Tag Archives: idea

Employing data science, new research uncovers clues behind unexplainable infant death – Microsoft on the Issues

Imagine losing your child in their first year of life and having no idea what caused it. This is the heartbreaking reality for thousands of families each year who lose a child to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID). Despite decades-long efforts to prevent SUID, it remains the leading cause of death for children between one month and one year of age in developed nations. In the U.S. alone, 3,600 children die unexpectedly of SUID each year.

For years, researchers hypothesized that infants who died due to SUID in the earliest stages of the life differed from those dying of SUID later. Now, for the first time, we know, thanks to the single largest study ever undertaken on the subject, this is statistically the case.

Working in collaboration with Tatiana Anderson and Jan-Marino Ramirez at Seattle Children’s Research Institute and Edwin Mitchell at University of Auckland, we analyzed the Center for Disease Control (CDC) data on every child born in the U.S. over a decade, including over 41 million births and 37,000 SUID deaths. We compared all possible groups by the age at the time of death to understand if these populations were different.”

In our study published today in Pediatrics, a leading pediatric journal, we found that SUID deaths during the first week of life, were statistically different from all other SUID deaths that occur between the first week and first year of life. SUID cases in the first week of life have been called SUEND, which stands for Sudden Unexpected Early Neonatal Death. We have called SUID deaths between 7-364 days postperinatal SUID.

The two groups – SUEND and postperinatal SUID – differed by several factors such as birth order, maternal age and marital status. For postperinatal deaths, the risk of SUID progressively while the opposite was true for SUEND deaths where firstborn children were more at risk. Postperinatal SUID rates were higher for unmarried, young mothers (between 15-24 years old) at birth, while unmarried, young mothers of the same age showed a decreased risk of SUEND death. The two groups also had different distributions of birthweight and pregnancy length.

Our study concluded that SUID deaths in the first week differed from postperinatal SUID deaths and that the two groups should be considered separately in future research. Considering these two as different causes may help uncover independent underlying physiological mechanisms and/or genetic factors.

This research is part of Microsoft’s AI for Good initiative, a $125 million five-year program where we utilize AI to help tackle some of the world’s greatest challenges and helping some of the world’s most vulnerable populations. For this research, we leveraged our machine learning, cloud-computing capabilities and advanced modelling techniques powered by AI to analyze the data.

By pairing our capabilities and data scientists with Seattle Children’s medical research expertise, we’re continuing to make progress on identifying the cause of SUID. Earlier this year, we published a study that estimated approximately 22% of SUID deaths in the U.S. were attributable to maternal cigarette-smoking during pregnancy, giving us further evidence that, through our collaboration with experts in varying disciplines, we are getting to the root of this problem and making remarkable advances.

We hope our progress in piecing together the SUID puzzle ultimately saves lives, and gives parents and researchers hope for the future.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Data silos hinder IoT in healthcare; tech giants could help

The Internet of Things in healthcare may not be a new idea, but it’s the key to creating a more connected world within healthcare, according to one analyst.

The Internet of Things, or IoT, is the connection of a group of digitized objects that can collect, send and receive data. Digital medical device use was born out of clinical need, often circumventing IT for approval or advice, said Gartner analyst Gregg Pessin. Now healthcare organizations are dealing with silos of IoT devices and data.

Gregg PessinGregg Pessin

“In the past, the CIO or the IT department has had little input into what happens in that acquisition process, so you end up with IoT solutions, many of them from many different companies, that all work in their own little world inside that clinical environment,” Pessin said.

That is changing. Healthcare organizations are beginning to see value in breaking down silos and bringing IoT data together to create a single view of a patient. Tech giants like AWS are pushing into the healthcare market providing platforms to gather and analyze IoT data while making it more accessible.

CIO’s perspective on IoT in healthcare

IoT data silos and the lack of interoperability in healthcare are major challenges, according to Craig Richardville, CIO of SCL Health, based in Broomfield, Colo. They must be overcome for a healthcare organization to make better use of the IoT data it’s collecting.

Craig RichardvilleCraig Richardville

In healthcare, integrating vast amounts of IoT data into provider workflows is a complex, uphill battle, Richardville said. But as the healthcare industry matures, he said, there is growing opportunity to standardize and integrate IoT data back into provider workflows to create a more complete view of a patient.

“That’s really the ecosystem we all want to create,” he said. “The end game is [a system] that is fully connected all the way through, safely and securely, that allows us to consume or digest that information and get that back into someone’s professional workflow so they can take advantage of the information. The outcome of that is we make better decisions.” 

Richardville believes IoT is the future of healthcare, further enabling a healthcare organization’s connection to patients in their homes. IoT in healthcare can grow an organization’s capabilities when it comes to remote patient monitoring, social determinants of health and other areas of healthcare. IoT data can help providers and healthcare leaders “make more precise and intelligent decisions,” he said. 

Richardville said IoT could provide greater connection to patients but that privacy and security should remain top of mind for healthcare CIOs as that connection to patients and data collection grows. It’s also important that a healthcare system has the capability to analyze the data coming from connected devices — an area where tech giants could play a significant role.

Companies like Amazon, Apple, Google and Microsoft, all of which continue to push into healthcare, could provide healthcare organizations with IoT data gathering and analytics capabilities, Richardville said. SCL Health has a “strong relationship” with Google, which he sees as an “accelerator” to the digital healthcare work the organization is doing.  

“When you look at the companies, whether it’s Amazon or Google or Microsoft, all getting into this space … it actually allows us to be able to lift our game,” Richardville said. 

When it comes to IoT, Gartner’s Pessin said there is strong motivation in healthcare to move toward platform products, which offer tools to gather and analyze IoT data.  

Tech giants further enable IoT in healthcare

Healthcare organizations are buying more patient data-collecting and IoT-enabled devices, which is creating a “tidal wave of data” healthcare CIOs have to deal with, Pessin said.

The amount of computing and storage power required to process that much data is likely more than an on-premises data center can handle. That’s where external, third-party players like tech giants come in, according to Pessin.

“What are they great at? They’re great at scaling resources and they’re adding all of these great, specific kinds of platform solutions like IoT services that they can sell on the platform,” Pessin said.

AWS, for example, has AWS IoT services that health IT and medical device manufacturer Philips Healthcare is using. Philips created a customer-facing HealthSuite digital platform to provide customers with the capability to “connect devices, collect electronic health data, aggregate and store data securely, analyze data and create solutions on the cloud,” according to the Philips HealthSuite digital platform website.

Dale Wiggins, general manager of the HealthSuite digital platform, said Philips chose AWS to be its cloud provider to store large amounts of data and large X-ray and MRI image files from Philips medical devices. The next step for the Philips HealthSuite platform is to use AWS IoT services for remote support management of Philips devices, Wiggins said.

AWS IoT provides Philips with a more cost-effective way to offer remote support capabilities on Philips devices to healthcare customers, he said.

“We’re looking at using IoT to solve a lot of legacy issues with our existing remote support capabilities with new, cutting-edge, always on, always available services that AWS really supports through what they provide with IoT,” he said.

AWS IoT offers device software, control services and data services, depending on customer needs, according to Dirk Didascalou, vice president of AWS IoT. AWS provides the infrastructure for IoT services and is HIPAA-compliant, but it does not have access to customer data through AWS IoT, Didascalou said.

Partnerships with tech giants and healthcare organizations, medical device manufacturers and even EHRs are becoming the norm, according to Pessin. Healthcare organizations create the data and tech giants can provide tools to collect, analyze and store that data. Pessin said healthcare CIOs have to be ready to develop partnerships between the two.

“The advances in digital care delivery that are coming are going to require massive resources, and it’s those large digital giants that have that available,” Pessin said. 

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Watercooling bits and pieces

It’s been a long time since I dismantled my watercooling setup. I have no idea how useful any of these parts are now but I’m looking to sell the lot in one go. Apologies if price seems way off, I haven’t been keeping up with computer tech lately. Open to offers.

Below is a list of parts. I will take photos if anyone shows any interest. Collection only.

Laing ddc 12v 10w with plexi top
HeatKiller CPU LGA1 366 Rev. 3.0 LC
2 x 120.2 Radiators: (one is an XSPC copper rad and I think the other…

Watercooling bits and pieces

Watercooling bits and pieces

It’s been a long time since I dismantled my watercooling setup. I have no idea how useful any of these parts are now but I’m looking to sell the lot in one go. Apologies if price seems way off, I haven’t been keeping up with computer tech lately. Open to offers.

Below is a list of parts. I will take photos if anyone shows any interest. Collection only.

Laing ddc 12v 10w with plexi top
HeatKiller CPU LGA1 366 Rev. 3.0 LC
2 x 120.2 Radiators: (one is an XSPC copper rad and I think the other…

Watercooling bits and pieces

For Sale – Acer Aspire Switch 11 SW5 11.6-Inch Convertible Notebook

I bought this for my daughter about a year ago. The idea was she would use it for homework etc. but she prefers to steal use my Dell laptop, or use the Chromebook, so I agreed to sell it on for her.

It’s boxed with all original packaging, had very little use, certainly never left the house and is in overall excellent condition.

I will add a few photos later, but for now, this is the model :
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Acer-11-6-Inch-Convertible-Notebook-Windows/dp/B00P2GDLNU

Price and currency: £99
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: Worthing, West Sussex
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Acer Aspire Switch 11 SW5 11.6-Inch Convertible Notebook

I bought this for my daughter about a year ago. The idea was she would use it for homework etc. but she prefers to steal use my Dell laptop, or use the Chromebook, so I agreed to sell it on for her.

It’s boxed with all original packaging, had very little use, certainly never left the house and is in overall excellent condition.

I will add a few photos later, but for now, this is the model :
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Acer-11-6-Inch-Convertible-Notebook-Windows/dp/B00P2GDLNU

Price and currency: £99
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: Worthing, West Sussex
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Take your first step towards the Imagine Cup with the Big Idea Challenge

Take your first step towards the Imagine Cup with the Big Idea Challenge

The 2018 Imagine Cup season is underway, and we are thrilled to announce the Big Idea Challenge! Pitch your world changing Imagine Cup idea and your team could win $3,000 USD, and technical resources to take your idea to the next level!

  • $3,000 USD – 1st Place prize
  • $2,000 USD – 2nd Place prize
  • $1,000 USD – 3rd Place prize
  • Judge feedback on project submission – Top 10 teams
  • $600 in Azure credits – Top 50 teams

Student developers around the world are asked every year to pitch their projects to investors, partners, customers, publishers, and even potential teammates. It’s how you share your vision, how you persuade people that you don’t just have the right idea, you’re also the right team to make it happen. Every winning pitch has a solid project plan to back it up. Want to win the Imagine Cup and get your project funded? Judges will want to know the why and the how you plan to bring your project to market.

How can you get a head start on the Imagine Cup? Create a three-minute pitch video as well as a project plan document and let us know what your Imagine Cup idea is all about. Your entry will be reviewed by a team of judges who will score it on a number of different criteria as described in the Official Rules. We’ve got plenty of resources to get you started: Take a look at winning Imagine Cup pitches as well as how to build your project plan, both should help you feel confident in taking that first step!

Start your journey today by registering for the 2018 Imagine Cup and submitting your solution to the Big Idea challenge from your account page by January 31st, 2018; winners will be announced in February. Don’t wait; 50 teams will win, and your Big Idea could take home $3,000 USD!

Pablo Veramendi
Imagine Cup Competition Manager

Resuscitating a dream to save lives with data science – Asia News Center

By Sarmila Basu

Back in high school in India, I had no idea that data science could save lives.

I wanted to be a doctor because I wanted to make a difference. And, what better way to make a difference than by saving lives?

That was my thinking until they told me I would have to cut up cadavers to become a doctor. That ended that. I would become a statistician and other people would be the ones who would make the ultimate difference by keeping us all alive.

Or so I thought.

Now I know better. I shouldn’t have overlooked the power of data to solve problems and find solutions.

Thousands of people die every year from a common, but devastating, bacterial infection they get when hospitalized. It’s called Clostridium Difficile 101 (or CDIFF for short). In the United States alone, around 500,000 people are infected every year and, of those, 29,000 die from it. Many more succumb to the disease around the world.

It’s an ugly infection, putting the most vulnerable at risk of dying from dehydration brought on by seemingly endless bouts of diarrhea. People get infected when antibiotics wipe out their good, infection-fighting bacteria. The elderly, young, and those with compromised immune systems are most at risk. But anyone can get it.

So how are data scientists like those on my Data and Decision Sciences team in Microsoft IT able to help?

We’re working with hospitals to predict when a patient is at risk of being infected by CDIFF.  That might sound simple, but knowing the answer to this question can help hospitals take life-saving precautions to help at-risk patients.

When a patient is brought into an Emergency Room, we use artificial intelligence-driven modeling to assess their risk. This assessment scores them on how likely they are to get infected by CDIFF and, if they are likely to get it, how likely it is to lead to death.

It scores them for age, medical history, antibiotics usage, and a long list of other factors. We’re working with two hospitals in the Midwest region of the United States to refine our model. And, using old data, we’re right 85 percent of the time. That number is gradually climbing as we pour more data and insights into the model, allowing it to learn and become more accurate. We’re hoping to get it into the mid- to upper-90s  percent range and then make it broadly available for all hospitals to use.

Assessing an individual person’s risk enables hospitals to adopt procedures for taking care of these high-risk patients, costly precautions that can be reserved for those at the most risk.

But there is a human side too.

CDIFF is spread easily. Say, for instance, when patients are casual with their hygiene, or when hospital personnel do not remember to wear fresh gloves or wash their hands as thoroughly or as regularly as they should. The story changes, however, when you can look at a patient’s chart and see that she or he is at “high risk” of dying if you aren’t as vigilant as possible. It’s human nature for people to do everything they can to protect that person.

And by now you are probably wondering: if data science can help hospitals fend off CDIFF, what else can it do? 

Lots.  

We’re working with other hospitals to find other ways to help them save lives. Some of the things we’re working on are not as exciting. For instance, forecasting when a hospital will run short on beds is dry stuff, but it can be crucially important when it comes to making sure there are enough of them available during a crisis. Also not flashy is predicting which patients are going be re-admitted for the same problem in less than 30 days. Nonetheless, getting ahead of these re-admissions can save hospitals millions of dollars and keep patient costs down.

We’re working hard to find new ways that data can do what I once thought was impossible, to save lives, and as you can imagine, lots of other cool stuff.  

Learn more about the power of data analytics and machine learning by reading about how we’re using data to help save kids who are in danger of dropping out of school and how we are using data to help manage our buildings at Microsoft. If you want to know how you can do these kinds of things at your company, read about how I started my role at Microsoft and how I built my analytics team.

Sarmila Basu is Senior Director, Data and Decision Sciences at Microsoft and is based at the company’s headquarters in Redmond in the U.S. state of Washington. She was born and raised in India’s third largest city, Kolkata (formerly known as Calcutta). She came to the United States 30 years ago as a postgraduate student and completed a Ph.D in Economics. Her parents still live in Kolkata and she visits there once a year. Sarmila is also president of the Seattle-based not-for-profit group, People for Progress in India. It helps grassroots organizations there in areas such as sustainable agriculture and the use of bio-sand filters to make drinking water available in remote villages, particularly in the south and west of the country. It also supports education and training programs for marginalized segments of society. You can read more about its work here. And, you can read more of  Sarmila’s blogs here.