Tag Archives: event

Chief data officer skills tested by AI ad blitz

If they’re watching a sporting event such as the PGA Championship, the summer afternoon isn’t totally restful for chief data officers. As the players chase the golf ball around the course, the IT pros at home must keep one eye on the leaderboard and one on the advertisements, and anticipate honing their chief data officer skills.

The ad spots often tout new technology. They use quick-cut imagery of futuristic cities and data centers and feature notables ranging from rapper Common to troubadour Bob Dylan. The technology for sale could be cognitive computing, blockchain technology, IoT or other trendy tech. The result is the exec in the C-suite who has a Monday morning question to test chief data officer (CDO) skills to the max.

These days that question is often, “What’s our plan for AI?”

Because AI can encompass almost anything magical, it can be a tough question for the chief data officer (CDO) to field. A look at a reporter’s notebook from last month’s MIT Chief Data Officer and Information Quality Symposium (MIT CDOIQ) in Cambridge, Mass., may provide a clue or two.

Kaizen and AI

At an MIT CDOIQ symposium panel sponsored by data platform vendor AtScale, the topic of BI on the data lake turned to a discussion of the imp called AI. Chris Crotts, group manager for enterprise data at Toyota North America, said business users tend to bring up questions on AI — questions that can test data strategy and chief data officer skills.

“Someone will call and say, ‘I need to do AI tomorrow.’ We look into it and find that what they are doing is reporting,” he said. In these cases, he said he asks the line-of-business user to describe the actual problem they are trying to solve. His teams then show them ways of analyzing the data to find answers.

“Part of going digital is to have data competency,” Crotts said. That means users have to be prepared to successfully employ something like AI. If people aren’t ready to analyze the data, Crotts said, it is not worthwhile to spin up a host of new tools.

So, his enterprise data group endeavors to prepare users to understand “how data consumption works.”

For their part, Crotts said, users become increasingly helpful in digging in and discovering issues in the data, such as the complex data that has begun to populate Toyota’s data lakes.

He said Toyota’s lineage in continuous improvement — the company is regarded as the birthplace of Kaizen, a work culture philosophy that focuses on understanding problems firsthand — infuses his and colleagues’ approaches to realizing the kind of change that AI can bring.

Stonebraker’s take

Michael Stonebraker, professor, MITMichael Stonebraker

In a separate presentation at the MIT conference, database veteran and MIT professor Michael Stonebraker also touched on the interest AI is garnering these days.

The guiding technical founder behind such database companies as Ingres, Illustra and Vertica, Stonebraker spoke under the auspices of one of his more recent foundlings, Tamr, a maker of advanced data preparation software.

Stonebraker, like others of late, highlighted the issues influencing chief data officer skills that stand between big data and AI-style analytics. These include the difficulty involved in getting varied data ready to ply for AI insights.

Getting training data is always a problem. Deep learning needs way too much training data.
Michael Stonebrakeradjunct professor at MIT and Tamr co-founder

“The hot button now is to talk about AI, machine learning and the data scientist,” Stonebraker said. “But if you are saying data scientists are going to save your butt, you are going to have this problem: They get 10 minutes a week for doing the job they were hired for.” Preparing data for the new engines, in short, is the first step toward AI.

On deep learning for the enterprise — the hallmark of what is new in AI today — Stonebraker was not optimistic. There, a lack of data volume, rather than a surplus of data, can become a determining issue.

“Getting training data is always a problem,” he lamented. For traditional business enterprises, as opposed to web juggernauts like Google and Facebook, “deep learning needs way too much training data,” he said.

Deep learning “works fine if you are doing image data, natural language [processing] or machine translation,” Stonebraker said.

It is not an entirely bleak outlook, however. He indicated that Tamr customers are seeing success with “conventional machine learning using random forest techniques at scale.”

The AI landscape

The admonitions of Stonebraker and Crotts suggest CDOs need to know their way around enterprise data. That is true whether the technology is AI or BI.

Sure, a good understanding of one’s data is a useful club to have in the golf bag of chief data officer skills. But things do change; an organization’s data must be seen in new contexts, as technology progresses and big data, AI or whatever comes next makes inroads.

A symposium takeaway: CDOs must focus on the people side of data and analytics, and be doubly sure to understand the nature of their data and how malleable it is for newer AI techniques.

SIEM benefits include efficient incident response, compliance

Security information and event management systems collect security log events from numerous hosts within an enterprise and store their relevant data centrally. By bringing this log data together, these SIEM products enable centralized analysis and reporting on an organization’s security events.

SIEM benefits include detecting attacks that other systems missed. Some SIEM tools also attempt to stop attacks — assuming the attacks are still in progress.

SIEM products have been available for many years, but initial security information and event management (SIEM) tools were targeted at large organizations with sophisticated security capabilities and ample security analyst staffing. It is only relatively recently that SIEM systems have emerged that are well-suited to meet the needs of small and medium-sized organizations.

SIEM architectures available today include SIEM software installed on a local server, a local hardware or virtual appliance dedicated to SIEM, and a public cloud-based SIEM service.

Different organizations use SIEM systems for different purposes, so SIEM benefits vary across organizations. This article looks at the three top SIEM benefits, which are:

  • streamlining compliance reporting;
  • detecting incidents that would otherwise not be detected; and
  • improving the efficiency of incident handling

1. Streamline compliance reporting

Many organizations deploy the tools for these SIEM benefits alone, including streamlining enterprise compliance reporting efforts through a centralized logging solution. Each host that needs to have its logged security events included in reporting regularly transfers its log data to a SIEM server. A single SIEM server receives log data from many hosts and can generate one report that addresses all of the relevant logged security events among these hosts.

An organization without a SIEM system is unlikely to have robust centralized logging capabilities that can create rich customized reports, such as those necessary for most compliance reporting efforts. In such an environment, it may be necessary to generate individual reports for each host or to manually retrieve data from each host periodically and reassemble it at a centralized point to generate a single report.

Many organizations deploy the tools for these SIEM benefits alone, including streamlining enterprise compliance reporting efforts through a centralized logging solution.

The latter can be incredibly difficult, in no small part because different operating systems, applications and other pieces of software are likely to log their security events in various proprietary ways, making correlation a challenge. Converting all of this information into a single format may require extensive code development and customization.

Another reason why SIEM tools are so useful is that they often have built-in support for most common compliance efforts. Their reporting capabilities are compliant with the requirements mandated by standards such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

By using SIEM logs, an organization can save considerable time and resources when meeting its security compliance reporting requirements, especially if it is subject to more than one such compliance initiative.

2. Detect the undetected

SIEM systems are able to detect otherwise undetected incidents.

Many hosts that log security breaches do not have built-in incident detection capabilities. Although these hosts can observe events and generate audit log entries for them, they lack the ability to analyze the log entries to identify signs of malicious activity. At best, these hosts, such as end-user laptops and desktops, might be able to alert someone when a particular type of event occurs.

SIEM tools offer increased detection capabilities by correlating events across hosts. By gathering events from hosts across the enterprise, a SIEM system can see attacks that have different parts on different hosts and then reconstruct the series of events to determine what the nature of the attack was and whether or not it succeeded.

In other words, while a network intrusion prevention system might see part of an attack and a laptop’s operating system might see another part of the attack, a SIEM system can correlate the log data for all of these events. A SIEM tool can determine if, for example, a laptop was infected with malware which then caused it to join a botnet and start attacking other hosts.

It is important to understand that while SIEM tools have many benefits, they should not replace enterprise security controls for attack detection, such as intrusion prevention systems, firewalls and antivirus technologies. A SIEM tool on its own is useless because it has no ability to monitor raw security events as they happen throughout the enterprise in real time. SIEM systems use log data as recorded by other software.

Many SIEM products also have the ability to stop attacks while they are still in progress. The SIEM tool itself doesn’t directly stop an attack; rather, it communicates with other enterprise security controls, such as firewalls, and directs them to block the malicious activity. This incident response capability enables the SIEM system to prevent security breaches that other systems might not have noticed elsewhere in the enterprise.

To take this a step further, an organization can choose to have its SIEM tool ingest threat intelligence data from trusted external sources. If the SIEM tool detects any activity involving known malicious hosts, it can then terminate those connections or otherwise disrupt the malicious hosts’ interactions with the organization’s hosts. This surpasses detection and enters the realm of prevention.

3. Improve the efficiency of incident handling activities

Another of the many SIEM benefits is that SIEM tools significantly increase the efficiency of incident handling, which in turn saves time and resources for incident handlers. More efficient incident handling ultimately speeds incident containment, thus reducing the amount of damage that many security breaches and incidents cause.

A SIEM tool can improve efficiency primarily by providing a single interface to view all the security log data from many hosts. Examples of how this can expedite incident handling include:

  • it enables an incident handler to quickly identify an attack’s route through the enterprise;
  • it enables rapid identification of all the hosts that were affected by a particular attack; and
  • it provides automated mechanisms to stop attacks that are still in progress and to contain compromised hosts.

The benefits of SIEM products make them a necessity

The benefits of SIEM tools enable an organization to get a big-picture view of its security events throughout the enterprise. By bringing together security log data from enterprise security controls, host operating systems, applications and other software components, a SIEM tool can analyze large volumes of security log data to identify attacks, security threats and compromises. This correlation enables the SIEM tool to identify malicious activity that no other single host could because the SIEM tool is the only security control with true enterprise-wide visibility.      

Businesses turn to SIEM tools, meanwhile, for a few different purposes. One of the most common SIEM benefits is streamlined reporting for security compliance initiatives — such as HIPAA, PCI DSS and Sarbanes-Oxley — by centralizing the log data and providing built-in support to meet the reporting requirements of each initiative.

Another common use for SIEM tools is detecting incidents that would otherwise be missed and, when possible, automatically stopping attacks that are in progress to limit the damage.

Finally, SIEM products can also be invaluable to improve the efficiency of incident handling activities, both by reducing resource utilization and allowing real-time incident response, which also helps to limit the damage.

Today’s SIEM tools are available for a variety of architectures, including public cloud-based services, which makes them suitable for use in organizations of all sizes. Considering their support for automating compliance reporting, incident detection and incident handling activities, SIEM tools have become a necessity for virtually every organization.

4 steps to engage employees with new live events in Microsoft 365 – Microsoft 365 Blog

Earlier this month, we announced new intelligent event capabilities in Microsoft 365 that enable anyone to create live and on-demand events for teams and across the organization. Today, we invite you to use the public preview of live events in Microsoft 365 and discover new ways to foster connection and engagement between leaders and employees at every level in your organization.

More than ever before, employees in the modern workplace seek work environments that unlock creativity, make their lives more productive and fulfilling, and foster a sense of connection with their organization’s mission and purpose.

A critical first step for your organization to thrive in this new culture of work is to drive alignment of your people around shared purpose and goals. Leaders realize that organizations who do this well have an advantage in attracting and retaining an engaged workforce.

Here are four ways your organization can enable leaders and employees to connect with new live events in Microsoft 365:

1—Use live events to kickstart interactive discussions across your organization

Today, executives at Microsoft—including CEO Satya Nadella—use Microsoft 365 to connect and communicate with employees around the globe. Now, any company or organization with Microsoft 365 can create these moments of high engagement, where people are focused on leaders and their messages and ask questions to clarify or reinforce conversations in the community.

Using Microsoft Stream, Teams, or Yammer, you can create a live event wherever your audience, team, or community resides. Attendees receive notifications and can participate in real-time, with high-definition video and interactive discussion using web, mobile, or desktop.

Following an event, it’s easy to make the recording available on an event page, allowing you to watch the event on your own schedule and catch up quickly with powerful AI features that unlock the content of the event recording. The recording is automatically transcribed and detects changes in speakers—making it simple to search for content later.

For employees who are in different time zones or unable to attend live, the conversation keeps going, so they still feel connected to leaders and peers—helping to overcome geographical or organizational boundaries.

The event and recordings are powered by Microsoft Stream, the intelligent video service in Office 365.

Image of a laptop open to display a live event in Microsoft 365.

2—Foster sustained dialogue in open communities

Give everyone a voice—before, during, and after a live event in Microsoft 365—with Yammer communities that span functions or the entire organization. Providing a forum for employees to be heard is an important piece of transforming a culture. These communities are where people can come any time to raise ideas, concerns, or questions, and where leaders can reply in an authentic way.

An active Yammer community builds trust and a sense of connection and belonging. And it provides a forum where employees who might not feel comfortable speaking out during a live event can connect directly with leaders.

With inline message translation, live events in Microsoft 365 empowers people to express themselves in their own language.

3—Create an intranet site for leaders to share events, blogs, video, news, and resources

Communicate at scale as a leader with a continuous, online presence using content, conversation, and video channels within a SharePoint communications site. You can optimize for news distribution and blogs, and deepen engagement with related content, polls and surveys, and readership analytics.

This is also a great spot to share recorded events for later viewing. Simply create a dedicated page for each event where employees can submit questions and comments in advance. Leaders and organizers can then use this input to craft the messaging and content of the events.

4—Plan corporate communications and measure impact

Executive and internal communications may be managed by a team of one or a team of many—but it takes careful planning and execution to ensure success. Microsoft Teams—the hub for teamwork in Office 365—is ideally suited to work together in the creation and production of events and other executive communications. It provides an effective backstage for your live event, giving you a shared space to work with speakers and approve content before sharing with a broader audience.

Once you have begun engaging your audience, every message within a Yammer community has a visible count of how many people your post has reached. This helps both community organizers and employees understand what is being read. Group insights demonstrate how the knowledge and information created in the community benefit people—regardless of their membership status in the group. For example, passive visitors may gain value from group conversations and apply the information elsewhere in their daily work. You can also see the number of views for an event recording and across a channel, and how many people liked the video. Pages and news articles also have statistics to understand readership.

Empowering all leaders across an organization

Leadership, of course, does not just refer to organizational leaders. Leaders of communities may be subject matter experts, functional managers, or passionate individuals who are leading areas of expertise, practices, or interest groups. These same capabilities in Microsoft 365 can enable leaders at any level to create and sustain connection with their communities.

Patrick Yates, manager of Diversity and Inclusion at TDS Telecom, considers community connections and engagement an important part of the employee experience, and a boon to recruiting talent. “Younger generations entering the workforce especially want a modern, inclusive environment—to be part of something that’s larger than themselves.”

Connect your employees and leaders today

Experience the public preview of live events in Microsoft 365, and get started on connecting your leaders and employees today. We will be adding additional features and functionality based on your feedback in the Tech Community.

To create a live event, you will need an Office 365 E3 or E5 license and your admin must give you permission to do so. To attend a live event, you need an Office 365 license for authenticated users. Public (anonymous) access is possible in specific configurations.

For more information on the intelligent event capabilities, visit the Microsoft 365 live events post on Tech Community.

What is Windows event log? – Definition from WhatIs.com

The Windows event log is a detailed record of system, security and application notifications stored by the Windows operating system that is used by administrators to diagnose system problems and predict future issues.

Applications and the operating system (OS) use these event logs to record important hardware and software actions that the administrator can use to troubleshoot issues with the operating system. The Windows operating system tracks specific events in its log files, such as application installations, security management, system setup operations on initial startup, and problems or errors.

The elements of a Windows event log

Each event in a log entry contains the following information:

Date: The date the event occurred.

Time: The time the event occurred.

User: The username of the user logged onto the machine when the event occurred.

Computer: The name of the computer.

Event ID: A Windows identification number that specifies the event type.

Source: The program or component that caused the event.

Type: The type of event, including information, warning, error, security success audit or security failure audit.

For example, an information event might appear as:

Information        5/16/2018 8:41:15 AM    Service Control Manager              7036       None

A warning event might look like:

Warning               5/11/2018 10:29:47 AM  Kernel-Event Tracing      1              Logging

By comparison, an error event might appear as:

Error                      5/16/2018 8:41:15 AM    Service Control Manager              7001       None

A critical event might resemble:

Critical   5/11/2018 8:55:02 AM    Kernel-Power    41           (63)

The type of information stored in Windows event logs

The Windows operating system records events in five areas: application, security, setup, system and forwarded events. Windows stores event logs in the C:WINDOWSsystem32config folder.

Application events relate to incidents with the software installed on the local computer. If an application such as Microsoft Word crashes, then the Windows event log will create a log entry about the issue, the application name and why it crashed.

[embedded content]

Configure a centralized Windows Server 2016
event log subscription.

Security events store information based on the Windows system’s audit policies, and the typical events stored include login attempts and resource access. For example, the security log stores a record when the computer attempts to verify account credentials when a user tries to log on to a machine.

Setup events include enterprise-focused events relating to the control of domains, such as the location of logs after a disk configuration.

System events relate to incidents on Windows-specific systems, such as the status of device drivers.

Forwarded events arrive from other machines on the same network when an administrator wants to use a computer that gathers multiple logs.

Using the Event Viewer

Microsoft includes the Event Viewer in its Windows Server and client operating system to view Windows event logs. Users access the Event Viewer by clicking the Start button and entering Event Viewer into the search field. Users can then select and inspect the desired log.

Windows Event Viewer
The Event Viewer application in the Windows operating system

Windows categorizes every event with a severity level. The levels in order of severity are information, warning, error and critical.

Most logs consist of information-based events. Logs with this entry usually mean the event occurred without incident or issue. An example of a system-based information event is Event 42, Kernel-Power which indicates the system is entering sleep mode.

Warning level events are based on particular events, such as a lack of storage space. Warning messages can bring attention to potential issues that might not require immediate action. Event 51, Disk is an example of a system-based warning related to a paging error on the machine’s drive.

An error level indicates a device may have failed to load or operate expectedly. Event 5719, NETLOGON is an example of a system error when a computer cannot configure a secure session with a domain controller.

Critical level events indicate the most severe problems. Event ID 41, Kernel-Power is an example of a critical system event when a machine reboots without a clean shutdown.

Other tools to view Windows event logs

Microsoft also provides the wevtutil command-line utility in the System32 folder that retrieves event logs, runs queries, exports logs, archives logs and clear logs.

Third-party utilities that also work with Windows event logs include SolarWinds Log & Event Manager, which provides real-time event correlation and remediation; file integrity monitoring; USB device monitoring; and threat detection. Log & Event Manager automatically collects logs from servers, applications and network devices.

ManageEngine EventLog Analyzer builds custom reports from log data and sends real-time text message and email alerts based on specific events.

Using PowerShell to query events

Microsoft builds Windows event logs in extensible markup language (XML) format with an EVTX extension. XML provides more granular information and a consistent format for structured data.

Administrators can build complicated XML queries with the Get-WinEvent PowerShell cmdlet to add or exclude events from a query.

Looking at the Hyper-V Event Log (January 2018 edition)

Hyper-V has changed over the last few years and so has our event log structure. With that in mind, here is an update of Ben’s original post in 2009 (“Looking at the Hyper-V Event Log”).

This post gives a short overview on the different Windows event log channels that Hyper-V uses. It can be used as a reference to better understand which event channels might be relevant for different purposes.

As a general guidance you should start with the Hyper-V-VMMS and Hyper-V-Worker event channels when analyzing a failure. For migration-related events it makes sense to look at the event logs both on the source and destination node.

Windows Event Viewer showing the Hyper-V-VMMS Admin log

Below are the current event log channels for Hyper-V. Using “Event Viewer” you can find them under “Applications and Services Logs”, “Microsoft”, “Windows”.
If you would like to collect events from these channels and consolidate them into a single file, we’ve published a HyperVLogs PowerShell module to help.

Event Channel Category Description
Hyper-V-Compute Events from the Host Compute Service (HCS) are collected here. The HCS is a low-level management API.
Hyper-V-Config This section is for anything that relates to virtual machine configuration files. If you have a missing or corrupt virtual machine configuration file – there will be entries here that tell you all about it.
Hyper-V-Guest-Drivers Look at this section if you are experiencing issues with VM integration components.
Hyper-V-High-Availability Hyper-V clustering-related events are collected in this section.
Hyper-V-Hypervisor This section is used for hypervisor specific events. You will usually only need to look here if the hypervisor fails to start – then you can get detailed information here.
Hyper-V-StorageVSP Events from the Storage Virtualization Service Provider. Typically you would look at these when you want to debug low-level storage operations for a virtual machine.
Hyper-V-VID These are events form the Virtualization Infrastructure Driver. Look here if you experience issues with memory assignment, e.g. dynamic memory, or changing static memory while the VM is running.
Hyper-V-VMMS Events from the virtual machine management service can be found here. When VMs are not starting properly, or VM migrations fail, this would be a good source to start investigating.
Hyper-V-VmSwitch These channels contain events from the virtual network switches.
Hyper-V-Worker This section contains events from the worker process that is used for the actual running of the virtual machine. You will see events related to startup and shutdown of the VM here.
Hyper-V-Shared-VHDX Events specific to virtual hard disks that can be shared between several virtual machines. If you are using shared VHDs this event channel can provide more detail in case of a failure.
Hyper-V-VMSP The VM security process (VMSP) is used to provide secured virtual devices like the virtual TPM module to the VM.
Hyper-V-VfpExt Events form the Virtual Filtering Platform (VFP) which is part of the Software Defined Networking Stack.
VHDMP Events from operations on virtual hard disk files (e.g. creation, merging) go here.

Please note: some of these only contain analytic/debug logs that need to be enabled separately and not all channels exist on Windows client. To enable the analytic/debug logs, you can use the HyperVLogs PowerShell module.

Alles Gute,

Lars

Visual Studio Live Share aims to spur developer collaboration

NEW YORK — Developers at Microsoft’s event here last week got a sneak peek at a tool that aims to boost programmer productivity and improve application quality.

Microsoft’s Visual Studio Live Share, displayed at its Connect(); 2017 conference, lets developers work on the same code in real time. It also continues to bolster the company’s credibility in their eyes, delivering tools and services that make their jobs easier.

The software brings the Agile practice of pair programming to a broader set of programmers, except the programmers do not need to be physically together. Developers can remotely access and debug the same code in their respective editor or integrated development environment and share their full project context, rather than just their screens. Visual Studio Live Share works across multiple machines. Interested developers can sign up to join the Visual Studio Live Share preview, set for early 2018. It will be a limited, U.S.-only preview.

“It works not just between Visual Studio Code sessions between two Macs or between two Visual Studio sessions on Windows, but you can, in fact, have teams composed of multiple different parts of the Visual Studio family on multiple different operating systems all developing simultaneously,” said Scott Guthrie, executive vice president in Microsoft’s cloud and enterprise group.

The ability for developers to collaboratively debug and enhance the quality of applications in real time is extremely useful for developers looking for help with coding issues. While the capability has been around in various forms for 20 years, by integrating it into the Visual Studio tool set, Microsoft aims to standardize live sharing of code.

Scott Guthrie, Microsoft executive vice president of cloud and enterprise, presenting the keynote at Connect(); 2017.
Scott Guthrie, Microsoft executive vice president of cloud and enterprise, presenting the keynote at Connect(); 2017.

“I will be happy to see full collaboration make it to a shipping product,” said Theresa Lanowitz, an analyst at Voke, a research firm in Minden, Nev. “I had that capability shipping in 1994 at Taligent.”

Thomas Murphy, an analyst at Gartner, said he likes what he has heard about Visual Studio Live Share thus far, but wants to see it firsthand and compare it with pair programming tools such as AtomPair.

“[Microsoft is] doing a great job of being open and participating in open software in a nice incremental fashion,” he said. “But does it bring them new developers? That is a harder question. I think there are still plenty of people that think of Microsoft as the old world, and they are now in the new world.”

General availability of Visual Studio App Center

There are still plenty of [developers] that think of Microsoft as the old world, and they are now in the new world.
Thomas Murphyanalyst, Gartner

Also this week, Microsoft made its Visual Studio App Center generally available. Formerly known as Visual Studio Mobile Center and based on Xamarin Test Cloud, Visual Studio App Center is essentially a mobile backend as a service that provides a DevOps environment to help developers manage the lifecycle of their mobile apps. Objective-C, Swift, Android Java, Xamarin and React Native developers can all use Visual Studio App Center, according to the company.

Once a developer connects a code repository to Visual Studio App Center, the tool automatically creates a release pipeline of automated builds, tests the app in the cloud, manages distribution of the app to beta testers and app stores, and monitors usage of the app with crash analytics data using HockeyApp analytics tool Microsoft acquired in 2014.

“HockeyApp is very useful for telemetry data; that was a good acquisition,” Lanowitz said. Xamarin’s mobile development tools, acquired by Microsoft in 2016, also are strong, she said.

Darryl K. Taft covers DevOps, software development tools and developer-related issues as news writer for TechTarget’s SearchSoftwareQuality, SearchCloudApplications, SearchMicroservices and TheServerSide. Contact him at dtaft@techtarget.com or @darrylktaft on Twitter.

Brad Smith takes his call for a Digital Geneva Convention to the United Nations – Microsoft on the Issues

On Thursday, Microsoft President Brad Smith spoke in Geneva, Switzerland, at an event hosted by the United Nations on the growing nature of nation-state cyberattacks and the urgent need for the world to work together to address this growing challenge.

Tags: Brad Smith, cybersecurity, Digital Geneva Convention