Tag Archives: integrations

Cisco wants to help developers build Webex integrations

Cisco is encouraging developers to innovate on the web conferencing platform Webex Meetings as third-party integrations become an increasingly crucial differentiator in the market for collaboration software.

The vendor has added a new Webex Meetings page to its website for developers. The page includes tutorials, sample source codes and a full catalog of API reference documents. Those resources will help developers customize how their organization manages users and data through Webex.

Cisco also hosts a cloud-based “sandbox” where developers can design and test Webex integrations and offers one-on-one support to members of its developer program, Cisco DevNet. More than 500,000 developers have registered for the program, but many are focused on networking rather than collaboration.

Cisco is in the midst of an overhaul of its collaboration portfolio that includes the merging of its team collaboration app, formerly known as Cisco Spark, with the online meetings platform Cisco Webex, which has more than 135 million users.

Beyond rebranding the two platforms — as Webex Teams and Webex Meetings — Cisco also refreshed their user interfaces and combined them onto the same back-end infrastructure.

In addition to the revamped DevNet page, Cisco is also highlighting its Android SDK for Webex Teams, the product of a new partnership with Google. The tool will help developers add the messaging and meetings features of Webex Teams to Android devices.

Webex integrations increase business value of the platform

Vendors rely on an ecosystem of partners to improve their platforms by developing value-added integrations with other apps. For example, Google recently added several Webex integrations to Google Calendar, making it easier for G Suite users to schedule and join Webex meetings.

Integrations expand the possible use cases of a platform, making it more valuable to businesses, said Alan Lepofsky, a principal analyst at Constellation Research Inc., based in Cupertino, Calif.

“In the highly competitive collaboration market, vendors such as Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Cisco, Salesforce and Slack are all competing for developer mindshare,” Lepofsky said. “They try and entice partners to develop new features and third-party integrations by offering both financial and marketing incentives.”

In the team collaboration market, Slack has been particularly successful at curating an ecosystem of developers. Open APIs helped the startup challenge established vendors like Cisco and Microsoft and inspired many vendors to embrace a similar approach. (This week, Slack said it was valued at $7.1 billion, up from $5.1 billion less than one year ago.)

Even Microsoft has taken steps to open its historically closed system as it attempts to boost adoption of Microsoft Teams, the cloud-based successor to Skype for Business. This spring, for example, the vendor released a new line-of-business app store for Teams, where organizations can upload custom integrations.

Cisco has also given customers tools to customize their use of Webex Teams. But the app stores of both Microsoft and Cisco still trail Slack’s directory, which contains more than 1,500 prebuilt integrations with third-party business apps.

Box Skills integrations give users access to AI

Box Skills integrations took more shape this week, as Box announced the expansion of its Box Skills private beta program with AI integrations with Google, IBM and Microsoft, though some details of the deals still are unclear.

Box first signaled the Box Skills integrations at its conference last year and the expansions of the beta program builds on the content management platform vendor’s long-standing plans to add AI capabilities for document, image and audio management.

“This is the next step of what Box previously announced,” said Alan Lepofsky, principal analyst at Constellation Research. “It’s appealing, but it comes with complications.”

It’s not known if Box customers will have to license the AI capabilities through the integrations or if those costs will be covered within their Box licenses. Another concern is security, Lepofsky said.

“If Box is your approved data provider, do you also have to check to see if it’s OK to pass those images to Google’s API,” Lepofsky said. “Box needs to be open and transparent about licensing and security.”

The vendor’s chief product officer, Jeetu Patel, said Box will announce pricing in the fall, with general availability of the private beta program sometime in the second half of 2018.

Among Box’s roster of beta users are Virgin Trains, Ancestry.com, The University of Chicago and the city of San Jose, the company said.

Box is leaning toward letting customers use some Box Skills features for free, and charging for others, especially for larger custom Box Skills projects, Patel said.

“There will be a specific charge to use Box Skills,” he said. “There will be a set of core foundational skills that we will make sure we will be helping with the contracting of, and then there’s going to be others that you can also buy directly.

In the long term, Box is hoping that a kind of marketplace for Box Skills integrations develops, Patel said.

Box Skills integrates with AI
Building off its announcement at BoxWorks last year, Box Skills now integrates with Google, IBM and Microsoft to provide AI capabilities for its users.

‘Mainly about AI’

The use cases for the Box Skills integrations are abundant and range from simple automation to navigating giant data sets for sentiment analysis or image recognition. And by keeping the AI options open to various market leaders, the new capabilities give Box customers flexibility to integrate into whichever API is best for them.

What it does is provide an incredible amount of additional functionality for Box customers.
Alan Lepofskyprincipal analyst, Constellation Research

While this could be useful for Box customers, Box is unlikely to take any customers from competitors like Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive to migrate due to these open APIs.

“If you’re using Google or Microsoft or IBM AI platforms, why wouldn’t you just use their content management tools too,” Lepofsky said. “You’re not going to get a Google Drive customer interested in Box because it can now use Google APIs.”

But for Box customers, the Box Skills integrations can create value around AI tools, which can increase efficiency and reduce human error.

“Things like image recognition and metadata tagging — that alone can save huge amounts of time and resources,” Lepofsky said. “What it does is provide an incredible amount of additional functionality for Box customers.”

As for its similarly named competitor, Dropbox, which recently went public, the Box Skills integrations do differentiate Box from Dropbox — something that Box was surely thinking about with this release.

“There’s nothing about Dropbox that says it can’t plug into the same platforms,” Lepofsky said, “but they haven’t made it as developer-friendly.”

When it was first announced in October 2017, Box Skills focused on image, audio and video intelligence.

The integrations with Google, IBM and Microsoft can help with those areas — yet it depends on which vendor the customer is most comfortable with. If a Box user’s organization runs primarily through Microsoft, it will most likely use that Box Skills integration.

“Each of them have some differentiation, but this announcement is mainly about AI,” Lepofsky said. “This talks about these APIs being around images and image tagging, object detection — and most people I speak to say Google image recognition is still the most advanced.”

Patel asserted that the key difference between Box and major competitors such as Google Drive and Microsoft OneDrive is that Box is vendor neutral, partnering with all four of the major machine learning and AI vendors — Google, AWS, Microsoft and IBM.

“As this market, which is in the pretty early stages, starts to develop … customers can rest assured that when the data is in Box, they can take advantage of any of those skills or any of those machine learning models, and apply it to Box content,” Patel said.

Box this month also unveiled a new service partnership with IBM to build custom Box Skills that apply IBM Watson AI tools to the Box Skills framework.

Box also announced support for the latest Azure cognitive services from Microsoft.

News director Shaun Sutner contributed to this article.

Introducing Evernote for Microsoft Teams

Over the years, Evernote has made teamwork easier by building integrations with a host of powerful apps, including Microsoft Outlook, Salesforce, Google Drive, Slack, and many others. Today we’re pleased to add another big name to that list.

Introducing Evernote for Microsoft Teams

Microsoft Teams is the communication hub for productive companies, where teams can chat, share messages, and move projects forward. As part of the Office 365 suite, it enables colleagues to share emails, documents, spreadsheets, and presentations, and manage the flow of information.

Our latest integration brings Evernote into the context of your conversations in Teams so you can easily reference specific notes within a conversation, and access notes without having to leave the Teams experience.

With Evernote for Microsoft Teams, you can seamlessly share, pin, edit, and search your Evernote content—right from the Microsoft Teams app. This helps you work without interruption and keeps everyone on the same page.

We sat down with Mansoor Malik, Principal Product Manager for Microsoft Teams, and Leo Gong, Senior Product Manager at Evernote, to get their thoughts on this new integration. We asked them why the partnership between Evernote and Microsoft is so exciting, and what it means for customers and the future of teamwork.

Q: What does integrating with Evernote bring to the Microsoft Teams product, and how will users benefit?

Mansoor Malik (Microsoft): Microsoft Teams democratizes information. It makes it available, brings transparency to it, and ensures everyone has access to it.

With this integration, users can now access their Evernote content and share it with the whole team—in one place, and in the same channel. You don’t have to remember a URL or switch back and forth between Teams and Evernote. It’s all right there.

Leo Gong (Evernote): For a lot of our customers, Evernote is their second brain. It’s where they collect all their information and the ideas they’re working on. Combining these two places allows them to easily tap into that knowledge hub and share it with everyone.

Let’s say you’re trying to plan logistics around a product launch in Microsoft Teams. Being able to access Evernote allows you to keep a record of what people are agreeing upon, and what the current plan is—in parallel to the conversation.

Q: What is the problem that this solves for users?

MM: You may have to-dos that you want to add in Evernote, and you may want to start talking about them. You can either share a snippet of it in Teams and start a conversation that way, or you can pin it as a tab and have the conversation around that tab.

What’s cool is that the conversation you have, in context with the note that’s pinned, happens right there. It can also be persistent so it stays within the chat. So anyone from the team can either jump into that conversation in real time or, if they come in later, reply to it in the same thread, with the same context.

LG: Many people use Evernote as a repository for their business’s information. This integration helps them very easily share that information whenever they’re asked.

Also, the same questions often get asked again and again. The Pinned tab allows you to pin a note in the channel with answers to all those frequently asked questions, so it’s easily accessible for others.

Finally, there can often be 10 to 20 different messages that you need to consider when you’re making a decision. It gets unmanageable very quickly. So it’s good to have a tab, one place to keep a list of “What’s the decision we just made, and what are the next steps?”

Q. What do you think people struggle with the most when it comes to sharing information within a team setting?

MM: Before, if you wanted to share something, you’d have to open up your email and attach a Word document or a file, and send it to somebody—even your colleague who’s sitting in the next office. Then you’d have to wait for their reply, then revise it, and so on. This integration means that those conversations, those decisions, can be documented, edited, and captured in real time, so you don’t have to wait for the back and forth.

LG: I think it’s the friction around sharing information. Even beyond this initial launch, we’re interested in making that easier. How can we automate the sharing of information? That’s something we think about.

Q: In your experience, how have workflows evolved over time? Do you find that people are asking for integrations with their favorite tools often?

MM: Employees today are on twice as many teams as they were five years ago. The amount of time that employees spend engaging in collaborative work—in meetings, on phone calls, or answering emails—has increased about 50 percent. It takes up to 80 percent more of employees’ time. Notwithstanding that, productivity experiences are getting fragmented over time, leading to reduced productivity, change fatigue, and reduced employee sentiment and morale. This integration tries to reunify the experience to address these issues.

LG: Workplaces are evolving to include more specialized tools, so more than ever we see a lot of different teams, and a lot of individuals, wanting and expecting choice at work.

Even with note editing, which is a relatively simple use case, there are so many tools out there and each of them has different strengths. Integrations allow customers to use the tools that will make them effective, because they’re able to bring their own tools into their collaborative work.

Evernote integrates with all types of documents and helps people share notes very easily, so that they can choose the tools they need to make them effective. With Microsoft Teams, you don’t have to use a specific database or a specific task management tool. Teams becomes the glue that helps you and your team work together—even if they’re on different systems.

Q: When integrating with another product, is there a typical checklist you go through? What makes this partnership a good fit?

MM: We look at how we can add value to our mutual customers. Specifically, we look at common teamwork productivity scenarios and ways to make it easier for people to get their job done, to make their experience more valuable, and enhance it so that they feel like it’s easy.

Evernote is a great fit for Teams because people are already working together in teams. Having Evernote integrated there just makes sense, to help them get their job done faster.

The other thing we look at is shared vision with our partners around the digital and cultural transformation that’s happening in the modern workplace. We certainly have to snap to that.

LG: It’s the same for us. The top bar that we need to clear is: Is there a natural fit in the users’ workflows? Does this measurably make their lives better? And second, what do we have to offer Microsoft? How does this make Evernote users more successful as well? And lastly, it’s a feasibility consideration, which is: Can we build it and how quickly?

Q: From a strategic product perspective, how do you keep up with the needs of an increasingly demanding customer?

MM: We’re always listening to our customer feedback, whether it’s on Twitter, UserVoice, or within our end product feedback tool. We also look at the way people are working and features they’re asking for, whether it’s apps for mobile, or even desktop.

We’re also trying to envision what the future of work will look like on a longer-term horizon. As the workforce changes, as Millennials get on board, they definitely have new demands. We look into that, we prioritize it, and we put it in the backlog. Whatever is most asked for gets done first, and we go down the stack from there.

LG: One, it’s having an ear to the ground. We spend a lot of time talking to our customers, and often we’ll see opportunities for improvement.

Two, is doing pretty extensive testing with features that we want to launch, and making sure that we’re doing it in a way that’s actually helpful to our users. You don’t want to necessarily implement exactly what the customer is requesting because often it’s a symptom of a greater or undiscovered need. So we think about what they’re really trying to say, and what they’re really struggling with.

Q: I imagine that can be hard at times, like doing a bit of detective work.

LG: Exactly.

MM: Yep, totally agree.

Q: There has been a shift from having competitors to the idea of “playing well with others.” What is your view on adopting this approach from the technology standpoint?

MM: We’re building a product for collaboration, so we have to be collaborative. By working and playing with others, we help our customers and users get the most value. And in this particular case, it really helps increase their productivity, and users love it. So if we can increase productivity, if we can keep the user engaged, even if it’s working with a competitor or a partner, so be it. That’s why we are open and willing to let people use the tools they want to use. Because we believe that tools and technology facilitate productivity and enable customers to get more done faster.

LG: Playing well with others has always been a core value for Evernote. We help you capture your thoughts and information—wherever it comes from.

As to how we adopt it from a technology standpoint, it means building our product in a modular way so we’re not just supporting a single document type. We’re architecting the app in a way where it can accept any document type as a module, so you can plug-and-play additional ones in the future.

It’s a win-win because building a product in a way that supports integrations speeds up your own development. Your developers will thank you because when they’re trying to extend functionality into the product in the future, they will also benefit.

Q: Advancements in technology have made it possible for people to work anywhere, from any device. How can we keep up with the demands of such a highly connected workforce?

MM: Every team is different. Every individual is different, and they have their unique preferences and needs. As a platform, Microsoft Teams enables people to bring anything they want in terms of the apps and services they use the most. By doing so they can customize Microsoft Teams to fit their needs better for their increased productivity.

By allowing these types of integrations, by working well with other partners and competitors, we’re meeting the demands of a highly connected workforce. At the same time, we’re making sure, as Evernote is, that we’re cross-platform, cross-device, multi-screen. We want to make sure that wherever you are, however you’re connected, you can get your work done.

LG: In a way, the causation is a little fuzzy because having integrations enables you to work from anywhere and from any device. At the same time, integrations help you live better in a world like that.

I think where Microsoft Teams is really helpful is that it provides a hub for you to manage a lot of complexity. Because if everybody’s using 20 different apps, it becomes very difficult to manage. But if there’s some way for you to start centralizing your communications, with all of your sharing in one place, it helps people manage the overload of information.

Q: What do you see changing in the next five years with regard to the way people are working? And how are you looking to solve that with new product features and/or updates?

MM: Everybody is looking to get stuff done faster. What we are thinking, with these integrations, is how we can use machine learning or AI to help them do that.

For example, imagine you’re making a note that you need to send marketing materials for review and approval. It’d be cool if, as you’re typing or talking about it, an AI bot senses that this is actually a task that needs to be created and assigned to somebody, and then followed up on. Those are ways that we can improve productivity by doing things for people on their behalf.

Call recording, transcription, and translation is also something that we are looking into. All this stuff can get done automatically.

LG: I see there being two related trends. One is that there’s a rapid acceleration of the amount of information that people are consuming. Number two is that technology has gotten to a point where it’s actually possible to help users manage that overflow of information, so we’re at a really interesting time.

The first thing that will really help people is better aggregation and integrations. I see Evernote being the place that helps you manage your information by integrating with the tools you use to create information, and collecting all of that in one central hub.

The second piece of technology is, as Mansoor mentioned, AI and machine learning. The interesting thing that we’ll be able to do in the next five years is apply machine learning to help users make sense of information that they’re getting. Because it’s really important to be able to sift through it all and figure out what’s important.

The analogy I love to give is: If I walk into your kitchen, it might be really tidy, but I don’t know where anything is kept. Machine learning allows us to surface your items in your kitchen, in a context that makes sense with regard to how I organize and how I think.

Get started

To find out for yourself how much more your team can achieve, simply head over to the Microsoft App Store and install Evernote for Microsoft Teams today. For more information, check out this Quick Start Guide.

Updates to Adobe Document Cloud bring integrated PDF services to Office 365 – Microsoft 365 Blog

Last September, we expanded our strategic partnership with Adobe to focus on integrations between Adobe Sign and Office 365 products such as Microsoft Teams, SharePoint, Outlook, and more.

We’ve seen our customers make great use of the combination. For example, the State of Hawaii saved a significant amount of employee time while also improving document status versus paper-based processes—providing a double win over previous paper-based processes.

Building on this success, today the Adobe Document Cloud team announced new capabilities that deepen the integration with Office 365 and can save you and your team time. PDF services integrations provide new fidelity when working with PDF documents as part of Office 365. Once integrated by your administrator, PDF services provide rich previews of PDF documents right within OneDrive and your SharePoint sites.

A screenshot displays a non-disclosure agreement in the Adobe Document Cloud.

In addition to many reporting, sharing, and collaboration scenarios, PDF files are frequently used to create final or archived versions of content spanning across many different files. With PDF services and the newly introduced Combine Files by Adobe functionality, you can select several files and pull into one PDF with just a couple of clicks within SharePoint document libraries.

A screenshot displays a launch team group in SharePoint.

PDF services are now available in the ribbon for online versions of Word, Excel, and PowerPoint—making the creation of high-quality, full fidelity PDFs from these applications even easier.

PDF servicesalong with capabilities as part of Adobe Sign and upcoming Adobe Reader enhancements—are all part of Adobe Document Cloud. All share a commitment to productive integrations across Office 365—and we hope to see your team benefit from these integrations as well.

If you are an administrator, with Adobe Document Cloud, get started integrating with Office 365 with this guide. Adobe Document Cloud and Office 365 provide great complementary functionalities, and you can learn more about this and Adobe Sign integrations with Office 365. We look forward to seeing continued productivity improvements across the millions of joint customers that Adobe Document Cloud and Microsoft Office 365 share.

Salesforce-Google integration bolsters CRM, analytics functionality

SAN FRANCISCO — Salesforce and Google cozied up a little more closely on several new product integrations: One offers a cloud alternative to Amazon Web Services, and another pushes Salesforce deeper into G Suite, Google’s subscription business applications cloud, which may send shock waves through the thriving ecosystem of partners that already provide small-business CRM to those apps.

The Salesforce-Google integration includes the naming of Google Cloud as Salesforce’s latest preferred public cloud for international customers, joining AWS, with which Salesforce partnered earlier this year.

The Salesforce-Google integration, announced earlier this month at Salesforce’s Dreamforce user conference, also includes Salesforce Lightning for Gmail and Google Sheets, as well as Quip Live Apps for Google Drive and Google Calendar. Salesforce’s Sales and Marketing Clouds will both have Google Analytics 360 embedded.

As part of the partnership, Google will also be offering existing Salesforce customers a one-year free trial of G Suite.

Salesforce is no stranger to partnering with other enterprise tech companies — even if some products compete — to offer its customers an enhanced experience, and that appears to be the reason behind the Salesforce-Google integration.

“In the past, [Salesforce] has announced some pretty big partnerships that turned out to maybe be not so big, but this is from a different angle,” said Michael Fauscette, chief research officer for G2 Crowd, based in Chicago. “They have a go-to-market strategy together.”

Integration to help SMBs

In the past, [Salesforce] has announced some pretty big partnerships that turned out to maybe be not so big, but this is from a different angle.
Michael Fauscettechief research officer, G2 Crowd

Small- and medium-sized businesses will benefit from the Salesforce-Google integration, because many of them already use Gmail and G Suite, according to analysts, and the Salesforce tie-in could make the San Francisco-based company attractive as a CRM option.

“I have a client, and the No. 1 challenge is adoption: They have these great tools and insights, but if people aren’t in there and feeding the engine and taking action, it doesn’t matter,” said Lisa Hager, global head of Salesforce practices for Mumbai-based Tata Consulting Services. “But if I go in to get my mail and the Salesforce platform prepopulates my email and spreadsheets, I’m more likely to go into that tool.”

Voices.com, which works with brands to find voice actors for campaigns and is based in London, Ont., has been a Salesforce customer for 12 years, and its CEO, David Ciccarelli, was enthusiastic about some of the Salesforce-Google integrations.

“Salesforce is a great system of record, but where it can improve upon is mass editing,” he said. “So, being able to one-click export from Salesforce into something manipulative like Google Sheets, make changes and one-click import back — that’s where you’ll see huge time savings.”

Marketing is where the data is

Salesforce has made a concerted effort to increase market share for its Marketing Cloud to match that of Sales Cloud and Service Cloud, and it looks to do that through data.

Just weeks after releasing B2B Lead Analytics for Facebook, Salesforce is embedding Google Analytics 360 into Marketing Cloud, giving marketers insights at the two leading data points on the internet.

“If you’re not in a separate data silo and you can ingest the Google Analytics 360 data on website visitors and keyword ad buys, with that integrated, you don’t have to take that data out and manually process it,” said Cindy Zhou, principal analyst for Constellation Research. “And there’s always data lost when you have to move it from one place to another. So, having it embedded natively will help you get deeper insights, and you can still apply Einstein on top to do audience segmentation and analysis.”

Ciccarelli of Voices.com said, as a smaller business, a license for Google Analytics 360 was always too much to budget for, but with it integrated into Salesforce at no additional cost, smaller companies will be able to receive enterprise-level insights.

Salesforce adds another storage cloud

The news of Salesforce adding another preferred public cloud for international expansion comes just months after Salesforce formed a similar partnership with AWS. The addition of Google Cloud is to address customer needs, according to Ryan Aytay, executive vice president for business development and strategic accounts for Salesforce.

“AWS continues to be an important part of our infrastructure, so nothing’s changing there,” Aytay said. “We’re just adding another preferred cloud and moving forward to address customer needs.”

Google and AWS are two of the three leaders in the cloud space, with the other being Microsoft’s Azure. Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff has been outspoken about his abhorrence toward former partner Microsoft, so it’s unlikely Salesforce will be partnering with the Seattle-based company anytime soon.

The move toward Google could have been a response to customers’ demands, according to Hager, as AWS is costly when it comes to cloud storage.

“Just being able to have that option of Google storage instead of AWS is important; I had three clients this morning complaining about the cost of AWS,” Hager said. “If you’re storing a lot of documents on Salesforce, it can get expensive. So, integrating with Google is a nice option.”

There’s some potential overlap with the integrated products, especially between Salesforce’s Quip and Google’s G Suite, but Salesforce executives aren’t worried about the overlap, with Aytay saying internally at Salesforce the company has used both products.

Zhou can see the products coexisting, but there’s also some “friendly competition” between G Suite and Quip, with the Salesforce product being a good alternative for companies creating contracts or requests for proposal.

Several of the Salesforce-Google integrations are already in market, including Lightning for Gmail and integrations with Calendar and Google Drive, with deeper integrations rolling out in 2018, according to the press release. Quip Live Apps integration with Google Drive is expected to be generally available in the first half of 2018 for $25 per user, per month with any Quip Enterprise License. And the integrations between Salesforce and Google Analytics 360 are expected in the first half of 2018 at no additional cost to licensed customers.

Arkadin unveils Cisco integrations for cloud telephony

Cloud communications provider Arkadin, based in Paris, has introduced a series of Cisco integrations that support cloud-based telephony with Cisco Spark and WebEx.

The Cisco integrations will use Arkadin’s PSTN service to support cloud-based calling. Arkadin will introduce Cisco Spark Calling for businesses deploying a cloud PBX or for businesses that want to use their existing on-premises telephony equipment.

Arkadin will also use Cisco’s Cloud Connected Audio – Service Provider, a partner architecture in which Cisco and its partners team up to provide customers with telephony connectivity. Arkadin’s service is branded Cloud Connected Audio – Arkadin and integrates with WebEx meetings. The service allows organizations to augment their audio conferencing cost structures with their existing networks. The service also offers global toll, toll-free and callback services.

The Cloud Connected Audio service offers an Opex model and enables organizations to integrate with on-premises telephony with WebEx capabilities. Audio bridging for the service is managed in the WebEx cloud.

Box debuts machine learning tools

Cloud content manager Box has revealed Box Skills, a framework for applying machine learning tools to content stored in Box. The service will allow organizations to digitize and automate business processes.

The machine learning tools are powered by IBM Watson, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud. These tools include video indexing, computer vision and sentiment analysis.

Box, based in Redwood City, Calif., also announced a set of developer resources to allow organizations to build custom machine learning skills, such as using a third-party machine learning platform for specific workflows or linking multiple skills to enable intelligent business processes.

At its annual customer conference this week, Box showcased three Box Skills that are currently in development:

  • Audio intelligence creates and indexes transcripts of audio files that can be searched.
  • Video intelligence offers features such as transcription and topic detection to allow users to find the information they need in a video.
  • Image intelligence detects individual objects and concepts in image files and automatically add keyword labels to images.

The Box Skills framework and developer kit are expected to enter beta early next year.

8×8 offers new UC product suites

Unified communications as a service provider 8×8 Inc. has launched a suite of UC products called Virtual Office Editions. The new product suite offers enterprise-grade communications and mix-and-match pricing.

X8 offers unlimited calling to 45 countries and includes the full suite of Virtual Office. The suite also includes integrations with Salesforce, Zendesk, NetSuite CRM and Salesforce analytics for call recording, call quality reporting and barge-monitor-whisper capabilities. The platform also integrates contact center capabilities from 8×8 ContactNow.

X5 offers unlimited calling to 32 countries, Virtual Office features such as meetings and HD voice and video, and integrations with Salesforce, Salesforce analytics, Zendesk and NetSuite CRM.

X2 offers unlimited calling to 14 countries, Virtual Office features such as HD voice and video, and integrations with Salesforce, Zendesk and NetSuite CRM.

The X8 version of Virtual Office is currently available in the U.S. and U.K., while the X5 and X2 versions are available in the U.S.