Tag Archives: Health

For Sale – Internal & External Hard Drives

Can you please state what health check you would like me to perform (if you are making an offer based on a health check)?

The drives have all been used in a HTPC that didn’t see much use at all (on once or twice per week for a movie). The Samsung drives are probably around 3 years old and the Seagate drives between 1 and 2 years.

The 2 external drives are around 12 months old. but it is best to assume that no warranty is provided (and you may be pleasantly surprised if you check the serial number).

For Sale – Internal & External Hard Drives

Can you please state what health check you would like me to perform (if you are making an offer based on a health check)?

The drives have all been used in a HTPC that didn’t see much use at all (on once or twice per week for a movie). The Samsung drives are probably around 3 years old and the Seagate drives between 1 and 2 years.

The 2 external drives are around 12 months old. but it is best to assume that no warranty is provided (and you may be pleasantly surprised if you check the serial number).

For Sale – Internal & External Hard Drives

Can you please state what health check you would like me to perform (if you are making an offer based on a health check)?

The drives have all been used in a HTPC that didn’t see much use at all (on once or twice per week for a movie). The Samsung drives are probably around 3 years old and the Seagate drives between 1 and 2 years.

The 2 external drives are around 12 months old. but it is best to assume that no warranty is provided (and you may be pleasantly surprised if you check the serial number).

For Sale – 6TB WD Red Drive HDD

For sale I have 1 6TB WD red, in full working order, its is now out of warranty (Just).

Please see Health report attached below.

Any questions please ask

Price and currency: £125
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Burnham On Sea
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – 6TB WD Red Drive HDD

For sale I have 1 6TB WD red, in full working order, its is now out of warranty (Just).

Please see Health report attached below.

Any questions please ask

Price and currency: £125
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Burnham On Sea
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – 6TB WD Red Drive HDD

For sale I have 1 6TB WD red, in full working order, its is now out of warranty (Just).

Please see Health report attached below.

Any questions please ask

Price and currency: £125
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Burnham On Sea
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Healthcare APIs get a new trial run for Medicare claims

In the ongoing battle to make healthcare data ubiquitous, the U.S. Digital Service for the Department of Health and Human Services has developed a new API, Blue Button 2.0, aimed at sharing Medicare claims information.

Blue Button 2.0 is part of an API-first strategy within HHS’ Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and it comes at a time when a number of major companies, including Apple, have embraced the potential of healthcare APIs. APIs are the building blocks of applications and make it easier for developers to create software that can easily share information in a standardized way. Like Apple’s Health Records API, Blue Button 2.0 is based on a widely accepted healthcare API standard known as Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources, or FHIR

Blue Button 2.0 is the API gateway to 53 million Medicare beneficiaries, including comprehensive part A, B and D data. “We’re starting to recognize that claims data has value in understanding the places a person has been in the healthcare ecosystem,” said Shannon Sartin, executive director of the U.S. Digital Service at HHS.

“But the problem is, how do you take a document that is mostly codes with very high-level information that’s not digestible and make it useful for a nonhealth-savvy individual? You want a third-party app to add value to that information,” Sartin said.

So, her team was asked to work on this problem. And out of their work, Blue Button 2.0 was born.

More than 500 developers have signed on

To date, over 500 developers are working with the new API to develop applications that bring claims data to consumers, providers, hospitals and, ultimately, into an EHR, Sartin said. But while there is a lot of interest, Sartin said this is just the first step when it comes to healthcare APIs.

“The government does not build products super well, and it does not do the marketing engagement necessary to get someone interested in using it,” she said. “We’re taking a different approach, acting as evangelists, and we’re spending time growing the community.”

And while a large number of developers are experimenting with Blue Button 2.0, Sartin’s group will be heavily vetting to eventually get to a much smaller number that will release applications due to privacy concerns around the claims data.

Looking for a user-friendly approach

We’re … acting as evangelists, and we’re spending time growing the community.
Shannon Sartinexecutive director of the U.S. Digital Service at HHS

In theory, the applications will make it easier for a Medicare consumer to let third parties access their claims information and then, in turn, make that data meaningful and actionable. But Arielle Trzcinski, senior analyst serving application development and delivery at Forrester Research, said she is concerned Blue Button 2.0 isn’t pushing the efforts around healthcare APIs far enough.

“Claims information is not the full picture,” she said. “If we’re truly making EHR records portable and something the consumer can own, you have to have beneficiaries download their medical information. That’s great, but how are they going to share it? What’s interesting about the Apple effort as a consumer is that you’re able to share that information with another provider. And it’s easy, because it’s all on your phone. I haven’t seen from Medicare yet how they might do it in the same user-friendly way.”

Sartin acknowledged Blue Button 2.0 takes aim at just a part of the bigger problem.

“My team is focused just on CMS and healthcare in a very narrow way. We recognize there are broader data and healthcare issues,” she said.

But when it comes to the world of healthcare APIs, it’s important to take that first step. And it’s also important to remember the complexity of the job ahead, something Sartin said her team — top-notch developers from private industry who chose government service to help — realized after they jumped in to the world of healthcare APIs. 

“We have engineers who’ve not worked in healthcare who thought the FHIR standard was overly complex,” she said. “But when you start to dig in to the complexity of health data, you recognize sharing health data with each doctor means something different. This is not as seamless as with banks that can standardize on numbers. There, a one is a one. But in health terminology, a one can mean 10 different things. You can’t normalize it. Having an outside perspective forces the health community to question it all.”

CMS creates chief health informatics officer position

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services created a chief health informatics officer position geared toward driving health IT strategy development and technology innovation for the department.

According to the job description, the chief health informatics officer (CHIO) will be charged with developing “requirements and content for health-related information technology, with an initial focus on improving innovation and interoperability.”

The chief health informatics officer position will develop a health IT and information strategy for CMS and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, as well as provide subject-matter expertise for health IT information management and technology innovation policy.

Applying health informatics to IT

The position also entails working with providers and vendors to determine how CMS will apply health informatics methods to IT, as well as acting as a liaison between CMS and private industry to lead innovation, according to the job description.

A candidate must have at least one year of “qualifying specialized experience,” including experience using health informatics data to examine, analyze and develop policy and program operations in healthcare programs; offering guidance on program planning to senior management for an organization; and supervising subordinate staff.

Pamela Dixon, co-founder and managing partner of healthcare executive search firm SSi-SEARCH, based in Atlanta, said a chief health informatics officer must have all the skill sets of a chief medical information officer and more. Dixon said a CHIO must be a strategic systems thinker, with the ability to innovate, a strong communicator and a “true leader.”

“The role could and should unlock the key to moving technology initiatives through healthcare dramatically faster, dramatically more effective,” Dixon said.

Finding the right balance

The role could and should unlock the key to moving technology initiatives through healthcare dramatically faster, dramatically more effective.
Pamela Dixonco-founder and managing partner, SSi-SEARCH

Eric Poon, who has served as Duke University Health System’s chief health information officer for the last three and a half years, said a successful informatics professional enables individuals within an organization to achieve quality improvement and patient safety goals with technology. Poon oversees clinical systems and analytics teams and ensures data that’s been gathered can be used to support quality initiatives and research.

One of the most significant challenges Poon said he faces is determining how to balance resources between the day-to-day and “what’s new,” along with making data accessible in a “high-quality way,” so faculty and researchers can easily access the data to support their work in quality improvement and clinical research. Being successful means creating a bridge between technology and individuals within the organization, Poon said.

“I would like them to say that we are making it possible for them to push the envelope with regards to data science and research and data exchange,” Poon said. “I also like to think we will have innovators who are coming up with new apps, new data science, machine learning algorithms that are realigning how we engage patients and how we are really becoming smart about how to use IT to move the needle in quality and safety … and patient health in a cost-effective way.”

Emerging roles important for change

Dixon said new and emerging leadership roles are important because they make organizations think about both what they need or want the individual to accomplish, as well as what the organization itself could accomplish with the right person.

“The actual title is less important,” she said. “There are CHIOs that might just as easily carry the title chief innovation officer or chief transformation officer or chief data officer, depending on their focus. The important thing is that we encourage and foster growth, value and innovation by creating roles that are aimed at doing just that.”

The creation of a chief health informatics officer position and the push to focus on health IT within CMS is part of a larger initiative started earlier this year after the Donald Trump administration announced MyHealthEData, which allows patients to take control of their healthcare data and allows CMS to follow them on their healthcare journey.

Johnathan Monroe, director of the CMS media relations group, said the organization will be accepting applications for the chief health informatics officer position until July 20.

Medicine Man: How AI is bringing humanity back into healthcare – Microsoft News Centre Europe

Oschner Health is one example of a company using AI to revolutionise healthcare. Its system is able to accurately track patients who are at risk of cardiac arrest, and can determine when there is a decline in their condition. This allows them to be admitted into intensive care hours earlier than they otherwise would have been. They are provided with potentially life-saving care, before their condition deteriorated to the point where medical care would have been less effective.

Project InnerEye, in use at Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, is another solution which uses machine learning and computer vision for the analysis of radiological images. Designed to identify tumours, it improves the delivery of treatments such as radiotherapy, by precisely distinguishing between cancerous and healthy tissues. It can also better monitor disease progression during chemotherapy, so that treatment can be adjusted in line with how patients respond.

These AI solutions allow medical professionals to improve patient care and admittance time, thanks to their improved precision. This, in turn, reduces financial and manpower strain, improving the healthcare experience in the areas where this technology is being used.

This is supported by data from the World Health Organization (WHO), which shows that between 30 and 50 percent of cancer deaths could be avoided with prevention, early detection and treatment. With cancer costing the global economy an excess of an estimated $1.16 trillion a year, the impact of technology such as AI, is game-changing.

In the UK alone, for example, there are only 4.7 radiologists per 100,000 population, and this number will need to almost double by 2022 to meet demand. Because of this shortage, the NHS spent nearly £88 million in 2016 paying for backlogs of radiology scans to be reported – the same amount could have paid for over 1,000 full-time consultants.

“We are drowning in data in hospitals,” Kos states. “We don’t have enough human brainpower to deal with it all in a timely manner – which in healthcare, is vital.”

Using technology such as AI can therefore substantially decrease strain on healthcare systems, while simultaneously improving patient care and reducing costs, allowing doctors to spend their time on more complex medical diagnoses. Or, indeed, spending more time connecting with patients.

The human factor
Introducing AI to healthcare isn’t removing the humanity from medicine. On the contrary, it’s increasing it.

A study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that doctors spend nearly twice as much time doing administrative work (49 percent) as they do with their patients (27 percent). In other words, doctors are spending more time crunching through data, sifting through and updating records, and analysing scans, than they are speaking to their patients.

In a profession where people are dealing with often traumatic, life-changing developments, this personal, human touch, is vital for the emotional well-being of patients and their loved ones. By using tools such as AI to free up more of their time, healthcare professionals can focus more on patient interaction, offering reassurance, providing guidance, and answering more questions.

Culture, and the challenges of change
Motivated by the lack of technology during his critical care period, Kos spent eight years crusading to introduce electronic medical record systems into hospitals. But nothing improved.

“We digitized, but we digitized all of the mistakes too. Then it dawned on me – digitization is important, but it’s not transformation.”

Without the supportive technology of cloud storage, or the data analysis powers of AI and machine learning, the full potential of these digitized records weren’t even close to being reached. Only years after, when cloud technology was accepted on a wider scale, and when collaborative tools such as Skype or real-time document editing in the cloud were established – could this initial digitization move on to the next level.

Research has shown that an organisation with the most advanced technology still won’t be as effective if it lacks the right company culture. Employees must be willing to embrace their new tools, while leaders must encourage a culture of learning. Only then, can the new tools be as effective as possible.

In the world of medicine, however, adopting the right culture for technological change can prove to be a challenge.

“Healthcare professionals are rather inward-looking,” says Kos. “Doctors listen to doctors. It’s a very top-down, hierarchical environment. You could have the best technology in the world, but if the culture isn’t ready to embrace it with a willingness to learn, it’s just not going to work.”

News briefs: Study outlines best practices for patient matching

A new, revised document detailing best practices for patient matching between health information exchange partners was released earlier this month by The Sequoia Project, a nonprofit organization chartered to advance the implementation of secure health information exchange nationwide.

The document, titled “A Framework for Cross-Organizational Patient Identity Management 2018,” includes a case study that illustrates a healthcare organization’s patient-matching success rate improving from 10% to 95%; it also draws a patient-matching maturity model and lists “minimally acceptable” patient-matching practices for CIOs, CTOs and other technology leaders, according to a Sequoia Project news release. 

A Patient Identity Management Workgroup — created by The Sequoia Project and composed of multiple industry, academic and government experts — provided comments to develop final recommendations for improving patient identity management.

The workgroup also incorporated proposals supporting patient identifier challenges in pediatrics, as there is currently no widely employed naming system for newborns that have not yet been given a legal name. Some considerations listed in the document for handling pediatrics include standards adoption, information governance, process and technology, vendor capture of multiple birth indicator, birth order and mother’s maiden name, and creation of a medical record prior to the birth event.

If we can standardize, in practice, how EMRs and HIOs leverage existing standards, we will increase patient match rates dramatically, even in the absence of having a national unique patient identifier.
Eric HeflinCTO for The Sequoia Project

Patient matching is one of the most “significant challenges” to nationwide health information sharing, Eric Heflin, document lead author and CTO for The Sequoia Project, based in Vienna, Va., said in the release.

This paper provides a roadmap for advancing our national patient matching strategy,” Heflin said. “We hope to see organizations adopt these minimal practices and maturity model for patient matching with their external health information exchange partners. If we can standardize, in practice, how EMRs and HIOs leverage existing standards, we will increase patient match rates dramatically, even in the absence of having a national unique patient identifier.”  

HealtheConnect Alaska partners with NextGate to improve patient matching

A health information exchange organization known as HealtheConnect Alaska has selected the Enterprise Master Patient Index (EMPI) platform by NextGate, which provides patient matching and identity management services, as the foundation for enhancing its patient identity management.

According to a NextGate news release, NextGate’s EMPI will enable real-time patient matching across the health IT systems of more than 20 hospitals and 450 healthcare organizations within HealtheConnect Alaska’s network, which currently enables electronic medical records exchange for more than 500 participants statewide, including AARP Alaska, Premera Blue Cross Blue Shield of Alaska and the state of Alaska’s Department of Health and Social Services.

The EMPI platform will be able to deliver a comprehensive view of a patient’s medical record. Using patient-matching algorithms, records will be unified and duplicate copies of data will be eliminated, while each individual is assigned a unique identifier serving as a cross-reference for greater data exchange. The EMPI platform will provide an opportunity for HealtheConnect Alaska to empower participating physicians and hospitals with an extensive patient record at the point of care to enhance clinical decision-making.

“Effective coordination between providers hinges on the ability to view accurate data from across the network,” Laura Young, executive director of HealtheConnect Alaska, said in the release. “The EMPI platform will play a significant role in our transformational journey toward improved care team collaboration, workflow efficiency, and the creation of a more holistic and real-time portrait of patients.”

Cybersecurity firm publishes ‘Healthcare Hacking Trends on the Dark Web’

Cynerio, an Israel-based cybersecurity startup that launched earlier this year, recently published a study,  called “Healthcare Hacking Trends on the Dark Web,” which provides a look at the buying and selling of protected health information (PHI) in the dark web black markets.

PHI data illegally retrieved by hackers from healthcare organizations usually includes information such as Social Security numbers, birthdates, medical procedures and results and, in some cases, financial information, according to the study.

The study outlined what hackers tend to do with protected health information once they’ve acquired it, which includes selling it in bundles called fullz, which are personal information records that can be used for fraud and extortion, the study said.

Cynerio’s study concluded one of the main reasons healthcare providers’ databases are hacked is because most clinical systems are “poorly patched and communicate through unsecure channels,” which hackers take advantage of to retrieve sensitive information.

FDA permits marketing of AI algorithm to aid in detection of wrist fractures

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) permitted the marketing last month of computer-aided detection and diagnosis software called Imagen OsteoDetect, which is designed to detect wrist fractures in adult patients. 

The diagnostic software uses an artificial intelligence algorithm to analyze two-dimensional X-ray images for signs of a common type of wrist fracture known as a distal radius fracture, according to an FDA news release. OsteoDetect is able to analyze wrist radiographs using machine learning techniques, allowing it to identify and highlight areas of distal radius fracture. The software marks the fracture’s location on the image, which can aid the provider in both detection and diagnosis.

“Artificial intelligence algorithms have tremendous potential to help healthcare providers diagnose and treat medical conditions,” Robert Ochs, acting deputy director for radiological health in the Office of In Vitro Diagnostics and Radiological Health in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in the release. “This software can help providers detect wrist fractures more quickly and aid in the diagnosis of fractures.”