Tag Archives: into

GCP Marketplace beats AWS, Azure to Kubernetes app store

Google Cloud Platform has made the first foray into a new frontier of Kubernetes ease of use with a cloud app store that includes apps preconfigured to run smoothly on the notoriously persnickety container orchestration platform.

As Kubernetes becomes the de facto container orchestration standard for enterprise DevOps shops, helping customers tame the notoriously complex management of the platform has become de rigueur for software vendors and public cloud service providers. Google stepped further into that territory with GCP Marketplace, a Kubernetes app store with application packages that can automatically be deployed onto container clusters with one click and then billed through Google Cloud Platform as a service.

A search of the AWS Marketplace for “Kubernetes” turned up Kubernetes infrastructure packages by Rancher, Bitnami and CoreOS, but not prepackaged apps from vendors such as Nginx and Elastic ready to be deployed on Kubernetes clusters, which is what GCP Marketplace offers. Another search of the Azure Marketplace returned similar results.

Just because Google is first to market with this Kubernetes app store doesn’t mean that what the company has done is magic.

“These marketplaces are based on Kubernetes template technologies such as Helm charts, so they’re widely available to everyone,” said Gary Chen, an analyst at IDC in Framingham, Mass. “I’m sure if [AWS and Azure] don’t have it, they are already working on something like this.”

Google executives said Helm charts factored into some of the app packages it created with partners, but in some cases it created GCP Marketplace offerings by way of its work with independent software vendors.

“Our approach gives vendors flexibility to use Helm or other packaging mechanisms, given that there isn’t a clear standard today,” the company said through a spokesperson.

GCP Marketplace Kubernetes apps
A screenshot of Kubernetes apps in the revamped GCP Marketplace.

Initially, GCP Marketplace apps offer click-to-deploy support onto Kubernetes clusters that run in Google Kubernetes Engine, and GKE does telemetry monitoring and logging on those apps in addition to offering billing support.

But there’s nothing that precludes these packages to eventually run on premises or even in other public cloud providers’ infrastructures, said Jennifer Lin, product director for Google Cloud.

“It’s always within the realm of possibility, but not something we’re announcing today,” she said.

There is precedent for GCP products with third-party cloud management capabilities — the Google Stackdriver cloud monitoring tool, for example, can be used with AWS and Azure resources.

Initial app partners include the usual suspects among open source cloud-native infrastructure and middleware projects such as GitLab, Couchbase, CloudBees, Cassandra, InfluxDB, Elasticsearch, Prometheus, Nginx, RabbitMQ and Apache Spark. Commonly used web apps such as WordPress and a container security utility from Aqua Security Software will also be available in the initial release of GCP Marketplace.

Mainstream enterprise customers will look for more traditional apps such as MySQL, SQL Server and Oracle databases, as well as back-office and productivity apps. Lin said Google plans more mainstream app support, but she declined to specify which apps are on the GCP Marketplace roadmap.

8×8 X Series combines UC and contact center

Unified-communications-as-a-service vendor 8×8 pushed further into the cloud contact center market this week with the release of X Series, an offering that combines voice, video, collaboration and contact center functions in a single platform.

Combining UC and contact center makes it easier for agents to get in touch with the right people when handling customer queries, said Meghan Keough, vice president of product marketing at 8×8, based in San Jose, Calif. For example, a company could set up shared rooms within a team collaboration app where agents and knowledge workers can chat or video conference.

The 8×8 X Series will also help companies better track customer contacts, because the same back-end infrastructure will handle calls to a local retail store and the customer service line at headquarters, Keough said. 

8×8 highlighted the platform’s ability to federate chats between leading team collaboration apps, such as Slack, Microsoft Teams and Cisco Webex Teams, allowing users of those cloud services to communicate with each other from their respective interfaces.

Technology acquired in 8×8’s 2017 acquisition of Sameroom is powering that federation and is available as a stand-alone product. The vendor also released its collaboration platform, 8×8 Team Messaging, in beta this week, with features such as persistent chat rooms, presence and file sharing.

The vendor is offering several subscription tiers for the 8×8 X Series. The more expensive plans include calling capabilities in 47 countries, as well as AI features, such as speech analytics.

Cloud fuels convergence of UC, contact center in 8×8 X Series

UC and contact center technologies used to live in “parallel universes,” said Jon Arnold, principal analyst of Toronto-based research and analysis firm J Arnold & Associates. But the cloud delivery model has made it easier to combine the platforms, which lets customers use the same over-the-top service for geographically separate office locations.

Many UCaaS vendors have added contact centers to their cloud platforms in recent years. While some, including 8×8, developed or acquired contact center suites, others — such as RingCentral and Fuze — partner with contact-center-as-a-service specialists, like Five9 and Nice InContact.

Legacy vendors are also taking steps to enhance their cloud contact center offerings. Cisco is planning to use the CC-One cloud platform it recently acquired from BroadSoft to target the midmarket, for example. Avaya, meanwhile, bought contact-center-as-a-service provider Spoken Communications earlier this year to fill a gap in its portfolio.

For many businesses, a cloud subscription to the 8×8 X Series will be cheaper than purchasing UC and contact center platforms separately, analysts said. Also, 8×8’s multi-tiered pricing model should appeal to organizations that are looking to transition to the cloud gradually.

8×8 is not the only vendor capable of offering integrated UC and contact center services, Arnold said. But the vendor has done a good job of marketing and packaging its products to make it easy for buyers and channel partners, he said.

“It’s all part of one large integrated family of services, and you can cherry-pick along the way what level is best for you,” Arnold said of the 8×8 X Series. “So, it kind of simplifies the roadmap [to the cloud] for companies.”

For Sale – Samsung 950 PRO NVMe M.2 256GB

Wasn’t sure there was a difference which is why I was asking earlier. I’ve looked into it though and unless I’m reading the tests wrong, the 960 Evo seems to have superceded the 950 Pro and is faster and the 970 is newer & quicker again. Something to do with the different architecture from the 2016 generations to the 2017 & 2018 ones?

Ignore me if I’m totally wrong though![/QUOTE

Samsung Evo 970 fastest drive available at the moment I believe from the reviews,and £85 at Scan with free delivery.

Click to expand…

Microsoft bills Azure network as the hub for remote offices

Microsoft’s foray into the rapidly growing SD-WAN market could solve a major customer hurdle and open Azure to even more workloads.

All the major public cloud platforms have increased their networking functionality in recent months, and Microsoft’s latest service, Azure Virtual WAN, pushes the boundaries of those capabilities. The software-defined network acts as a hub that links with third-party tools to improve application performance and reduce latency for companies with multiple offices that access Azure.

IDC estimates the software-defined wide area network (SD-WAN) market will hit $8 billion by 2021, as cloud computing continues to proliferate and employees must access cloud-hosted workloads from various locations. So far, the major cloud providers have left that work to partners.

But this Azure network service solves a big problem for customers that make decisions about network transports and integration with existing routers, as they consume more cloud resources from more locations, said Brad Casemore, an IDC analyst.

“Now what you’ve got is more policy-based, tighter integration within the SD-WAN,” he said.

Azure Virtual WAN uses a distributed model to link Microsoft’s global network with traditional on-premises routers and SD-WAN systems provided by Citrix and Riverbed. Microsoft’s decision to rely on partners, rather than provide its own gateway services inside customers’ offices, suggests it doesn’t plan to compete across the totality of the SD-WAN market, but rather provide an on-ramp to integrate with third-party products.

Customers can already use various SD-WAN providers to easily link to a public cloud, but Microsoft has taken the level of integration a step further, said Bob Laliberte, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group in Milford, Mass. Most SD-WAN vendors are building out security ecosystems, but Microsoft already has that in Azure, for example.

This could also simplify the purchasing process, and it would make sense for Microsoft to eventually integrate this virtual WAN with Azure Stack to help facilitate hybrid deployments, Laliberte said.

It’s unclear if customers trust Microsoft — or any single hyperscale cloud vendor — at the core of their SD-WAN implementation, as their architectures spread across multiple clouds.

The Azure Virtual WAN service is billed as a way to connect remote offices to the cloud, and also to each other, with improved reliability and availability of applications. But that interoffice linkage also could lure more companies to use Azure for a whole host of other services, particularly customers just starting to embrace the public cloud.

There are still questions about the Azure network service, particularly around multi-cloud deployments. It’s unclear if customers trust Microsoft — or any single hyperscale cloud vendor — at the core of their SD-WAN implementation, as their architectures spread across multiple clouds, Casemore said.

Azure updates boost network security, data analytics tools

Microsoft also introduced an Azure network security feature this week, Azure Firewall, with which users can create and enforce network policies across multiple endpoints. A stateful firewall protects Azure Virtual Network resources and maintains high availability without any restrictions on scale.

Several other updates include an expanded Azure Data Box service, still in preview, which provides customers with an appliance onto which they can upload data and ship directly to an Azure data center. These types of devices have become a popular means to speed massive migrations to public clouds. Another option for Azure users, Azure Data Box Disk, uses SSD disks to transfer up to 40 TB of data spread across five drives. That’s smaller than the original box’s 100 TB capacity, and better suited to collect data from multiple branches or offices, the company said.

Microsoft also doubled the query performance of Azure SQL Data Warehouse to support up to 128 concurrent queries, and waived the transfer fee for migrations to Azure of legacy applications that run on Windows Server and SQL Server 2008/2008 R2, for which Microsoft will end support in July 2019. Microsoft also plans to add features to Power BI for ingestions and integration across BI models that are similar to Microsoft customers’ experience with Power Query for Excel.

Rackspace colocation program hosts users’ legacy servers

Rackspace’s latest service welcomes users’ legacy gear into Rackspace data centers and once in place, gives the vendor a golden opportunity to sell these customers additional services.

The Rackspace Colocation program primarily targets midsize and larger IT shops that want to launch their first cloud initiative, or sidestep the rising costs to operate their own internal data centers. Many of these IT shops have just begun to grapple with the realities of their first digital transformation projects. They must choose where to position key applications from private clouds to microservices that run on Azure and Google Cloud.

Some Rackspace users run applications on customized hardware and operating systems that are not supported by public clouds, while others have heavily invested in hardware and want to hold onto those systems for another five years to get the full value out of those systems, said Henry Tran, general manager of Rackspace’s managed hosting and colocation business.

Customers that move existing servers into Rackspace’s data centers gain better system performance from closer proximity to Rackspace’s infrastructure. This gives Rackspace a chance to upsell those customers add-on interconnectivity and other higher-margin services.

“[The Rackspace Colocation services program] is a way to get you in the door by handling all the mundane stuff, but longer term they are trying to get you to migrate to their cloud,” said Cassandra Mooshian, senior analyst at Technology Business Research Inc. in Hampton, N.H.

Green light for greenfield colocation services

There are still many enterprise workloads that run in corporate data centers, so there are a lot of greenfield opportunities to pursue in colocation services. Roughly 60% of enterprises don’t use colos today, and the colocation market should grow around 8% annually through 2021, said Dan Thompson, a senior analyst at 451 Research. “There is still a lot of headroom for companies to migrate to colocation and/or cloud,” he said.

This speaks loudly to the multi-cloud and hybrid cloud world we are living in.
Dan Thompsonanalyst, 451 Research

Other colocation service providers have expanded with various higher-margin cloud and other managed services, but Rackspace has chosen a different path.

“They’ve had hosting and cloud services for a while but are now moving in the direction of colocation,” 451 Research’s Thompson said. “This speaks loudly to the multi-cloud and hybrid cloud world we are living in.”

Rackspace’s acquisition of Datapipe in late 2017 initiated its march into colocation, with the ability to offer capabilities and services to Datapipe customers through Microsoft’s Azure Stack, VMware’s Cloud on AWS and managed services on Google’s Cloud platform. In return, Rackspace gained access to Datapipe’s colocation services and data centers to gain a market presence in the U.S. West Coast, Brazil, China and Russia.

Rackspace itself was acquired in late 2016 by private equity firm Apollo Global Management LLC, which gave the company some financial backing and freedom to expand its business.

Datrium DVX switches focus to converged markets, enterprise

Datrium has a new CEO, and a new strategy for pushing hyper-convergence into the enterprise.

Tim Page replaced Brian Biles, one of Datrium’s founders, as CEO in June. Biles moved into the chief product officer role, one he said he is better suited for, to allow Page to build out an enterprise sales force.

The startup is also changing its market focus. Its executives previously avoided calling Datrium DVX primary storage systems hyper-converged, despite its disaggregated architecture that included storage and Datrium Compute Nodes and Data Nodes. They pitched the Datrium DVX architecture as “open convergence” instead because customers could also use separate x86 or commodity servers. As a software-defined storage vendor, Datrium played down its infrastructure architecture.

Now Datrium positions itself as hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) on both the primary and secondary storage sides. The use cases and reasons for implementation are the same as hyper-converged — customers can collapse storage and servers into a single system.

“You can think of us as a big-a– HCI,” Biles said. “We’re breaking all the HCI rules.”

Datrium DVX is nontraditional HCI with stateless servers, large caches and shared storage but is managed as a single entity.

You can think of us as a big-a– HCI. We’re breaking all the HCI rules.
Brian Bileschief product officer, Datrium

“We mean HCI in a general way,” Biles said. “We’re VM- or container-centric, we don’t have LUNs. DVX includes compute and storage, it can support third-party servers. But when you look at our architecture, it is different. To build this, we had to break all the rules.”

Datrium’s changed focus is opportunistic. The HCI market is growing at a far faster rate than traditional storage arrays, and that trend is expected to continue. Vendors who have billed themselves as software-defined storage without selling underlying hardware have failed to make it.

Secondary storage is also taking on a converged focus with the rise of newcomers Rubrik and Cohesity. Datrium also wants to compete there with a cloud-native version of DVX for backup and recovery.

However, Datrium will find a highly competitive landscape in enterprise storage and HCI. It will go against giants Dell EMC, Hewlett Packard Enterprise and NetApp on both fronts, and Cisco and Nutanix in HCI. Besides high-flying Cohesity and Rubrik, its backup competition includes Veritas, Dell EMC, Veeam and Commvault.

A new Datrium DVX customer, the NFL’s San Francisco 49ers, buys into the vendor’s HCI story. Jim Bartholomew, the 49ers IT director, said the football team collapsed eight storage platforms into one when it installed eight DVX Compute Nodes and eight DVX Data Nodes. It will also replace its servers and perhaps traditional backup with DVX, 49ers VP of corporate partnerships Brent Schoeb said.

“The problem was, we had three storage vendors and always had to go to a different one for support,” Bartholomew said.

Schoeb said the team stores its coaching and scouting video on Datrium DVX, as well as all of the video created for its website and historical archives.

“We were fragmented before,” Schoeb said of the team’s IT setup. “Datrium made it easy to consolidate our legacy storage partners. We rolled it all up into one.”

Datrium DVX units in the 49ers' data center.
The NFL’s San Francisco 49ers make an end run around established storage vendors by taking a shot with startup Datrium.

Roadmap: Multi-cloud support for backup, DR

Datrium parrots the mantra from HCI pioneer Nutanix and others that its goal is to manage data from any application wherever it resides on premises or across clouds.

Datrium is building out its scale-out backup features for secondary storage. Datrium DVX includes read on write snapshots, deduplication, inline erasure coding and a built-in backup catalog called Snapstore.

Another Datrium founder, CTO Sazzala Reddy, said the roadmap calls for integrating cloud support for data protection and disaster recovery. Datrium added support for AWS backup with Cloud DVX last fall, and is working on support for VMware Cloud on AWS and Microsoft Azure.

“We want to go where the data is,” Reddy said. “We want to move to a place where you can move any application to any cloud you want, protect it any way you want, and manage it all in the data center.”

New CEO: Datrium’s ready to pivot

Page helped build out the sales organization as COO at VCE, the EMC-Cisco-VMware joint venture that sold Vblock converged infrastructure systems. He will rebuild the sales structure at DVX, shifting the focus from SMB and midmarket customers to the enterprise.

DVX executives claim they have hundreds of customers and hope to hit 1,000 by the end of 2018, although that goal is likely overambitious. The startup is far from profitable, and will require more than the $110 million in funding it has raised. Industry sources say Datrium already has about $40 million in venture funding lined up for a D round, and is seeking strategic partners before disclosing the round. Datrium has around 200 employees.

“Datrium’s at an interesting point,” Page said of his new company. “They’re getting ready to pivot in a hyper-growth space now into the enterprise. What we didn’t have was an enterprise sales motion — it’s different selling into the Nimble, Tintri, Nutanix midmarket world. It’s hard to port anyone from that motion into the enterprise motion. We’re going to get into that growth phase, and make sure we do it right.”

Biles said he is following the same model as in his previous company, Data Domain. The backup deduplication pioneer took off after bringing Frank Slootman in as CEO during its early days of shipping products in 2003. Data Domain became a public company in 2007, and EMC acquired it for $2.1 billion two years later.

“I knew a lot less then than I know now, but I know there are many better CEOs than me,” Biles said. “Customer opportunities are much bigger than they used to be, and the sales cycle is much bigger than our team was equipped for. We needed to do a spinal transplant. There’s a bunch of things to deal with as you get to hundreds of employees and a lot of demanding customers. My training is on the product side.”

Ctera Networks adds Dell and HPE gateway appliance options

Ctera Networks is aiming to move its file storage services into the enterprise through new partnerships with Dell and Hewlett Packard Enterprise.

The partnerships, launched in June, allow Ctera to bundle its Enterprise File Services Platform on more-powerful servers with greater storage capacity. Ctera previously sold its branded cloud gateway appliances on generic white box hardware at a maximum raw capacity of 32 TB. The new Ctera HC Series Edge Filers include the HC1200 model offering as much as 96 TB, the HC400 with as much as 32 TB and the HC400E at 16 TB on Dell or HPE servers with 3.5-inch SATA HDDs.

The gateway appliances bundle Ctera’s file services that provide users with access to files on premises and transfers colder data to cloud-based, scale-out object storage at the customer site or in public clouds.

The new models include the Petach Tikvah, Israel, company’s first all-flash appliances. The HC1200 is equipped with 3.84 TB SATA SSDs and offers a maximum raw capacity of 46.08 TB. The HC400 tops out at 15.36 TB. The all-flash models use HPE hardware with 2.5-inch read-intensive SSDs that carry a three-year warranty.

Ctera Networks doesn’t sell appliances with a mix of HDDs and SSDs. The HC400 and HC400E are single rack-unit systems with four drive bays, and the HC1200 is a 2U device with 12 drive bays.

“In the past, we had 32 TB of storage, and it would replace a certain size of NAS device. With this one, we can replace a large series of NAS devices with a single device,” Ctera Networks CEO Liran Eshel said.

Ctera HC Series Edge Filers
New Ctera HC Series Edge Filers include Ctera Networks HC1200 (top) and HC400 file storage.

New Ctera Networks appliances enable multiple VMs

The new, more-powerful HC Series Edge Filers will enable customers to run multiple VMware virtual machines (VMs), applications and storage on the same device, Eshel said. The HC Series supports 10 Gigabit Ethernet networking with fiber and copper cabling options.

“Our earlier generation was just a cloud storage gateway. It didn’t do other things,” Eshel said. “With this version, we actually have convergence — multiple applications in the same appliance. Basically, we’re providing top-of-the-line servers with global support.”

The Dell and HPE partnerships will let Ctera Networks offer on-site support within four hours, as opposed to the next-business-day service it provided in the past. Ctera will take the first call, Eshel said, and be responsible for the customer ticket. If it’s a hardware issue, Ctera will dispatch partner-affiliated engineers to address the problem.

Using Dell and HPE servers enables worldwide logistics and support, which is especially helpful for users with global operations.

“It was challenging to do that with white box manufacturing,” Eshel said.

Software-defined storage vendors require these types of partnerships to sell into the enterprise, said Steven Hill, a senior analyst at 451 Research.

“In spite of the increasingly software-based storage model, we find that many customers still prefer to buy their storage as pre-integrated appliances, often based on hardware from their current vendor of choice,” Hill wrote in an e-mail. “This guarantees full hardware compatibility and provides a streamlined path for service and support, as well as compatibility with an existing infrastructure and management platform.”

Cloud object storage options

The Ctera product works with on-premises object storage from Caringo, Cloudian, DataDirect Networks, Dell EMC, Hitachi, HPE, IBM, NetApp, Scality and SwiftStack. It also supports Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform, IBM Cloud, Microsoft Azure, Oracle and Verizon public clouds. Ctera has reseller agreements with HPE and IBM.

Eshel said one multinational customer, WPP, has already rolled out the new appliances in production for use with IBM Cloud.

The list price for the new Ctera HC Series starts at $10,000. Ctera also continues to sell its EC Series appliances on white box hardware. Customers have the option to buy the hardware pre-integrated with the Ctera software or purchase virtual gateway software that they can install on server hypervisors on premises or in Amazon or Azure public clouds.

Ping adds AI-driven API protection with Elastic Beam acquisition

BOSTON — Ping Identity is moving beyond single sign-on and further into API security with its latest acquisition.

At the Identiverse 2018 conference on Tuesday, the Denver-based identity and access management (IAM) provider announced the acquisition of Elastic Beam, a Redwood City, Calif., cybersecurity startup that uses artificial intelligence to monitor and protect APIs. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Ping CEO Andre Durand discussed the importance of API protection in the past as part of the company’s “intelligent identity” strategy. The company, which specializes in IAM services such as single sign-on, had previously introduced PingAccess for API management and security.

Elastic Beam, which was founded in 2014, will become part of Ping’s new API protection offering, dubbed PingIntelligence for APIs. Elastic Beam’s API Behavioral Security (ABS) automatically discovers an organization’s APIs and monitors the activity using AI-driven behavioral analysis.

“The moment it detects abnormal activity on an API, it automatically blocks that API,” said Bernard Harguindeguy, founder of Elastic Beam.

Harguindeguy, who joined Ping as its new senior vice president of intelligence, said ABS’ use of AI is ideal for API monitoring and defense, because there are simply too many APIs and too much data around them for human security professionals to effectively track and analyze on their own.

“API security is a very hard problem. You cannot rely on roles and policies and attacker patterns,” he said. “We had to use AI in a very smart way.”

Durand said the explosion of APIs in both cloud services and mobile applications has expanded the attack surface for enterprises and demanded a new approach to managing and securing APIs. While Durand acknowledged the potential for AI systems to make mistakes, he said improving API protection can’t be done without the help of machine learning and AI technology.

“We’re in the early stages of applying AI to the enormity of traffic that we have access to today,” he said. “We want to limit the space and time that users have access to, but there’s no policy that can do that. I don’t think there’s a way to have that breakthrough without machine learning, big data and AI.”

PingIntelligence for APIs is currently in private preview, and it will be generally available in the third quarter this year.

The 39 most powerful female engineers of 2018

Gwynne Shotwell is the president and COO of SpaceX and was inducted into the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame earlier this year.

She’s been at SpaceX since 2002, the year the company was founded, and became its president in 2008. By 2012, she’d helped SpaceX become the first privately funded company to send a spacecraft to the International Space Station, forever changing the space industry.

Under her leadership, SpaceX was the first private company to send a satellite into geostationary orbit, too. Setting new standards is one of her favorite things about the job, with milestones like “landing a first-stage booster on a drone ship and on land, re-flying a rocket, launching Falcon Heavy, the most powerful rocket currently in operation,” she tells us.

Her path to becoming a powerful engineer all began with a smart, and smartly dressed, role model.

“I was inspired to become an engineer by a very smart, well-dressed mechanical engineer who I saw speak at a Society of Women Engineers event as a teenager,” Shotwell says.

“She was doing really critical work and I loved her suit. That’s what a 15-year-old girl connects with. I used to shy away from telling that story, but if that’s what caused me to be an engineer, I think we should talk about that.”

Correction: A previous version of this post misstated Shotwell’s starting date. She began working at SpaceX in 2002, not 2012.

For Sale – MSI Geforce GTX 1080Ti Gaming X

Bought this back in January as I got into the bit coin mining craze but never got round to doing it properly so was only used for around 2 months, since then it has just been used for the odd bit of VR gaming.

Full spec of this card can be found here…

MSI Global

It still has 6 months warranty left so any issues in that time I can get it replaced.

I have all the bits it came with and the original packaging still in excellent condition, delivery will be via next day DPD courier.

[​IMG]

Price and currency: £730
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Bank Transfer
Location: Bristol/England
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.