Tag Archives: industry

AI in mining takes root in the industry

The mining industry has used technologies such as advanced machinery, satellite imagery and hypersensitive measurement tools. However, the industry is just beginning to use AI in mining, which has the potential to save workers time and companies money.

Geospatial analysis and data science vendor Descartes Lab has many customers in the mining sector, with a few packaged products specifically for customers in that area. Based in Santa Fe, N.M., the 2014 startup spun out of Los Alamos National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy weapons research center.

The mining sector is in the early stages of using AI technologies, said James Orsulak, senior director of enterprise sales at Descartes Labs. Still, he said, almost all of the company’s clients have small data science teams made up of highly skilled experts.

“We’re seeing a transition where there are more former geologists who went back to school to get a data science degree,” Orsulak said.

Astral imagery

The Descartes Labs platforms for mining companies combine data sets from NASA’s Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), an advanced imaging instrument on the Terra satellite, with AI and analytics.

Vendors like Descartes Labs sell AI in mining technology.
Vendors like Descartes Labs sell AI in mining technology.

Descartes Labs ingested the entire dataset from ASTER, a process that took many CPU hours, Orsulak said. Using machine learning, Descartes Labs then removed all the structures, clouds and snow from the satellite images, leaving only a bare earth model.

We’re seeing a transition where there are more former geologists who went back to school to get a data science degree.
James OrsulakSenior director of enterprise sales, Descartes Labs

Mining clients then combine their data with the platform and layer in other types of data on the model, including mineral classification, geochemistry and geophysics data.

The platform, among other things, can be used to find new mineral deposits with machine learning, as  it can use data on known deposits to  find similar, previously unknown deposits.

Manually, that can take months or years, said Lori Wickert, a geologist and principal remote sensing consultant at Newmont Corporation, a gold mining company. 

“Working with the Descartes platform is providing an opportunity to shortcut that process in a major way,” Wickert said, adding that the software has saved her countless hours of manual work.

Another style

Meanwhile, Kespry, an industrial drone software and analytics vendor, also focuses on the mining sector, but with a slightly different approach.

The 2013 startup, based in Menlo Park, Calif., uses industrial drone imagery to fly over mining sites for mine planning and inventory management, said George Mathew, CEO and chairman of Kespry.

Using drone imagery either collected from its own drones or mining industry customers, along with its data science platform, Kespry maps daily topography changes in active areas, identify slope stability, identify draining patterns and more.

The company can also use the imagery and platform to automatically measure stockpile volumes of mined materials.

For mining companies and other industrial businesses that aren’t yet using AI and machine learning, the time to start is now, Mathew said.  

“The companies that end up making those investments now, they end up with a head start,” he said.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Adaptive Biotechnologies and Microsoft expand partnership to decode COVID-19 immune response and provide open data access – Stories

Differentiated approach may improve detection methods and inform vaccine discovery for COVID-19

Other industry leaders including LabCorp, through its Covance drug development business, Illumina, and Providence join forces to accelerate this critical effort

Infographic showing decoding the immune response to COVID-19

SEATTLE and REDMOND, Wash. — March 20, 2020 Adaptive Biotechnologies Corp. (Nasdaq: ADPT) and Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT) on Friday announced they will leverage their existing partnership mapping population-wide adaptive immune responses to diseases at scale to study COVID-19. Finding the relevant immune response signature may advance solutions to diagnose, treat and prevent the disease, augmenting existing research efforts that primarily focus on the biology of the virus. These data will be made freely available to any researcher, public health official or organization around the world via an open data access portal.

“We can improve our collective understanding of COVID-19 by decoding the immune system’s response to the virus and the disease patterns that can be inferred from studying these data at the population level,” said Chad Robins, CEO and co-founder of Adaptive Biotechnologies. “Immune response data may enable detection of the virus in infected people not showing symptoms and improve triaging of newly diagnosed patients, potentially solving two of the challenges we are facing in the current diagnostic paradigm.”

To generate immune response data, Adaptive will open enrollment in April to collect de-identified blood samples, using a LabCorp-enabled mobile phlebotomy service, from individuals diagnosed with or recovered from COVID-19 in a virtual clinical trial managed by Covance. Immune cell receptors from these blood samples will be sequenced using Illumina platform technology and mapped to SARS-CoV-2-specific antigens that will have been confirmed by Adaptive’s proprietary immune medicine platform to induce an immune response. The immune response signature found from the initial discovery work and the initial set of samples will be uploaded to the open data access portal. Leveraging Microsoft’s hyperscale machine learning capabilities and the Azure cloud platform, the accuracy of the immune response signature will be continuously improved and updated online in real time as more trial samples are sequenced from the study.

To expedite the development and relevance of the immune response signature across the global population, the companies are seeking additional participation from institutions and research groups around the world to contribute blood samples to this open data initiative. Providence, a large health system with 51 hospitals, including the one near Seattle that treated the first U.S. COVID-19 patient, is an initial clinical collaborator.

“The solution to COVID-19 is not likely going to come from one person, one company or one country. This is a global issue, and it will be a global effort to solve it,” said Peter Lee, corporate vice president, AI and Research, Microsoft. “Making critical information about the immune response accessible to the broader research community will help advance ongoing and new efforts to solve this global public health crisis, and we can accomplish this goal through our proven TCR-Antigen mapping partnership with Adaptive.”

Timing and enrollment details about the upcoming study and the open data access portal will be coming soon. Institutions or collaborators interested in contributing blood samples can direct inquiries to [email protected]

For additional resources go to https://www.adaptivebiotech.com/about-us/media-resources/.

About the Adaptive and Microsoft partnership

Adaptive and Microsoft partnered in 2018 to create a TCR-Antigen Map, an approach to translating the genetics of the adaptive immune system to understand at scale how it works. Together we are using immunosequencing and machine learning to map T-cell receptor (TCR) sequences to diseases and disease-associated antigens. Using these data, we aim to develop a blood test for the early and accurate detection of many diseases, translating the natural diagnostic capability of the immune system into the clinic. In 2019, we confirmed clinical signals in two diseases, and established our first proof of concept in Lyme Disease. We expect to submit our first clinical application to the FDA in 2020.

About Adaptive Biotechnologies

Adaptive Biotechnologies is a commercial-stage biotechnology company focused on harnessing the inherent biology of the adaptive immune system to transform the diagnosis and treatment of disease. We believe the adaptive immune system is nature’s most finely tuned diagnostic and therapeutic for most diseases, but the inability to decode it has prevented the medical community from fully leveraging its capabilities. Our proprietary immune medicine platform reveals and translates the massive genetics of the adaptive immune system with scale, precision and speed to develop products in life sciences research, clinical diagnostics, and drug discovery. We have two commercial products, and a robust clinical pipeline to diagnose, monitor and enable the treatment of diseases such as cancer, autoimmune conditions and infectious diseases. Our goal is to develop and commercialize immune-driven clinical products tailored to each individual patient. For more information, please visit adaptivebiotech.com.

About Illumina

Illumina is improving human health by unlocking the power of the genome. Our focus on innovation has established us as the global leader in DNA sequencing and array-based technologies, serving customers in the research, clinical, and applied markets. Our products are used for applications in the life sciences, oncology, reproductive health, agriculture, and other emerging segments. To learn more, visit www.illumina.com and follow @illumina.

About LabCorp

LabCorp (NYSE: LH), an S&P 500 company, is a leading global life sciences company that is deeply integrated in guiding patient care, providing comprehensive clinical laboratory and end-to-end drug development services. With a mission to improve health and improve lives, LabCorp delivers world-class diagnostics solutions, brings innovative medicines to patients faster, and uses technology to improve the delivery of care. LabCorp reported revenue of more than $11.5 billion in 2019. To learn more about LabCorp, visit www.LabCorp.com, and to learn more about Covance Drug Development, visit www.Covance.com.

About Providence

Providence is a national, not-for-profit Catholic health system comprising a diverse family of organizations and driven by a belief that health is a human right. With 51 hospitals, 1,085 physician clinics, senior services, supportive housing and many other health and educational services, the health system and its partners employ more than 119,000 caregivers serving communities across seven states – Alaska, California, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, and Washington, with system offices in Renton, Wash., and Irvine, Calif.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, [email protected]

Beth Keshishian, Adaptive Media, (917) 912-7195, [email protected]

Lynn Lewis or Carrie Mendivil, Adaptive Investor, (415) 937-5405, [email protected]

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at https://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Welcoming more women into cybersecurity: the power of mentorships

From the way our industry tackles cyber threats, to the language we have developed to describe these attacks, I’ve long been a proponent to challenging traditional schools of thought—traditional cyber-norms—and encouraging our industry to get outside its comfort zones. It’s important to expand our thinking in how we address the evolving threat landscape. That’s why I’m not a big fan of stereotypes; looking at someone and saying they “fit the mold.” Looking at my CV, one would think I wanted to study law, or politics, not become a cybersecurity professional. These biases and unconscious biases shackle our progression. The scale of our industry challenges is too great, and if we don’t push boundaries, we miss out on the insights that differences in race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, neurology, ability, and degrees can bring.

As we seek to diversify the talent pool, a key focus needs to be on nurturing female talent. Microsoft has hired many women in security, and we will always focus on keeping a diverse workforce. That’s why as we celebrate Women in Cybersecurity Month and International Women’s Day, the security blog will feature a few women cybersecurity leaders who have been implementing some of their great ideas for how to increase the number of women in this critical field. I’ll kick off the series with some thoughts on how we can build strong mentoring relationships and networks that encourage women to pursue careers in cybersecurity.

There are many women at Microsoft who lead our security efforts. I’m incredibly proud to be among these women, like Joy Chik, Corporate Vice President of Identity, who is pushing the boundaries on how the tech industry is thinking about going passwordless, and Valecia Maclin, General Manager of Security Engineering, who is challenging us to think outside the box when it comes to our security solutions. On my own team, I think of the many accomplishments of  Ping Look, who co-founded Black Hat and now leads our Detection and Response Team (DART), Sian John, MBE, who was recently recognized as one of the top 50 influencers in cybersecurity in the U.K., and Diana Kelley, Microsoft CTO, who tirelessly travels to the globe to share how we are empowering our customers through cybersecurity—just to name a few. It’s important we continue to highlight women like these, including our female cybersecurity professionals at Microsoft who made the Top 100 Cybersecurity list in 2019. The inspiration from their accomplishments goes far beyond our Microsoft campus. These women represent the many Microsoft women in our talented security team. This month, you’ll also hear from some of them in subsequent blog posts on how to keep the diverse talent you already have employed. And to conclude the month, Theresa Payton, CEO at Fortalice Solutions, LLC., and the host of our CISO Spotlight series will share tips from her successful experience recruiting talented women into IT and cybersecurity.

Our cyber teams must be as diverse as the problems we are trying to solve

You’ve heard me say this many times, and I truly believe this: As an industry, we’ve already acknowledged the power of diversity—in artificial intelligence (AI). We have clear evidence that a variety of data across multiple sources and platforms enhances and improves AI and machine learning models. Why wouldn’t we apply that same advantage to our teams? This is one of several reasons why we need to take diversity and inclusion seriously:

  • Diverse teams make better and faster decisions 87 percent of the time compared with all male teams, yet the actual number of women in our field fluctuates between 10 and 20 percent. What ideas have we missed by not including more women?
  • With an estimated shortfall of 3.5 million security professionals by 2021, the current tech talent pipeline needs to expand—urgently.
  • Cyber criminals will continue to exploit the unconscious bias inherent in the industry by understanding and circumventing the homogeneity of our methods. If we are to win the cyber wars through the element of surprise, we need to make our strategy less predictable.

Mentoring networks must start early

Mentorship can be a powerful tool for increasing the number of women in cybersecurity. People select careers that they can imagine themselves doing. This process starts young. Recently a colleague’s pre-teen daughter signed up for an after-school robotics class. When she showed up at the class, only two other girls were in the room. Girls are opting out of STEM before they can (legally) opt into a PG-13 movie. But we can change this. By exposing girls to technology earlier, we can reduce the intimidation factor and get them excited. One group that is doing this is the Security Advisor Alliance. Get involved in organizations like this to reach girls and other underrepresented groups before they decide cybersecurity is not for them.

Building a strong network

Mentoring young people is important, but to solve the diversity challenges, we also need to bring in people who started on a different career path or who don’t have STEM degrees. You simply won’t find the talent you need through the anemic pipeline of college-polished STEM graduates. I recently spoke with Mari Galloway, a senior security architect in the gaming industry and CEO of the Women’s Society of Cyberjutsu (WSC) about this very topic in my podcast. She agreed on the importance of finding a mentor, and being a mentee.

Those seeking to get into cybersecurity need a network that provides the encouragement and constructive feedback that will help them grow. I have mentored several non-technical women who have gone on to have successful roles in cybersecurity. These relationships have been very rewarding for me and my mentees, which is why I advocate that everybody should become a mentor and a mentee.

If you haven’t broken into cybersecurity yet, or if you are in the field and want to grow your career, here are a few tips:

  • Close the skills gap through training and certificate programs offered by organizations like Sans Institute and ISC2. I am especially excited about Girls Go Cyberstart, a program for young people that Microsoft is working on with Sans Institute.
  • Build up your advocate bench with the following types of mentors:
    • Career advocate: Someone who helps you with your career inside your company or the one you want to enter.
    • Coach: Someone outside your organization who brings a different perspective to troubleshooting day-to-day problems.
    • Senior advisor: Someone inside or outside your organization who looks out for the next step in your career.
  • Use social media to engage in online forums, find local events, and reach experts. Several of my mentees use LinkedIn to start the conversation.
  • When you introduce yourself to someone online be clear that you are interested in their cumulative experience not just their job status.

For those already in cybersecurity, be open to those from the outside seeking guidance, especially if they don’t align with traditional expectations of who a cybersecurity professional is.

Mentorship relationships that yield results

A mentorship is only going to be effective if the mentee gets valuable feedback and direction from the relationship. This requires courageous conversations. It’s easy to celebrate a mentee’s visible wins. However, those moments are the result of unseen trench work that consists of course correcting and holding each other accountable to agreed upon actions. Be prepared to give and receive constructive, actionable feedback.

Creating inclusive cultures

More women and diverse talent should be hired in security not only because it is the right thing to do, but because gaining the advantage in fighting cybercrime depends on it. ​Mentorship is one strategy to include girls before they opt out of tech, and to recruit people from non-STEM backgrounds.

What’s next

Watch for Diana Kelley’s blog about how to create a culture that keeps women in the field.

Learn more about Girls Go Cyberstart.

Bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage on security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity. Or reach out to me on LinkedIn or Twitter.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

IoT Signals energy report: Embracing transparent, affordable, and sustainable energy

The increased use of renewables, resiliency challenges, and sustainability concerns are all disrupting the energy industry today. New technologies are accelerating the way we source, store, and distribute energy. With IoT, we can gain new insights about the physical world that enables us to optimize and create more efficient processes, reduce energy waste, and track specific consumption. This is a great opportunity for IoT to support power and utilities (P&U) companies across grid assets, electric vehicles, energy optimization, load balancing, and emissions monitoring.

We’ve recently published a new IoT Signals report focused on the P&U industry. The report provides an industry pulse on the state of IoT adoption to help inform us how to better serve our partners and customers, as well as help energy companies develop their own IoT strategies. We surveyed global decision-makers in P&U organizations to deliver an industry-level view of the IoT ecosystem, including adoption rates, related technology trends, challenges, and benefits of IoT.

The study found that while IoT is almost universally adopted in P&U, it comes with complexity. Companies are commonly deploying IoT to improve the efficiency of operations and employee productivity, but can be challenged by skills and knowledge shortages, privacy and security concerns, and timing and deployment issues. To summarize the findings:

Top priorities and use cases for IoT in power and utilities

  1. Optimizing processes through automation is critical for P&U IoT use. Top IoT uses cases in P&U include automation-heavy processes such as smart grid automation, energy optimization and load balancing, smart metering, and predictive load forecasting. In support of this, artificial intelligence (AI) is often a component of energy IoT solutions, and they are often budgeted together. Almost all adopters have either already integrated AI into an IoT solution or are considering integration.
  2. Using IoT to improve both data security and employee safety is a top priority. Almost half of decision-makers we talked to use IoT to make their IT practices more secure. Another third are implementing IoT to make their workplaces safer, as well as improve the safety of their employees.
  3. P&U companies also leverage IoT to secure their physical assets. Many P&U companies use IoT to secure various aspects of their operations through equipment management and infrastructure maintenance.
  4. The future is bright with IoT adoption continuing to focus on automation, with growth in adoption for use cases related to optimizing energy and creating more efficient maintenance systems.

Decision-makers cite cost savings and reducing human error as the greatest benefits to IoT adoption; 63 percent and 57 percent respectively say these are the most valuable ways they use IoT in their businesses

Today, customers around the world are telling us they are heavily investing in four common use cases for IoT in the energy sector:

Grid asset maintenance

Visualize your grid’s topology, gather data from grid assets, and define rules to trigger alerts. Use these insights to predict maintenance and provide more safety oversight. Prevent failures and avoid critical downtime by monitoring the performance and condition of your equipment.

Energy optimization and load balancing

Balance energy supply and demand to alleviate pressure on the grid and prevent serious power outages. Avoid costly infrastructure upgrades and gain flexibility by using distributed energy resources to drive energy optimization.

Emissions monitoring and reduction

Monitor emissions in near real-time and make your emissions data more readily available. Work towards sustainability targets and clean energy adoption by enabling greenhouse gas and carbon accounting and reporting.

E-mobility

Remotely maintain and service electric vehicle (EV) charging points that support various charging speeds and vehicle types. Make it easier to own and operate electric vehicles by incentivizing ownership and creating new visibility into energy usage.

Learn more about IoT for energy

Read about the real world customers doing incredible things with IoT for energy where you can learn about market leaders like Schneider Electric making remote asset management easier using predictive analytics.

“Traditionally, machine learning is something that has only run in the cloud … Now, we have the flexibility to run it in the cloud or at the edge—wherever we need it to be.” Matt Boujonnier, Analytics Application Architect, Schneider Electric.

Read the blog where we announced Microsoft will be carbon negative by 2030 and discussed our partner Vattenfall delivering a new, highly transparent 24/7 energy matching solution; a first-of-its-kind approach that gives customers the ability to choose the green energy they want and ensure their consumption matches that goal using Azure IoT.

We are committed to helping P&U customers bring their vision to life with IoT, and this starts with simplifying and securing IoT. Our customers are embracing IoT as a core strategy to drive better outcomes for energy providers, energy users, and the planet. We are heavily investing in this space, committing $5 billion in IoT and intelligent edge innovation by 2022, and growing our IoT and intelligent edge partner ecosystem.
 
When IoT is foundational to a transformation strategy, it can have a significantly positive impact on the bottom line, customer experiences, and products. We are invested in helping our partners, customers, and the broader industry to take the necessary steps to address barriers to success. Read the full IoT Signals energy report and learn how we’re helping power and utilities companies embrace the future and unlock new opportunities with IoT.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Android 11 features zero in on security, privacy

New Android 11 features will likely not represent a major shift for the enterprise, but industry observers believe they will help IT professionals better manage mobile devices.

Google released the first developer preview of the updated OS last month, with a final release expected in the third quarter of 2020. Among the changes are a few items — including improved biometric support and limited-time permissions for applications — that experts said would affect businesses.

Eric Klein, an independent analyst, said the improvements reflect Google’s larger efforts to appeal to enterprise customers.

Eric KleinEric Klein

“The way in which they’re approaching their overall strategy as an organization — from Chrome to the cloud and G Suite [productivity applications] — they’re continuing to refine their assets for business use,” he said.

A focus on privacy and security

Android 11, per the preview, includes changes intended to bolster privacy and security. One feature offers users greater control over what applications can do; it lets users — or IT administrators — give apps one-time-only permissions to access such things as location data or a phone’s camera and microphone.

According to Google, this builds on an Android 10 feature, in which users could permit an application to access such data and features, but only while the app was in use.

Andrew HewittAndrew Hewitt

Forrester analyst Andrew Hewitt said the granular data control offered by this feature is in line with modern enterprise security.

“[It] is more philosophically aligned [than before] with a zero-trust strategy — where a user only has access to what they need, and nothing more,” he said.

Klein said the feature will work as part of an overall device management strategy to help prevent bad actors from taking user data.

“There are many ways enterprises are protecting themselves that are well-known, basic security hygiene: restricting application usage, blacklisting apps — things of that nature,” he said, adding that controlling app permissions is a further step along that journey.

Android 11 will also reportedly include greater biometric support, notably by making it easier to integrate biometric authentication into apps and allowing developers to determine which biometric inputs — like fingerprints, iris scans and face scans — they consider strong or weak.

Hewitt said such a feature will interest IT professionals as they look to eliminate passwords — a frequent pain point in ensuring enterprise security.

“While passwordless authentication still remains immature in adoption, it’s certainly on the minds of many mobility management professionals,” he said.

Other effects on the enterprise

While security improvements are an integral part of Android 11, they are not the only ones set to have an impact on companies.

Holger MuellerHolger Mueller

Holger Mueller, vice president and principal analyst at Constellation Research, said he saw changes like improved 5G support — including a feature that determines whether a device is on a metered or unmetered network and adjusts data traffic accordingly — as new and necessary steps for Android.

The implementation of new messaging and chat “bubbles” — notifications that float on top of other applications and thus enable text conversations while multi-tasking — was taken as a heartening sign for productivity.

“[It’s] good to see Google not giving up on messaging,” he said. “The new messaging will likely improve [the] everyday user experience on Android.”

Hewitt said that with Android 11, Google has implemented new processes and options to ensure OS updates do not break app compatibility. Google announced methods, for example, to help developers test for compatibility by turning changes on or off — making it easier to determine which new OS behavior might pose problems.

“[Compatibility] has been a perennial issue in enterprise mobility,” Hewitt said.

Competing with iOS

Klein said the improvements in Android 11 — especially those related to privacy and security — reflect Google’s desire to compete for the enterprise. He noted Android’s reputation for security has long lagged behind that of iOS.

“There’s a perception that it’s just not secure — that hasn’t gone away yet,” he said. “Many [administrators] will say, ‘I’m not trusting an Android device. I’m not trusting my employees with Android devices.’ That perception is still there, and it’s something Google has to overcome. I think they are overcoming it.”

Google, Klein said, has historically faced criticism for the cadence of its security patches and its reliance on partners to push out those patches. The company has been working to improve that process, he said.

“In order to [compete] effectively — to ensure that peace of mind IT requires for mass rollouts — they’re going to have to … show they’re serious about security and privacy,” he said.

Go to Original Article
Author:

AI, Azure and the future of healthcare with Dr. Peter Lee – Microsoft Research

headshot of Peter Lee for the Microsoft Research Podcast

Episode 109 | March 4, 2020

Over the past decade, the healthcare industry has undergone a series of technological changes in an effort to modernize it and bring it into the digital world, but the call for innovation persists. One person answering that call is Dr. Peter Lee, Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Healthcare, a new organization dedicated to accelerating healthcare innovation through AI and cloud computing.

Today, Dr. Lee talks about how MSR’s advances in healthcare technology are impacting the business of Microsoft Healthcare. He also explains how promising innovations like precision medicine, conversational chatbots and Azure’s API for data interoperability may make healthcare better and more efficient in the future.

Related:


Transcript

Peter Lee: In tech industry terms, you know, if the last decade was about digitizing healthcare, the next decade is about making all that digital data good for something, and that good for something is going to depend on data flowing where it needs to flow at the right time.

Host: You’re listening to the Microsoft Research Podcast, a show that brings you closer to the cutting-edge of technology research and the scientists behind it. I’m your host, Gretchen Huizinga.

Host: Over the past decade, the healthcare industry has undergone a series of technological changes in an effort to modernize it and bring it into the digital world, but the call for innovation persists. One person answering that call is Dr. Peter Lee, Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Healthcare, a new organization dedicated to accelerating healthcare innovation through AI and cloud computing.

Today, Dr. Lee talks about how MSR’s advances in healthcare technology are impacting the business of Microsoft Healthcare. He also explains how promising innovations like precision medicine, conversational chatbots and Azure’s API for data interoperability may make healthcare better and more efficient in the future. That and much more on this episode of the Microsoft Research Podcast.

(music plays)

Host: Peter Lee, welcome to the podcast!

Peter Lee: Thank you. It’s great to be here.

Host: So you’re a Microsoft Corporate Vice President and head of a relatively new organization here called Microsoft Healthcare. Let’s start by situating that within the larger scope of Microsoft Research and Microsoft writ large. What is Microsoft Healthcare, why was it formed, and what do you hope to do with it?

Peter Lee: It’s such a great question because when, we were first asked to take this on, it was confusing to me! Healthcare is such a gigantic business in Microsoft. You know, the number that really gets me is, Microsoft has commercial contracts with almost 169,000 healthcare organizations around the world.

Host: Wow.

Peter Lee: I mean, it’s just massive. Basically, anything from a one-nurse clinic in Nairobi, Kenya, to Kaiser Permanente or United Healthcare, and everything in-between. And so it was confusing to try to understand, what is Satya Nadella thinking to ask a “research-y” organization to take this on? But, you know, the future of healthcare is so vibrant and dynamic right now, and is so dependent on AI, on Cloud computing, big data, I think he was really wanting us to think about that future.

Host: Let’s situate you.

Peter Lee: Okay.

Host: You cross a lot of boundaries from pure to applied research, computer science to medicine. You’ve been head of Carnegie Mellon University’s computer science department, but you were also an office director at DARPA, which is the poster child for applied research. You’re an ACM fellow and on the board of directors of the Allen Institute for AI, but you’re also a member of the National Academy of Medicine, fairly newly minted as I understand?

Peter Lee: Right, just this year.

Host: And on the board of Kaiser Permanente’s School of Medicine. So, I’d ask you what gets you up in the morning, but it seems like you never go to bed So instead, describe what you do for a living, Peter! How you choose what hat to wear in the morning and what’s a typical day in your life look like?

Peter Lee: Well, you know, this was never my plan. I just love research, and thinking hard about problems, being around other smart people and thinking hard about problems, getting real depth of understanding. That’s what gets me up. But I think the world today, what’s so exciting about it for anyone with the research gene, is that research, in a variety of areas, has become so important to practical, everyday life. It’s become important to Microsoft’s business. Not just Microsoft, but all of our competitors. And so I just feel like I’m in a lucky position, as well as a lot of my colleagues, I don’t think any of us started with that idea. We just wanted to do research and now we’re finding ourselves sort of in the middle of things.

Host: Right. Well, talk a little bit more about computer science and medicine. How have you moved from one to the other, and how do you kind of envision yourself in this arena?

Peter Lee: Well, my joke here is, these were changes that, actually, Satya Nadella forced me to make! And it’s a little bit of a joke because I was actually honored that he would think of me this way, but it was also painful because I was in a comfort zone just doing my own research, leading research teams, and then, you know, Satya Nadella becomes the CEO, Harry Shum comes on board to drive innovation, and I get asked to think about new ways to take research ideas and get them out into the world. And then, three years after that, I get asked to think about the same thing for healthcare. And each one of those, to my mind, are examples of this concept that Satya Nadella likes to talk about, “growth mindset.” I joke that growth mindset is actually a euphemism because each time you’re asked to make these changes, you just get this feeling of dread. You might have a minute where you’re feeling honored that someone would ask you something, but then…

Host: Oh, no! I’ve got to do it now!

Peter Lee: …and boy, I was, you know, on a roll in what I was doing before, and you do spend some time feeling sorry for yourself… but when you work through those moments, you find that you do have those periods in your life where you grow a lot. And my immersion with so many great people in healthcare over the last three or four years has been one of those big growth periods. And to be recognized, then, let’s say, by the National Academies is sort of validation of that.

Host: All right, so rewind just a little bit and talk about that space you were in just before you got into the healthcare situation. You were doing Microsoft Research. Where, on the spectrum from pure, like your Carnegie Mellon roots, to applied, like your DARPA roots, did that land? There’s an organization called NeXT here I think, yeah?

Peter Lee: That’s right. You know, when I was in academia, academia really knows how to do research.

Host: Yeah.

Peter Lee: And they really put the creatives, the graduate students and the faculty, at the top of the pyramid, socially, in the university. It’s just a great setup. And it’s organized into departments, which are each named after a research area or a discipline and within the departments there are groups of people organized by sub-discipline or area, and so it’s an organizing principle that’s tried and true. When I went to DARPA, it was completely different. The departments aren’t organized by research area, they’re organized by mission, some easily assessable goal or objective. You can always answer the question, have we accomplished it yet or not?

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: And so research at DARPA is organized around those missions and that was a big learning experience for me. It’s not like saying we’re going to do computer vision research. We’ll be doing that for the next fifty years. It’s, can we eliminate the language barrier for all internet-connected people? That’s a mission. You can answer the question, you know, how close are we?

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: And so the mix between those two modes of research, from academia to DARPA, is something that I took with me when I joined Microsoft Research and, you know, Microsoft Research has some mix, but I thought the balance could be slightly different. And then, when Satya Nadella became the CEO and Harry Shum took over our division, they challenged me to go bigger on that idea and that’s how NeXT started. NeXT tried to organize itself by missions and it tried to take passionate people and brilliant ideas and grow them into new lines of business, new engineering capabilities for Microsoft, and along the way, create new CVPs and TFs for our company. There’s a tension here because one of the things that’s so important for great research is stability. And so when you organize things like you do in academia, and in large parts of Microsoft Research, you get that stability by having groups of people devoted to an area. We have, for example, say, computer networking research groups that are best in the world.

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: And they’ve been stable for a long time and, you know, they just create more and more knowledge and depth, and that stability is just so important. You feel like you can take big risks when you have that stability. When you are mission-oriented, like in NeXT, these missions are coming and going all the time. So that has to be managed carefully, but the other benefit of that, management-wise, is more people get a chance to step up and express their leadership. So it’s not that either model is superior to the other, but it’s good to have both. And when you’re in a company with all the resources that Microsoft has, we really should have both.

Host: Well, let’s zoom out and talk, somewhat generally, about the promise of AI because that’s where we’re going to land on some of the more specific things we’ll talk about in a bit, but Microsoft has several initiatives under a larger umbrella called AI for Good and the aim is to bring the power of AI to societal-scale problems in things like agriculture, broadband accessibility, education, environment and, of course, medicine. So AI for Health is one of these initiatives, but it’s not the same thing as Microsoft Healthcare, right?

Peter Lee: Well, the whole AI for Good program is so exciting and I’m just so proud to be in a company that makes this kind of commitment. You can think of it as a philanthropic grants program and it is, in fact, in all of these areas, providing funding and technical support to really worthy teams, passionate people, really trying to bring AI to bear for the greater good.

Host: Mm-hmm.

Peter Lee: But it’s also the case that we devote our own research resources to these things. So it’s not just giving out grants, but it’s actually getting into collaborations. What’s interesting about AI for Health is that it’s the first pillar in the AI for Good program that actually overlaps with a business at Microsoft and that’s Microsoft Healthcare. One way that I think about it is, it’s an outlet for researchers to think about, what could AI do to advance medicine? When you talk to a lot of researchers in computer science departments, or across Microsoft research labs, increasingly you’ll see more and more of them getting interested in healthcare and medicine and the first things that they tend to think about, if they’re new to the field, are diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Can we come up with something that will detect ovarian cancer earlier? Can we come up with new imaging techniques that will help radiologists do a better job? Those sorts of diagnostic and therapeutic applications, I think, are incredibly important for the world, but they are not Microsoft businesses. So the AI for Health program can provide an outlet for those types of research passions. And then there are also, as a secondary element, four billion people on this planet today that have no reasonable access to healthcare. AI and technology have to be part of the solution to creating that more equitable access and so that’s another element that, again, doesn’t directly touch Microsoft’s business today in Microsoft Healthcare, but is so important we have a lot to offer so AI for Health is just, I think, an incredibly visionary and wonderful program for that.

Host: Well, let’s zoom back out… um, no, let’s zoom back in. I’ve lost track of the camera. I don’t know where it is! Let’s talk about the idea of precision medicine, or precision healthcare, and the dream of improving those diagnostic and therapeutic interventions with AI. Tell us what precision medicine is and how that plays out and how are the two rather culturally diverse fields of computer science and medicine coming together to solve for X here?

Peter Lee: Yeah, I think one of the things that is sometimes underappreciated is, over the past ten to twenty years, there’s been a massive digitization of healthcare and medicine. After the 2008 economic collapse, in 2009, there was the ARA… there was a piece of legislation attached to that called the HITECH Act, and HITECH actually required healthcare organizations to digitize health records. And so for the past ten years, we’ve gone from something like 15% of health records being in digital form, to today, now over 98% of health records are in digital form. And along with that, medical devices that measure you have gone digital, our ability to sequence and analyze your genome, your proteome, have gone digital and now the question is, what can we do with all the digital information? And on top of that, we have social information.

Host: Yeah.

Peter Lee: People are carrying mobile devices, people talk to computers at home, people go to their Walgreens to get their flu shots.

Host: Yeah.

Peter Lee: And all of this is in digital form and so the question is, can we take all of that digital data and use it to provide highly personalized and precisely targeted diagnostics and therapeutics to people.

Host: Mm-hmm.

Peter Lee: Can we get a holistic, kind of, 360-degree view of you, specifically, of what’s going on with you right now, and what might go on over the next several years, and target your wellness? Can we advance from sick care, which is really what we have today…

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: …to healthcare.

Host: When a big tech company like Microsoft throws its hat in the healthcare ring and publicly says that it has the goal of “transforming how healthcare is experienced and delivered,” I immediately think of the word disruption, but you’ve said healthcare isn’t something you disrupt. What do you mean by that, and if disruption isn’t the goal, what is?

Peter Lee: Right. You know, healthcare is not a normal business. Worldwide, it’s actually a $7.5 trillion dollar business. And for Microsoft, it’s incredibly important because, as we were discussing, it’s gone digital, and increasingly, that digital data, and the services and AI and computation to make good use of the data, is moving to the cloud. So it has to be something that we pay very close attention to and we have a business priority to support that.

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: But, you know, it’s not a normal business in many, many different senses. As a patient, people don’t shop, at least not on price, for their healthcare. They might go on a website to look at ratings of primary care physicians, but certainly, if you’re in a car accident, you’re unconscious. You’re not shopping.

Host: No.

Peter Lee: You’re just looking for the best possible care. And similarly, there’s a massive shift for healthcare providers away from what’s called fee-for-service, and toward something called value-based care where doctors and clinics are being reimbursed based on the quality of the outcomes. What you’re trying to do is create success for those people and organizations that, let’s face it, they’ve devoted their lives to helping people be healthier. And so it really is almost the purest expression of Microsoft’s mission of empowerment. It’s not, how do we create a disruption that allows us to make more money, but instead, you know, how do we empower people and organizations to deliver better – and receive better – healthcare? Today in the US, a primary care doctor spends almost twice as much time entering clinical documentation as they do actually taking care of patients. Some of the doctors we work with here at Microsoft call this “pajama time,” because you spend your day working with patients and then, at home, when you crawl into bed, you have to finish up your documentation. That’s a big source of burn out.

Host: Oh, yeah.

Peter Lee: And so, what can we do, using speech recognition technologies, natural language processing, diarization, to enable that clinical note-taking to be dramatically reduced? You know, how would that help doctors pay more attention to their patients? There is something called revenue-cycle management, and it’s sort of sometimes viewed as a kind of evil way to maximize revenues in a clinic or hospital system, but it is also a place where you can really try to eliminate waste. Today, in the US market, most estimates say that about a trillion dollars every year is just gone to waste in the US healthcare system. And so these are sort of data analysis problems, in this highly complex system, that really require the kind of AI and machine learning that we develop.

Host: And those are the kinds of disruptions we’d like to see, right?

Peter Lee: That’s right. Yeah.

Host: We’ll call them successes, as you did.

Peter Lee: Well, and they are disruptions though, they’re disruptions that help today’s working doctors and nurses. They help today’s hospital administrators.

(music plays)

Host: Let’s talk about several innovations that you’ve actually made to help support the healthcare industry’s transformation. Last year – year ago – at the HIMSS conference, you talked about tools that would improve communication, the healthcare experience and interoperability and data sharing in the cloud. Tell us about these innovations. What did you envision then, and now, a year later, how are they working out?

Peter Lee: Yeah. Maybe the one I like to start with is about interoperability. I sometimes have joked that it’s the least sexy topic, but it’s the one that is, I think, the most important to us. In tech industry terms, you know, if the last decade was about digitizing healthcare, the next decade is about making all that digital data good for something and that good for something is going to depend on data flowing where it needs to flow…

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: …at the right time. And doing that in a way that protects people’s privacy because health data is very, very personal. And so a fundamental issue there is interoperability. Today, while we have all this digital data, it’s really locked into thousands of different incompatible data formats. It doesn’t get exposed through modern APIs or microservices. It’s oftentimes siloed for business reasons, and so unlocking that is important. One way that we look at it here at Microsoft is, we are seeing a rising tidal wave of healthcare organizations starting to move to the cloud. Probably ten years from now, almost all healthcare organizations will be in the cloud. And so, with that historic shift that will happen only once, ever, in human history, what can we do today to ensure that we end up in a better place ten years from now than we are now? And interoperability is one of the keys there. And that’s something that’s been recognized by multiple governments. The US government, through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, has proposed new regulations that require the use of specific interoperable data standards and API frameworks. And I’m very proud that Microsoft has participated in helping endorse and guide the specific technical choices in those new rules.

Host: So what is the API that Microsoft has?

Peter Lee: So the data standard that we’ve put a lot of effort behind is something called FHIR. F-H-I-R, Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources. And for anyone that’s used to working in the web, you can look at FHIR and you’ll see something very familiar. It’s a modern data standard, it’s extensible, because medical science is advancing all the time, and it’s highly susceptible to analysis through machine learning.

Host: Okay.

Peter Lee: And so it’s utterly modern and standardized, and I think FHIR can be a lingua franca for all healthcare data everywhere. And so, for Microsoft, we’ve integrated FHIR as a first-class data type in our cloud, in Azure.

Host: Oh, okay.

Peter Lee: We’ve enabled FHIR in Office. So the Teams application, for example, it can connect to health data for doctors and nurses. And there’s integration going on into Dynamics. And so it’s a way to convert everything that we do here at Microsoft into great healthcare-capable tools. And once you have FHIR in the cloud, then you also, suddenly, unlock all of the AI tools that we have to just enable all that precision medicine down the line.

Host: That’s such a Biblical reference right then! The cloud and the FHIR.

Peter Lee: You know, there are – there’s an endless supply of bad puns around FHIR. So thank you for contributing to that.

Host: Well, it makes me think about the Fyre Festival, which was spelt F-Y-R-E, which was just the biggest debacle in festival history

Peter Lee: I should say, by the way, another thing that everyone connected to Microsoft should be proud of is, we have really been one of the chief architects for this new future. One of the most important people in the FHIR development community is Josh Mandel, who works with us here at Microsoft Healthcare, and he has the title Chief Architect, but it’s not Chief Architect for Microsoft, it’s Chief Architect for the cloud.

Host: Oh, my gosh.

Peter Lee: So he spends time talking to the folks at Google, at AWS, at Salesforce and so on.

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: Because we’re trying to bring the entire cloud ecosystem along to this new future.

Host: Tell me a little bit about what role bots might play in this arena?

Peter Lee: Bots are really interesting because, how many listeners have received a lab test result and have no idea what it means? How many people have received some weird piece of paper or bill in the mail from their insurance company? It’s not just medical advice, you know, where you have a scratch in your throat and you’re worried about what you should do. That’s important too, but the idea of bots in healthcare really span all these other things. One of the most touching, in a project led by Hadas Bitran and her team, has been in the area of clinical trials. So there’s a website called clinicaltrials.gov and it contains a registry describing every registered clinical trial going on. So now, if you are desperate for more experimental care, or you’re a doctor treating someone and you’re desperate for this, you know, how do you find, out of thousands of documents, and they’re complicated…

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: …technical, medical, science things.

Host: Jargon-y.

Peter Lee: Yeah, and it’s difficult. If you go to clinicaltrials.gov and type into the search box ‘breast cancer’ you get hundreds of results. So the cool project that Hadas and her team led was to use machine reading from Microsoft Research out of Hoifung Poon’s team, to read all of those clinical trials documents and create a knowledge graph and use that knowledge graph then to drive a conversational chatbot so that you can engage in a conversation. So you can say, you know, “I have breast cancer. I’m looking for a clinical trial,” and the chatbot will start to ask you questions in order to narrow down, eventually, to the one or two or three clinical trials that might be just right for you. And so this is something that we just think has a lot of potential.

Host: Yeah.

Peter Lee: And business-wise, there are more mundane, but also important things. Just call centers. Boy, those nurses are busy. What would happen if we had a bot that would triage and tee up some of those things and really give superpowers to those call center nurses. And so it’s that type of thing that I think is very exciting about conversational tech in general. And of course, Microsoft Research and NeXT should be really proud of really pioneering a lot of this bot technology.

Host: Right. So if I employed a bot to narrow down the clinical trials, could I get myself into one? Is that what you’re explaining here?

Peter Lee: Yeah, in fact, the idea here is that this would help, tremendously, the connection between perspective patients and clinical trials. It’s so important because pharmaceutical companies, in clinics that are setting up clinical trials, more than 50% of them fail to recruit enough participants. They just never get off the ground because they don’t get enough. The recruitment problem is so difficult.

Host: Wow.

Peter Lee: And so this is something that can really help on both ends.

Host: I didn’t even think about it from the other angle. Like, getting people in. I always just assumed, well, a clinical trial, no biggie.

Peter Lee: It’s such a sad thing that most clinical trials fail. And fail because of the recruitment problem.

Host: Huh. Well, let’s talk a little bit more about some of the really interesting projects that are going on across the labs here at Microsoft Research. So what are some of the projects and who are some of the people that are working to improve healthcare in technology research?

Peter Lee: Yeah. I think pretty much every MSR lab is doing interesting things. There’s some wonderful work going on in the Cambridge UK lab, in Chris Bishop’s lab there, in a group being led by Aditya Nori. One of the things there has been a set of projects in collaboration with Novartis really looking at new ideas about AI-powered molecule design for cellular therapies, as well as very precise dosing of therapies for things like macular degeneration and so these are, sort of, bringing the very best machine learning and AI researchers shoulder-to-shoulder with the best researchers and scientists at Novartis to really kind of innovate and invent the future. In the MSR India lab, Sriram Rajamani’s team, they’ve been standing up a really impressive set of technologies and projects that have to do with global access to healthcare and this is something that I think is just incredibly, incredibly important. You know, we really could enable, through more intelligent medical devices for example, much less well-trained technicians and clinicians to be able to deliver healthcare at a distance. The other thing that is very exciting to me there is just looking at data. You know, how do we normalize data from lots of different sources?

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: And then MSR Asia in Beijing, they’ve increasingly been redirecting some of the amazing advances that that lab is famous for in computer vision to the medical imaging space. And there are just amazing possibilities in taking images that might not be high resolution enough for a precise diagnosis and using AI to, kind of, magically improve the resolution. And so just across board, you go from, kind of, lab to lab you just see some really inspiring work going on.

Host: Yeah, some of the researchers have been on the podcast. Antonio Criminisi with InnerEye, umm…  haven’t had Ethan Jackson from Premonition yet

Peter Lee: No, Premonition… Well, Antonio Criminisi and the work that he led on InnerEye, you know, we actually went all the way to an FDA 510(k) approval on the tumor segmentations…

Host: Wow.

Peter Lee: …and the components of that now are going into our cloud. Really amazing stuff.

Host: Yeah.

Peter Lee: And then Premonition, this is one of these things that is, in the age of coronavirus…

Host: Right?

Peter Lee: …is very topical.

Host: I was just going to refer to that, but I thought maybe I shouldn’t…

Peter Lee: The thing that is so important is, we talked of precision medicine before…

Host: Yeah.

Peter Lee: …but there is also an emerging science of precision population health. And in fact, the National Academy of Medicine just recently codified that as an official part of medical research and it’s bringing some of the same sort of precision medicine ideas, but to population health applications and studies. And so when you look at Premonition, and the ability to look at a whole community and get a genetically precise diagnosis of what is going on in that community, it is something that could really be a game-changer, especially in an era where we are seeing more challenging infectious disease outbreaks.

Host: I think a lot of people would say, can we speed that one up a little? I want you to talk for a minute about the broader tech and healthcare ecosystem and what it takes to be a leader, both thought and otherwise, in the field. So you’ve noted that we’re in the middle of a big transformation that’s only going to happen once in history and because of that, you have a question that you ask yourself and everyone who reports to you. So what’s the question that you ask, and how does the answer impact Microsoft’s position as a leader?

Peter Lee: Right. You know, healthcare, in most parts of the world, is really facing some big challenges. It’s at a financial breaking point in almost all developed countries. The spread of the latest access to good medical practice has been slowing in the developing world and as you, kind of, look at, you know, how to break out of these cycles, increasingly, people turn to technology. And the kind of shining beacon of hope is this mountain of digital data that’s being produced every single day and so how can we convert that into what’s called the triple aim of better outcomes, lower costs and better experiences? So then, when you come to Microsoft, you have to wonder, well, if we’re going to try to make a contribution, how do you do it? When Satya Nadella asked us to take this on, we told ourselves a joke that he was throwing us into the middle of the Pacific Ocean and asking us to find land, because it’s such a big complex space, you know, where do you go? And, we had more jokes about this because you start swimming for a while and you start meeting lots of other people who are just as lost and you actually feel a little ashamed to feel good about seeing other people drowning. But it fundamentally it doesn’t help you to figure out what to work on, and so we started to ask ourselves the question, if Microsoft were to disappear today, in what ways would healthcare be harmed or held back tomorrow and into the future? If our hyperscale cloud were to disappear today, in what ways would that matter to healthcare? If all of the AI capabilities that we can deploy so cheaply on that cloud were to disappear, how would that matter? And then, since we’re coming out of Microsoft Research, if Microsoft Research were to disappear today, in what ways would that matter? And asking ourselves that question has sort of helped us focus on the areas where we think we have a right to play. And I think the wonderful thing about Microsoft today is, we have a business model that makes it easy to align those things to our business priorities. And so it’s really a special time right now.

(music plays)

Host: Well, this is – not to change tone really quickly – but this is the part of the podcast where I ask what could possibly go wrong? And since we’ve actually just used a drowning in the sea metaphor, it’s probably apropos… but when you bring nascent AI technologies, and I say nascent because most people have said, even though it’s been going on for a long time, we’re still in an infancy phase of these technologies. When you bring that to healthcare, and you’re literally dealing with lifeanddeath consequences, there’s not any margin for error. So… I realize that the answer to this question could be too long for the podcast, but I have to ask, what keeps you up at night, and how are you and your colleagues addressing potential negative consequences at the outset rather than waiting for the problems to appear downstream?

Peter Lee: That’s such an important question and it actually has multiple answers. Maybe the one that I think would be most obvious to the listeners of this podcast has to do with patient safety. Medical practice and medical science has really advanced on the idea of prospective studies and clinical validation, but that’s not how computer science, broadly speaking, works. In fact, when we’re talking about machine learning it’s really based on retrospective studies. You know, we take data that was generated in the past and we try to extract a model through machine learning from it. And what the world has learned, in the last few years, is that those retrospective studies don’t necessarily hold up very well, prospectively. And so that gap is very dangerous. It can lead to new therapies and diagnoses that go wrong in unpredictable ways, and there’s sort of an over-exuberance on both sides. As technologists, we’re pretty confident about what we do and we see lots of problems that we can solve, and the healthcare community is sometimes dazzled by all of the magical machine learning we do and so there can be over-confidence on both sides. That’s one thing that I worry about a lot because, you know, all over our field, not just all over Microsoft, but across all the other major tech companies and universities, there are just great technologists that are doing some wonderful things and are very well-intentioned, but aren’t necessarily validated in the right way. And so that’s something that, really, is worrisome. Going along with safety is privacy of people’s health data. And while I think most people would be glad to donate their health data for scientific progress, no one wants to be exploited. Exploited for money, or worse, you know, denied, for example, insurance.

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: And you know, these two things can really lead to outcomes, over the next decade, that could really damage our ability to make good progress in the future.

Host: So that said, we’re pretty good at identifying the problem. We may be able to start a good conversation, air quotes, on that, but this is, for me, like, what are you doing?

Peter Lee: Yeah.

Host: Because this is a huge thing, and

Peter Lee: I really think, for real progress and real transformation, that the foundations have to be right and those foundations do start with this idea of interoperability. So the good thing is that major governments, including the US government, are seeing this and they are making very definitive moves to foster this interoperable future. And so now, our role in that is to provide the technical guidance and technologies so that that’s done in the right way. And so everything that we at Microsoft are doing around interoperability, around security, around identity management, differential privacy, all of the work that came out of Microsoft Research in confidential computing…

Host: Yeah.

Peter Lee: …all of those things are likely to be part of this future. As important as confidential computing has been as a product of Microsoft Research, it’s going to be way, way more important in this healthcare future. And so it’s really up to us to make sure that regulators and lawmakers and clinicians are aware and smart about these things. And we can provide that technical guidance.

Host: What about the other companies that you mentioned? I mean, you’re not in this alone and it’s not just companies, it’s nations, and, I dare say, rogue actors, that are skilled in this arena. How do you get, sort of, agreement and compliance?

Peter Lee: I would say that Microsoft is in a good position because it has a clear business model. If someone is asking us, well what are you going to with our data? We have a very clear business model that says that we don’t monetize on your data.

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: But everyone is going to have to figure that out. Also, when you are getting into a new area like healthcare, every tech company is a big, complicated place with lots of stakeholders, lots of competing internal interests, lots of politics.

Host: Right.

Peter Lee: And so Microsoft, I think, is in a very good position that way too. We’re all operating as one Microsoft. But it’s so important that we all find ways to work together. One point of contact has been engineered by the White House in something called the Blue Button Developers Conference. So that’s where I’m literally holding hands with my counterparts at Google, at Salesforce, at Amazon, at IBM, making certain pledges there. And so the convening power of governments is pretty powerful.

Host: It’s story time. We’ve talked a little about your academic and professional life. Give us a short personal history. Where did it all start for Peter Lee and how did he end up where he is today?

Peter Lee: Oh, my.

Host: Has to be short.

Peter Lee: Well, let’s see, so uh, I’m Korean by heritage. I was born in Ohio, but Korean by heritage and my parents immigrated from Korea. My dad was a physics professor. He’s long retired now and my mother a chemistry professor.

Host: Wow.

Peter Lee: And she passed away some years ago. But I guess as an Asian kid growing up in a physical science household, I was destined to become a scientist myself. And in fact, they never said it out loud, but I think it was a disappointment to them when I went to college to study math! And then maybe an even the bigger disappointment when I went from math to computer science in grad school. Of course they’re very proud of me now.

Host: Of course! Where’d you go to school?

Peter Lee: I went to the University of Michigan. I was there as an undergrad and then I was planning to go work after that. I actually interviewed at a little, tiny company in the Pacific Northwest called Microsoft…

Host: Back then!

Peter Lee: … and …but I was wooed by my senior research advisor at Michigan to stay on for my PhD and so I stayed and then went from grad school right to Carnegie Mellon University as a professor.

Host: And then worked your way up to leading the department…

Peter Lee: Yeah. So I was there for twenty four years. They were wonderful years. Carnegie Mellon University is just a wonderful, wonderful place. And um..

Host: It’s almost like there’s a pipeline from Microsoft Research to Carnegie Mellon. Everyone is CMU this, CMU that!

Peter Lee: Well, I remember, as an assistant professor, when Rick Rashid came to my office to tell me that he was leaving to start this thing called Microsoft Research and I was really sad and shocked by that. Now here I am!

Host: Right. Well, tell us, um, if you can, one interesting thing about you that people might not know.

Peter Lee: I don’t know if people know this or not, but I have always had an interest in cars, in fast cars. I spent some time, when I was young, racing in something called shifter karts and then later in open wheel Formula Ford, and then, when I got my first real job at Carnegie Mellon, I had enough money that I spent quite a bit of it trying to get a sponsored ride with a semi-pro team. I never managed to make it. It’s hard to kind of split being an assistant professor and trying to follow that passion. You know, I don’t do that too much anymore. Once you are married and have a child, the annoyance factor gets a little high, but it’s something that I still really love and there’s a community of people, of course, at a place like Microsoft, that’s really passionate about cars as well.

Host: As we close, Peter, I’d like you to leave our listeners with some parting advice. Many of them are computer science people who may want to apply their skills in the world of healthcare, but are not sure how to get there from here. Where, in the vast sea of technology and healthcare research possibilities, should emerging researchers set their sights and where should they begin their swim?

Peter Lee: You know, I think it’s all about data and how to make something good out of data. And today, especially, you know, we are in that big sea of data silos. Every one of them has different formats, different rules, most of them don’t have modern APIs. And so things that can help evolve that system to a true ocean of data, I think anything to that extent will be great. And it is not just tinkering around with interfaces. It’s actually AI. To, say, normalize the schemas of two different data sets, intelligently, is something that we will need to do using the, kind of, latest machine learning, latest program synthesis, the kind of, latest data science techniques that we have on offer.

Host: Who do you want on your team in the coming years?

Peter Lee: The thing that I think I find so exciting about great researchers today is their intellectual flexibility to start looking at an idea and getting more and more depth of understanding, but then evolve as a person to understanding, you know, what is the value of this in the world, and understanding that that is a competitive world. And so, how willing are you to compete in that competitive marketplace to make the best stuff? And that evolution that we are seeing over and over again with people out of Microsoft Research is just incredibly exciting. When you see someone like a Galen Hunt or a Doug Burger or a Lili Cheng come out of Microsoft Research and then evolve into these world leaders in their respective fields, not just in research, but spanning research to really competing in a highly competitive marketplace, that is the future.

Host: Peter Lee, thank you for joining us on the podcast today. It’s been an absolute delight.

Peter Lee: Thank you for having me. It’s been fun.

(music plays)

To learn more about Dr. Peter Lee and how Microsoft is working to empower healthcare professionals around the world, visit Microsoft.com/research

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Allianz partners with Microsoft to digitally transform the insurance industry

Allianz and Microsoft to reimagine the insurance industry experience with Azure to streamline insurance processes; Microsoft will partner with Syncier, the B2B2X insurtech founded by Allianz, to offer customized insurance platform solutions and related services

Jean-Philippe Courtois, EVP and president, Microsoft Global Sales, Marketing & Operations and Christof Mascher, COO and member of the Board of Management of Allianz SE
Jean-Philippe Courtois, EVP and president, Microsoft Global Sales, Marketing & Operations (left) and Christof Mascher, COO and member of the Board of Management of Allianz SE (right). Source: allianz.com

MUNICH, Germany, and REDMOND, Wash. — Nov. 14, 2019 — On Thursday, Allianz SE and Microsoft Corp. announced a strategic partnership focused on digitally transforming the insurance industry, making the insurance process easier while creating a better experience for insurance companies and their customers. Through the strategic partnership, Allianz will move core pieces of its global insurance platform, Allianz Business System (ABS), to Microsoft’s Azure cloud and will open-source parts of the solution’s core to improve and expand capabilities.

Syncier will offer a configurable version of the solution called ABS Enterprise Edition to insurance providers as a service, allowing them to benefit from one of the most advanced and comprehensive insurance platforms in the industry, reducing costs and centralizing their insurance portfolio management. This will increase efficiencies across all lines of insurance business, resulting in better experiences through tailored customer service and simplified product offerings.

“Teaming up with Microsoft and leveraging Azure’s secure and trusted cloud platform will support us in digitalizing the insurance industry,” said Christof Mascher, COO and member of the Board of Management of Allianz SE. “Through this partnership, Allianz and Syncier strive to offer the most advanced Insurance as a Service solutions on Microsoft Azure. The ABS Enterprise Edition is an exciting opportunity, both for larger insurers needing to replace their legacy IT, and smaller players — such as insurtechs — looking for a scalable insurance platform.”

“Allianz is setting the standard for insurance solutions globally,” said Jean-Philippe Courtois, EVP and president, Microsoft Global Sales, Marketing & Operations. “Together, Microsoft and Allianz are offering a solution that combines Allianz’s deep knowledge of the insurance sector with Microsoft’s trusted Azure cloud platform. By delivering an open-source, cloud-based insurance platform and software application marketplace, we will support innovation and transformation across this sector.”

Syncier’s ABS Enterprise Edition can handle insurance processes across all lines of business: property and casualty, life, health, and assistance. It can be customized for any insurance company, country and regulatory requirements. Insurers, brokers and agents adopting the platform can service clients and manage entire portfolios end to end in one system, gaining a unique 360-degree view of each client and the business.

To accelerate industry innovation, Syncier will also offer an Azure cloud-based marketplace for ready-made software applications and services tailored to the insurance sector. Such solutions could include, for example, customer service chatbots or AI-based fraud detection. The marketplace enables insurance providers to easily and quickly implement the available solutions in a plug-and-play manner.

Allianz uses ABS globally as a platform for all lines of business and along with Microsoft is committed to supporting the ABS Enterprise Edition long term as an industry solution. Today, ABS handles around 60 million insurance policies in 19 countries and is being rolled out to all Allianz entities.

About Allianz

The Allianz Group is one of the world’s leading insurers and asset managers with more than 92 million retail and corporate customers. Allianz customers benefit from a broad range of personal and corporate insurance services, ranging from property, life and health insurance to assistance services to credit insurance and global business insurance. Allianz is one of the world’s largest investors, managing around 729 billion euros on behalf of its insurance customers. Furthermore, our asset managers PIMCO and Allianz Global Investors manage more than 1.5 trillion euros of third-party assets. Thanks to our systematic integration of ecological and social criteria in our business processes and investment decisions, we hold the leading position for insurers in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. In 2018, over 142,000 employees in more than 70 countries achieved total revenues of 132 billion euros and an operating profit of 11.5 billion euros for the group. For more information on Syncier, visit www.syncier.com.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, [email protected]

Gregor Wills, Allianz, +49 89 3800 61313, [email protected]

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Docker Enterprise spun off to Mirantis, company restructures

In a startling turn of events, Docker as the industry knows it is no more.

Mirantis, a privately held company based in Campbell, Calif., acquired the Docker Enterprise business from Docker Inc., including Docker employees, Docker Enterprise partnerships and some 750 Docker Enterprise customer accounts. The IP acquired in the deal for an undisclosed sum, announced today, includes Docker Engine – Enterprise, Docker Trusted Registry, Docker Universal Control Plane and Docker CLI.

“This is the end of Docker as we knew it, and it’s a stunning end,” said Jay Lyman, an analyst at 451 Research. The industry as a whole had been skeptical of Docker’s business strategy for years, particularly in the last six months as the company went quiet. The company underwent a major restructuring in the wake of the Mirantis deal today, naming longtime COO Scott Johnston as CEO. Johnston replaces Robert Bearden, who served just six months as the company’s chief executive.

“This validates a lot of the questions and uncertainty that have been surrounding Docker,” Lyman said. “We certainly had good reasons for asking the questions that we were.”

While not the end for Docker Enterprise, it appears to be the end for Docker’s Swarm orchestrator, which Mirantis will support for another two years. The primary focus will be on Kubernetes, Mirantis CEO Adrian Ionel wrote in a company blog post.

This is the end of Docker as we knew it, and it’s a stunning end.
Jay LymanAnalyst, 451 Research

Docker Enterprise customers are already being directed to Mirantis for support, though Docker account managers and points of contact remain the same for now, as they transition over to Mirantis. Going forward, Mirantis will incorporate Docker Kubernetes into its Kubernetes as a Service offering, which analysts believe will give it a fresh toehold in public and hybrid cloud container orchestration.

However, it’s a market already crowded with vendors. Competitors include big names such as Google, which offers hybrid Kubernetes services with Anthos, and IBM-Red Hat, which so far has dominated the enterprise market for on-premises and hybrid Kubernetes management with more than 1000 customers.

A surprising exit for Docker Inc.

While the value of the deal remains unknown, it’s unlikely that Mirantis, which numbers 400 employees and is best known for its on-premises OpenStack and Kubernetes-as-a-service business, could afford a blockbuster sum equivalent to the hundreds of millions of dollars in funding Docker Inc. received since it launched Docker Engine 1.0 in 2014.

“I thought Docker would find a bigger buyer — I’m not sure Mirantis has the resources or name to do a very large deal,” said Gary Chen, an analyst at IDC.

Analysts were also surprised that Docker split off Docker Enterprise rather than being acquired as a whole, though it’s possible a second deal for Docker’s remaining Docker Hub and Docker Desktop IP could follow.

“It could be another buyer only wanted that part of the business, but Docker put so much into Docker Enterprise for quite a while — this is a complete turnaround,” Chen said.

Docker Enterprise hit scalability, reliability snags for some

As Docker looked to differentiate its Kubernetes implementation within Docker Enterprise last year, one customer who used the Swarm orchestrator for some workloads hoped that Kubernetes support would alleviate scalability and stability concerns. Mitchell International, an auto insurance software company in San Diego, said it suffered a two-hour internal service outage when a Swarm master failed and a quorum algorithm to elect a new master node also did not work. This outage prompted Mitchell to move Linux containers to Amazon EKS, but members of its IT team hoped Docker Enterprise with Kubernetes support would replace swarm for Windows containers.

However, about a month ago, a senior architect at a large insurance company on the East Coast told SearchITOperations he’d experienced similar issues in his deployment, including the software’s Kubernetes integration.

This company’s environment is comprised of thousands of containers and hundreds of host nodes, and according to the architect, the Docker Enterprise networking implementation can become unstable at that scale. He traced this to its use of the Raft Consensus Algorithm, an open source utility which maintains consistency in distributed systems, and how it stores data in the open source RethinkDB, which can become corrupt when it processes high volumes of data, and out of sync with third-party overlay networks in the environment.

“The Docker implementation gives you the native Kubernetes APIs, but we do have concerns with how some of the core networking with their Universal Control Plane is implemented,” the architect said, speaking on condition of anonymity because he is not permitted to speak for his company in the press. “This is challenging at scale, and that carries forward into Kubernetes.”

The insurance company has been able to address this by running a greater number of relatively small Docker Enterprise clusters, but wasn’t satisfied with that as a long-term approach, and has begun to evaluate different Kubernetes distros from vendors such as Rancher and VMware to replace Docker Enterprise.

The senior architect was briefed on Mirantis’ managed service plans prior to the acquisition this week, and said his company will still move away from Docker Enterprise next year.

“We talked to Mirantis’ leadership team before [the acquisition] became public, but we don’t see a managed service as a strategic piece for us,” he said in an interview today. “I’m sure some customers will continue to ride out [the transition], but we’re not looking for a vendor to come in and manage our platform.”

Mirantis CEO pledges support, tech stability for customers

Docker reps said last year that it has many customers using Docker Enterprise with Windows and Swarm who had not run into the issue, in response to Mitchell International’s report of a problem. A company spokesperson did not respond to requests for comment about the more recent customer report of issues with Kubernetes last month.

Mirantis CEO Ionel said he hasn’t yet dug into that level of detail on the product, but that his company’s tech team will take the lead on Kubernetes product development going forward.

“Mirantis will contribute our Kubernetes expertise, including around scalability, robustness, ease of management and operation to the platform,” he said in an interview with SearchITOperations today. “That’s part of the unique value that we bring — the [Docker] brand will remain [Universal Control Plane], since that’s what customers are used to, but the technology underneath the hood is going to get an upgrade.”

At least for the foreseeable future, most Docker Enterprise customers will probably wait and see how the platform changes under Mirantis before they make a decision, consultants said.

“I know of only one Docker Enterprise customer, and I am sure they will stay on the platform, as it supports their production environment, until they see what Mirantis provides going forward,” said Chris Riley, DevOps delivery director at Cprime Inc., an Agile software development consulting firm in San Mateo, Calif.

Most enterprises have yet to deploy full container platforms in production, but most of his enterprise clients are either focused on OpenShift for its hybrid cloud support or using a managed Kubernetes service from a public cloud provider, Riley said.

Docker intends to refocus its efforts around Docker Desktop, but that product won’t be of interest to the insurance company’s senior architect and his team, who have developed their own process for moving apps from the developer desktop into the CI/CD pipeline.

In fact, the senior architect said he’d become frustrated by the company’s apparent focus on Docker Desktop over the last 18 months, while some Docker Enterprise customers waited for features such as blue-green container cluster upgrades, which Docker shipped in Docker Enterprise 3.0 in July.

“We’d been asking for ease of upgrade features for two years — it’s been a big pain point for us, to the point where we developed our own [software] to address it,” he said. “They finally started to get there [with version 3.0], but it’s a little too late for us.”

Mirantis’ Ionel said the company plans to include seamless upgrades as a major feature of its managed service offering. Other areas of focus will be centralized management of a fleet of Kubernetes clusters rather than just one, and self-service features for development teams.

Mirantis will acquire all of Docker’s customer support and customer success team employees, as well as the systems they use to support Docker Enterprise shops and all historical customer support data, Ionel said.

“Nothing there has changed,” he said. “They are still doing today what they were doing yesterday.”

Go to Original Article
Author:

Atlassian CISO Adrian Ludwig shares DevOps security outlook

BOSTON — Atlassian chief information security officer and IT industry veteran Adrian Ludwig is well aware of a heightened emphasis on DevOps security among enterprises heading into 2020 and beyond, and he believes that massive consolidation between DevOps and cybersecurity toolsets is nigh.

Ludwig, who joined Atlassian in May 2018, previously worked at Nest, Macromedia, Adobe and Google’s Android, as well as the U.S. Department of Defense. Now, he supervises Atlassian’s corporate security, including its cloud platforms, and works with the company’s product development teams on security feature improvements.

Atlassian has also begun to build DevOps security features into its Agile collaboration and DevOps tools for customers who want to build their own apps with security in mind. Integrations between Jira Service Desk and Jira issue tracking tools, for example, automatically notify development teams when security issues are detected, and the roadmap for Jira Align (formerly AgileCraft) includes the ability to track code quality, privacy and security on a story and feature level.

However, according to Ludwig, the melding of DevOps and IT security tooling, along with their disciplines, must be much broader and deeper in the long run. SearchSoftwareQuality caught up with him at the Atlassian Open event here to talk about his vision for the future of DevOps security, how it will affect Atlassian, and the IT software market at large.

SearchSoftwareQuality: We’re hearing more about security by design and applications security built into the DevOps process. What might we expect to see from Atlassian along those lines?

Ludwig: As a security practitioner, probably the most alarming factoid about security — and it gets more alarming every year — is the number of open roles for security professionals. I remember hearing at one point it was a million, and somebody else was telling me that they had found 3 million. So there’s this myth that people are going to be able to solve security problems by having more people in that space.

And an area that has sort of played into that myth is around tooling for the creation of secure applications. And a huge percentage of the current security skills gap is because we’re expecting security practitioners to find those tools, integrate those tools and monitor those tools when they weren’t designed to work well together.

Adrian LudwigAdrian Ludwig

It’s currently ridiculously difficult to build software securely. Just to think about what it means in the context of Atlassian, we have to license tools from half a dozen different vendors and integrate them into our environment. We have to think about how results from those tools flow into the [issue] resolution process. How do you bind it into Jira, so you can see the tickets, so you can get it into the hands of the developer? How do you make sure that test cases associated with fixing those issues are incorporated into your development pipeline? It’s a mess.

My expectation is that the only way we’ll ever get to a point where software can be built securely is if those capabilities are incorporated directly into the tools that are used to deliver it, as opposed to being add-ons that come from third parties.

SSQ: So does that include Atlassian?

Ludwig: I think it has to.

SSQ: What would that look like?

Ludwig: One of the areas that my team has been building something like that is around the way that we monitor our security investigations. We’ve actually released some open source projects in this area, where the way that we create alerts for Splunk, which we use as our SIEM, is tied into Jira tickets and Confluence pages. When we create alerts, a Confluence page is automatically generated, and it generates Jira tickets that then flow to our analysts to follow up on them. And that’s actually tied in more broadly to our overall risk management system.

We are also working on some internal tools to make it easier for us to connect the third-party products that look for security vulnerabilities directly into Bitbucket. Every single time we do a pull request, source code analysis runs. And it’s not just a single piece of source code analysis; it’s a wide range of them. Is that particular pull request referencing any out-of-date libraries? And dependencies that need to be updated? And then those become comments that get added into the peer review process.

My job is to make sure that we ship the most secure software that we possibly can, and if there are commercial opportunities, which I think there are, then it seems natural that we might do those as well.
Adrian LudwigCISO, Atlassian

It’s not something that we’re currently making commercially available, nor do we have specific plans at this point to do that, so I’m not announcing anything. But that’s the kind of thing that we are doing. My job is to make sure that we ship the most secure software that we possibly can, and if there are commercial opportunities, which I think there are, then it seems natural that we might do those as well.

SSQ: What does that mean for the wider market as DevOps and security tools converge?

Ludwig: Over the next 10 years, there’s going to be massive consolidation in that space. That trend is one that we’ve seen other places in the security stack. For example, I came from Android. Android now has primary responsibility, as a core platform capability, for all of the security of that device. Your historical desktop operating systems? Encryption was an add-on. Sandboxing was an add-on. Monitoring for viruses was an add-on. Those are all now part of the mobile OS platform.

If you look at the antivirus vendors, you’ve seen them stagnate, and they didn’t have an off-road onto mobile. I think it’s going to be super interesting to watch a lot of the security investments made over the last 10 years, especially in developer space, and think through how that’s going to play out. I think there’s going to be consolidation there. It’s all converging, and as it converges, a lot of stuff’s going to die.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Extending the power of Azure AI to business users

Today, Alysa Taylor, Corporate Vice President of Business Applications and Industry, announced several new AI-driven insights applications for Microsoft Dynamics 365.

Powered by Azure AI, these tightly integrated AI capabilities will empower every employee in an organization to make AI real for their business today. Millions of developers and data scientists around the world are already using Azure AI to build innovative applications and machine learning models for their organizations. Now business users will also be able to directly harness the power of Azure AI in their line of business applications.

What is Azure AI?

Azure AI is a set of AI services built on Microsoft’s breakthrough innovation from decades of world-class research in vision, speech, language processing, and custom machine learning. What I find particularly exciting is that Azure AI provides our customers with access to the same proven AI capabilities that power Xbox, HoloLens, Bing, and Office 365.

Azure AI helps organizations:

  • Develop machine learning models that can help with scenarios such as demand forecasting, recommendations, or fraud detection using Azure Machine Learning.
  • Incorporate vision, speech, and language understanding capabilities into AI applications and bots, with Azure Cognitive Services and Azure Bot Service.
  • Build knowledge-mining solutions to make better use of untapped information in their content and documents using Azure Search.

Bringing the power of AI to Dynamics 365 and the Power Platform

The release of the new Dynamics 365 insights apps, powered by Azure AI, will enable Dynamics 365 users to apply AI in their line of business workflows. Specifically, they benefit from the following built-in Azure AI services:

  • Azure Machine Learning which powers personalized customer recommendations in Dynamics 365 Customer Insights, analyzes product telemetry in Dynamics 365 Product Insights, and predicts potential failures in business-critical equipment in Dynamics 365 Supply Chain Management.
  • Azure Cognitive Services and Azure Bot Service that enable natural interactions with customers across multiple touchpoints with Dynamics 365 Virtual Agent for Customer Service.
  • Azure Search which allows users to quickly find critical information in records such as accounts, contacts, and even in documents and attachments such as invoices and faxes in all Dynamics 365 insights apps.

Furthermore, since Dynamics 365 insights apps are built on top of Azure AI, business users can now work with their development teams using Azure AI to add custom AI capabilities to their Dynamics 365 apps.

The Power Platform, comprised of three services – Power BI, PowerApps, and Microsoft Flow, also benefits from Azure AI innovations. While each of these services is best-of-breed individually, their combination as the Power Platform is a game-changer for our customers.

Azure AI enables Power Platform users to uncover insights, develop AI applications, and automate workflows through low-code, point-and-click experiences. Azure Cognitive Services and Azure Machine Learning empower Power Platform users to:

  • Extract key phrases in documents, detect sentiment in content such as customer reviews, and build custom machine learning models in Power BI.
  • Build custom AI applications that can predict customer churn, automatically route customer requests, and simplify inventory management through advanced image processing with PowerApps.
  • Automate tedious tasks such as invoice processing with Microsoft Flow.

The tight integration between Azure AI, Dynamics 365, and the Power Platform will enable business users to collaborate effortlessly with data scientists and developers on a common AI platform that not only has industry leading AI capabilities but is also built on a strong foundation of trust. Microsoft is the only company that is truly democratizing AI for businesses today.

And we’re just getting started. You can expect even deeper integration and more great apps and experiences that are built on Azure AI as we continue this journey.

We’re excited to bring those to market and eager to tell you all about them!

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center