Tag Archives: disclosures

July Patch Tuesday brings three public disclosures

Microsoft announced three public disclosures from the 54 vulnerabilities released in the July Patch Tuesday.

An elevation of privilege public disclosure (CVE-2018-8313) affects all OSes except Windows 7. Attackers could impersonate processes, cross-process communication or interrupt system functionality to elevate their privilege levels. The patch addresses this issue by ensuring that the Windows kernel API enforces permissions.

“The fact that there is some level of detailed description of how to take advantage of this out in the open, it’s a good chance an attacker will look to develop some exploit code around this,” said Chris Goettl, director of product management and security at Ivanti, based in South Jordan, Utah.

A similar elevation-of-privilege vulnerability (CVE-2018-8314) this July Patch Tuesday affects all OSes except Windows Server 2016. Attackers could escape a sandbox to elevate their privileges when Windows fails a check. If this vulnerability were exploited in conjunction with another vulnerability, the attacker could run arbitrary code. The update fixes how Windows’ file picker handles paths.

A spoofing vulnerability in the Microsoft Edge browser (CVE-2018-8278) tricks users into thinking they are on a legitimate website. The attacker could then extract additional code to remotely exploit the system. The patch fixes how Microsoft Edge handles HTML content.

“That type of enticing of a user, we know works,” Goettl said. “It’s not a matter of will they get someone to do it or not; it’s a matter of statistically you only need to entice so many people before somebody will do it.”

Out-of-band updates continue

Chris Goettl of IvantiChris Goettl

Before July Patch Tuesday, Microsoft announced a new side-channel attack called Lazy FP State Restore (CVE-2018-3665) — similar to the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities — on supported versions of Windows. An attacker uses a different side-channel to pull information from other registers on Intel CPUs through speculative execution.

Jimmy Graham of QualysJimmy Graham

Microsoft also updated its Spectre and Meltdown advisory (ADV180012). It does not contain any new releases on the original three variants, but the company did update the Speculative Store Bypass, Variant 4 of the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities. This completed coverage for Intel processors, and Microsoft is still working with AMD to mitigate its processors.

Microsoft released out-of-band patches between June and July Patch Tuesday for a third-party Oracle Outside In vulnerability (ADV180010) that affects all Exchange servers.

“We don’t have a lot of info on the exploitability,” said Jimmy Graham, director of product management at Qualys, based in Foster City, Calif. “It should be treated as critical for Exchange servers.”

New Windows Server 2008 R2 servicing model on its way

Alongside its June Patch Tuesday, Microsoft announced plans to switch the updating system for Windows Server 2008 SP2 to a rollup model. The new monthly model will more closely match the servicing model used for older Windows versions, enabling administrators to simplify their servicing process. This will include a security-only quality update, a security monthly quality rollup and a preview of the monthly quality rollup.

“The 2008 Server users out there now need to adopt the same strategy, where they had the luxury of being able to do one or two updates if they chose to and not the rest,” Goettl said.

The new model will preview on Aug. 21, 2018. Administrators will still receive extended support for Windows Server 2008 SP2 until January 2020. After that, only companies that pay for Premium Assurance will have an additional six years of support.

For more information about the remaining security bulletins for July Patch Tuesday, visit Microsoft’s Security Update Guide.

Chip bugs hit cloud computing usage less than first feared

In the aftermath of one of the largest compute vulnerability disclosures in years, it turns out that cloud computing usage won’t suffer greatly after all.

Public clouds were potentially among the most imperiled architectures from the Spectre and Meltdown chip vulnerabilities. But at least from the initial patches, the impact to these platforms’ security and performance appears to be less dire than predicted.

Many industry observers expressed concern that these chip-level vulnerabilities would make the multitenant cloud model a conspicuous target for hackers to gain access to data in other users’ accounts on the same shared host. But major cloud vendors’ quick responses – in some cases months ago — have largely addressed those issues.

Customers must still update systems that live on top of the cloud, but with the underlying patches, cloud environments are well-positioned to address the initial concerns about data theft. And cloud customers have far less to do than a company that owns its own data center and needs to update its hardware, microcode, hypervisor and perhaps management instances.

“The sky is not falling; just relax,” said Chris Gardner, an analyst with Forrester Research. “They’re probably the most critical CPU bugs we’ve seen in quite some time, but the mitigations help and the chip manufacturers are already working on long-term solutions.”

In some ways, vendors’ rapid response to install fixes to the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities also illustrates their centralization and automation chops.

“We couldn’t have worked with hardware vendors and open source projects like Linux at the pace they were able to do to patch project,” said Joe Kinsella, CTO and founder of CloudHealth, a cloud managed service provider in Boston. “The end result is a testament to the centralization of ability to actually go and respond.”

Security experts say there are no known exploits in the wild for the Meltdown and the two-pronged Spectre vulnerabilities. The execution of a hack through these vulnerabilities, especially Spectre, is beyond the scope of the average hacker, who is far more likely to find a path of less resistance, they say.

In fact, the real impact from Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities so far has been the patching process itself. Microsoft, in particular, riled some of its Azure customers with forced, unscheduled reboots, after reports about Meltdown and Spectre surfaced before the embargo on the disclosure was to be lifted. Google, for its part, said it avoided reboots by live migrating all its customers.

And while Amazon Web Services (AWS), Microsoft, Google and others could quietly get ahead of the problem to varying degrees, smaller cloud companies were often left scrambling.

AMD and Intel have worked on firmware updates to further mitigate the problem, but early versions of these have caused issues of their own.  Updated patches are supposedly imminent, but it’s unclear if they will require another round of cloud provider reboots.

The initial patches to Meltdown and Spectre are stopgap measures — it may take years to redesign chips in a way that doesn’t rely on speculative execution, an optimization technique at the root of these vulnerabilities. It’s also possible that any fundamental redesign of these chips could ultimately benefit cloud vendors, which swap out hardware more frequently than traditional enterprises and thus could jump on the new processors faster.

I can’t imagine a chief risk officer or chief security officer saying this is inconsequential to what we’re going to do in the future.
Marty PuranikCEO, Atlantic.Net

These flaws could cause potential customers to rein in their cloud computing usage, or do additional due diligence before they transition out of their own data centers. This is particularly true in the financial sector and other heavily regulated industries that have just begun to warm to the public cloud.

“If you [are] starting a new project, there’s this question mark that wasn’t there before,” said Marty Puranik, CEO of Atlantic.Net, a cloud hosting provider in Orlando, Fla. “I can’t imagine a chief risk officer or chief security officer saying this is inconsequential to what we’re going to do in the future.”

Performance hits not as bad as first predicted

The other potential fallout from Spectre and Meltdown is how the patches will impact performance. Initial predictions were up to a 30% slowdown, and frustrated customers took to the Internet to highlight major performance hits. Cloud vendors have pushed back on those estimates, however, and multiple managed service providers that oversee thousands of servers on behalf of their clients said that the vast majority of workloads were unaffected.

While it remains to be seen if performance issues will start to emerge over time, IT pros seem to corroborate the providers’ claims. More than a dozen sources — many of whom requested anonymity because of the situation’s sensitive and fluid nature — told SearchCloudComputing that they saw almost no impact from the patches.

The reality is that the number of impacted systems is fairly small and the performance impact is highly variable, said Kinsella. “If it was really 30% I think we’d be having a different conversation because that’s like rolling back a couple years of Moore’s Law,” he said.

Zendesk, based in San Francisco, suspected something was up with its cloud environment following an uptick in reboot notices from AWS toward the end of 2017, said Steve Loyd, vice president of technology operations at Zendesk. Those reboots weren’t exactly welcome, but were better than the alternative, and the company hasn’t seen a big impact from testing patches so far, he said.

Google said it has seen no reports of notable impacts for its cloud customers, while Microsoft and AWS initially said they expected a minority of customers to see performance degradation. It’s unclear how Microsoft has mitigated these issues for those customers, though it has recommended customers switch to a faster networking service that just became generally available. AWS said in a statement that, since installing its patches, it has worked with impacted customers to optimize workloads and “in almost every case, prevent significant changes to their cost.”

The biggest potential exception to these negligible impacts on cloud computing usage would be anything that uses the OS kernel extensively, such as distributed databases or caching systems. Of course, the same type of workload on premises would presumably face the same problem, but even a small impact adds up at scale.

“If any single system doesn’t appear to have more than 1% impact, it’s almost immeasurable,” said Eric Wright, chief evangelist at Turbonomic, a Boston-based hybrid cloud management provider. “But if you have that across 100 systems, you have to add one new virtual system to your load, so no matter how you slice it, there’s some kind of impact.”

Cloud providers also could take more of a hit with customers simply because of their pricing schemes. A company that owns its own data center could just throw some underused servers at the problem. But cloud vendors charge based on CPU cycles, and slower workloads there could have a more pronounced impact, said Pete Lindstrom, an analyst at IDC.

“It’s impressionistic stuff but that’s how security works,” he said. “Really, the question will be what does the monthly bill look like, and is the impact actually there?”

The biggest beneficiary from performance impacts could be abstracted services, such as serverless or platform as a service products. In those scenarios, all the patches are the responsibility of the provider and analysts believe that, to the customer, these services will appear unaltered.

ACI Information Group, a news and social media aggregator, patched its AWS EC2 instances, base AMIs and Docker images. So far the company hasn’t noticed any huge issues, but employees did take note that its serverless workloads required no work on their part to address the problem and the performance was unaffected, said Chris Moyer, vice president of technology at ACI and a TechTarget contributor.

“We have about 40% of our workload on serverless now, so that’s a big win for us too, and another reason to complete our migration entirely,” he said.

Trevor Jones is a senior news writer with SearchCloudComputing and SearchAWS. Contact him at tjones@techtarget.com.