Tag Archives: Google

Google got faster pulling bad Android apps from Play Store

Google wants to reinforce that the Play Store is the safest place for Android users to get apps with a new set of stats on how its efforts to block bad Android apps have improved.

Andrew Ahn, product manager for Google Play, said the company has “halved the probability” of users installing bad Android apps and also made the Play Store “a more challenging place for those who seek to abuse the app ecosystem for their own gain.”

“In 2017, we took down more than 700,000 apps that violated the Google Play policies, 70% more than the apps taken down in 2016. Not only did we remove more bad apps, we were able to identify and action against them earlier,” Ahn wrote in a blog post. “In fact, 99% of apps with abusive contents were identified and rejected before anyone could install them. This was possible through significant improvements in our ability to detect abuse — such as impersonation, inappropriate content, or malware — through new machine learning models and techniques.”

Liviu Arsene, senior e-threat analyst at Romania-based antimalware firm Bitdefender, said it is “commendable that Google is going through great lengths to optimize be malicious app bouncing process,” considering the more than 3.5 million apps in the Play Store.

“However, malware developers don’t necessarily have to submit ‘bad Android apps’ when they can simply create something that’s barely functional with the sole purpose of getting past the vetting process. Some apps may offer deceptive descriptions and functionalities just to get installed on devices, from which they can request all sorts of permissions for tracking users or for bombarding them with ads,” Arsene told SearchSecurity. “There have been instances where apps walk a very fine line between complying with Google’s advertising policy and spamming users with nag screens, browser redirects, and unsolicited pop-ups just for the sole purpose of generating revenue for the developer. While, granted, they don’t install malware or pilfer personal data, some of them can still be borderline legitimate.”

Will the Play Store catch all the bad apps?

A Google spokesperson told SearchSecurity that there will always be a chance for bad Android apps to slip through because “they evade detection in a sneaky way, or seem to be very borderline cases,” and in those cases Google relies on analyzing how apps are being distributed, monitoring user community flagging and reviewing data from post-install Google Play Protect scans in order to take action on a potentially harmful app.

“Apps submitted to Google Play are automatically scanned for potentially malicious code as well as spammy developer accounts before they are published on the Google Play Store. To complement that effort, we recently introduced a proactive app review process to catch policy offenders earlier in the process, while still ensuring that developers can get their apps to market as soon as possible — in a matter of hours, not days or weeks,” the spokesperson said. “During that process, apps are specifically reviewed for compliance against our Google Play Developer Content Policy and Developer Distribution Agreement, which prevents things like apps that are impersonating legitimate companies or deceptive behavior.”

Arsene applauded the work done by Google to block bad Android apps “because Android is one of the most popular operating systems.”

“Some built in app scanning features even let users know if they’ve downloaded something malicious from a third-party marketplace, which acts as an additional line of defense,” Arsene said. “However, it’s recommended that everyone owning an Android device, regardless if they install apps from official marketplaces or not, install a mobile security solution as it will have the ability to protect them from much more than just malicious apps, but also against web-based attacks and other online threats.”

Big content providers influence undersea cable price drops

Google this month said it will build three new undersea cable routes to be completed in 2019, bringing to 11 the number of cables in which the company has invested since 2010.

Google’s multimillion-dollar move isn’t unusual anymore, even though undersea cable builds were historically driven by individual telecom operators or consortiums that then sold optical wavelength services to their customers.

The big four content providers — Google, Amazon, Microsoft and Facebook — are increasingly financing undersea cable routes to enable fast, high-capacity data connections around the globe, particularly to locations where they have built data centers. Yet, these changes in the submarine networking market worry telecom operators that fear the big content providers have more money to invest in undersea cable, leaving the traditional players at a disadvantage.

Not only are 1 Gb, 10 Gb and 100 Gb wavelength service prices declining year over year, according to trend data from telecommunications research and consulting firm TeleGeography, but each time a new undersea cable goes live, 100 Gb wavelength prices drop quicker as more bandwidth becomes available at the high end of the market.

Yet, the news isn’t all bad for telecom operators, according to Michael Bisaha, senior analyst at TeleGeography, based in Carlsbad, Calif. Speaking at a recent webinar, he said the big content providers shouldn’t always be viewed as competitors taking over the undersea market, because they aren’t always financing entire cable builds. Moreover, content providers may finance only a portion of a cable, so telecom operators have opportunities to get onto a shared cable system and use that to stretch their investment capital, he said.

There are definitely opportunities to compete with or cater to the content players.
Michael Bisahasenior analyst at TeleGeography

Content providers that have consistently invested in cable routes are on the routes where they have their major content hubs or cloud hubs, largely in the United States, Western Europe and some in Asia, Bisaha said. But that doesn’t mean they only need primary undersea routes. They still need diverse routes, and when their needs don’t meet the threshold of investing in a whole cable, they might need wavelengths or shared spectrum to specific geographies that they may buy from a telecom operator, he added.

“There are definitely opportunities to compete with or cater to the content players,” Bisaha said, adding that content providers are primarily buying or investing in cables on the major routes that connect their primary hubs.

“The existence of one content provider on a cable doesn’t necessarily preclude the need for the wholesale providers beyond those cable routes,” Bisaha added.

Undersea cable pricing trends

Apart from the influence content providers are having on the high end of the undersea cable market, the growing need for bandwidth is also driving the 10 Gb wavelength market, where prices dropped from 2014 through 2017 at an average compound annual rate of 20% to 25%, according to TeleGeography data. Bisaha said he expects the downward pricing trend to continue for both 10 Gb and 100 Gb wavelengths.

Even as 100 Gb wavelength prices drop, steeper “shocks to the 100 [Gb] system” tend to coincide with new content-provider-sponsored cables coming online, Bisaha said. Increased participation of content companies influences the 100 Gb market more than in the 10 Gb or the 1 Gb markets.

Still, global undersea cable prices aren’t falling uniformly in all areas. Less popular subsea routes may have higher transport rates than those for major hubs. “While the range in different geographies may indeed continue to shrink, we don’t expect them to completely disappear,” Bisaha said.

For Sale – 2 x W/cooled GTX1080 / EKWB Pred 360 / NZXT fans & controller

I’ve just been having another look and a Google and it seems that your hunch is true – whilst my case (Define R5) can take the full length of the rad along the top position, it can only accommodate a thickness of 55mm, whilst the Predator 360 is 68mm.

I’m afraid that it is too much to take a punt on (if it was 58mm or so then I’d take the chance!).

I’m really sorry, but I’ll have to bow out. Absolutely gutted!!!

For Sale – 2 x W/cooled GTX1080 / EKWB Pred 360 / NZXT fans & controller

I’ve just been having another look and a Google and it seems that your hunch is true – whilst my case (Define R5) can take the full length of the rad along the top position, it can only accommodate a thickness of 55mm, whilst the Predator 360 is 68mm.

I’m afraid that it is too much to take a punt on (if it was 58mm or so then I’d take the chance!).

I’m really sorry, but I’ll have to bow out. Absolutely gutted!!!

For Sale – 2 x W/cooled GTX1080 / EKWB Pred 360 / NZXT fans & controller

I’ve just been having another look and a Google and it seems that your hunch is true – whilst my case (Define R5) can take the full length of the rad along the top position, it can only accommodate a thickness of 55mm, whilst the Predator 360 is 68mm.

I’m afraid that it is too much to take a punt on (if it was 58mm or so then I’d take the chance!).

I’m really sorry, but I’ll have to bow out. Absolutely gutted!!!

For Sale – Google Wifi (2 pack) & ASUS DSL-N55U

Google WIFI Twin pack – Only bought in October so in as new condition with all orig packaging.

£185.00inc.

ASUS DSL-N55U – Wifi ADSL Router

DSL-N55U Annex A | Networking | ASUS United Kingdom

£25.00inc.

BOTH in perfect working order.

Price and currency: £
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Bristol
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
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Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Google Wifi (2 pack) & ASUS DSL-N55U

Google WIFI Twin pack – Only bought in October so in as new condition with all orig packaging.

£185.00inc.

ASUS DSL-N55U – Wifi ADSL Router

£25.00inc.

BOTH in perfect working order.

Price and currency: £
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Bristol
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Businesses slow to embrace products like Samsung Flip board

Samsung has joined Cisco, Google and Microsoft in a digital whiteboard market that has attracted the interest, but not yet the wallets, of companies.

The Korean tech giant launched its Flip interactive display this week at the CES technology conference in Las Vegas. Scheduled for release this month, the Samsung Flip board will sell for $2,699, which is considerably less than competing products from the major vendors but higher than technology offered by smaller manufacturers.

The Flip has a 55-inch, 4K display that lets users annotate content using their fingers or stylus. The device has USB ports and a wireless connection for PCs and mobile devices. The latter lets remote workers view the Flip display.

Today, education, professional sports and media and entertainment account for a significant portion of whiteboard sales. Manufacturers are banking on businesses and government to grow the market.

To date, however, enterprises haven’t embraced the technology. A 2017 survey by Nemertes Research found only 23% of companies using interactive whiteboards and 47% evaluating them. Deployments have been limited mostly to workgroups focused on marketing, content development, engineering, application development and product management. Those groups find electronic whiteboards useful in brainstorming sessions.

“We don’t yet see them as a must-have in every conference room,” Nemertes analyst Irwin Lazar said. “Buyers are still struggling with the business case for whiteboards.”

Samsung Flip
The Samsung Flip can configure to horizontal or vertical orientations and features multiuser annotation.

Samsung Flip board pricing

Samsung’s product costs considerably less than similar size whiteboards from Cisco, Google and Microsoft. But those devices, which range from $5000 to $9000, offer more capabilities, including video conferencing and integration with the vendor’s collaboration software.

Independent analyst Dave Michels believes products that combine video and an interactive whiteboard will be more attractive to enterprises over time than whiteboard-only products. “Every room needs an HDMI display anyway,” Michels said. “Board-only solutions were probably obsolete before they found their way.”

But Lazar sees a “pretty good market” for whiteboards with fewer capabilities than those from the major vendors. Enterprises interested in those products have turned to vendors like Bluescape, DisplayNote, InFocus and Newline Interactive.

In general, those vendors offer whiteboard products that are less expensive than the Samsung Flip board, so the company will likely find it difficult to grab market share. “Given the higher price, and Samsung’s relative newness in the enterprise [whiteboard] market, I think they’ll have a difficult time competing with the other vendors,” Lazar said.

For Sale – Google Wifi (2 pack) & ASUS DSL-N55U

Google WIFI Twin pack – Only bought in October so in as new condition with all orig packaging.

£185.00inc.

ASUS DSL-N55U – Wifi ADSL Router

£25.00inc.

BOTH in perfect working order.

Price and currency: £
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Bristol
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Top cloud providers dominate headlines in 2017

It’s no surprise that top cloud providers, Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google, continued to dominate technology headlines in 2017. This year, we saw these cloud giants perform the same one-upmanship around tools, services and prices that we have in the past — but this time, with a sharper focus on technologies such as containers and hybrid cloud.

Before you head into 2018, refresh your memory of SearchCloudComputing’s top news from the past year:

Amazon, Microsoft crave more machine learning in the cloud

All the top cloud providers see the importance in machine learning, and Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure put their differences aside in October to jointly create Gluon, an open source deep learning interface based on Apache MXNet. This new library is intended to make AI technologies more accessible to developers and help them more easily create machine learning models. In the future, Gluon will work worth Microsoft Cognitive Toolkit.

Meanwhile, Google Cloud Platform offers TensorFlow, another open source library for machine learning. While TensorFlow is a formidable opponent, some developers shy away from it due to its complexities.

The main problem that all providers face in this space is that the public cloud isn’t always the best environment for complex machine learning workloads due to cost, data gravity or a lack of skill. Some data scientists continue to use the public cloud to test, but then run the workloads on premises.

Google hybrid cloud strategy crystallizes with Nutanix deal

While cloud is popular, many workloads are still kept on premises — either due to their design or compliance issues. Top cloud providers continue to seek partnerships to target the hybrid market and ease the gap between data centers and the cloud.

The Amazon and VMware deal tends to be the most common example of this. But in June 2017, Google partnered with Nutanix to fuel its own hybrid efforts. Next year, customers will be able to manage and deploy workloads between the Google public cloud and their own hyper-converged infrastructure from a single interface. This partnership will also extends Google cloud services, such as BigQuery, to Nutanix customers, and enable customers to use Nutanix boxes as edge devices.

Kubernetes on Azure hints at hybrid cloud endgame

One of containers’ main advantages is enhanced portability between cloud platforms — a feature that’s especially attractive to hybrid cloud users. In February 2017, Microsoft unveiled the general availability of Kubernetes on Azure Container Service (AKS, formerly ACS), making it the first public cloud provider to support all the major container orchestration engines: Kubernetes, Mesosphere’s DC/O and Docker Swarm.

The move was one that could especially benefit hybrid cloud users because both Docker Swarm and Kubernetes enable teams to manage containers that run on multiple platforms from a single location. In October, Azure rolled out a new managed Kubernetes service, and rebranded ACS as AKS. AWS countered in November with Amazon Elastic Container Service for Kubernetes, a managed service.

Azure migration takes hostile approach to lure VMware apps

To compete with VMware Cloud on AWS, Microsoft released a similar service for Azure in November 2017 — without VMware support.

Azure Migrate enables enterprises to analyze their on-premises environment, discover dependencies and more easily migrate VMware workloads into the Azure public cloud. A bare-metal subset of the service, VMware virtualization on Azure, is expected to be available in 2018, and enables users to run a VMware stack on top of Azure hardware. While the service is based on a partnership with unnamed VMware partners, and involves VMware-certified hardware, the development of it didn’t directly involve VMware itself, and cuts the vendor out of potential revenues. VMware has since said that it will not recommend or support the product.

Cloud pricing models reignite IaaS provider feud

The price war continued in 2017, but top cloud providers changed their tune: instead of direct cuts, they altered their pricing models. AWS abandoned its per-hour billing, in favor of per-second billing, to counter per-minute billing from Google and Azure. Google shortly responded with its own shift to a per-second billing model.

Microsoft, for its part, added a Reserved VM Instances option to Azure, which provides discounts to customers that purchase compute capacity in advance for a one- or three-year period. The move was a most direct shot at AWS’ Elastic Compute Cloud Reserved Instances, which follow a similar model.