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Microsoft Store empowers students with free Computer Science Education Week workshops | Windows Experience Blog

Students at a Microsoft Store

One hundred and thirteen years ago in New York, a girl was born into a generation where the average woman was more likely to perfect a signature pie recipe than solve a pi-based equation. Pushing against expectations, this girl became one of the pre-eminent technologists of our times and made it possible to convert human language into machine code understood by computers. On Dec. 9, the anniversary of Admiral Grace Hopper’s birthday kicks off Computer Science Education Week, an annual program dedicated to inspiring K-12 students to take interest in computer science.

As technology such as AI and cloud computing rapidly transforms the future of work, it’s more important than ever for students and educators to develop STEM—science, technology, engineering and math—skills. It’s estimated that over 85 million jobs worldwide will go unfilled by 2030 if we don’t bridge the STEM skills gap—but schools often struggle to implement quality STEM curriculum and prepare students for career paths that are just starting to come into focus.

Inspire students to ignite a passion for Computer Science

Microsoft Stores are committed to empowering students and educators with computer science resources and will host over 400 events in partnership with STEM influencers throughout Computer Science Education Week across locations. Ensuring no one is left behind when it comes to developing increasingly crucial computer science skills, programming this year has an increased focus on inclusion for traditionally underrepresented students.

Microsoft Store workshops will offer hands-on learning centered around coding, game design, app development and more using technologies from Windows, Surface, Office 365, Minecraft and more. Participants will hear from a diverse group of mentors and organizations from across the STEM field, including Lynell Caldwell, NASA, Brandon Copeland, Black Girls Code, Al Smith, Curtis Baham, Lee Woodall, Dennis Brown and Titus O’Neil.

Students at a Microsoft Store

Check your local Microsoft Store to register for exciting workshops geared toward empowering every learner, including workshops like;

  • Latina Girls in Gaming with MakeCode Arcade: Learn basic block coding and create video games with Gabriela Ponce, producer with Turn 10 Studios and advocate for helping the Latinx community succeed in the gaming industry. Gaby will share more about her journey combining her passions for art, culture and technology, and empower Latina girls to embrace STEM skills.
  • All Kids Code with Tynker Space Quest: Solve coding puzzles to guide an astronaut in space with Nadmi Casiano, the first deaf woman to graduate with an aeronautical engineering degree. All students are welcome, and ASL interpreters will be available at participating Microsoft Store locations to empower students with hearing disabilities.
  • African American Girls Code with Tynker Space Quest: Joan Higgenbotham, one of the first African American female astronauts to go into space, will share her experience at a workshop geared toward inspiring African American Girls to pursue STEM. Participants will learn basic coding concepts in an engaging format as they navigate aliens in search for a spaceship.
  • MANCODE with Design and Code Apps: Brainstorm app ideas and bring ideas to life with MANCODE, an organization aimed at addressing the stagnate growth of African American males within the STEM industry, who currently represent only 2.2% of the field. This workshop is geared toward underrepresented male students aged 13 and older, who will meet a male minority mentor and learn about the importance of technology.
  • Harry Potter Kano Coding Kit Workshop: Explore the magic of STEM at a Harry Potter Kano Coding Kit Workshop that introduces foundational coding concepts, including drag-and-drop coding. This autism-friendly workshop features alternate activities to allow a broad level of participation, and parents are welcome to join with their child.

In addition to these workshops, Microsoft Stores will also host Minecraft Hour of Code workshops, teaching students of all ages to code with Minecraft. The new Minecraft Hour of Code lesson aligns with this year’s theme, Computer Science for Good. Students will explore coding and artificial intelligence as they protect a village from forest fires in an immersive Minecraft world. Anyone can learn how coding can help build a better world—in just one hour!

Check availability of workshops and RSVP at your local Microsoft Store. Programming will vary by location. And, do you know students always get 10% off at Microsoft Store?* Make sure to take advantage of your discount when you shop at Microsoft Store.

* See full terms at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/b/education

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Author: Microsoft News Center

8×8 Video Meetings launches for free in challenge to Zoom

8×8 has launched a free version of its video conferencing app, hoping to lure businesses into subscribing to its cloud-based calling and contact center suite.

8×8 is challenging Zoom and LogMeIn in launching its first stand-alone video product. The move comes as those vendors have been seeking to penetrate 8×8’s primary market: business calling, also known as unified communications as a service (UCaaS).

Zoom has aggressively expanded its cloud-based business calling service over the past year while LogMeIn has pursued product consolidation. The company recently folded its flagship video conferencing platform, GoToMeeting, into a broader UCaaS offering called GoToConnect.

8×8 Video Meetings places no limit on how long meetings can last. In contrast, the free versions of Zoom and GoToMeeting cap meetings at 40 minutes. 8×8’s free version also provides toll-free dial-in options, which are usually a pay-by-the-minute add-on.

“This is certainly a compelling new entrant that will challenge Zoom and GoToMeeting’s freemium offerings,” said Mike Fasciani, analyst at Gartner.

Screenshot of 8x8 Video Meetings
8×8 Video Meetings uses WebRTC to enable browser-based meetings without downloads or plugins.

But only 50 people can meet at once on 8×8’s platform. That’s fewer than the 100-person limit of Zoom’s free version, although more than GoToMeeting’s three-person cap. (Zoom’s paid service can support 1,000 participants, while GoToMeeting’s premium tier can support 3,000.)

Users can access 8×8 Video Meetings without registering. However, signing up with an email address unlocks benefits such as calendar integration, team admin controls, and personalized virtual meeting rooms. In turn, 8×8 will try to convince users who register to become paying customers.

8×8 Video Meetings launched in September for businesses subscribed to the vendor’s X Series suite, which includes calling, messaging and contact center apps. 8×8 built the product using the open source software of Jitsi, which the vendor acquired from Atlassian last year.

Businesses get a couple of perks for using 8×8 Video Meetings as part of the X Series. For those customers, 8×8 Video Meetings includes a call-me feature for connecting to a meeting’s audio. Also, the video app integrates with third-party services, such as single sign-on software.

In the future, 8×8 might create a paid subscription tier for 8×8 Video Meetings. The offering could include advanced features like transcription and meeting room controls, said Eduardo Cocozza, a senior marketing director at 8×8.

Because it relies on WebRTC, 8×8 Video Meetings lets users conduct meetings in web browsers like Chrome and Firefox without downloads or plugins. But desktop and mobile apps are available for those who want them. Highfive, Cisco and BlueJeans have also enabled browser-based video conferencing in recent years.

8×8 is currently beta-testing meeting room software for connecting its video app to software-agnostic endpoints from vendors like Logitech and Poly. 8×8 is in the process of cementing partnerships with hardware vendors for preintegrated room kits, Cocozza said.

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Project Silica proof of concept stores Warner Bros. ‘Superman’ movie on quartz glass

Turning digital data into physical artifacts

With a nearly 100-year history in film and television, Warner Bros. owns one of the world’s deepest and most significant entertainment libraries. Re-releasing older films in new formats or for new audiences is an important part of the business. It’s also a tremendous cultural responsibility to preserve some of the world’s most beloved stories in perpetuity, Colf said.

“Imagine if a title like the ‘Wizard of Oz’ or a show like ‘Friends’ wasn’t available for generation after generation to enjoy and see and understand,” she said. “We think that’s unimaginable, and that’s why we take the job of preserving and archiving our content extremely seriously.”

The company has redundancy plans in place to handle multiple worst-case scenarios: an earthquake or hurricane that strikes one of the coasts, a fire where the suppression systems don’t kick in or a climate control failure that allows moisture to build up and ruin film stock.

The goal is to have three archival copies of each asset stored in different locations around the world: two separate digitized copies, along with the original physical copy on whatever medium a film or television episode or animated cartoon was created.

Fortunately, original film negatives will last for centuries if stored in the right conditions. But for some older television shows — think episodes of “Alice” shot in the 1970s — the original physical copy has a limited shelf life that requires migration to newer formats. And for today’s films and television shows that are shot digitally, the archival-quality third copy has a very short migration cycle of three to five years, which is challenging to manage.

“Let’s say a TV show is pushing directly into our digital archives; there’s nothing physical,” said Steven Anastasi, Warner Bros. vice president for global media archives and preservation services. “The digital file is going in but I don’t have something I can put in a vault or in a salt mine or anything physical coming into the building.”

Researcher Youssef Assaf drops a square of silica glass in a kettle of boiling water to demonstrate its durability
Microsoft Project Silica researcher Youssef Assaf drops a square of silica glass in a kettle of boiling water to demonstrate its durability. The team has baked, boiled, microwaved, demagnetized and scoured similar pieces of glass with steel wool — with no loss to the data stored inside. Photo by Jonathan Banks for Microsoft.

Warner Bros. is potentially looking at Project Silica to create a permanent physical asset to store important digital content and provide durable backup copies. Right now, for theatrical releases that are shot digitally, the company creates an archival third copy by converting it back to analog film. It splits the final footage into three color components —cyan, magenta and yellow — and transfers each onto black-and-white film negatives that won’t fade like color film.

Those negatives are put into a cold storage archive. In these highly managed vaults, temperature and humidity are tightly controlled, and air sniffers look for signs of chemical decomposition that could signal problems. If they need the film back, they must reverse those complicated steps.

That process is expensive, and there are only a handful of film labs left in the world that can do it. And the process is not optimal from a qualitative point of view, said Brad Collar, Warner Bros. senior vice president of global archives and media engineering.

“When we shoot something digitally — with zeros and ones representing the pixels on the screen ­— and print that to an analog medium called film, you destroy the original pixel values. And, sure, it looks pretty good, but it’s not reversible,” Collar said.

“If we can take the digital representation of those pixels and put it on a medium like silica and read it back off exactly as it was when it came out of the camera, we’ve done our preservation job to the very best of our ability. That’s what I love about this,” he said.

It’s not economical to create archival film negatives for every digitally shot television episode in the Warner Bros. library. The company hopes Project Silica might prove to be a cheaper, higher quality alternative to create physical archives of digital content.

There’s much more work ahead to reach that scale — Microsoft researchers would need to significantly increase the speed at which data can be written and read, as well as its density. Warner Bros. envisions its own infrastructure to read data from the glass archives. But both partners see promise in how far they’ve come.

“If Project Silica’s storage solution proves to be as cost-effective and as scalable as it could be — and we all recognize it’s still early days — this is something we’d love to see adopted by other studios and our peers and other industries,” Colf said.

“If it works for us, we firmly believe that this will be a benefit to anyone who wants to preserve and archive content,” she said.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

For Sale – HP Proliant Microserver N54L AMD Turion II Dual Core 2.2GHz Barebones

I have swapped out my hard drives and ram into another unit so this system is now surplus to requirements.
Yours for £90 delivered
IMG_20191014_135336.jpgIMG_20191014_135347.jpgIMG_20191014_135426__01.jpg
Location
Shrewsbury
Price and currency
£90
Delivery
Courier
Prefer goods collected?
I have no preference
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Bank Transfer, Paypal Friends and Family

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What’s new with the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard?

Exchange continues to serve as the on-ramp into Office 365 for many organizations. One big reason is the hybrid capabilities that connect on-premises Exchange and Exchange Online.

If you use Exchange Server, it’s not difficult to join it to Exchange Online for a seamless transition into the cloud. Microsoft refined the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard to remove a lot of the technical hurdles to shift one of the more important IT workloads into Exchange Online. If you haven’t seen the Exchange hybrid experience recently, you may be surprised about some of the improvements over the last few years.

Exchange hybrid setups have come a long way

I started configuring Exchange hybrid deployments the first week Microsoft made Office 365 publicly available in June 2011 with the newest version of Exchange at the time, Exchange 2010. Setting up an Exchange hybrid deployment was a laborious task. Microsoft provided a 75-page document with the Exchange hybrid configuration steps, which would take about three workdays to complete. Then I could start the troubleshooting process to fix the innumerable typos I made during the setup.

In December 2011, Microsoft released Exchange 2010 Service Pack 2, which included the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard. The wizard reduced that 75-page document to a few screens of information that cut down the work from three days to about 15 minutes. The Exchange hybrid configuration wizard did not solve all the problems of an Exchange hybrid deployment, but it made things a lot easier.

What the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard does

The Exchange hybrid configuration wizard is just a PowerShell script that runs all the necessary configuration tasks. The original hybrid configuration wizard completed seven key tasks:

  1. verified prerequisites for a hybrid deployment;
  2. configured Exchange federation trust;
  3. configured relationships between on-premises Exchange and Exchange Online;
  4. configured email address policies;
  5. configured free/busy calendar sharing;
  6. configured secure mail flow between the on-premises and Exchange Online organizations; and
  7. enabled support for Exchange Online archiving.

How the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard evolved

Since the initial release of the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard, Microsoft expanded its capabilities in multiple ways with several major improvements over the last few years.

Since the initial release of the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard, Microsoft expanded its capabilities in multiple ways with several major improvements over the last few years.

Exchange hybrid configuration wizard decoupled from service pack updates: This may seem like a minor change, but it’s a significant development. Having the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard as part of the standard Exchange update cycle meant that any updates to the wizard had to wait until the next service pack update.

Now the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard is an independent component from Exchange Server. When you run the wizard, it checks for a new release and updates itself to the most current configuration. This means you get fixes or additional features without waiting through that quarterly update cycle.

Minimal hybrid configuration: Not every migration has the same requirements. Sometimes a quicker migration with fewer moving parts is needed, and Microsoft offered an update in 2016 for a minimal hybrid configuration feature for those scenarios.

The minimal hybrid configuration helps organizations that cannot use the staged migration option, but want an easy switchover without worrying about configuring extras, such has the free/busy federation in calendar availability.

The minimal hybrid configuration leaves out the following functionality from a full hybrid configuration:

  • cross-premises free/busy calendar availability;
  • Transport Layer Security secured mail flow between on-premises Exchange and Exchange Online;
  • cross-premises eDiscovery;
  • automatic Outlook on the web (OWA) and ActiveSync redirection for migrated users; and
  • automatic retention for archived mailboxes.

If these features aren’t important to your organization and speed is of the essence, the minimal hybrid configuration is a good option.

Recent update goes further with setup work

Microsoft designed the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard to migrate mailboxes without interrupting the end user’s ability to work. The wizard gives users a full global address book, free/busy calendar availability and some of the mailbox delegation features used with an on-premises Exchange deployment.

A major new addition to the hybrid configuration wizard its ability to transfer some of the on-premises Exchange configurations to the Exchange Online tenant. The Hybrid Organization Configuration Transfer feature pulls configuration settings from your Exchange organization and does a one-time setup of the same settings in your Exchange Online tenant.

Microsoft expanded the abilities of Hybrid Organization Configuration Transfer in November 2018 so it configures the following settings: Active Sync Mailbox Policy, Mobile Device Mailbox Policy, OWA Mailbox Policy, Retention Policy, Retention Policy Tag, Active Sync Device Access Rule, Active Sync Organization Settings, Address List, DLP Policy, Malware Filter Policy, Organization Config and Policy Tip Configuration.

The Exchange hybrid configuration wizard only handles these settings once. If you make changes in your on-premises Exchange organization after you run the Exchange hybrid configuration wizard, those changes will not be replicated in the cloud automatically.

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Bollywood, blockbusters and a $5 billion industry: How Indian company Eros Now is redefining online video | Transform

Being on the cutting edge of technology was baked into the DNA of Indian video company Eros Now from the start.

Its parent company, Eros International Plc., was founded in 1977, the same year the VHS videocassette format was released in North America. While some in the entertainment industry were leery about the newfangled technology, Eros was all in.

“Back then, it was a scary thing,” says Eros Digital CEO Rishika Lulla Singh. “But we embraced VHS and we continued to embrace new technology.”

That approach has served the company well. Eros International Plc., a movie distribution and production company, was India’s first VHS distributor and the first Indian media company listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

Eros Now, its on-demand video arm, was launched in 2012 and has now attracted over 18.8 million paid subscribers and 155 million users worldwide with its more than 12,000 Bollywood films, music videos and original content including series and short episodes.

Eros Now amassed its big audience largely by premiering blockbuster films and related content such as trailers and music videos on its site even before they were on YouTube, Lulla Singh says. The company aims to differentiate itself not just as a one-stop destination for online entertainment but also as a tech innovator — and a new collaboration with Microsoft is underpinning those efforts.

Portrait of Rishika Lulla Singh, CEO of Indian company Eros Digital
Eros Digital CEO Rishika Lulla Singh.

Eros Now is working with Microsoft to migrate the company’s operations to the Azure cloud platform to improve video and viewing experiences for consumers worldwide. Lulla Singh says Microsoft’s ability to innovate in cloud computing and artificial intelligence, its research in voice services and discovery, and the company’s capacity for handling big data were the primary reasons Eros Now wanted to collaborate with Microsoft to develop next-generation video technology.

“We feel that Azure can help us to drive a lot of our ambitions to create the correct architecture for the video platform,” she says. “It was the sheer sophistication of the product over everything else on the market.”

The collaboration, Microsoft’s first effort in India in streaming video, signifies a move into a thriving entertainment market. Streaming video is growing rapidly in India, where the market is projected to reach $5 billion by 2023, according to a study by The Boston Consulting Group.

“India is among the fastest-growing entertainment and media markets globally, with cutting-edge innovation in content creation, distribution and data insights ,” says Anant Maheshwari, president of Microsoft India. “Our partnership with Eros Now is a significant milestone. Together, we hope to redefine the video viewing experience for consumers in India and across the globe.”

Lulla Singh has been working with teams across Microsoft and says she’s been struck by the company’s collaborative culture.

“Microsoft wants to enable other companies to be cool and to essentially realize your own ambition. The collaboration that’s come from that is incredible,” she says.

The rise in video streaming has shifted consumer expectations and the role of companies like Microsoft in the industry. Consumers are watching content on multiple devices, from smartphones to tablets, and media companies are facing increased competition to attract viewers, Maheshwari says. Those companies are looking to cloud providers for secure and scalable content delivery, he says, and for capabilities such as advanced search and smart content recommendations.

“What will differentiate video streaming services is the ability to give users exciting content to experience within the limited time and attention span they have,” he says. “AI and intelligent cloud tools will be the next drivers of the media business and will impact everything in the content value chain.”

Eros Now, Lulla Singh says, saw an opportunity to distinguish itself by creating original content that was a departure from the typical Indian television fare.

“The television landscape in India is very, very different to what happens in the U.S., where we have ‘Game of Thrones’ and a lot of sexy content,” she says. “That doesn’t really exist in the Indian television ecosystem.

“Most Indian programming is catered to more older audiences, which is actually not relevant to the new millennial audiences.”

Eros Now began developing its own original content around 2015, launching “Side Hero,” a Bollywood-inspired comedy series, last year, followed by “Smoke,” a drama about drug cartels. Last December, the company introduced “Eros Now Quickie,” a series of eight- to 10-minute episodes ranging from docudramas to comedy, and segments on food, health and travel.

Eros Now plans to continue innovating by personalizing content for customers by language, subtitles and other geographic-based preferences. Bollywood movies have been growing in popularity in regions outside India including China, Russia and Eastern Europe, Lulla Singh says. Eros Now, which currently has viewers in more than 135 countries, hopes to ride that momentum to expand into new markets and reach its goal of 50 million subscribers over the next three years.

“We just want to continue to create, continue to please our customers and grow in the process as well,” she says.

Top image: A sampling of Eros Now’s original content, which began premiering in 2018. (Images courtesy of Eros Now)

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Author: Microsoft News Center

For Sale – Custom water loop 9800x rtx 2080 work station pc

I’m selling my work station due to moving into a smaller office and needing a smaller machine. It’s running on windows 10. I was going to dismantle and put components into a new case but i love the build and think it’s a shame to dismantle.

It’s only recently been built (3 months) and is packed with top of the line parts. Used for mainly cad applications but is an absolute beast for gaming and can handle any 4K game.

List below

Intel 9800x 8 core 16 threads cpu
Rtx 2080 Gpu founders edition
Asus x299 motherboard
T force nighthawk 32gb ddr4 3000mhz quad channel memory
Wd black 500gb nvme m.2 drive
2tb hard drive
Evga 850w gold certified psu

Water cool parts include
Alphacool 480mm radiator (80mm thick)
4 Thermaltake riing premium edition fans with controller
Thermaltake d5 pr22 Pacific pump reservoir
Ek nickel fittings and acrylic tubes
Ek mono block for cpu and vrm

Machine runs super cool due to the massive radiator. The cpu is lightly overlocked to 4.6ghz on all cores and runs like a dream. Could easily push more but i do not chase numbers.

all fans and res rgb is managed by software.
mono block and ram along with motherboards rbg all managed by ASUS software.

The machine is located at my home address in Tadworth Surrey and can be demoed prior to purchase.

Price and currency: 2050
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: pp gift or b/t
Location: tadworth surrey,
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

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By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Kaseya ramps up managed compliance services focus

MSP software vendor Kaseya revealed it has invested $10 million into a newly formed business unit dedicated to managed compliance services.

The division focuses on Kaseya Compliance Manager, a platform the vendor developed after acquiring RapidFire Tools in 2018. Kaseya Compliance Manager lets MSPs assess and monitor customers’ compliance posture within a number of regulatory frameworks, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the Payment Card Industry Security Standard, and General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The platform can also help MSPs and their customers demonstrate compliance with cyberinsurance policies. Kaseya recently appointed Max Pruger, formerly chief revenue officer at CloudJumper, to lead the unit as senior vice president and general manager of compliance.

“We as a company believe that compliance is the next big managed service. It is a close cousin to security … [and] a fantastic opportunity for MSPs to expand their business and monetize a very low-touch type of offering,” said Fred Voccola, CEO of Kaseya.

What Kaseya Compliance Manager does

Fred Voccola, CEO of KaseyaFred Voccola

According to Voccola, Kaseya’s compliance management platform scans a customer’s networks and infrastructure to gather about 70% to 90% of the data required by regulators. The remaining 10% to 30% of information can’t be obtained through automated processes, so the software generates a checklist to guide that information’s collection.

“What our product does is it automates everything that can be automated and then it lists the 50 to 100 items that have to be ‘manually’ proven,” Voccola said.

HIPAA, for example, states that a medical provider must physically store patient files in a room with secure locks on the doors. In this case, Kaseya Compliance Manager would direct the MSP and its customer to take photos of the door locks and load the photos into the software, he said.

Once the information is collected, MSPs can then generate documentation and reports to show the customer has met compliance requirements.

In addition, Voccola said the software lets MSPs continually monitor customers’ compliance status. MSPs can receive alerts if changes in a customer’s network or infrastructure cause a compliance issue.

Enabling managed compliance services

A portion of Kaseya’s $10 million investment will go into developing resources to help MSPs establish managed compliance practices. Resources include a content library to learn about how to price, sell and deliver the services. “MSPs don’t have to be an expert in the compliance framework with this offering. That’s the biggest part of it,” Voccola said.

Max Pruger, senior vice president and general manager of compliance, KaseyaMax Pruger

Kaseya is also encouraging MSPs to use the platform internally. Under certain regulatory frameworks, such as HIPAA, MSPs must demonstrate internal compliance before they can touch customer data. Voccola said Kaseya gives MSPs the license for their own internal usage for free when they purchase Kaseya Compliance Manager.

Pruger added that MSPs can also benefit from using the software internally for showing continual compliance with cyberinsurance policies. “Every MSP out there should have cyberinsurance,” Pruger noted.

Voccola said that regulatory compliance will soon become a common part of doing business for all MSPs in the U.S., especially as states roll out localized privacy legislation. He cited the California Consumer Privacy Act introduced in 2018, as an example.

Pruger agreed. “I will say that in the next 24 months, every single MSP will have to have a compliance practice, because every single state in the United States is going to have specific compliance rules that they are going to have to follow,” Pruger said.

In the next quarter, Pruger said he aims to bring Kaseya Compliance Manager to market across GDPR, cyberinsurance, HIPAA and NIST frameworks. “As far as cyberinsurance, HIPAA and NIST go within the U.S., every single MSP has to be [compliant with] at least one of those,” he said. He noted that he will look to add more compliance standards on the platform.

Only about 400 MSPs are currently using Kaseya Compliance Manager, Voccola noted — a number the company hopes to greatly increase in the coming months.

SADA offers flat-rate GCP services

SADA, a business and technology consultancy based in Los Angeles, launched four flat-rate packaged offers for Google Cloud Platform adopters.

The packaged services include Anthos First Step, Anthos Flat-Rate, Database Migration Flat-Rate and VM Migration Flat-Rate. SADA delivers the services for a flat price and according to a fixed time. Miles Ward, CTO at SADA, said the GCP services address customers’ uncertainty and risk when moving to the cloud. An organization may balk at a cloud migration service if the service provider can’t cite a definitive delivery schedule or set a fixed price.

“The ability to have a flat-rate offer lets the conversation start,” Ward said. He noted customers are more likely to greenlight a project if the service is prescriptive, time-bound and available at a specific price point.

The Anthos First Step package provides the first phase of setting up and using Google Anthos. The offering includes x86 portable or rack-mounted infrastructure and Google Anthos, VMware vCenter 6.5 and F5 Big-IP Virtual Addition. SADA provides on-site hardware and software installation, a hands-on lab and a help desk trained on Anthos/Kubernetes.

Anthos Flat-Rate covers the second phase of an Anthos implementation. The package includes everything in the first-step package as well as additional items including a review of the initial implementation, identification of production goals and stakeholders for readiness reviews, and any additional equipment delivery and validation, according to SADA.

The Database Migration Flat-Rate package includes migration of a customer’s database to GCP, while VM Migration Flat-Rate migrates a customer’s virtual machines to GCP.

Hostway, Hosting rebrand as Ntirety

Emil Sayegh, president and CEO at NtiretyEmil Sayegh

Hostway Services Inc. and Hosting, which merged in January, have rebranded as Ntirety.

The managed cloud services company is based in Austin, Texas, and has vendor certifications with companies such as AWS, Microsoft and Oracle. Emil Sayegh, president and CEO at Ntirety, cited “strong synergy” between the companies’ offerings and no overlap between their customer bases. On the IT side, the companies had both been using ScienceLogic to run their businesses. The consolidation of those instances has generated cost savings, Sayegh noted.

No additional acquisitions are in the offing this year, but Sayegh noted the potential for merger and acquisition activity in 2020.

Other news

Christian Alvarez as vice president, Americas Channel, at NutanixChristian Alvarez
  • Nutanix has appointed Christian Alvarez as vice president, Americas Channel. Alvarez was previously worldwide head of channels and distribution at Juniper Networks. He has also held positions at Cyan, a Ciena company; Avaya; eLandia Group; Connexion Technologies and Terremark Worldwide, a Verizon company. Nutanix said its partners include value-added resellers, distributors, system integrators, OEM partners and technology alliances.
  • Hewlett Packard Enterprise launched HPE ML Ops, a container-based software product to support the machine-learning model lifecycle, according the company. An HPE spokesperson said the vendor believes the product presents an opportunity for partners. “Channel partners need to build a practice in this area and develop expertise in data science, AI [and machine learning], and advanced analytics. It’s an opportunity for them to … provide a strategic advisory role for their customers as they look to deliver game-changing business innovation with AI,” the spokesperson said.
  • NYI, a hybrid IT solutions provider based in New York, has acquired a data center in Chicago. The former Navisite facility is geared toward edge and IoT requirements, according to the company.
  • In distribution news, Ingram Micro inked a deal with CoreKinect to provide its IoT sensors to U.S. channel partners. Meanwhile, Tech Data signed an agreement with OPAQ to provide its network-security-as-a-service cloud platform to U.S. service providers.
  • Mission, an MSP based in Los Angeles, said it obtained AWS APN Premier Consulting Partner status.
  • Axcient, a business availability and cloud migration company, unveiled a lead generation program that it said is free for all Axcient partners.
  • Opengear, which specializes in enterprise automation, network resilience and security, will host its first channel partner conference Sept. 16-17 in Dallas.

Market Share is a news roundup published every Friday.

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For Sale – Custom water loop 9800x rtx 2080 work station pc

I’m selling my work station due to moving into a smaller office and needing a smaller machine. It’s running on windows 10. I was going to dismantle and put components into a new case but i love the build and think it’s a shame to dismantle.

It’s only recently been built (3 months) and is packed with top of the line parts. Used for mainly cad applications but is an absolute beast for gaming and can handle any 4K game.

List below

Intel 9800x 8 core 16 threads cpu
Rtx 2080 Gpu founders edition
Asus x299 motherboard
T force nighthawk 32gb ddr4 3000mhz quad channel memory
Wd black 500gb nvme m.2 drive
2tb hard drive
Evga 850w gold certified psu

Water cool parts include
Alphacool 480mm radiator (80mm thick)
4 Thermaltake riing premium edition fans with controller
Thermaltake d5 pr22 Pacific pump reservoir
Ek nickel fittings and acrylic tubes
Ek mono block for cpu and vrm

Machine runs super cool due to the massive radiator. The cpu is lightly overlocked to 4.6ghz on all cores and runs like a dream. Could easily push more but i do not chase numbers.

all fans and res rgb is managed by software.
mono block and ram along with motherboards rbg all managed by ASUS software.

The machine is located at my home address in Tadworth Surrey and can be demoed prior to purchase.

Price and currency: 2050
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: pp gift or b/t
Location: tadworth surrey,
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

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The roots of Oracle’s cloud evolution: A 20-year review

Oracle’s strategy going into 2020 is to support users wherever they are, while not-so-subtly urging them to move onto Oracle cloud services – particularly databases.

In fact, some say its Oracle’s legacy as a database vendor that may be the key to the company’s long-term success as a major cloud player.

To reconcile the Oracle cloud persona of today with the identity of database giant that the company still holds, it helps to look back at key milestones in Oracle’s history over the past 20 years, beginning with Oracle database releases at the turn of the century.

Oracle releases Database 8i, 9i

Two major versions of Oracle’s database arrived in 1998 and 2001. Oracle Database 8i was the first written with a heavy emphasis on web applications — the “i” stood for Internet.

Then Oracle 9i introduced the feature Real Application Clusters (RAC) for high-availability scenarios. RAC is a widely popular and lucrative database option for Oracle, one it has held very close to date. RAC is only supported and certified for use on Oracle’s cloud service at this time. 

With the 9i update, Oracle made a concerted effort to improve the database’s administrative tooling, said Curt Monash, founder of Monash Research in Acton, Mass.

“This was largely in reaction to growing competition from Microsoft, which used its consumer software UI expertise to have true ease-of-administration advantages versus Oracle,” Monash said. “Oracle narrowed the gap impressively quickly.”

Timeline: These 10 milestones marked Oracle's path to modern cloud computing
These 10 milestones marked Oracle’s path to modern cloud computing

Oracle acquires PeopleSoft and Siebel

Silicon Valley is littered with the bones of once-prominent application software vendors that either shut down or got swallowed up by larger competitors. To that end, Oracle’s acquisitions of PeopleSoft and Siebel still resonate today.

The company launched what many considered to be a hostile takeover of PeopleSoft, the second-largest software vendor in 2003 after SAP. It ultimately succeeded with a $10.3 billion bid the following year. Soon after the deal closed, Oracle laid off more than half of PeopleSoft’s employees in a widely decried act.

Oracle also gained J.D. Edwards, known for its manufacturing ERP software, through the PeopleSoft purchase.

The PeopleSoft deal, along with Oracle’s $5.8 billion acquisition of Siebel in 2005, reinvented the company as a big player in enterprise applications and set up the path toward Fusion.

Oracle realized that to catch up to SAP in applications, it needed acquisitions, said Holger Mueller, an analyst with Constellation Research in Cupertino, Calif., who worked in business and product development roles at Oracle during much of the 2000s.

“To cement ownership within complex CRM, they needed Siebel,” Mueller said. Those Siebel customers largely remain in the fold today, he added. While rival HCM software vendor Workday has managed to poach some of Oracle’s PeopleSoft customers, Salesforce hasn’t had the same luck converting Siebel users over to its CRM, according to Mueller.

Oracle’s application deals were as much or more about acquiring customers as they were about  technology, said Frank Scavo, president of IT consulting firm Strativa in Irvine, Calif.

“Oracle had a knack for buying vendors when they were at or just past their peak,” he said. “PeopleSoft was an example of that.”

The PeopleSoft and Siebel deals also gave Oracle the foundation, along with its homegrown E-Business Suite, for a new generation of applications in the cloud era.

Oracle’s Fusion Applications saga

Oracle first invoked the word “Fusion” in 2005, under the promise it would deliver an integrated applications suite that comprised a superset of functionality from its E-Business Suite, PeopleSoft and Siebel software, with both cloud and on-premises deployment options.

The company also pledged that Fusion apps would deliver a consumer-grade user experience and business intelligence embedded throughout processes.

Fusion Applications were supposed to become generally available in 2008, but Oracle didn’t make these applications generally available to all customers until 2011.

It’s been suggested that Oracle wanted to take its time and had the luxury of doing so, since its installed base was still weathering a recession and had little appetite for a major application migration, no matter how useful the new software was.

Fusion Applications’ sheer scope was another factor. “It takes a long time to build software from scratch, especially if you have to replace things that were strong category leaders,” Mueller said.

Oracle’s main shortcoming with Fusion Applications was its inability to sell very much of them early on, Mueller added.

Oracle acquires Hyperion and BEA

After its applications shopping spree, Oracle eyed other areas of software. First, it bought enterprise performance management vendor Hyperion in 2007 for $3.3 billion to bolster its financials and BI business.

“Hyperion was a smart acquisition to get customers,” Mueller said. “It helped Oracle sell financials. But it didn’t help them in the move to cloud.”

In contrast, BEA and its well-respected application server did. The $8.5 billion deal also gave Oracle access to a large customer base and many developers, Mueller added.

John Rymer, ForresterJohn Rymer

BEA’s products also gave a boost to Oracle’s existing Fusion Middleware portfolio, said John Rymer, an analyst at Forrester. “At the time, Oracle’s big competitor in middleware was IBM,” he said. “[Oracle] didn’t have credibility.”

Oracle’s hardware play

Oracle made a major strategic shift in 2008 with the introduction of Exadata, its first foray into hardware.

Exadata packs servers, networking and storage, along with Oracle database and other software, into preconfigured racks. Oracle also created storage processing software for the machines, which its marketing arm initially dubbed “engineered systems.”

With the move, Oracle sought to take a bigger hold in the data warehousing market against the likes of Teradata and Netezza, which was subsequently acquired by IBM.

Exadata was a huge move for Oracle, Monash said.

“They really did architect hardware around software requirements,” he said. “And they attempted to change their business relationship with customers accordingly. … For context, recall that one of Oracle’s top features in its hypergrowth years in the 1980s was hardware portability.”

In fact, it would have been disastrous if Oracle didn’t come up with Exadata, according to Monash.

“Oracle was being pummeled by independent analytics DBMS vendors, appliance-based or others,” he said. “The competition was more cost-effective, naturally, but Exadata was good enough to stem much of the bleeding.”

Steve DahebSteve Daheb

Exadata and its relatives are foundational to Oracle’s IaaS, and the company also offers the systems on-premises through its Cloud at Customer program.

“We offer customers choice,” said Steve Daheb, senior vice president of Oracle Cloud. “If customers want to deploy [Oracle software] on IBM or HP [gear], you could do that. But we also continue to see this constant theme in tech, where things get complicated and then they get aggregated.”

Oracle buys Sun Microsystems

Few Oracle acquisitions were as controversial as its $7.4 billion move to buy Sun Microsystems. Critics of the deal bemoaned the potential fate of open-source technologies such as the MySQL database and the Java programming language under Oracle’s ownership, and the deal faced serious scrutiny from European regulators.

Oracle ultimately made a series of commitments about MySQL, which it promised to uphold for five years, and the deal won approval in early 2010.

Sun’s hardware became a platform for Exadata and other Oracle appliances. MySQL has chugged along with regular updates, contrary to some expectations that it would be killed off.

But many other Sun-related technologies fell into the darkness, such as Solaris and Sun’s early version of an AWS-style IaaS. Oracle also moved Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, although it maintains tight hold over Java SE.

The Sun deal remains relevant today, given how it ties into Ellison’s long-term vision of making Oracle the IBM for the 21st century, Mueller said.

That aspiration realized would see Oracle become a “chip-to-click” technology provider, spanning silicon to end-user applications, he added. “The verdict is kind of still out over whether that is going to work.”

Oracle Database 12c

The company made a slight but telling change to its database naming convention with the 2013 release of 12c, swapping consonants for one that denoted “cloud,” rather than “g” for grid computing.

Oracle’s first iteration of 12c had multitenancy as a marquee feature. SaaS vendors at the time predominantly used multitenancy at the application level, with many customers sharing the same instance of an app. This approach makes it easier to apply updates across many customers’ apps, but is inherently weaker for security, Ellison contended.

Oracle 12c’s multi-tenant option provided an architecture where one container database held many “pluggable” databases.

Oracle later rolled out an in-memory option to compete with SAP’s HANA in-memory database. SAP hoped its customers, many of which used Oracle’s database as an underlying store, would migrate onto HANA.

2016: Oracle acquires NetSuite

Oracle’s $9.3 billion purchase of cloud ERP vendor NetSuite came with controversy, given Ellison’s large personal financial stake in the vendor. But on a strategic level, the move made plenty of sense.

NetSuite at the time had more than 10,000 customers, predominantly in the small and medium-sized business range. Oracle, in contrast, had 1,000 or so customers for its cloud ERP aimed at large enterprises, and not much presence in SMB.

Thus, the move plugged a major gap for Oracle. It also came as Oracle and NetSuite began to compete with each other at the margins for customers of a certain size.

Oracle’s move also gave it a coherent two-tier ERP strategy, wherein a customer that opens new offices would use NetSuite in those locations while tying it back to a central Oracle ERP system. This is a practice rival SAP has used with Business ByDesign, its cloud ERP product for SMBs, as well as Business One.

The NetSuite acquisition was practically destined from the start, said Scavo of Strativa.

“I always thought Larry was smart not to do the NetSuite experiment internally. NetSuite was able to develop its product as a cloud ERP system long before anyone dreamed of doing that,” Scavo said.

NetSuite customers could benefit as the software moves onto Oracle’s IaaS if they receive the promised benefits of better performance and elasticity, which NetSuite has grappled with at times, Scavo added. “I’m looking forward to seeing some evidence of that.”

Oracle launches its second-generation IaaS cloud

The IaaS market has largely coalesced around three players in hyperscale IaaS: AWS, Microsoft and Google. Other large companies such as Cisco and HPE tried something similar, but ceded defeat and now position themselves as neutral middle players keen to help customers navigate and manage multi-cloud deployments.

Oracle, meanwhile, came to market with an initial public IaaS offering based in part on OpenStack, but it failed to gain much traction. It subsequently made major investments in a second-generation IaaS, called Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, which offers many advancements at the compute, network and storage layers over the original.

With [on-premises software] we had to make it work with everybody. Part of it is working together to bring that to the cloud.
Steve DahebSenior vice president, Oracle Cloud

Oracle has again shifted gears, evidenced by its partnership with Microsoft to boost interoperability between Oracle Cloud Infrastructure and Azure. One expected use case is for IT pros to run their enterprise application logic and presentation tiers on Azure, while tying back to Oracle’s Autonomous Database on the Oracle cloud.

“We started this a while back and it’s something customers asked for,” Oracle’s Daheb said. There was significant development work involved and given the companies’ shared interests, the deal was natural, according to Daheb.

“If you think about this world we came from, with [on-premises software], we had to make it work with everybody,” Daheb said. “Part of it is working together to bring that to the cloud.”

Oracle Autonomous Database marks the path forward

Ellison will unveil updates to Oracle database 19c, which runs both on-premises and in the cloud, in a talk at OpenWorld. While details remain under wraps, it is safe to assume the news will involve autonomous management and maintenance capabilities Oracle first discussed in 2017.

Oracle database customers typically wait a couple of years before upgrading to a new version, preferring to let early adopters work through any remaining bugs and stability issues. Version 19c arrived in January, but is more mature than the name suggests. Oracle moved to a yearly naming convention and update path in 2018, and thus 19c is considered the final iteration of the 12c release cycle, which dates to 2013.

Oracle users should be mindful that autonomous database features have been a staple of database systems for decades, according to Monash.

But Oracle has indeed accomplished something special with its cloud-based Autonomous Database, according to Daheb. He referred to an Oracle marketing intern who was able to set up databases in just a couple of minutes on the Oracle Cloud version. “For us, cloud is the great democratizer,” Daheb said.

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