Tag Archives: features

Array bolsters throughput, security in NFV appliance

Array Networks Inc. has introduced an upgrade of its network functions virtualization hardware. New features in the AVX NFV appliance, which provides application delivery, security and other networking operations, include support for 40 GbE interfaces and higher throughput for encrypted traffic.

Array, based in Milpitas, Calif., launched the AVX5800, AVX7800 and AVX9800 appliances this week. Along with support for optional 40 GbE network interface cards (NICs), the latest hardware provides a significant improvement in elliptic curve cryptography (ECC) processing over a Secure Sockets Layer virtual private network (SSL VPN).

The new NFV appliances include Array’s latest software release, AVX 2.7. The upgrade provides better fine-tuning of system resources for virtualized network functions running on the platform. Other improvements include the ability to back up and restore AVX configurations and images via USB and an online image repository for software running on AVX appliances.

Array has also added enhancements for companies using the NFV appliance with OpenStack environments. The company has introduced a hypervisor driver that lets the AVX platform serve as an OpenStack compute node.

The AVX NFV platform, launched in May 2017, comprises a series of virtualized servers for running Array and third-party applications, such as Fortinet’s FortiGate next-generation firewall and Positive Technologies’ PT AF web application firewall.

A10 Harmony Controller Update

A10 has launched an upgrade to its Harmony Controller, an application delivery controller, or ADC, that is also a cloud management, orchestration and analytics engine.

A10, based in San Jose, Calif., released Harmony version 4.1 last week, adding improvements to the product’s ability to configure and manage policies across A10’s line of Thunder security appliances.

New features in Harmony include preloaded Thunder ADC services. Also added to the controller is a self-service app for Thunder SSL inspection, which decrypts traffic, so security devices can analyze it.

AVX9800
Array Networks’ AVX9800 NFV appliance

Other improvements include extending Harmony’s analytics history to 12 months, so network operators and security pros can go further back in time when investigating events.

Harmony is a cloud-optimized ADC that can spin up specific services anywhere in a hybrid cloud environment. The software also incorporates per-application analytics and centrally manages and orchestrates application services.

Aviatrix improves its AWS security

Aviatrix has added to its AVX network security software better control over traffic leaving Amazon Web Services. The enhancements provide customers with stronger protection against internal threats and external attacks.

The new AVX capability announced last week focuses on filtering egress data from an AWS virtual private cloud (VPC). An AWS VPC provides a private cloud computing environment on the infrastructure-as-a-service provider’s platform. The benefit of a VPC is the granular control a company can get over a virtual network service serving sensitive workloads.

AVX for AWS VPCs verifies the traffic destination’s IP address, hostname or website, the vendor, based in Palo Alto, Calif., said. An inline, software-controlled AVX Gateway does the VPC filtering and prevents traffic from going to unauthorized locations.

The Aviatrix platform, which comprises a controller and gateway, operates over a network overlay that spans cloud and data center environments. The new VPC egress security feature is available as part of the platform, which is available only as software.

Companies can deploy the Aviatrix product through the AWS marketplace. Aviatrix also has versions of its technology for Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud.

News roundup: Manage employee resource groups and more

This week’s news roundup features a tool to manage employee resource groups, a roadmap for a wellness coaching technology program and an AI-powered platform to match employees with the right insurance options.

Ready, set, engage

Espresa, which makes a platform for automating employee programs, has added new features that can track and manage employee resource groups.

Employee resource groups, which are organically formed clubs of people with shared enthusiasms, are increasingly popular in U.S. corporations. A 2016 study by Bentley University indicated 90% of Fortune 500 companies have employee resource groups, and 8.5% of American employees participate in at least one.

At a time when employee retention has become more critical, thanks to a very tight labor market, employee resource groups can help employee engagement. But the grassroots nature of the efforts makes it hard for both employees and HR departments to track and manage them.

In many companies today, employee resource groups are managed with a cobbled-together collection of wiki pages, Google Docs and Evite invitations, said Raghavan Menon, CTO of Espresa, based in Palo Alto, Calif. And HR departments often have no idea what’s going on, when it’s happening or who is in charge.

“Today, nothing allows the employer or company to actually promote [employee resource groups] and then decentralize them to allow employees to manage and run the groups with light oversight from HR,” Menon explained.

Espresa’s new features give HR departments a web-based way to keep track of the employee resource groups, while giving the employees a matching mobile app to help them run the efforts.

“When employees are running things, they’re not going to use it if it’s an old-style enterprise app,” he said. “They want consumer-grade user experience on a mobile app.”

With Espresa, HR staff can also measure employee resource groups’ success factors, including participation and volunteer activity levels. That information can then be used to make decisions about company funding or a rewards program, Menon said.

An alternate health coach

Is it possible to help an employee with a chronic condition feel supported and empowered to make lifestyle changes using high-tech health coaching and wearable health technology? According to John Moore, M.D., medical director at San Francisco-based Fitbit, the answer is yes.

During World Congress’ 10th annual Virtual Health Care Summit in Boston, Moore outlined a health coaching roadmap designed to help HR departments and employers meet workers where they are.

“Hey, we know the healthcare experience can be really tough, and it’s hard to manage with other priorities,” he said. “We know you have a life.”

Using a health coach, wearables or a mobile phone — and possibly even looping in family and friends — an employee with a health condition is walked through the steps of setting micro-goals over a two-week period. Reminders, support and encouragement are delivered via a wearable or a phone and can include a real or virtual coach, or even a family intervention, if necessary.

The idea, Moore stressed, is to enable an HR wellness benefits program to give ownership of lifestyle changes back to the employee, while at the same time making the goals sufficiently small to be doable.

“This is different than [typical] health coaching in the workplace,” he said. “This is going to be a much richer interaction on a daily basis. And because it’s facilitated by technology, it’s more scalable and more cost-effective. We’ll be able to collect information that spans from blood pressure, to weight, to steps, to glucose activity and sleep data to get the whole picture of the individual so they can understand themselves better.”

This is an in-the-works offering from Fitbit, and it will not be limited to just the Fitbit-brand device. This platform will be based on technology Fitbit acquired from Twine in February 2018. Moore outlined a vision of interoperability that could include everything, from the pharmacy to a glucose meter to, eventually, an electronic health record system. This could work in tandem with a company’s on-site or near-site health clinic and expand from there, he said.

“Technology can help break down barriers that have existed in traditional healthcare. Right now, interactions are so widely spaced, you can’t put coaches in the office every day or every week. There needs to be a way to leverage technology,” he said. “We can’t just give people an app with an AI chatbot and expect it to magically help them. The human element is still a very important piece, and we can use technology to make that human superhuman.”

HR on the go

StaffConnect has released version 2.2 of its mobile engagement platform, which includes new options for customers to create portals for easier access to payroll, training and other HR information and forms. The StaffConnect service can be used by workers in the office and by what the company calls “nondesk employees,” or NDEs.

The company’s 2018 Employee Engagement Survey showed more than one-third of companies have at least 50% of their workforce as NDEs and highlighted the challenges of keeping all employees equally informed and engaged. The survey indicated the vast majority of companies continue to use either email (almost 80%) or an intranet (almost 49%) to communicate with employees, while just 2% of companies reach out via mobile devices.

The company is also now offering a REST API to make it easier to integrate its platform into existing HR services, and it added custom branding and increased quiz feature options to boost customization.

StaffConnect’s new version also offers additional security options and features, including GDPR compliance and protection for data at rest.

Curious About Windows Server 2019? Here’s the Latest Features Added

Microsoft continues adding new features to Windows Server 2019 and cranking out new builds for Windows Server Insiders to test. Build 17709 has been announced, and I got my hands on a copy. I’ll show you a quick overview of the new features and then report my experiences.

If you’d like to get into the Insider program so that you can test out preview builds of Windows Server 2019 yourself, sign up on the Insiders page.

Ongoing Testing Requests

If you’re just now getting involved with the Windows Server Insider program or the previews for Windows Server 2019, Microsoft has asked all testers to try a couple of things with every new build:

  • In-place upgrade
  • Application compatibility

You can use virtual machines with checkpoints to easily test both of these. This time around, I used a physical machine, and my upgrade process went very badly. I have not been as diligent about testing applications, so I have nothing of importance to note on that front.

Build 17709 Feature 1: Improvements to Group Managed Service Accounts for Containers

I would bet that web applications are the primary use case for containers. Nothing else can match containers’ ability to strike a balance between providing version-specific dependencies while consuming minimal resources. However, containerizing a web application that depends on Active Directory authentication presents special challenges. Group Managed Service Accounts (gMSA) can solve those problems, but rarely without headaches. 17709 includes these improvements for gMSAs:

  • Using a single gMSA to secure multiple containers should produce fewer authentication errors
  • A gMSA no longer needs to have the same name as the system that host the container(s)
  • gMSAs should now work with Hyper-V isolated containers

I do not personally use enough containers to have meaningful experience with gMSA. I did not perform any testing on this enhancement.

Build 17709 Feature 2: A New Windows Server Container Image with Enhanced Capabilities

If you’ve been wanting to run something in a Windows Server container but none of the existing images meet your prerequisites, you might have struck gold in this release. Microsoft has created a new Windows Server container image with more components. I do not have a complete list of those components, but you can read what Lars Iwer has to say about it. He specifically mentions:

  • Proofing tools
  • Automated UI tests
  • DirectX

As I read that last item, I instantly wanted to know: “Does that mean GUI apps from within containers?” Well, according to the comments on the announcement, yes*. You just have to use “Session 0”. That means that if you RDP to the container host, you must use the /admin switch with MSTSC. Alternatively, you can use the physical console or an out-of-band console connection application.

Commentary on Windows Server 2019 Insider Preview Build 17709

So far, my experiences with the Windows Server 2019 preview releases have been fairly humdrum. They work as advertised, with the occasional minor glitch. This time, I spent more time than normal and hit several frustration points.

In-Place Upgrade to 17709

Ordinarily, I test preview upgrades in a virtual machine. Sure, I use checkpoints with the intent of reverting if something breaks. But, since I don’t do much in those virtual machines, they always work. So, I never encounter anything to report.

For 17709, I wanted to try out the container stuff, and I wanted to do it on hardware. So, I attempted an in-place upgrade of a physical host. It was disastrous.

Errors While Upgrading

First, I got a grammatically atrocious message that contained false information. I wish that I had saved it so I could share with others that might encounter it, but I must have accidentally my notes. the message started out with “Something happened” (it didn’t say what happened, of course), then asked me to look in an XML file for information. Two problems with that:

  1. I was using a Server Core installation. I realize that I am not authorized to speak on behalf of the world’s Windows administrators, but I bet no one will get at mad at me for saying, “No one in the world wants to read XML files on Server Core.”
  2. The installer didn’t even create the file.

I still have not decided which of those two things irritates me the most. Why in the world would anyone actively decide to build the upgrade tool to behave that way?

Problems While Trying to Figure Out the Error

Well, I’m fairly industrious, so I tried to figure out what was wrong. The installer did not create the XML file that it talked about, but it did create a file called “setuperr.log”. I didn’t keep the entire contents of that file either, but it contained only one line error-wise that seemed to have any information at all: “CallPidGenX: PidGenX function failed on this product key”. Do you know what that means? I don’t know what that means. Do you know what to do about it? I don’t know what to do about it. Is that error even related to my problem? I don’t even know that much.

I didn’t find any other traces or logs with error messages anywhere.

How I Fixed My Upgrade Problem

I began by plugging the error messages into Internet searches. I found only one hit with any useful information. The suggestions were largely useless. But, the guy managed to fix his own problem by removing the system from the domain. How in the world did he get from that error message to disjoining the domain? Guesswork, apparently. Well, I didn’t go quite that far.

My “fix”: remove the host from my Hyper-V cluster. The upgrade worked after that.

Why did I put the word “fix” in quotation marks? Because I can’t tell you that actually fixed the problem. Maybe it was just a coincidence. The upgrade’s error handling and messaging was so horrifically useless that without duplicating the whole thing, I cannot conclusively say that one action resulted in the other. “Correlation is not causation”, as the saying goes.

Feedback for In-Place Upgrades

At some point, I need to find a productive way to express this to Microsoft. But for now, I’m upset and frustrated at how that went. Sure, it only took you a few minutes to read what I had to say. It took much longer for me to retry, poke around, search, and prod at the thing until it worked, and I had no idea that it was ever going to work.

Sure, once the upgrade went through, everything was fine. I’m quite happy with the final product. But if I were even to start thinking about upgrading a production system and I thought that there was even a tiny chance that it would dump me out at the first light with some unintelligible gibberish to start a luck-of-the-draw scavenger hunt, then there is a zero percent chance that I would even attempt an upgrade. Microsoft says that they’re working to improve the in-place upgrade experience, but the evidence I saw led me to believe that they don’t take this seriously at all. XML files? XML files that don’t even get created? Error messages that would have set off 1980s-era grammar checkers? And don’t even mean anything? This is the upgrade experience that Microsoft is anxious to show off? No thanks.

Microsoft: the world wants legible, actionable error messages. The world does not want to go spelunking through log files for vague hints. That’s not just for an upgrade process either. It’s true for every product, every time.

The New Container Image

OK, let’s move on to some (more) positive things. Many of the things that you’ll see in this section have been blatantly stolen from Microsoft’s announcement.

Once my upgrade went through, I immediately started pulling down the new container image. I had a bit of difficulty with that, which Lars Iwer of Microsoft straightened out quickly. If you’re trying it out, you can get the latest image with the following:

Since Insider builds update frequently, you might want to ensure that you only get the build version that matches your host version (if you get a version mismatch, you’ll be forced to run the image under Hyper-V isolation). Lars Iwer provided the following script (stolen verbatim from the previously linked article, I did not write this or modify it):

Trying Out the New Container Image

I was able to easily start up a container and poke around a bit:

Testing out the new functionality was a bit tougher, though. It solves problems that I personally do not have. Searching the Internet for, “example apps that would run in a Windows Server container if Microsoft had included more components” didn’t find anything I could test with either (That was a joke; I didn’t really do that. As far as you know). So, I first wrote a little GUI .Net app in Visual Studio.

*Graphical Applications in the New Container Image

Session 0 does not seem to be able to show GUI apps from the new container image. If you skimmed up to this point and you’re about to tell me that GUI apps don’t show anything from Windows containers, this links back to the (*) text above. The comments section of the announcement article indicate that graphical apps in the new container will display on session 0 of the container host.

I don’t know if I did something wrong, but nothing that I did would show me a GUI from within the new container style. The app ran just fine — it shows up under Get-Process — but it never shows anything. It does exactly the same thing under microsoft/dotnet-framework in Hyper-V isolation mode, though. So, on that front, the only benefit that I could verify was that I did not need to run my .Net app in Hyper-V isolation mode or use a lot of complicated FROM nesting in my dockerfile. Still no GUI, though, and that was part of my goal.

DirectX Applications in the New Container Image

After failing to get my graphical .Net app to display, I next considered DirectX. I personally do not know how to write even a minimal DirectX app. But, I didn’t need to. Microsoft includes the very first DirectX-dependent app that I was ever able to successfully run: dxdiag.

Sadly, dxdiag would not display on session 0 from my container, either. Just as with my .Net app, it appeared in the local process list and docker top. But, no GUI that I could see.

However, dxdiag did run successfully, and would generate an output file:

Notes for anyone trying to duplicate the above:

  • I started this particular container with 
    docker run it mcr.microsoft.com/windowsinsider
  • DXDiag does not instantly create the output file. You have to wait a bit.

Thoughts on the New Container Image

I do wish that I had more experience with containers and the sorts of problems this new image addresses. Without that, I can’t say much more than, “Cool!” Sure, I didn’t personally get the graphical part to work, but a DirectX app from with a container? That’s a big deal.

Overall Thoughts on Windows Server 2019 Preview Build 17709

Outside of the new features, I noticed that they have corrected a few glitchy things from previous builds. I can change settings on network cards in the GUI now and I can type into the Start menu to get Cortana to search for things. You can definitely see changes in the polish and shine as we approach release.

As for the upgrade process, that needs lots of work. If a blocking condition exists, it needs to be caught in the pre-flight checks and show a clear error message. Failing partway into the process with random pseudo-English will extend distrust of upgrading Microsoft operating systems for another decade. Most established shops already have an “install-new-on-new-hardware-and-migrate” process. I certainly follow one. My experience with 17709 tells me that I need to stick with it.

I am excited to see the work being done on containers. I do not personally have any problems that this new image solves, but you can clearly see that customer feedback led directly to its creation. Whether I personally benefit or not, this is a good thing to see.

Overall, I am pleased with the progress and direction of Windows Server 2019. What about you? How do you feel about the latest features? Let me know in the comments below!

At OpenText Enterprise World, security and AI take center stage

OpenText continues to invest in AI and security, as the content services giant showcased where features from recent acquisitions fit into its existing product line at its OpenText Enterprise World user conference.

The latest Pipeline podcast recaps the news and developments from Toronto, including OpenText OT2, the company’s new hybrid cloud/on-premises enterprise information management platform. The new platform brings wanted flexibility while also addressing regulatory concerns with document storage.

“OT2 simplifies for our customers how they invest and make decisions in taking some of their on-premises workflows and [porting] them into a hybrid model or SaaS model into the cloud,” said Muhi Majzoub, OpenText executive vice president of engineering and IT.

Majzoub spoke at OpenText Enterprise World 2018, which also included further updates to how OpenText plans to integrate Guidance Software’s features into its endpoint security offerings following the Guidance’s September 2017 acquisition.

Will the native AI functionality from OpenText compare and keep up? What will be the draw for new customers?
Alan Lepofskyprincipal analyst, Constellation Research

OpenText has a rich history of acquiring companies and using the inherited customer base as an additional revenue or maintenance stream, as content management workflows are often built over decades of complex legacy systems.

But it was clear at OpenText Enterprise World 2018 that the Guidance Software acquisition filled a security gap in OpenText’s offering. One of Guidance’s premier products, EnCase, seems to have useful applications for OpenText users, according to Lalith Subramanian, vice president of engineering for analytics, security and discovery at OpenText.

In addition, OpenText is expanding its reach to Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud, but it’s unclear if customers will prefer OpenText offerings to others on the market or if current customers will migrate to public clouds.

“It comes down to: Will customers want to use a general AI platform like Azure, Google, IBM or AWS?” said Alan Lepofsky, principal analyst for Constellation Research. “Will the native AI functionality from OpenText compare and keep up? What will be the draw for new customers?”

Matt Wood talks AWS’ AI platform, ethical use

NEW YORK — AWS spotlighted its evolving AI offerings at AWS Summit this week, with a variety of features and upgrades.

The company incorporated one emerging technology, Amazon Rekognition, into the event’s registration process as it scanned consenting attendees’ faces and compared them against photos submitted previously during registration.

But despite outlines for customers’ use, the AWS AI platform is not immune to growing concerns over potentially unethical usage of these advanced systems. Civil rights advocacy groups worry that technology providers’ breakneck pace to provide AI capabilities, such as Rekognition, could lead to abuses of power in the public sector and law enforcement, among others.

Matt Wood, AWS general manager of deep learning and AI, discussed advancements to the AWS AI platform, adoption trends, customer demands and ethical concerns in this interview.

AWS has added a batch transform feature to its SageMaker machine learning platform to process data sets for non-real-time inferencing. How does that capability apply to customers trying to process larger data files?

Matt Wood: We support the two major ways you’d want to run predictions. You want to run predictions against fresh data as it arrives in real time; you can do that with SageMaker-hosted endpoints. But there are tons of cases in which you want to be able to apply predictions to large amounts of data, either that just arrives or gets exported from a data warehouse, or that is just too large in terms of the raw data size to process one by one. These two things are highly complementary.

We see a lot of customers that want to run billing reports or forecasting. They want to look at product sales at the end of a quarter or the end of a month [and] predict the demand going forward. Another really good example is [to] build a machine learning model and test it out on a data set you understand really well, which is really common in oil and gas, medicine and medical imaging.

In the keynote, you cited 100 new machine learning features or services [AWS has developed] since re:Invent last year. What feedback do you get from customers for your current slate [of AI services]?

Wood: What we heard very clearly was a couple things. No. 1, customers really value strong encryption and strong network isolation. A lot of that has to do with making sure customers have good encryption integrated with Key Management Service inside SageMaker. We also recently added PrivateLink support, which means you can connect up your notebooks and training environment directly to DynamoDB, Redshift or S3 without that data ever flowing out over the private internet. And you can put your endpoints over PrivateLink as well. [Another] big trend is around customers using multiple frameworks together. You’ll see a lot of focus on improving TensorFlow, improving Apache MXNet, adding Chainer support, adding PyTorch support and making sure ONNX [Open Neural Network Exchange] works really well across those engines so that customers can take models trained in one and run them in a different engine.

Matt Wood, AWS GM of Deep Learning and AIMatt Wood speaks during the AWS Summit keynote address (Source: AWS).

What do you hear from enterprises that are reluctant or slow to adopt AI technologies? And what do you feel that you have to prove to those customers?

Wood: It’s still early for a lot of enterprises, and particularly for regulated workloads, there’s a lot of due diligence to do — around HIPAA [Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act], for example, getting HIPAA compliance in place. The question is: ‘How can I move more quickly?’ That’s what we hear all the time.

There’s two main pathways that we see [enterprises take] today. The first is: They try and look at the academic literature, [which] is very fast-moving, but also very abstract. It’s hard to apply it to real business problems. The other is: You look around on the web, find some tutorials and try to learn it that way. That often gives you something which is up and running that works, but again, it glosses over the fundamentals of how do you collect training data, how do you label that data, how do you build and define a neural network, how do you train that neural network.

To help developers learn, you want a very fast feedback loop. You want to be able to try something out, learn from it, what worked and what didn’t work, then make a change. It’s kick-starting that flywheel, which is very challenging with machine learning.

What are some usage patterns or trends you’ve seen from SageMaker adopters that are particularly interesting?

Wood: A really big one is sports analytics. Major League Baseball selected SageMaker and the AWS AI platform to power their production stats that they use in their broadcasts and on [their] app. They’ve got some amazing ideas about how to build more predictive and more engaging visuals and analytics for their users. [It’s the] same thing with Formula 1 [F1]. They’re taking 65 years’ worth of performance data from the cars — they have terabytes of the stuff — to model different performance of different cars but also to look at race prediction and build an entirely new category of visuals for F1 fans. The NFL [is] doing everything from computer vision to using player telemetry, using their position on the field to do route prediction and things like that. Sports analytics drives such an improvement in the experience for fans, and it’s a big area of investment for us.

Another is healthcare and medical imaging. We see a lot of medical use cases — things like disease prediction, such as how likely are you to have congestive heart failure in the next 12 months, do outpatient prediction, readmittance prediction, those sorts of things. We can actually look inside an X-ray and identify very early-stage lung cancer before the patient even knows that they’re sick. [And] you can run that test so cheaply. You can basically run it against any chest X-ray.

You partnered with Microsoft on Gluon, the deep learning library. What’s the status of that project? What other areas might you collaborate with Microsoft or another major vendor on an AI project?

Wood: Gluon is off to a great start. Celgene, a biotech that’s doing drug toxicity prediction, is trying to speed up clinical trials to get drugs to market more quickly. All of that runs in SageMaker, and they use Gluon to build models. That’s one example; we have more.

Other areas of collaboration we see is around other engines. For example, we were a launch partner for PyTorch 1.0 [a Python-based machine learning library, at Facebook’s F8 conference]. PyTorch has a ton of interest from research scientists, particularly in academia, [and we] bring that up to SageMaker and work with Facebook on the development.

Microsoft President Bradford Smith recently called on Congress to consider federal regulation for facial recognition services. What is Amazon’s stance on AI regulation? How much should customers determine ethical use of AI, facial recognition or other cloud services, and what is AWS’ responsibility?

Wood: Our approach is that Rekognition, like all of our services, falls under our Acceptable Use Policy, [which] is very clear with what it allows and what it does not allow. One of the things that it does not allow is anything unconstitutional; mass surveillance, for example, is ruled out. We’re very clear that customers need to take that responsibility, and if they fall outside our Acceptable Use [Policy}, just like anyone else on AWS, they will lose access to those services, because we won’t support them. They need to be responsible with how they test, validate and communicate their use of these technologies because they can be hugely impactful.

AWS Summit Rekognition kiosksAmazon Rekognition kiosks scan the faces of attendees and print identification badges (Source: David Carty).

The American Civil Liberties Union, among others, has asked AWS to stop selling Rekognition to law enforcement agencies. Will you comply with that request? If not, under what circumstances might that decision change?

Wood: Again, that’s covered under our Acceptable Use Policy. If any customer in any domain is using any of our services in a way which falls outside of acceptable use, then they will lose access to that service.

Certainly, the Acceptable Use Policy covers lawful use, but do you think that also covers ethical use? That’s a thornier question.

Wood: It is a thornier question. I think it’s part of a broader dialogue that we need to have, just as we’ve had with motor cars and any large-scale technology which provides a lot of opportunity, but which also needs a public and open discussion.

How do I get access to Office 365 preview versions?


Organizations that want cutting-edge productivity features and don’t mind a little risk can receive more experimental…

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Office 365 preview versions before Microsoft distributes standard releases.

Like the Office Insider program that gives participants early access to the latest feature updates to Microsoft Office applications, a global administrator can use the Office 365 admin center to determine who gets access to the targeted release for the newest features. Microsoft calls the more widely distributed version its standard release, which is the refined service that goes to all customers.

Setting up the Office 365 preview option

Companies that participate in the targeted release program get a first look at fledgling features that can help the organization get its IT staff ready to support new functionality and determine if any security or compliance adjustments will need to be made.

By default, all users in an Office 365 tenant get the standard release. To configure the targeted release Office 365 previews for select users or the entire organization, administrators need to make adjustments in the Office 365 admin center.

To configure the targeted release Office 365 previews for select users or the entire organization, administrators need to make adjustments in the Office 365 admin center.

Sign into your Office 365 account, go to Settings and select Organization profile. Find Release preferences and click Edit. Administrators can then choose to enable or disable Office 365 targeted release.

  • To enable targeted release for all users, choose Targeted release for everyone, click Next and then select Yes to confirm.
  • To enable targeted release for selected users, choose Targeted release for selected users, click Next and then select Yes to confirm. You can then add individuals by searching for their names and clicking the plus to add them. Click Save and then Close when complete.
  • To disable targeted release, choose Standard release, click Next and then select Yes to confirm.

Administrators can also add users in bulk and add or remove users from targeted release at any time. Once the administrator makes the change, it can take up to 24 hours for the modification to take effect in the organization’s Office 365 tenant.

It’s important for administrators to follow any established business policies or procedures related to this Office 365 preview option to avoid any surprises for end users. For example, an administrator might send a notification to employees designated for the Office 365 targeted release. This note should remind users that they are using a service that is not yet in general release. The targeted release might have issues that the administrators can forward to Microsoft for the company to fix for a future release.

Windows Server 2019 Preview: What’s New and What’s Cool

Introducing the newly-announced Windows Server 2019 public preview. Covers the new features and includes a discussion on their impact. Should you be excited or worried about the next installment of Windows Server?

Read the post here: Windows Server 2019 Preview: What’s New and What’s Cool