Tag Archives: Innovation

Schlumberger refines global teamwork with Microsoft 365 – Microsoft 365 Blog

The Schlumberger logo.


Profile picture of Ron Markezich.With more than 80 years of pioneering innovation in reservoir characterization, drilling, production, and exploration, Schlumberger is the leading provider of upstream products and services in the oil and gas industry. It’s a highly collaborative business, both internally, with more than 100,000 employees working in 85 countries, and externally, with the world’s leading global oil and gas customers depending on Schlumberger products and services. Moving data and expensive resources through a complex network of delivery systems calls for reliable, real-time collaboration and communication for all stakeholders. That’s one reason why standardizing on Microsoft 365 is a major step forward in the company’s strategy to harness the cloud and drive efficient customer service.

Recently, Schlumberger’s VP of Information Technology Sebastien Lehnherr had this to say about driving teamwork and productivity on a global scale:

“Operational efficiency and agility are requirements in a highly regulated service industry striving for performance and service quality. We use Microsoft 365 as a core element of our digital strategy—Microsoft Teams, Enterprise Mobility + Security, Power BI, and Windows 10 empower our employees globally with the intuitive, feature-rich tools that help them collaborate more efficiently and be more productive working in the office or while on the road.”

With highly secure, collaborative cloud apps at their fingertips, Schlumberger employees working in the field and at head offices in Paris, Houston, London, and The Hague are empowered by agile digital connections that accelerate service delivery and keep customers’ products moving to market. Unimpeded communication helps connect the big-picture expertise from Schlumberger’s leadership centers with local experience at production sites, adding value to customer relationships. We’re also excited to see how Schlumberger’s global Windows 10 deployment will add value to its Microsoft cloud business productivity platform.

Asia and the Intelligent Edge: Riding a new wave of innovation – Asia News Center

A new wave of innovation is surging ahead. And, the world’s manufacturing powerhouse, Asia, is riding its crest.

The billions of appliances, gadgets, machines, and vehicles that are routinely rolling off Asian production lines are becoming smarter and connected. So too are the factories that make them.

Built with sensors, infused with artificial intelligence (AI) and enabled by machine learning (ML), these devices will push the boundaries of the Internet of Things (IoT) through the next decade and beyond. Advanced algorithms will help them see, listen, reason, predict and more, without requiring “always on” connectivity to the cloud.

This is the intelligent edge and it is based on the principle that data has gravity. In other words, the closer we move computing to a device, the faster we can move from insights to action.

You can see edge computing is any scenario where data is collected and processed inside a device or machine, allowing it to act faster than it would if had to rely on the cloud. Equipment on a factory floor can use ML and AI to anticipate when a part will break or fail. An autonomous car will be able to take evasive action when it faces a possible collision. In both cases, the milliseconds saved could be the critical difference between a safe outcome and an accident.

At this year’s Computex trade show in Taipei, we saw how the intelligent edge will be a key part of a future in which trusted, ubiquitous computing will be part of the fabric of life.

“Everything in our lives is being connected,” Nick Parker, Microsoft’s Corporate Vice President of Consumer and Device Sales, said in a keynote address to a sell-out audience.ws. “Whether it is the sensors in our domestic appliances, whether it is our cars, whether it is new markets for precision agriculture, whether it is the IoT of our lives, or maybe in the experiences we have with technology.”

Nick Parker, Corporate Vice President of Consumer and Device Sales, Microsoft

With insights gleaned from these connected intelligent devices, companies will be able to reimagine business models with new product offerings, new customer experiences, and new efficiencies.

The business potential is huge, and the competition is likely to be fierce. Isaiah Cheung, Microsoft’s Vice President for Consumer and Device Sales in the Greater China Region, said the race is now on among Asian manufacturers and service providers to get into the intelligent edge game.

“New emerging device companies in our region want to infuse their products with AI,” he said. “And big, established companies are doing the same. They want AI built into the big multimillion dollar machinery in their factories to improve efficiency. And, they want to build the intelligent edge into all the consumer devices, appliances and services they export around the world.

“Just the other day, I had one big brand ask me how they could put AI into a new line of rice cookers. Another one is doing the same with its white goods. The list goes on and on.”

Isaiah Cheung, Vice President, Consumer and Device Sales, Microsoft Greater China Region

To add to this progress, Microsoft has established the  Intelligent Edge Partner Community. “Our initial focus is on fostering collaboration across our partners, providing training, and early-adopter programs,” Roanne Sones, Microsoft’s Corporate Vice President of Core Operating System and Intelligent Edge, shared. “From a resource perspective, members receive access to documentation, specs, builds and certification details to further their intelligent edge business”.

Parker sees a new wave of business opportunities and economic progress coming off the back of the intelligent edge, with Asia being a major player.

“Asia has always been very much a center of global innovation, whether it is in a lab in Shenzhen or our partnerships across the Greater China region in terms of supply chain or our partnerships in Taiwan,”  Parker to a media conference at Computex. “We see so much of our new technology, particularly in the intelligent edge, starting here and delivering worldwide.”

Roanne Sones, Corporate Vice President of Core Operating System and Intelligent Edge, Microsoft.

Asia is also playing a major role in developing new AI technologies, with Microsoft’s research labs around the world – including in China and India – working in this space for decades. They have achieved a series of breakthroughs, using the immense computing power of the Azure cloud.

With this know-how, Microsoft has been able to infuse AI into its core products and services. It has delivered AI tools and frameworks, including cognitive, vision, spatial and object APIs, and earlier this year announced a limited preview of Project Brainwave, an architecture for deep neural net processing on the edge – all of which partners can use to enable next-generation AI applications and solutions that run on devices.

Project Brainwave – a new deep learning acceleration platform for real-time AI.

Meanwhile, intelligence is spreading across mass markets as microcontroller units (MCU) become connected. These tiny AI-enabled single-chip computers (see picture at the top of this article) now power more than 9 billion new devices around the world every year.

“An MCU is a single-chip computer that is no larger than your thumbnail,” Distinguished Engineer and Managing Director at Microsoft, Galen Hunt, told the Computex audience. “These are very tiny, very low-cost chips and enabling them with connectivity means you can turn anything into an IoT device. We are headed to a world where everything can become connected.”

As amazing as they are, these tiny chips have had one a big flaw: They were never designed to be secure. When a device is compromised, it can impact your privacy, your data and your infrastructure, and even your physical security.

“If these devices aren’t secured, who are we bringing into our most personal spaces? Who are we bringing into our homes, into our schools, into our hospitals, our offices, our factories? And what is at stake? Our data, our privacy, our infrastructure, our property, even our safety.”

This changed this year when Microsoft launched Azure Sphere, an end-to-end solution for creating highly secure, MCU-powered devices.

Galen Hunt, Distinguished Engineer and Director, Microsoft

In a recent blog, Hunt described MCU internet connectivity as “a two-way street.” “With these devices becoming a gateway to our homes, workplaces, and sensitive data, they also become targets for attacks. Look around a typical household and consider what could happen when even the most mundane devices are compromised: a weaponized stove, baby monitors that spy, the contents of your refrigerator being held for ransom.

“We also need to consider that when a device becomes compromised, it’s not just a problem for the owner, it can also become a problem for society. A device can disrupt and do damage on a larger scale.”

This is what happened with the 2016 Mirai botnet attack where roughly 100,000 compromised IoT devices were repurposed by hackers into a botnet that effectively knocked the east coast of the United States off the internet for a day.

With connected MCUs built into billions of new devices every year, it is of “paramount importance” that security keeps pace with an ever-changing threat landscape.

Hunt suggests that as we look to a future, where every device will be smart or intelligent, we need to redefine what we mean by “smart”. Yes, smart devices are intuitive, insightful, and easy to use. But we need to add one more thing: Smart devices must be secure – if a device is not secure it is not smart.

This makes security essential for manufacturers in Asia and around the world. “We see an ecosystem that is very eager to deliver the products that customers need, and customers need secure products,” he said adding that Azure Sphere makes it easy for manufacturers to create smart/intelligent products that are innately secured.

READ: Unlocking the Economic Impact of Digital Transformation in Asia Pacific

ALSO READ: Microsoft’s AI Blog

Chief data officer role: Searching for consensus

Big data continues to be a force for change. It plays a part in the ongoing drama of corporate innovation — in some measure, giving birth to the chief data officer role. But consensus on that role is far from set.

The 2018 Big Data Executive Survey of decision-makers at more than 50 blue-chip firms found 63.4% of respondents had a chief data officer (CDO). That is a big uptick since survey participants were asked the same question in 2012, when only 12% had a CDO. But this year’s survey, which was undertaken by business management consulting firm NewVantage Partners, disclosed that the background for a successful CDO varies from organization to organization, according to Randy Bean, CEO and founder of NewVantage, based in Boston.

For many, the CDO is likely to be an external change agent. For almost as many, the CDO may be a long-trusted company hand. The best CDO background could be that of a data scientist, line executive or, for that matter, a technology executive, according to Bean.

In a Q&A, Bean delved into the chief data role as he was preparing to lead a session on the topic at the annual MIT Chief Data Officer and Information Quality Symposium in Cambridge, Mass. A takeaway: Whatever it may be called, the chief data officer role is central to many attempts to gain business advantage from key emerging technologies. 

Do we have a consensus on the chief data officer role? What have been the drivers?

Randy Bean: One principal driver in the emergence of the chief data officer role has been the growth of data.

Randy Bean, CEO, NewVantage PartnersRandy Bean

For about a decade now, we have been into what has been characterized as the era of big data. Data continues to proliferate. But enterprises typically haven’t been organized around managing data as a business asset.

Additionally, there has been a greater threat posed to traditional incumbent organizations from agile data-driven competitors — the Amazons, the Googles, the Facebooks.

Organizations need to come to terms with how they think about data and, from an organization perspective, to try to come up with an organizational structure and decide who would be a point person for data-related initiatives. That could be the chief data officer.

Another driver for the chief data officer role, you’ve noted, was the financial crisis of 2008.

Bean: Yes, the failures of the financial markets in 2008-2009, to a significant degree, were a data issue. Organizations couldn’t trace the lineage of the various financial products and services they offered. Out of that came an acute level of regulatory pressure to understand data in the context of systemic risk.

Banks were under pressure to identify a single person to regulators to address questions about data’s lineage and quality. As a result, banks took the lead in naming chief data officers. Now, we are into a third or fourth generation in some of these large banks in terms of how they view the mandate of that role.

Isn’t that type of regulatory driver somewhat spurred by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which recently went into effect? Also, for factors defining the CDO role, NewVantage Partners’ survey highlights concerns organizations have about being surpassed by younger, data-driven upstarts. What is going on there?

Bean: GDPR is just the latest of many previous manifestations of this. There have been the Dodd-Frank regulations, the various Basel reporting requirements and all the additional regulatory requirements that go along with classifying banks as ‘too large to fail.’

That is a defensive driver, as opposed to the offensive and innovation drivers that are behind the chief data officer role. On the offensive side, the chief data officer is about how your organization can be more data-driven, how you can change its culture and innovate. Still, as our recent survey finds, there is defensive aspect, even there. Increasingly, organizations perceive threat coming from all kinds of agile, data-driven competitors.

Organizations need to come to terms with how they think about data and, from an organization perspective, to try to come up with an organizational structure and decide who would be a point person for data-related initiatives. That could be the chief data officer.
Randy BeanCEO and founder, NewVantage

You have written that big data and AI are on a continuum. That may be worthwhile to emphasize, as so much attention turns to artificial intelligence these days.

Bean: A key point is that big data has really empowered artificial intelligence.

AI has been around for decades. One of the reasons why it hasn’t gained traction is, in its aspects as a learning mechanism, it requires large volumes of data. In the past, data was only available in subsets or samples or in very limited quantities, and the corresponding learning on the part of the AI was slow and constrained.

Now, with the massive proliferation of data and new sources — in addition to transactional information, you also now have sensor data, locational data, pictures, images and so on — that has led to the breakthrough in AI in recent years. Big data provides the data that is needed to train the AI learning algorithms.

So, it is pretty safe to say there is no meaningful artificial intelligence without good data — without an ample supply of big data.

And it seems to some of us, on this continuum, you still need human judgment.

Bean: I am a huge believer in the human element. Data can help provide a foundation for informed decision-making, but ultimately it’s the combination of human experience, human judgment and the data. If you don’t have good data, that can hamper your ability to come to the right conclusion. Just having the data doesn’t lead you to the answer.

One thing I’d say is, just because there are massive amounts of data, it hasn’t made individuals or companies any wiser in and of itself. It’s just one element that can be useful in decision-making, but you definitely need human judgment in that equation, as well.

Microsoft Inspire 2018

Inspire 2018: Opening doors for partner innovation, growth and differentiation

Organizations around the world are undergoing transformation fueled by cloud, artificial intelligence, mixed reality, and the Internet of Things. These technologies are helping businesses and society reach new heights – retail is becoming more personal, banking is becoming more seamless, and healthcare is becoming more predictive and preventive.

At the heart of these incredible stories of transformation – and more – are Microsoft partners. The Microsoft partner ecosystem is a group of hundreds of thousands of organizations driving positive, global impact. Building everything from line-of-business apps to industry-specific solutions on Dynamics 365 to gaming experiences, these companies are a natural extension of the team at Microsoft, delivering cutting-edge technology to millions of customers.

Read more

Microsoft to deliver intelligent cloud from Norway datacenters | Stories

Microsoft Cloud to accelerate digital transformation and innovation through a strategic partnership with Equinor and to the benefit of organizations across Norway

REDMOND, Wash., and OSLO, Norway — June 20, 2018 — Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday announced plans to further expand its significant and growing investment in cloud computing in Europe by delivering the intelligent Microsoft Cloud from two new datacenter regions in Norway: one in the greater Stavanger region and the other in Oslo.

The Microsoft Cloud, comprising Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and Dynamics 365, will offer enterprise-grade reliability and performance with data residency from new datacenter locations. Initial availability of Azure is planned for late 2019 with Office 365 and Dynamics 365 to follow. Microsoft has deep expertise protecting data, championing privacy, and empowering customers around the globe to meet extensive security and privacy requirements with Microsoft’s Trusted Cloud principles and the broadest set of compliance certifications and attestations in the industry.

“Over a billion customers around the world trust the intelligent Microsoft Cloud to provide a platform to help transform their businesses,” said Jason Zander, executive vice president, Microsoft Azure, Microsoft. “By delivering the Microsoft Cloud from new datacenter regions in Norway, organizations will be empowered through cloud-scale innovation while meeting their data residency, security and compliance needs.”

Equinor, an international energy company, has chosen the Microsoft Cloud in Norway to enable its digital transformation and drive cloud-enabled innovation. The strategic partnership is supporting Equinor’s digital journey through a seven-year consumption and development agreement valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars (USD). Leveraging the cloud is a prerequisite for the energy industry’s transformation toward a digital future, and secure, reliable and cost-efficient operations are a requirement for Equinor’s adaptation of the cloud.

“Equinor plays a central role in stimulating innovation and advancement of the Norwegian economy, and we are deeply honored to be partnering with them to help take their business into its next stage of growth through the intelligent Microsoft Cloud,” said Kimberly Lein-Mathisen, general manager, Microsoft Norway. “By bringing these new datacenters online in Norway, we are also very pleased to be able to pave the way for growth and transformation of many other businesses and organizations in Norway, whether they be large enterprises, government bodies, or any of the 200,000 small and medium-size businesses that create Norway’s thriving economy.”

Torbjørn Røe Isaksen, Norwegian minister of Trade and Industry said, “The Norwegian government is deeply committed to helping Norway thrive as a hub for digital innovation. Norway needs new industries that create jobs and boost economic growth. In February 2018 the Norwegian government released its datacenter strategy ‘Powered by Nature,’ establishing that attracting datacenters and international investments is an important part of our industrial policy. Therefore, we are very pleased to see Microsoft’s commitment to our country with this new datacenter. We believe that datacenters and cloud services will help ensure the competitiveness and productivity of Norwegian businesses and government institutions, and have a positive impact on our responsibility to our citizens to create an inclusive working life, to the environment, and to our economic development and job growth.”

The delivery of cloud services from Norway expands on Microsoft’s existing investments having operated in the country since 1990 with nearly 600 people working in offices in Lysaker, Oslo, Trondheim and Tromsø across sales, marketing and development, and a network of more than 1,700 partners. This new investment is the first time Microsoft will deliver the intelligent Microsoft Cloud from datacenters located in Norway and is expected to enable greater innovation for oil and gas and other industries, as well as the public sector.

Extending the value of the Microsoft Cloud regions for Norway, customers can also take advantage of hybrid cloud options with Microsoft Azure Stack. Available through service providers in the region, Azure Stack enables customers to develop solutions that harness the power of consistency between Azure and Azure Stack to cater to unique connectivity and compliance needs.

Microsoft has been rapidly expanding to meet an intensifying customer demand for cloud services. By investing in local infrastructure, Microsoft’s intelligent cloud services help companies innovate in their industries and move their businesses to the cloud while meeting data residency, security and compliance needs. Microsoft also has a long history of collaborating with customers to navigate evolving business needs and has developed strategies to help customers prepare for the new European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). We have invested to make the Microsoft Cloud GDPR compliant, are delivering innovation that accelerates GDPR compliance, and have built a community of experts to help customers along their full GDPR journey.

Office 365 and Dynamics 365 continue to expand the data residency options for customers with 18 geographies announced. The two products are the only productivity and business application platforms that can offer in-geo data residency across such a broad set of locations. Each datacenter geography delivers a consistent experience, backed by robust policies, controls and systems to help keep data safe and help comply with local and regional regulations.

Over the past three years, the number of Azure regions available has more than doubled. Azure has more regions than any other cloud provider with 52 regions announced across the globe.

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:
Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, rrt@we-worldwide.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

Microsoft to deliver intelligent cloud from Norway datacenters | Stories

Microsoft Cloud to accelerate digital transformation and innovation through a strategic partnership with Equinor and to the benefit of organizations across Norway

REDMOND, Wash., and OSLO, Norway — June 20, 2018 — Microsoft Corp. on Wednesday announced plans to further expand its significant and growing investment in cloud computing in Europe by delivering the intelligent Microsoft Cloud from two new datacenter regions in Norway: one in the greater Stavanger region and the other in Oslo.

The Microsoft Cloud, comprising Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and Dynamics 365, will offer enterprise-grade reliability and performance with data residency from new datacenter locations. Initial availability of Azure is planned for late 2019 with Office 365 and Dynamics 365 to follow. Microsoft has deep expertise protecting data, championing privacy, and empowering customers around the globe to meet extensive security and privacy requirements with Microsoft’s Trusted Cloud principles and the broadest set of compliance certifications and attestations in the industry.

“Over a billion customers around the world trust the intelligent Microsoft Cloud to provide a platform to help transform their businesses,” said Jason Zander, executive vice president, Microsoft Azure, Microsoft. “By delivering the Microsoft Cloud from new datacenter regions in Norway, organizations will be empowered through cloud-scale innovation while meeting their data residency, security and compliance needs.”

Equinor, an international energy company, has chosen the Microsoft Cloud in Norway to enable its digital transformation and drive cloud-enabled innovation. The strategic partnership is supporting Equinor’s digital journey through a seven-year consumption and development agreement valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars (USD). Leveraging the cloud is a prerequisite for the energy industry’s transformation toward a digital future, and secure, reliable and cost-efficient operations are a requirement for Equinor’s adaptation of the cloud.

“Equinor plays a central role in stimulating innovation and advancement of the Norwegian economy, and we are deeply honored to be partnering with them to help take their business into its next stage of growth through the intelligent Microsoft Cloud,” said Kimberly Lein-Mathisen, general manager, Microsoft Norway. “By bringing these new datacenters online in Norway, we are also very pleased to be able to pave the way for growth and transformation of many other businesses and organizations in Norway, whether they be large enterprises, government bodies, or any of the 200,000 small and medium-size businesses that create Norway’s thriving economy.”

Torbjørn Røe Isaksen, Norwegian minister of Trade and Industry said, “The Norwegian government is deeply committed to helping Norway thrive as a hub for digital innovation. Norway needs new industries that create jobs and boost economic growth. In February 2018 the Norwegian government released its datacenter strategy ‘Powered by Nature,’ establishing that attracting datacenters and international investments is an important part of our industrial policy. Therefore, we are very pleased to see Microsoft’s commitment to our country with this new datacenter. We believe that datacenters and cloud services will help ensure the competitiveness and productivity of Norwegian businesses and government institutions, and have a positive impact on our responsibility to our citizens to create an inclusive working life, to the environment, and to our economic development and job growth.”

The delivery of cloud services from Norway expands on Microsoft’s existing investments having operated in the country since 1990 with nearly 600 people working in offices in Lysaker, Oslo, Trondheim and Tromsø across sales, marketing and development, and a network of more than 1,700 partners. This new investment is the first time Microsoft will deliver the intelligent Microsoft Cloud from datacenters located in Norway and is expected to enable greater innovation for oil and gas and other industries, as well as the public sector.

Extending the value of the Microsoft Cloud regions for Norway, customers can also take advantage of hybrid cloud options with Microsoft Azure Stack. Available through service providers in the region, Azure Stack enables customers to develop solutions that harness the power of consistency between Azure and Azure Stack to cater to unique connectivity and compliance needs.

Microsoft has been rapidly expanding to meet an intensifying customer demand for cloud services. By investing in local infrastructure, Microsoft’s intelligent cloud services help companies innovate in their industries and move their businesses to the cloud while meeting data residency, security and compliance needs. Microsoft also has a long history of collaborating with customers to navigate evolving business needs and has developed strategies to help customers prepare for the new European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). We have invested to make the Microsoft Cloud GDPR compliant, are delivering innovation that accelerates GDPR compliance, and have built a community of experts to help customers along their full GDPR journey.

Office 365 and Dynamics 365 continue to expand the data residency options for customers with 18 geographies announced. The two products are the only productivity and business application platforms that can offer in-geo data residency across such a broad set of locations. Each datacenter geography delivers a consistent experience, backed by robust policies, controls and systems to help keep data safe and help comply with local and regional regulations.

Over the past three years, the number of Azure regions available has more than doubled. Azure has more regions than any other cloud provider with 52 regions announced across the globe.

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:
Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, rrt@we-worldwide.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.