Tag Archives: Explore

Seventeenth century French artifact arrives in Seattle for an immersive exhibition, powered by Microsoft – Stories

Visitors can explore the Mont-Saint-Michel through an AI and mixed-reality-powered experience at Seattle’s Museum of History & Industry

Museum visitors explore the Mont-Saint-Michel through an AI and mixed-reality-powered experie

SEATTLE — Nov. 21, 2019 Seattle’s Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI) and Microsoft Corp. on Thursday announced the opening of a new exhibit, “Mont-Saint-Michel: Digital Perspectives on the Model,” which features a unique blend of 17th and 21st century technology.

Powered by Microsoft AI and mixed-reality technology as well as the recently released HoloLens 2 device, the interactive exhibition transports visitors into a holographic tour of the picturesque Mont-Saint-Michel, a medieval monastery perched atop a remote tidal island off the coast of Normandy, France.

The virtual experience is complemented by a physical relief map of the Mont-Saint-Michel, an intricate, three-dimensional model of the landmark. Entirely crafted by hand in the 1600s by the resident Benedictine monks, the 1/144-scale model precisely depicts the monument in such intricate detail that maps like this were considered valuable strategic tools to leaders like Napoleon and King Louis XIV, who considered the maps military secrets and hid them from public view.

“The Museum of History & Industry is honored to share this icon of world history, enhanced by leading-edge technology, to create a unique experience born of innovations both past and present,” said Leonard Garfield, MOHAI’s executive director. “More than 300 years separate the remarkable relief map and today, but the persistent human drive toward invention and creativity bridges those years, reflecting the unbroken quest for greater understanding and appreciation of the world around us.”

The opening of the exhibit is timed with the 40th anniversary of the Mont-Saint-Michel being designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This is the first time the relief map, as well as the mixed-reality experience, has been in North America.

“The relief maps were technological marvels of Louis XIV and Napoleon’s time. It’s exciting to see how we can blend old and new technology to unlock the hidden treasures of history, especially for younger generations,” said Brad Smith, president of Microsoft. “This exhibit provides a unique model for preserving cultural heritage around the world, something Microsoft is committed to through our AI for Good program.”

The Mont-Saint-Michel experience is an example of Microsoft’s AI for Cultural Heritage program, which aims to leverage the power of AI to empower people and organizations dedicated to the preservation and enrichment of cultural heritage. Microsoft is working with nonprofits, universities and governments around the world to use AI to help preserve the languages we speak, the places we live and the artifacts we treasure. For example, earlier today Microsoft announced it is working with experts in New Zealand to include te reo Māori in its Microsoft Translator application, which will enable instant translations of text from more than 60 languages into te reo Māori and vice versa. This will be one of the first indigenous languages to use the latest machine learning translation technology to help make the language accessible to as many people as possible. The AI for Cultural Heritage program is the fourth pillar of Microsoft’s AI for Good portfolio, a five-year commitment to use AI to tackle some of society’s biggest challenges.

The relief map is on loan to MOHAI from the Musée des Plans-Reliefs in Paris, which houses more than 100 historically significant and well-preserved relief maps. The relief map of Mont-Saint-Michel is considered the museum’s crown jewel.

“One of the challenges in the history of art is the relationship with the public. To gain the attention, to capture the view or the interest of the public, is not always evident,” said Emmanuel Starcky, director, Musée des Plans-Relief. “With the HoloLens technology, you have now the possibility to realize immersive experiences in art, where you still see the reality but have more information about it. It will be a unique experience for the American public to discover the relief map, its condition in the 17th century and its evolution through three centuries, as well as reflect on the purpose of those relief maps.”

Drawing from hundreds of thousands of detailed images, Iconem, a leader in the digital preservation of cultural heritage sites, used Microsoft AI to create a photorealistic 3D digital model of the historic structure. Then, French mixed-reality specialists at HoloForge Interactive developed a unique Microsoft HoloLens experience to draw people into the artifact like never before.

The “Mont-Saint-Michel: Digital Perspectives on the Model” exhibit, including both the original relief map and mixed-reality experience, will be on display at MOHAI Nov. 23, 2019 through Jan. 26, 2020.

About MOHAI

MOHAI is dedicated to enriching lives through preserving, sharing, and teaching the diverse history of Seattle, the Puget Sound region, and the nation. As the largest private heritage organization in the State of Washington; the museum engages communities through interactive exhibits, online resources, and award-winning public and youth education programs.  For more information about MOHAI, please visit mohai.org, or call (206) 324-1126. Facebook: facebook.com/seattlehistory Twitter: @MOHAI

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications, (425) 638-7777, [email protected]

Museum of History & Industry PR, Wendy Malloy, (206) 324-1126, ext. 150, [email protected]

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

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The new business imperative: A unified cloud security strategy

As more businesses begin to explore the benefits of moving on-premises data and applications to the cloud, they’re having to rethink their traditional approaches to data security. Not only are cybercriminals developing more sophisticated attacks, but the number of employees and users who can access, edit, and share data has increased the risk of breaches. In fact, Gartner indicates* that “through 2022, 95 percent of cloud security incidents failures will be the customer’s fault. CIOs can combat this by implementing and enforcing policies on cloud ownership, responsibility and risk acceptance. They should also be sure to follow a life cycle approach to cloud governance and put in place central management and monitoring planes to cover the inherent complexity of multicloud use.”

Instead of relying on a patchwork of third-party security solutions that don’t always speak to each other, potentially leaving systems vulnerable to attack, companies are now adopting a unified, end-to-end cloud security defense. This typically involves choosing a cloud provider that can integrate security controls right into existing corporate systems and processes. When these controls span the entire IT infrastructure, they make it easier to protect data and maintain user trust by offering increased compatibility, better performance, and more flexibility.

Protection that’s always compatible

A holistic, cloud-supported threat warning and detection system can be designed to work seamlessly across every asset of an IT environment. For instance, built-in security management solutions can give IT teams the ability to constantly monitor the entire system from a centralized location, rather than manually evaluating different machines. This allows them to sense threats early, provide identity monitoring, and more—all without any compatibility issues.

Container shipping company Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) has gone this route. As in many businesses, MSC’s IT environment is spread across a variety of locations, networks, and technologies, such as container ships, trucking networks, and offices. Its previous security strategy employed a mixture of third-party solutions that often ran into compatibility issues between different components, giving attackers a large surface area to probe. This made MSC vulnerable to threats such as fileless attacks, phishing, and ransomware. However, after transitioning to a unified cloud security solution, it has been able to guard against attacks using protection that integrates effortlessly into its existing environment.

Reliable performance, more efficiently

The more complex an IT environment gets, the more time employees spend testing, maintaining, and repairing third-party security solutions. A unified cloud security approach improves performance by not only providing a consistent, layered defense strategy, but by also automating it across the entire IT infrastructure. At MSC, software and security updates are now done automatically and deployed without delay across the cloud. Information about possible threats and breaches can quickly be shared across devices and identities, speeding up response and recovery times so that employees can focus on other issues.

Security with flexibility to grow

Scalability is another factor driving adoption. A cloud environment can easily scale to accommodate spikes in traffic, additional users, or data-intensive applications. A patchwork of third-party security solutions tends not to be so nimble. At MSC, security controls are integrated into multiple levels of the existing IT infrastructure—from the operating system to the application layer—and can be dynamically sized to meet new business needs. For example, continuous compliance controls can be established to monitor regulatory activities and detect vulnerabilities as they grow.

A unified security approach: becoming the standard

The best security solutions perform quietly in the background, protecting users without them noticing. Unified cloud security does this while also reducing the resources required to keep things running smoothly. “Once you have true defense in depth, there’s less chance of having to single out a user and impact their productivity because you have to reimage an infected machine,” said Aaron Shvarts, chief security officer at MSC Technology North America.

After moving its workloads to Azure and upgrading its previous third-party security solutions to the native protection of Windows Defender, MSC now has a defense strategy that suits the complexity of its business. Learn more about Azure security solutions and how Microsoft can help you implement unified security across your cloud.

To stay up to date on the latest news about Microsoft’s work in the cloud, bookmark this blog and follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

*Gartner, Smarter with Gartner, Is the Cloud Secure?, 27 March 2018, https://www.gartner.com/smarterwithgartner/is-the-cloud-secure/

Learn at your own pace with Microsoft Quantum Katas

For those who want to explore quantum computing and learn the Q# programming language at their own pace, we have created the Quantum Katas – an open source project containing a series of programming exercises that provide immediate feedback as you progress.

Coding katas are great tools for learning a programming language. They rely on several simple learning principles: active learning, incremental complexity growth, and feedback.

The Microsoft Quantum Katas are a series of self-paced tutorials aimed at teaching elements of quantum computing and Q# programming at the same time. Each kata offers a sequence of tasks on a certain quantum computing topic, progressing from simple to challenging. Each task requires you to fill in some code; the first task might require just one line, and the last one might require a sizable fragment of code. A testing framework validates your solutions, providing real-time feedback.

Working with the Quantum Katas in Visual Studio
Working with the Quantum Katas in Visual Studio

Programming competitions are another great way to test your quantum computing skills. Earlier this month, we ran the first Q# coding contest and the response was tremendous. More than 650 participants from all over the world joined the contest or the warmup round held the week prior. More than 350 contest participants solved at least one problem, while 100 participants solved all fifteen problems! The contest winner solved all problems in less than 2.5 hours. You can find problem sets for the warmup round and main contest by following the links below. The Quantum Katas include the problems offered in the contest, so you can try solving them at your own pace.

We hope you find the Quantum Katas project useful in learning Q# and quantum computing. As we work on expanding the set of topics covered in the katas, we look forward to your feedback and contributions!

How Minecraft is helping kids fall in love with books

How Minecraft is helping kids fall in love with books

Ever wanted to explore Treasure Island or pretend to be Robinson Crusoe? Minecraft is now being used to create an ‘immersive experience’ to engage reluctant readers – we see how it plays out




Minecraft of resources … Litcraft’s Treasure Island.
Illustration: Lancaster University

Robert Louis Stevenson’s 1881 classic Treasure Island tells of Jim Hawkins’s adventures on board the Hispaniola, as he and his crew – along with double-crossing pirate Long John Silver – set out to find Captain Flint’s missing treasure on Skeleton Island. Now, more than a century later, children can try and find it themselves, with the bays and mountains of Stevenson’s fictional island given a blocky remodelling in Minecraft, as part of a new project aimed at bringing reluctant readers to literary classics.

From Spyglass Hill to Ben Gunn’s cave, children can explore every nook and cranny of Skeleton Island as part of Litcraft, a new partnership between Lancaster University and Microsoft, which bought the game for $2.5bn (£1.9bn) in 2015 and which is now played by 74 million people each month. The Litcraft platform uses Minecraft to create accurate scale models of fictional islands: Treasure Island is the first, with Michael Morpurgo’s Kensuke’s Kingdom just completed and many others planned.

While regular Minecraft is rife with literary creations – the whole of George RR Martin’s sprawling setting for Game of Thrones, Westeros, has been created in its entirety, as have several different Hogwarts – Litcraft is not all fun and games, being peppered with educational tasks that aim to re-engage reluctant readers with the book it is based on. Lead researcher and head of Lancaster University’s English and creative writing department, Professor Sally Bushell, calls it “an educational model that connects the imaginative spatial experience of reading the text to an immersive experience in the game world”.

An example of Minecraft’s flexibility – users have recreated entire literary worlds, like JK Rowling’s Hogwarts.

She says, of the Litcraft Treasure Island: “We hope it will motivate reluctant readers – we can say, ‘We’re going to read the book and then at one point, we’ll go play on the ship.’ I would have loved it as a kid. It is an empathetic task – you do what the characters did yourself, so you understand why they act they way they did in the book.”

The Treasure Island “level” has been extensively road-tested by children such as Dylan, whose school is set to adopt Litcraft in 2019. “It’s really fun,” he says. “I enjoyed it because I’ve read the book, but you have to follow rules in that. In games, you can explore. Now I know exactly what the book looked like.”

What did he like most? “I like that you get to see the pictures. You don’t have to make them in your head. And I liked the ship, Ben Gunn’s cave and the parrots. And there was that weird pig that kept jumping off that cliff. That wasn’t in the book!” (“That was a game glitch,” says Bushell).

The project, which is featured on Microsoft’s Minecraft.edu website, is currently being presented to school teachers and librarians across the UK. There has been “an enthusiastic response” to the trials under way in local schools, with plans to roll Litcraft out to libraries in Lancashire and Leeds from October 2018.

Dylan, like many nine-year-olds, enjoys books but is more enthusiastic when talking about Minecraft, which he does with the casual expertise that many children have with their favourite games. He’s already made his own Hunger Games world in Minecraft at home, but couldn’t get some of his traps to work.

This know-how seems to both frighten and impress less tech-savvy adults – which Bushell hopes will not deter schools from adopting it. “The kids know how to do it more than the teachers do,” she says. “It inverts the relationship: you’ve got kids who know more than the adults. You need quite confident teachers. They’re more worried about it. I want to say, ‘Don’t be worried, because all your eight-year-olds will know how to do this.’”

Libraries are particularly interested in the possibilities of multiplayer, Bushell says, adding that one of the future projects will be Lord of the Flies: “In that case, you want all the kids in there playing out a scenario and asking philosophical questions. We hope they do some reading, then play the game, then do some empathetic writing based on what they did in there.”

The Kensuke’s Kingdom map, based on Morpurgo’s story of a boy washed up alone, is particularly aimed at engaging reluctant readers and has just been completed. “The library resources we are putting together include audio and in-game reading and writing as well as graphic novels as a step to the full text,” said Bushell. “The resources are designed to encourage them to either return to or connect with the book through the immersive experience.”

Bushell said more literary Minecraft islands will follow. “Treasure Island is the first world for Minecraft.edu but they anticipate a series – most likely, the next will be The Swiss Family Robinson, The Tempest and Robinson Crusoe,” Bushell says. A recreation of Dante’s Inferno, with a map for each level of hell, is also in development.

But what book does Dylan hope to see next? “The Hunger Games,” he says with no hesitation. “A proper one.”

Managed private cloud gives IT a cost-effective option

Cost is a big factor when IT admins explore different options for cloud. In certain cases, a managed private cloud may be more cost-effective than public cloud.

Canonical, a distributor and contributor to Linux Ubuntu, helps organizations manage their cloud setups and uses a variety of proprietary technology to streamline management. Based on the company’s BootStack offering, Canonical’s managed cloud supports a variety of applications and use cases. A managed private cloud can help organizations operate in the “Goldilocks zone,” where they have the right amount of cloud resources for their needs, said Stephan Fabel, director of product at Canonical, based in London. 

Currently, 35% of enterprises are moving data to a private cloud, but hurdles such as hardware costs and initial provisioning can cause organizations to delay deployment, according to a June 2018 report by 451 Research. Here, Fabel talks about what makes a managed private cloud a more effective strategy for the long term.

What is different about BootStack? 

Stephan Fabel: BootStack is applicable to the entire reference architecture to our OpenStack offering. The use case will often dictate a loose handling of the details in terms of the reference architecture. So, you can say, for example, deploy a telco-grade cluster or a cluster for enterprise or a cluster for application development, and those are very different characteristics from another company.

Stephan Fabel, CanonicalStephan Fabel

We support Swift [an API for data storage and scalability] and Chef [framework codes for deployments]. With some of the more locked-down distributions of OpenStack, we support multiple Cinder-volume stores. … We have the ability to do a Contrail application programming interface and even an open Contrail.

The reason why we can do a managed private cloud at the economics we portray them is that we have the operational efficiencies baked into our tooling. Metal as a service and Juju [an open source application modeling tool] provide that base layer on which OpenStack can run and manage.

One thing that is not entirely unique — but it is rare — is that BootStack actually stands for ‘build, operate and optionally transfer.’ Managed service providers generally want users to get on their platform and never leave. We basically say, ‘You know you want to get started with OpenStack, but you’re not sure you’re operationally ready. That’s fine; jump on BootStack for a year, and then build up your confidence or skill set. When you’re ready to take it on, go for it.’

We’ll transfer back the stack in your control and convert it from a managed service to a generic support contract.

What features contribute to a managed private cloud being more cost-effective than public cloud? 

Fabel: The value of public cloud is that you can get started with a snap of your finger, use your credit card and off you go. … However, down the road, you can end up in a situation where due to smart lock-in schemes, nonopen APIs’ interfaces and unique business features, you’re locked into this public cloud and paying a lot of money out of your Opex.

The challenge is it takes a lot more investment upfront to actually get started with a managed private cloud. Somebody still has to order hardware, it still constitutes a commitment, and someone still needs to install the hardware and run it for you. … But, for what it’s worth, we’ll send two engineers, and it’ll take two weeks and you’ll have a private cloud.

Is it common to be able to deploy a private cloud with just two engineers, or is that specific to Canonical?

I think we’ll see more adoption of managed services from the more advanced user base.
Stephan Fabeldirector of product at Canonical

Fabel: You’ll certainly find in this space a lot of players who will emphasize their expertise and the ability to do almost anything you want with OpenStack, in a similar amount of time. The question is, what kind of cloud is within that offering? If you go to a professional service-oriented company, they’ll try and sell you bodies to continually engage with as their way of staying with the contract, which racks up those tremendous costs.

The differentiating fact with Juju is, as opposed to other configuration tooling such as Puppet or Chef, it actually takes things further by not just installing packages and making sure the configuration is set; it is actually orchestrating the OpenStack installation.

So, for example, a classic problem with OpenStack is upgrading it. If you go to some of our competitors, their upgrades are going to be an extremely expensive professional services quote, because it’s so manual. What we did is basically encoded the smart in with what we call Charms that work in conjunction with Juju to manage that automatically.

How does automation help reduce the cost of managed private cloud? 

Fabel: We launched [Juju] five years ago, and it went through a lot of growing pains. Back then, everybody was set on configuration management, and they were appropriating configuration management technology to also do orchestration. … That’s great if you’re only deploying one thing. But, as OpenStack exhibits, it’s not quite that easy when you try and deploy something a little bit more complex.

[Now,] Juju basically says, ‘I will write out the configuration because I’m an agent and I understand the context.’ If you can automate tasks such as server installation and management, and you can code that logic, then you have to think less.

It does require more discipline on the Charms side and more knowledge on the operator in case something does go wrong. … For you to be able to debug this, you actually have to understand how to use it. And that’s a hurdle that people in the beginning sort of dismissed.

Will there always be a mix of public and private managed cloud?

Fabel: We’re seeing interest in power users of OpenStack who want to move onto new frontiers, such as Kubernetes, which seems to be it right now, and we’re ready to take [management] off their hands.

I think we’ll see more adoption of managed services from the more advanced user base and in the more off-the-shelf kind of market that want a 15-node or 20-node cloud. It’s not about the 2,000-node cloud as much anymore. I think there’s a whole market that’s just saying, ‘I have a 10-node cloud, and I can pay VMware or someone to run it for me, and I choose so because it’s economically more attractive.’ 

Wanted – Cheap PC parts and Raspberry Pi for child.

Hi guys,

My son is a bit of a Minecraft geek and would like to explore the java version and look to setup a minecraft server. He’s only 8 so doesn’t have a great deal of cash but does have a little bit birthday money left over.
I already have a tower case, psu and SSD drive for the build, just looking for something cheap m-atx/itx which will run minecraft. Preferably an FM2 board/cpu or something similar.

He’s also interested in a Raspberry Pi as he’s just started using these at school to code.

As for the Pi, anything really, its just for coding so doesn’t need to be the latest model.

Thanks a lot guys.

Location: Newcastle

______________________________________________________
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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – Cheap PC parts and Raspberry Pi for child.

Hi guys,

My son is a bit of a Minecraft geek and would like to explore the java version and look to setup a minecraft server. He’s only 8 so doesn’t have a great deal of cash but does have a little bit birthday money left over.
I already have a tower case, psu and SSD drive for the build, just looking for something cheap m-atx/itx which will run minecraft. Preferably an FM2 board/cpu or something similar.

He’s also interested in a Raspberry Pi as he’s just started using these at school to code.

As for the Pi, anything really, its just for coding so doesn’t need to be the latest model.

Thanks a lot guys.

Location: Newcastle

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – Cheap PC parts and Raspberry Pi for child.

Hi guys,

My son is a bit of a Minecraft geek and would like to explore the java version and look to setup a minecraft server. He’s only 8 so doesn’t have a great deal of cash but does have a little bit birthday money left over.
I already have a tower case, psu and SSD drive for the build, just looking for something cheap m-atx/itx which will run minecraft. Preferably an FM2 board/cpu or something similar.

He’s also interested in a Raspberry Pi as he’s just started using these at school to code.

As for the Pi, anything really, its just for coding so doesn’t need to be the latest model.

Thanks a lot guys.

Location: Newcastle

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Cheap PC parts and Raspberry Pi for child.

Hi guys,

My son is a bit of a Minecraft geek and would like to explore the java version and look to setup a minecraft server. He’s only 8 so doesn’t have a great deal of cash but does have a little bit birthday money left over.
I already have a tower case, psu and SSD drive for the build, just looking for something cheap m-atx/itx which will run minecraft. Preferably an FM2 board/cpu or something similar.

He’s also interested in a Raspberry Pi as he’s just started using these at school to…

Cheap PC parts and Raspberry Pi for child.