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For Sale – Alienware 13 r3 Laptop i7-6700HQ. GTX1060 6GB. QHD Touchscreen.16GB DDR4. 2x 256GB SSD. £680 delivered

Bought from the forums here For Sale – Alienware 13 R3 Laptop

This has had very little use as I actually received my new workstation earlier than expected. I bought it as a stop gap, and it has performed flawlessly. I really should have moved it on by now but haven’t had a chance.

I can post some pictures if needs be when I am home in two days, but it looks as it did in the previous listing.

It comes with the power supply, and I will include a small laptop bag I purchased to store it in (on a shelf) when not in use).

Any questions etc just ask

Price
£730 including delivery to mainland uk which is what I paid if I remember correctly.

Looking around for the spec and condition this seems very fair.

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Cisco Webex Edge for Devices links on-prem endpoints to cloud

Businesses using on-premises video gear from Cisco can now get access to cloud services, while keeping their video infrastructure in place.

A new service, called Cisco Webex Edge for Devices, lets businesses connect on-premises video devices to cloud services like Webex Control Hub and the Webex Assistant. Customers get access to some cloud features but continue to host video traffic on their networks.

Many businesses aren’t ready to move their communications to the cloud. Vendors have responded by developing ways to mix on-premises and cloud technologies. Cisco Webex Edge for Devices is the latest offering of that kind.

“It gives users that cloudlike experience without the businesses having to fully migrate everything to the cloud,” said Zeus Kerravala, principal analyst at ZK Research.

Cisco wants to get as many businesses as possible to go all-in on the cloud. Webex Edge for Devices, introduced this month, tees up customers to make that switch. Companies will have the option of migrating their media services to the cloud after connecting devices to the service.

Webex Edge for Devices is available for no additional charge to businesses with an enterprise-wide Collaboration Flex Plan, a monthly per-user subscription. Alternatively, companies can purchase cloud licenses for the devices they want to register with the service for roughly $30 per device, per month. The service won’t work with gear that’s so old Cisco no longer supports it.

Video hardware linked to the cloud through the service will show up in the Webex Control Hub, a console for managing cloud devices. For on-premises devices, the control hub will provide diagnostic reports, usage data, and insight into whether the systems are online or offline.

Many businesses are already using a mix of on-premises and cloud video endpoints. Webex Edge for Devices will let those customers manage those devices from a single console. In the future, Cisco plans to add support for on-premises phones.

Businesses will also be able to sync on-premises video devices with cloud-based calendars from Microsoft and Google. That configuration will let the devices display a one-click join button for meetings scheduled on those calendars.

Another cloud feature unlocked by Webex Edge for Devices is the Webex Assistant. The service is an AI voice system that lets users join meetings, place calls and query devices with their voice.

In the future, Cisco plans to bring more cloud features to on-premises devices. Future services include People Insights, a tool that provides background information on meeting participants with information gleaned from the public internet.

Cisco first released a suite of services branded as Webex Edge in September 2018. The suite included Webex Edge Audio, Webex Edge Connect and Webex Video Mesh. The applications provide ways to use on-premises and cloud technologies in combination to improve the quality of audio and video calls.

Cisco’s release of Webex Edge for Devices underscores its strategy of supporting on-premises customers without forcing them to the cloud, said Irwin Lazar, analyst at Nemertes Research.

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Veeam’s Timashev discusses selling company, next steps

It’s the end of an era at Veeam Software.

Ratmir Timashev and Andrei Baronov are stepping away from the backup, recovery and data management company they founded in 2006. Private equity firm Insight Partners said last week it would acquire Veeam in a transaction that valued Veeam at $5 billion. Timashev said it was his decision to step down from the board of directors and from his position of executive vice president of sales and marketing. He will remain in those roles until the sale closes, likely by the end of the first quarter. Baronov has left his CEO position and will relinquish his spot on the board.

Timashev held the CEO job from 2006 to 2016, and has been the most public face of Veeam. Timashev said he feels he’s leaving Veeam in good hands. For example, William Largent, who has served in various positions since the beginning of the company, returned to the role of CEO.

“At some point, the founders have to step down,” Timashev said in an interview.

He expressed confidence in Insight Partners as the new owner. The firm had invested $500 million in Veeam a year ago and first invested in the company in 2013.

Timashev seemed excited for the future of Veeam, which started in backup for virtual infrastructure and has since expanded to cover cloud and physical environments. It has grown in that time into a billion-dollar annual revenue company and claims 365,000 users and 70,000 partners.

Timashev said Veeam has conquered the VMware backup market and will next tackle the hybrid cloud in its “act two.” He specifically called out four targets in Veeam’s focus: AWS, Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and Google. The transition includes a move to subscription pricing.

Timashev, 53, this week discussed why the founders decided to sell the company, what the sale could mean for customers, and what he plans to do next.

What was behind the decision to sell the company now?

Veeam's Ratmir TimashevRatmir Timashev

Ratmir Timashev: We felt that it’s good timing for us to accelerate our growth globally, but also specifically in the U.S. Insight has been our strategic partner since 2013. But I’ve known Insight since 2001.

We believe right now the whole industry, as well as Veeam, is in a transition to what we call “act two.” For us, “act one” was dominating the highly virtualized, modern, on-premises data center, from the data management and backup point of view. And we’ve done a great job in the last 10 years.

The whole industry and also Veeam is going through a large transition to a hybrid cloud and pay-as-you-go subscription model. It’s a difficult transition, but we believe that we will be successful.

So, we thought that Insight, with the industry experience — and experience with different business models and software companies — would be a great partner to take us to this next level.

Will you still be involved in Veeam?

Timashev: I will be involved in the transition and then my role will be more on a consultant basis.

How long do you see the transition lasting?

Timashev: We don’t know — [at least] until the deal is closed, which is expected by the end of Q1. The transition might [end] sometime after that. But I will not be employed by Veeam when the transaction closes. 

What would you like to see during the transition period? What are some of your goals while you’re still employed with Veeam?

Timashev: We want to make sure that employees understand that not a lot of changes will occur. This acquisition is not about reducing the cost or shrinking the expenses. It’s about growth.

Sometimes when a private equity firm buys a company, in an industry or segment that is not growing, their goal is to reduce the costs. That’s not the case with Veeam because we are in a high growth area with a leading position. And we’re extremely well-positioned to capitalize on this expanding market for us.

We believe that we have a very strong executive management team.

Considering your relationship with Insight, could you have stayed on after the deal closed, as an executive?

Timashev: I could have, but that’s not our plan.

Why, since you’ve been there from the beginning, why is now the time that you want to step away?

Timashev: In general, I want to spend more time with my family and kids. I worked very hard in the last 20, 30 years building two companies. [To start Veeam, the two invested the money they made from selling their first company, Aelita Software, to Quest in 2004.]

Andrei is in a similar position — we are the same age. And we have kids and want to spend more time with family.

Since you’ve been with the company since the beginning, will it be hard to step away?

Timashev: It’s always hard, it’s like a baby. Friends of mine are asking how difficult it is. I asked them, ‘Is it difficult to sell your child for $5 billion?’

Is there anything that’s unfinished that you wish had been completed by now? Do you have any concerns that you hope get resolved in the near future?

Whoever wins this new market is going to dominate. Veeam won the VMware market. When a new market opens up, you only have two, three, four years to win that market.
Ratmir TimashevCo-founder, Veeam Software

Timashev: Not really — right now, we are going through a major transition, which represents some challenges, as well as opportunities. Whoever wins this new market is going to dominate. Veeam won the VMware market. It took us two or three years to win that market and then we basically rode the wave.

When a new market opens up, you only have two, three, four years to win that market. And there will always be three winners — number one, number two, number three, and then there will be a whole bunch of others.

We’re very well-positioned.

So you don’t have your third company in the works yet?

Timashev: We always have some ideas — always definitely to find another billion-dollar market opportunity. And I always say it takes three things to create a successful technology company — to be at the right time, at the right place, and create a brilliant product. And me and Andrei have done it twice now.

So, I’m sure that at some point after taking some time off, we might come up with a new idea.

What do you think the sale means for your customers? Have they expressed any concerns going forward following this news?

Timashev: No, they look very positively [on the sale], especially the U.S. customers. As part of this transaction, we are going to become 100% U.S.-shareholder owned. And with the executive management that is primarily U.S.-based, that news is very positive, especially for our U.S. customers. We have lots of large enterprise customers in the U.S., as well as federal customers, and they are taking this very positively.

What will it take to make your product the best for the hybrid cloud era?

Timashev: We have to follow our playbook. We have done it twice. Back in the ’90s, we won the hearts and minds of Windows administrators [with Aelita]. And then 10 years later in 2008, 2009, we won the hearts and minds of VMware administrators. Now 10 years later, we just have to win the hearts and minds of AWS, Azure, Office 365 and Google users.

What does it take? First, the product has to be brilliant, simple, and we have to listen to our core customers. Our core customer used to be [running] VMware. Now it’s going to be a different buyer — AWS, Azure, Office 365, Google buyer. They have their own budget. Sometimes they belong to IT. Sometimes they belong to DevOps.

We have to offer them the simple, flexible and reliable product. That’s what Veeam is known for: simple, flexible and reliable.

Can you give more detail on what your consultant work for Veeam might entail?

Timashev: Just sitting down with [Insight Partners managing director] Mike Triplett, with Bill Largent on a regular basis, and advising them how to attack this new market, how to play the Veeam playbook to win the new markets of AWS, Azure, Office 365 and Google. Those are four big markets.

Will there be any big changes in terms of Veeam offices? What will happen to the headquarters in Switzerland and the people who work there?

Timashev: No, no big changes. We will be looking at U.S. headquarters. We already have two very large offices in Columbus, Ohio, and in Atlanta, Georgia. We have probably around 400 people in each office. So probably one of those will become the U.S. headquarters.

Our office in Switzerland will continue to operate the way it is now. We are unique in the sense that we have always had our management team very distributed. We don’t really have a single office where everybody needs each other.

What do you see generally, for the future of the backup and recovery market and data protection?

Timashev: The market, if you look laterally, it’s backup and recovery, [but it’s also] data management. We believe that there are other components to data management in addition to backup and recovery — [for example] replication, cloud mobility, governance and compliance, analytics.

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For Sale – Toshiba Ultrabook Z40

Hi i have for sale a toshiba z40 that i bought from here a little over a year ago, screen size is 14 inches.
I bought it with the sole purpose to use with a meter to calibrate my tv’s. It’s been sat there since so i might aswell sell it.
There’s a few marks around the vga port mainly, its like the silver coating has rubbed away, it was like this when i bought it, other than that I’d say it’s in pretty decent condition.
Specification of the laptop is as below:

* Intel Core i5-4210 Processor up to 2.7Ghz
* 12GB DDR3 RAM
* 128GB Original Toshiba SSD Drive
* Windows 7 Professional 64Bit(upgraded to Windows 10 by previous owner)
* Built-In Bluetooth
* HDMI Port
* VGA Port
* 3x USB 3.0 Ports
* 3.5mm Headphone jack
* Ethernet Port
* SD Card Reader
* Original Toshiba Battery and charger

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask.

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MariaDB X4 brings smart transactions to open source database

MariaDB has come a long way from its MySQL database roots. The open source database vendor released its new MariaDB X4 platform, providing users with “smart transactions” technology to enable both analytical and transactional databases.

MariaDB, based in Redwood City, Calif., was founded in 2009 by the original creator of MySQL, Monty Widenius, as a drop replacement for MySQL, after Widenius grew disillusioned with the direction that Oracle was taking the open source database.

Oracle acquired MySQL via its acquisition of Sun Microsystems in 2008. Now, in 2020, MariaDB still uses the core MySQL database protocol, but the MariaDB database has diverged significantly in other ways that are manifest in the X4 platform update.

The MariaDB X4 release, unveiled Jan. 14, puts the technology squarely in the cloud-native discussion, notably because MariaDB is allowing for specific workloads to be paired with specific storage types at the cloud level, said James Curtis, senior analyst of data, AI and analytics at 451 Research.

“There are a lot of changes that they implemented, including new and improved storage engines, but the thing that stands out are the architectural adjustments made that blend row and columnar storage at a much deeper level — a change likely to appeal to many customers,” Curtis said.

MariaDB X4 smart transactions converges database functions

The divergence with MySQL has ramped up over the past three years, said Shane Johnson, senior director of product marketing at MariaDB. In recent releases MariaDB has added Oracle database compatibility, which MySQL does not include, he noted.

In addition, MariaDB’s flagship platform provides a database firewall and dynamic data masking, both features designed to improve security and data privacy. The biggest difference today, though, between MariaDB and SQL is how MariaDB supports pluggable storage engines, which gain new functionality in the X4 update.

The thing that stands out are the architectural adjustments made that blend row and columnar storage at a much deeper level — a change likely to appeal to many customers.
James CurtisSenior analyst of data, AI and analytics, 451 Research

Previously when using the pluggable storage engine, users would deploy an instance of MariaDB for transactional use cases with the InnoDB storage engine and another instance with the ColumnStore columnar storage engine for analytics, Johnson explained.

In earlier releases, a Change Data Capture process synchronized those two databases. In the MariaDB X4 update, transactional and analytical features have been converged in an approach that MariaDB calls smart transactions.

“So, when you install MariaDB, you get all the existing storage engines, as well as ColumnStore, allowing you to mix and match to use row and columnar data to do transactions and analytics, very simply, and very easily,” Johnson said.

MariaDB X4 aligns cloud storage

Another new capability in MariaDB X4 is the ability to more efficiently use cloud storage back ends.

“Each of the storage mediums is optimized for a different workload,” Johnson said.

For example, Johnson noted that Amazon Web Service’s S3, is a good fit for analytics, because of its high-availability and capacity. He added that for transactional applications with row-based storage, Amazon Elastic Block Storage (EBS) is a better fit. The ability to mix and match both EBS and S3 in the MariaDB X4 platform makes it easier for user to consolidate both analytics and transactional workload in the database.

“The update for X4 is not so much that you can run MariaDB in the cloud, because you’ve always been able to do that, but rather that you can run it with smart transactions and have it optimized for cloud storage services,” Johnson said.

MariaDB database as a service (DBaaS) is coming

MariaDB said it plans to expand its portfolio further this year.

The core MariaDB open source community project is currently at version 10.4, with plans for version 10.5, which will include the smart transactions capabilities, to debut sometime in the coming weeks, according to MariaDB.

The new smart transaction capabilities have already landed in the MariaDB Enterprise 10.4 update. The MariaDB Enterprise Server has more configuration settings and hardening for enterprise use cases.

The full MariaDB X4 platform goes a step further with the MariaDB MaxScale database proxy, which provides automatic failover, transaction replay and a database firewall, as well as utilities that developers need to build database applications.

Johnson noted that traditionally new features tend to land in the community version first, but as it happened, during this cycle MariaDB developers were able to get the features into the enterprise release quicker.

MariaDB has plans to launch a new DBaaS product this year. Users can already deploy MariaDB to a cloud of choice on their own. MariaDB also has a managed service that provides full management for a MariaDB environment.

“With the managed service, we take care of everything for our customers, where we deploy MariaDB on their cloud of choice and we will manage it, administer it, operate and upgrade, it,” Johnson said. “We will have our own database as a service rolling out this year, which will provide an even better option.”

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NSA reports flaw in Windows cryptography core

After years of criticism from the infosec community about hoarding critical vulnerabilities, the National Security Agency may be changing course.

The highlight of Microsoft’s first Patch Tuesday of 2020 is a vulnerability in the Windows cryptography core first reported to vendor by the NSA. The flaw in CryptoAPI DLL (CVE-2020-0601) affects Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 and 2019. According to Microsoft’s description, an attacker could exploit how Windows validates ECC certificates in order to launch spoofing attacks.

The NSA gave a more robust description in its advisory, noting that the Windows cryptography flaw also affects “applications that rely on Windows for trust functionality,” and specifically impacts HTTPS connections, signed files and emails and signed executable code.

“Exploitation of the vulnerability allows attackers to defeat trusted network connections and deliver executable code while appearing as legitimately trusted entities,” NSA wrote in its advisory. “NSA assesses the vulnerability to be severe and that sophisticated cyber actors will understand the underlying flaw very quickly and, if exploited, would render the previously mentioned platforms as fundamentally vulnerable. The consequences of not patching the vulnerability are severe and widespread. Remote exploitation tools will likely be made quickly and widely available.”

Will Dormann, vulnerability analyst at the CERT Coordination Center, confirmed the issue also affects X.509 certificates, meaning an attacker could spoof a certificate chain to a trusted root certificate authority and potentially intercept or modify TLS-encrypted communication.

Johannes Ullrich, fellow at the SANS Internet Storm Center, said the flaw is especially noteworthy because “the affected library is a core component of the Windows operating systems. Pretty much all software doing any kind of cryptography uses it.”

“The flaw is dangerous in that it allows an attacker to impersonate trusted websites and trusted software publishers. Digital signatures are used everywhere to protect the integrity and the authenticity of software, web pages and, in some cases, email,” Ullrich told SearchSecurity. “This flaw could be used to trick a user into installing malicious software. Most endpoint protection products will inspect the digital signature of software the user installs, and consider software created by trusted organizations as harmless. Using this flaw, an attacker would be able attach a signature claiming that the software was created by a trusted entity.”

However, Craig Young, computer security researcher for Tripwire’s vulnerability and exposure research team, said the impact of this Windows cryptography vulnerability might be more limited to enterprises and “most individuals don’t need to lose sleep over this attack just yet.”

“The primary attack vectors most people would care about are HTTPS session compromise malware with spoofed authenticode signatures. The attack against HTTPS however requires that the attacker can insert themselves on the network between the client and server. This mostly limits the attack to nation-state adversaries,” Young told SearchSecurity. “The real risk is more likely to enterprises where a nation state attacker may be motivated to carry out an attack. The worst-case scenario would be that a hostile or compromised network operator is used to replace legitimate executable content from an HTTPS session with malicious binaries having a spoofed signature.”

Beyond patching, NSA suggested network prevention and detection techniques to inspect certificates outside of Windows cryptography validation.

“Some enterprises route traffic through existing proxy devices that perform TLS inspection, but do not use Windows for certificate validation. The devices can help isolate vulnerable endpoints behind the proxies while the endpoints are being patched,” NSA wrote. “Properly configured and managed TLS inspection proxies independently validate TLS certificates from external entities and will reject invalid or untrusted certificates, protecting endpoints from certificates that attempt to exploit the vulnerabilities. Ensure that certificate validation is enabled for TLS proxies to limit exposure to this class of vulnerabilities and review logs for signs of exploitation.”

NSA takes credit

Infosec experts credited the NSA for not only reporting the Windows cryptography flaw but also providing detailed insight and advice about the threat. Chris Morales, head of security analytics at Vectra, based in San Jose, Calif., praised the NSA for recommending “leveraging network detection to identify malicious certificates.”

“I think they did a great job of being concise and clear on both the problem and recommended courses of action,” Morales told SearchSecurity. “Of course, it would be great if the NSA did more of this, but it is not their normal job and I wouldn’t expect them to be accountable for doing a vendor job. Relying on the vendor for notification of security events will always be important.”

Young also commended the NSA’s advisory for being very helpful and providing “useful insights which are not included in either the CERT/CC note or the Microsoft advisory.”

The NSA is designated as the Executive Secretariat of the government’s Vulnerabilities Equities Process (VEP), designed to organize the process of determining what vulnerabilities found by federal agencies would be kept secret and which would be disclosed. However, the NSA has consistently received criticism from experts that it keeps too many vulnerabilities secret and should disclose more in order to help protect the public. In recent years, this criticism was loudest when leaked NSA cyberweapons were used in widespread WannaCry attacks.

The NSA advisory for the Windows cryptography flaw is rare for the agency, which has been more open with warnings about potential threats but hasn’t been known to share more technical analysis.

Also making this vulnerability an outlier is that the NSA was given attribution in Microsoft’s patch acknowledgements section. Anne Neuberger, deputy national manager at the NSA, said on a call with news media Tuesday that this wasn’t the first vulnerability the NSA has reported to Microsoft, but it does mark the first time the agency accepted attribution.

Infosec journalist Brian Krebs, who broke the story of the Windows cryptography patch on Monday, claimed sources told him this disclosure may mark the beginning of a new initiative at NSA to make more vulnerability research available to vendors and the public.

NSA did not respond to requests for comment at the time of this writing.

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January Patch Tuesday fixes cryptography bug found by NSA

Microsoft closed a flaw in a key cryptographic feature it discovered with help from the National Security Agency as part of the January Patch Tuesday security updates.

Microsoft issued fixes for Windows, Internet Explorer, Office, several .NET technologies, OneDrive for Android and Microsoft Dynamics for January Patch Tuesday to close 49 unique vulnerabilities, with eight rated as critical. Microsoft said there were no exploited or publicly disclosed vulnerabilities. This month’s updates were the last free security fixes for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008/2008 R2 as those operating systems left extended support.

Windows cryptographic library flaw fixed

The bug that drew the most attention from various security researchers on January Patch Tuesday is a spoofing vulnerability (CVE-2020-0601), rated important, that affects Windows 10 and Windows Server 2016 and 2019 systems. The NSA uncovered a flaw in the crypt32.dll file that handles certificate and cryptographic messaging functions in the Windows CryptoAPI. The bug would allow an attacker to produce a malicious program that appears to have an authenticated signature from a trusted source.

A successful exploit using a spoofed certificate could be used to launch several types of attacks, such as deliver a malicious file that appears trustworthy, perform man-in-the-middle campaigns and decode sensitive data. An unpatched system could be particularly susceptible because the malicious file could appear legitimate and even skirt Microsoft’s AppLocker protection.

“The guidance from us would be, regardless of Microsoft’s ‘important’ classification, to treat this as a priority one and get the patch pushed out,” said Chris Goettl, director of product management and security at Ivanti, a security and IT management vendor based in South Jordan, Utah.

Goettl noted that companies might not be directly attacked with exploits that use the CryptoAPI bug, but could be at risk from attacks on the back-end system of a vendor or another outside entity, such as when attackers embedded the NotPetya ransomware in tax software to slip past defenses.

Chris Goettl, director of product management and security, IvantiChris Goettl

“It’s not a very common occurrence because good code-signing certificates can establish a level of trust, while this [vulnerability] invalidates that trust and allows an attacker to try and spoof that. It introduces a lot of potential for risk, so we recommend people close [CVE-2020-0601] down as quickly as possible,” he said.

Bugs in Windows remote connection technology patched

January Patch Tuesday also closed three vulnerabilities related to Remote Desktop Services rated critical.

CVE-2020-0609 and CVE-2020-0610 are both remote code execution vulnerabilities in the Remote Desktop Gateway that affect server operating systems on Windows Server 2012 and newer. Microsoft said both CVEs can be exploited pre-authentication without any interaction from the user. Attackers who use the exploit can run arbitrary code on the target system, then perform other tasks, including install programs, delete data or add a new account with full user rights.

CVE-2020-0611 is a remote code execution vulnerability in the Remote Desktop Client that affects Windows 7 and newer on desktops, and Windows Server 2008 R2 and newer on server systems, when the attacker tricks a user to connect to a malicious server. The threat actor could then perform a range of actions, such as install programs, view or change data, or make a new account with full user rights.   

Legacy operating systems reach end-of-life

January Patch Tuesday marks the last time Microsoft will provide security updates and other fixes for the Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 operating systems unless customers pay to enter the Extended Security Updates (ESU) program. Companies must also have Software Assurance coverage or subscription licenses to purchase ESU keys for the server operating systems. Users will need to add the ESU key to systems they want to keep protected. ESU for those systems will end in three years.

Companies that plan to keep these legacy operating systems and have signed up for the ESU program should install the servicing stack updates Microsoft released for all three operating systems on January Patch Tuesday, Goettl said. Administrators also need to deploy and activate the ESU key using Microsoft’s instructions.

ESU is an expensive option. For on-premises server workloads, organizations will need either Software Assurance or a subscription license at a cost of about 75% of the license cost each year.  

ESU does not add new or updated features, just security fixes.

For organizations that plan to keep these operating systems running without the safety net of ESU, there are a few ways to minimize the risk around those workloads, including adding more security layers and removing the workload from a direct connection to the internet, Goettl said.

“If there’s an application or something that needs to run on Windows 7, then virtualize that environment. Get the users on the Windows 10 platform and have them connect into the Windows 7 environment to access that critical app. You will it spend more money doing it that way, but you will reduce your risk significantly,” he said.

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For Sale – Toshiba Ultrabook Z40

Hi i have for sale a toshiba z40 that i bought from here a little over a year ago, screen size is 14 inches.
I bought it with the sole purpose to use with a meter to calibrate my tv’s. It’s been sat there since so i might aswell sell it.
There’s a few marks around the vga port mainly, its like the silver coating has rubbed away, it was like this when i bought it, other than that I’d say it’s in pretty decent condition.
Specification of the laptop is as below:

* Intel Core i5-4210 Processor up to 2.7Ghz
* 12GB DDR3 RAM
* 128GB Original Toshiba SSD Drive
* Windows 7 Professional 64Bit(upgraded to Windows 10 by previous owner)
* Built-In Bluetooth
* HDMI Port
* VGA Port
* 3x USB 3.0 Ports
* 3.5mm Headphone jack
* Ethernet Port
* SD Card Reader
* Original Toshiba Battery and charger

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask.

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Forbes’ Google Cloud migration rooted in trust, cost savings

Forbes says its online audience grew from 15 million users per month in 2012 to 120 million in 2018, a growth spike that ultimately prompted a large-scale move off on-premises systems and into Google Cloud.

The Google Cloud migration now supports all three aspects of Forbes’ business: content, sales and its publishing infrastructure, according to chief digital officer Salah Zalatimo.

“[In 2020], we’re going to be continuing to mature our business model and diversify our revenue,” Zalatimo said. “Google Cloud is about giving us flexibility. We’re going to be able to establish new products and test new features really quickly.”

Forbes used to run its publishing operations on an on-premises, WordPress-based system that was heavily customized, with a front end clunked up by an accumulation of legacy code.

The number of actual people those audience figures represent is likely lower, as Google Analytics defines a user as a browser endpoint. Thus, if an individual read Forbes content both on a phone and a laptop, the user would be counted twice.

Still, the scale involved led to Forbes’ 2018 decision to build a new, custom publishing platform. At that point, the company determined it wanted to make a wholesale push into the cloud centered around one primary provider.

Google won Forbes’ business for several reasons, including pricing, incentives to help its Google cloud migration and a lower-pressure approach to sales, according to Zalatimo. “We didn’t have to make any hard commitments.”

While Forbes has a relationship with Microsoft as an Office 365 shop, it quickly ruled out Azure. “We talked to them, but the pricing was just too high,” he said.

Forbes also met with sales teams at AWS, where it initially hosted the new publishing platform, but ultimately decided that Google provided the most ease of use and the best level of automation for its needs. Forbes moved the publishing platform as part of its Google cloud migration during the first half of 2019.

Forbes has moved most of its digital infrastructure into containers and orchestrates them with Google Kubernetes Engine. It also uses the Istio service mesh to wrangle microservices. Google Cloud storage underpins the system and Google Pub/Sub supports serverless operations.

Forbes estimates that the move to GCP has saved 50 engineer-hours per week thanks to efficiencies and automation. Regression testing and new feature deployment time has dropped by 58%, according to the company.

In addition, Forbes is using Google’s AI and machine learning features to train models that suggest headlines, track trending topics and improve reader engagement.

Google Cloud hones enterprise chops

Former Oracle executive Thomas Kurian came aboard as Google Cloud CEO in November 2018. Since then, Kurian has moved to build out Google’s enterprise cloud sales and support organizations — areas where it had lagged behind competitors. Forbes’ experience on this front has been positive, Zalatimo said.

They are still maturing as an enterprise provider, and we knew that going in.
Salah ZalatimoChief digital officer, Forbes

“They are still maturing as an enterprise provider, and we knew that going in,” he said. “But they knew that going in, too.”

Forbes did work with a services partner to help with the Google Cloud migration, but Google’s account representatives were “extremely involved,” he added. “We always had access, even if it was less traditional.” As one example, Forbes’ teams might find themselves having to call a salesperson in order to escalate a technical issue, Zalatimo said.

Forbes is using a wide array of Google Cloud offerings, including its audience analytics platform, BigQuery data warehouse, Hangout meeting software and authentication service, all of which are well-established.


But of all the cloud providers with which Forbes works, Google stands out as keen on engaging customers very early on in the new product development process, he added. “A lot of [vendors] talk about it, and say they want to do it, but I don’t think a lot of companies actually do.”

Weighing Google’s influence

Walmart and other large retailers have shunned doing business with AWS, given how closely they compete with its parent company in e-commerce. Google’s kingmaker positions in general web search as well as the hugely influential Google News service might make a media company such as Forbes similarly think twice about making heavy investments in its technology.

Forbes did factor this into its decision, according to Zalatimo. “Our options [were] either to lean in or lean away,” he said. “At the end of the day, they do carry the leverage. As an independent publisher, we really don’t. So, if you can’t beat them, join them.”

The company is taking part in the Google News Initiative, where Google works with publishers on new product development and other collaborative efforts.

Forbes benefits from this relationship with Google — but not to the extent it gets any special insights into the Google News algorithm, which can heavily affect a publisher’s traffic when changes are made. “They are like Fort Knox about this,” he said.

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For Sale – Alienware 13 r3 Laptop i7-6700HQ. GTX1060 6GB. QHD Touchscreen.16GB DDR4. 2x 256GB SSD. £680 delivered

Bought from the forums here For Sale – Alienware 13 R3 Laptop

This has had very little use as I actually received my new workstation earlier than expected. I bought it as a stop gap, and it has performed flawlessly. I really should have moved it on by now but haven’t had a chance.

I can post some pictures if needs be when I am home in two days, but it looks as it did in the previous listing.

It comes with the power supply, and I will include a small laptop bag I purchased to store it in (on a shelf) when not in use).

Any questions etc just ask

Price
£730 including delivery to mainland uk which is what I paid if I remember correctly.

Looking around for the spec and condition this seems very fair.

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