during the proof-of-concept stage with specific vendors.

This ability to push certain features of a policy to mobile devices is certainly required, as is the ability to wipe devices remotely if the need occurs should they be lost or stolen. While all the MDM products covered in this article provide the ability to remotely wipe mobile devices, in the case of Good for Enterprise and IBM MaaS360, organizations have the option to wipe mobile devices completely or to just remove the container.

Also important for MDM products is the ability to perform actions such as VPN connections, wireless network configurations and certificate installs, which AirWatch can accomplish. Sophos also offers the ability to manage policies from a security perspective by enforcing antiphishing, antimalware and web protection.

You must assert these options in an RFP beforehand to determine what part of the mobile device policy you’re looking to secure. Evaluating what policy changes you can push to a mobile device and what functions an organization might want to see within a policy will help provide insight for an educated decision on the best mobile device management products.

Most times there will be multiple policies created that allow certain users to receive a particular policy, while allowing someone with other needs to receive a completely different MDM policy. This is a standard function within all MDMs, but it should be understood that a single policy for all users is not always plausible.

Finding the best mobile device management product for you

There are many vendors in this saturated market, but following these five criteria should assist organizations in narrowing the field down to find the best mobile device management products available today. There is much overlap between vendors, but finding the right one that can secure an organization’s data completely and offer full coverage, with the ability to manage all the aspects needed in a policy, is what businesses should be aiming for in MDM products.

Many large companies, especially those in the financial or government sector, are running Good for Enterprise due to the extra layer of security it provides by leveraging a container and integrated apps developed by vendors with whom they partnered.

There is much overlap between vendors, but finding the right one that can secure an organization’s data completely and offer full coverage, with the ability to manage all the aspects needed in a policy, is what businesses should be aiming for in MDM products.

IBM MaaS360, on the other hand, offers both a container and non-container approach to mobile security and management, which makes it suitable for larger enterprises that require some flexibility in terms of operational method deployment. This gives IBM MaaS360 the ability to play to both sides and gives them some leverage over competitors by attracting customers from both mindsets.

Many midsize companies don’t have to meet the level of security imposed by large financial clients, though, and thus aren’t running to boost their mobile device security. We’ve seen that, many times, compliance will bring an extra layer of required security, however, thereby making these organizations more conscience at times about securing data on mobile devices.

Midsize to large companies — those outside of the financial sector — tend to run AirWatch, Sophos or MobileIron MDM due to their abilities to keep the native feel of mobile devices intact, while being able to push custom policies that secure mobile devices to the clients.

As for app integration, Citrix has performed very well in this area with XenMobile, having shown that it’s pushing the boundaries of this area. These apps are selling points to many customers who want to integrate their data onto a mobile device, but want the flexibility to manage the data these mobile apps are consuming. By dispensing these approved apps to managed mobile devices and writing policy for their data to be used on these apps, MDM products, such as Citrix’s, assist with adding an extra layer of data control for the company and ease of use for the user.

As mobile devices become more indispensible for business users, the MDM market will keep expanding in response to the growing need for mobile security. 

Baramundi Management Suite

The Baramundi Management Suite (which begins at $25.90 per device) is a relative newcomer to our mobile device management (MDM) review roundup. It’s also notable for the fact that the software comes in the form of a virtual machine (VM) intended for either local installation on a server in your data center or for use in the cloud as a server instance in either Amazon Web Services (AWS) or Microsoft Azure. While it might be a solid enough MDM competitor for many small to midsize businesses (SMBs), the Baramundi Management Suite suffers from some unneeded complexity as well as a dependence on Microsoft back-office platforms for full functionality. It’s these issues that keep it behind our Editors’ Choice winner VMware AirWatch for now.

Similar Products

On the plus side, the MDM function is just one part of the bigger picture in the Baramundi Management Suite. Similar to Microsoft Intune, the Baramundi Management Suite also handles some desktop management chores for Microsoft Windows and Apple OS X-based desktops, up to the installation of a new operating system (OS). The downside here is that full functionality requires integration with an external Microsoft Active Directory (AD) domain and a Microsoft Exchange Server for sending email notifications. The first is something we encounter often, but the second has become something of a limitation now that many SMBs are going with hosted email services such as Google G Suite instead of an in-house email server. Our trial system didn’t have access to either of these platforms so we were unable to test all of the features, including the sending of email messages for device enrollment. Additionally, on the MDM side, Windows-based devices also required AD support, which means that shops without AD and Microsoft Exchange will only be able to manage Android and Apple devices with the Baramundi Management Suite.

Installation and Device Enrollment

Installing the Baramundi Management Suite consists of provisioning a VM, which was accomplished by the company for our test instance in the Microsoft Azure public cloud. The same could be accomplished in AWS should you choose to go that route. Connecting to the system uses a remote desktop session to connect you into a Windows Server environment. The one advantage to a VM approach is the consistency of deployment for the management infrastructure across multiple cloud services and on-premises, which means you’ve got easy access to redundancy and scalability should you need it.

To enroll either an Android or iOS device, you simply download the Baramundi Mobile Agent application from the appropriate store and follow the in-app instructions. Baramundi provides a Quick Response Code (QR code) that contains the server and account information so you don’t have to type this in. The agent includes a QR scanning capability, which removes the need for any additional apps. On iOS, the app installs the appropriate certificates to get you securely connected to the server.

We were able to register an iOS phone, a Samsung Galaxy S8+ smartphone, and a Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 device. The Baramundi Management Suite does support the Samsung Knox platform and the ability to block (black list) or allow (white list) specific apps. Only those apps which have been white-listed will be allowed should a user choose to install them. We did find some limitations to this capability depending on the version of Knox you’re using but it shouldn’t be an issue with updated phones.

Management Interface

Opening the Baramundi Management Suite console presents a dashboard that shows the status of Windows devices. The dashboard for mobile devices shows compliance status and rules violations. The Compliance Overview block includes clickable links to take you to another section of the management interface with more detailed information. The graphics displayed are static, meaning you can’t click an image and drill down for further details like you can in other products like VMware AirWatch and SOTI MobiControl. You also can’t modify the dashboard screens.

Like most of the other products in this roundup, the Baramundi Management Suite uses the concept of device profiles to configure specific settings. One difference from products such as and SOTI MobiControl is that the Baramundi Management Suite uses the concept of a universal profile to apply the same basic settings to all platforms. Creating a profile consists of settings collected into groupings they call “building blocks.” For example, one building block addresses restrictions on hardware such as the camera. Other building blocks include settings for Wi-Fi access points and virtual private network (VPN) credentials.

Once a profile has been created, it must be deployed by using a job. Jobs perform a number of different actions, including installing or uninstalling an app or profile; locking, unlocking, or wiping a device; and compiling a hardware or software inventory. Performing an action such as a device lock or wipe requires several steps, including creating a job to accomplish the task and then deploying it to a specific device. This seems more cumbersome for mobile devices than simply right-clicking and choosing “Lock Device” as in other systems such as SOTI MobiControl.

Viewing individual devices lets you see pertinent information about the device and perform specific tasks such as assign a job or edit the owner details. A Device Actions menu item on the page only let you deactivate the device. To do anything else requires creating a job. Creating a new job happens under the Jobs section. The Baramundi Management Suite includes a number of standard jobs to do things such as take a hardware and software inventory or distribute an app. Initiating a device wipe requires a number of steps to first create the job and then assign it to a specific device. This amount of effort would become quite tedious for most administrators after the first few device wipe requests.

Reporting was one strong area for the Baramundi Management Suite. A long list of pre-defined reports gives you access to most of the pertinent information. Creating new reports requires a full version of Crystal Reports which is an additional cost but does offer a robust report building tool. On the downside, the Baramundi Management Suite interface was not as intuitive as other products, like and SOTI MobiControl. It’s also missing features such as geofencing, geolocation, or mobile expense management (MEM). The geolocation feature is a significant one when an employee loses his or her device.

Pricing

The base price for a single Baramundi Management Suite device is $25.90 plus a yearly maintenance cost between $3.50 and $5.50 depending on contract length. While that sounds like a lot, it actually puts the Baramundi Management Suite among the cheapest of all the products we tested, along with AppTec360 Enterprise Mobility Management.

Overall, we liked the Baramundi Management Suite, though we did find that it offers only the basic functionality that we’d expect out of an MDM product. However, it does manage that at a very low cost. Still, it doesn’t fully compare with the capabilities found in the other products in this roundup, notably our Editors’ Choice winner VMware AirWatch. Simple administrative functions, such as wiping a device, require far too many steps when compared to all of the other products in our roundup. Plus, its reliance on Microsoft for full functionality makes life hard on companies that have opted for different cloud-based back-office platforms.

Azure IoT Hub Device Provisioning Service is generally available

The Azure IoT Hub Device Provisioning Service is now available with the same great support you’ve come to know and expect from Azure IoT services. The Device Provisioning Service enables customers to configure zero-touch device provisioning to Azure IoT Hub, and it brings the scalability of the cloud to what was once a laborious one-at-a-time process. The Device Provisioning Process was designed with the challenges of the supply chain in mind, providing the infrastructure needed to provision millions of devices in a secure and scalable manner.

image

With general availability support comes expanded protocol support. Automatic device provisioning with the Device Provisioning Service now supports all protocols that IoT Hub supports including HTTP, AMQP, MQTT, AMQP over websockets, and MQTT over websockets. This release also corresponds to expanded SDK language support for both the device and client side. We now support SDKs in the following languages including C, C#, Java, Node (service for now, device coming soon), and Python (device for now, service coming soon). Get started with the Device Provisioning Service with the quick start tutorials.

The Device Provisioning Service works in a wide variety of scenarios:

  • Zero-touch provisioning to a single IoT solution without requiring hardcoded IoT Hub connection information in the factory (initial setup).
  • Automatically configuring devices based on solution-specific needs.
  • Load balancing devices across multiple hubs.
  • Connecting devices to their owner’s IoT solution based on sales transaction data (multitenancy).
  • Connecting devices to a specific IoT solution depending on use-case (solution isolation).
  • Connecting a device to the IoT hub with the nearest geo-location.
  • Re-provisioning based on a change in the device, such as a change in ownership or location.

The Device Provisioning Service is flexible enough to support all those scenarios using the same basic flow:

image

We’ve made it easier than ever to use hardware-based security with the Device Provisioning Service device SDKs. We offer in-box support for different kinds of hardware security modules (HSMs), and we have partnerships with several hardware manufacturers to help our customers be as secure as possible. You can learn more about the hardware partnerships by reading the blog post Provisioning for true zero-touch secure identity management for IoT, and you can learn more about HSMs by reading the blog post Azure IoT supports new security hardware to strengthen IoT security. The SDKs are extensible to support other HSMs, and you can learn more about how to use your own custom HSM with the device SDKs. While using an HSM is not required to use the Device Provisioning Service, we strongly recommend using one in your devices. The SDKs provide a TPM simulator and a DICE simulator (for X.509 certs) for development and testing purposes. Learn more about all the technical concepts involved in device provisioning.

Azure IoT is committed to offering you services which take the pain out of deploying and managing an IoT solution in a secure, reliable way. To learn more please watch the videos What is the Device Provisioning Service and Provisioning a real device. You can create your own Device Provisioning Service on the Azure portal, and you can check out the device SDKs on GitHub. Learn all about the Device Provisioning Service and how to use it in the documentation center. We would love to get your feedback on secure device registration, so please continue to submit your suggestions through the Azure IoT User Voice forum.

To sum things up with a limerick:

Come join us in our celebration
Of IoT auto-registration
It’s generally available
Full-featured and capable
For your devices’ automation

Why device upgrade strategies fail

Ivan Pepelnjak, writing in IP Space, was asked by one of his readers about why software anchoring a device upgrade is still plagued by delays and bugs. In Pepelnjak’s view, the challenge stems from the networking industry’s long commitment to command-line interface and routing platforms built atop 30-year-old code.

With device upgrade and software rollouts, engineers are often split between two realities. In one camp, engineers “vote with their wallets” and invest in technology that supports automation, while in the other group, engineers cling to manual configuration and face holdups accommodating hundreds of routers at a time because they lack a gradual rollout for updates. “I never cease to be amazed at how disinterested enterprise networking engineers are about network automation. Looks like they barely entered the denial phase of grief while everyone else is passing them by left and right,” Pepelnjak wrote.

Dig deeper into Pepelnjak’s thoughts on device upgrade strategies and what steps engineers should take to improve them.

Where cybersecurity jobs fall the shortest

Last week, Jon Oltsik, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group in Milford, Mass., blogged about the global cybersecurity skills shortage. This week, he revisited the topic, identifying the most acute shortfalls, using data compiled by ESG and the Information Systems Security Association. According to Oltsik, the top three areas where expertise is most lacking are security analysis and investigation, application security, and cloud security skills.

Survey respondents also pointed to concern about their organizations’ gap in skills such risk-compliance administration, security engineering and penetration testing. “The overall picture is bleak — many organizations may not have the right skills and resources to adequately secure new business and IT initiatives and may also lack ample skills to detect and respond to incidents in a timely fashion. Therefore, I keep coming back to two words — existential threat,” Oltsik wrote.

Read more of Oltsik’s thoughts on the cybersecurity skills shortage.

Juniper boosts Contrail for telcos

Zeus Kerravala, writing in ZK Research, gave high marks to Juniper Networks’ Contrail Cloud platform aimed at telcos. One plus: the platform’s tight integration with internal and third-party services and applications.

As a result, Contrail Cloud works easily with software from a number of sources, including network functions virtualization assurance through AppFormix; prevalidated virtualized network functions with Affirmed Networks as well as Juniper’s own vSRX virtual firewall, collaboration with Red Hat and end-to-end cloud management on behalf of customers.

Kerravala said in order to compete and offer services to enterprise customers, telcos must be able to exploit cloud architectures that support the rapid rollout of new services. “Juniper’s Contrail Cloud offerings takes much of the complexity out of the equation ensuring that telcos can meet the increasing demands of their business customers,” he wrote.

Explore more of Kerravala’s thoughts on Juniper Contrail.

For Sale – Seagate 2TB 2.5″ External HDD

Make/model : Seagate STBX2000401 – for want of a better link it’s the same as the device shown here.
Capacity : 2TB
USB 3.0, 2.5″ hard drive

In great condition, boxed and comes with its original (bespoke?) USB lead.

This was bought from new by ourselves about 2.5 years ago and has been plugged into either our Xbox or PS4 since purchase. Only getting rid of it as we’re upgrading to a PS4 Pro and that has enough default storage for us (being a bit more ruthless with how many downloads we’re going to retain as well!).

Freshly formatted but I’m happy to run whatever diagnostic check you fancy as long as I’ve access to that tool (at no cost!).

Will send via RMSD if asking price is met.

Price and currency: 60
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG
Location: Derby
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Microsoft and Huawei deliver Full Neural On-device Translations

Microsoft is delivering the world’s first fully neural on device translations in the Microsoft Translator app for Android, customized for the Huawei Mate 10 series. Microsoft achieved this breakthrough by partnering with Huawei to customize Microsoft’s new neural technology for Huawei’s new NPU (Neural Processing Unit) hardware. This results in dramatically better and faster offline translations as compared to existing offline packs.

The Microsoft Translator app with these capabilities comes pre-installed on Huawei Mate 10 devices allowing every Mate 10 user to have native access to online quality level translations even when they are not connected to the Internet.

Until now, due to the computational requirements of neural machine translation, it was not possible to do full Neural Machine Translation (NMT) on-device. Huawei’s Mate 10 is the first phone featuring a dedicated Neural Processing Unit (NPU) for accelerating AI computing tasks. By combining Microsoft latest advancement in NMT on-device technology, and Huawei Mate 10 NPU, both speed and quality of offline translations are dramatically boosted. This offers users a unique offline language experience not found on other devices: the power of neural network translation without an internet connection.

What does this mean for users of the Microsoft Translator app on the Huawei Mate 10?

Imagine you are traveling and need to use the Translator app to ask for directions or understand a restaurant menu. With spotty network coverage and high roaming costs, you may not have an internet connection. Now, before you travel, you can download neural offline packs and have state-of-the-art neural translation at your fingertips, wherever you go.

“Before, customers had to choose between the quality of online and the convenience of offline translations. Now, with our NPU and Microsoft Translator software, customers get the best of both.”
Baofeng(Felix) Zhang, VP of CBG software and Head of AI, Huawei

AI-Powered Offline Translations using Neural Networks: The Numbers

Better

Whether it is for its mobile app or its Translator API, part of Microsoft Cognitive Services, Microsoft uses the industry standard BLEU score to measure its translation quality. BLEU rates translation quality by comparing how close machine translations are to human ones.
Using this methodology, internal tests have shown, depending on the language, up to a 23 percent better offline translation quality over competing best-in-class offline packs, and often a difference of less than 1 BLEU point between Microsoft state-of-the art online neural and offline neural translations.

This means that even when you’re not connected to the Internet, offline translation quality using the Translator app on Huawei’s Mate 10 is closer to human translation than offline translations have ever been.

Faster

Quality of translations is not the only benefit of this new technology. Our tests also showed that translation of a full-page text picture was not only more accurate, but also up to three times faster than with the previous versions of Microsoft Translator on other high-end devices.

Smaller

This new technology also saves space: The language packs for Huawei Mate 10 are 50 percent smaller than current Translator packs, leaving more space for your travel memories.

A full-featured app for all your mobile translation needs

The app has all the features Microsoft Translator is known for, including 60+ text translation languages and the Translator live feature that allows up to 100 people to have real-time conversations from their own device, including joining a translated presentation using the Presentation Translator PowerPoint add-in, and more. The full feature list can be found here.

The new Mate 10 exclusive neural translation packs are available for the following languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Thai.

In addition to these purely neural network powered languages, additional language packs are available for the remaining languages.

Read more about the Huawei Mate 10 release here: http://consumer.huawei.com/en/phones/mate10