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For Sale – Dell 9370 i7 FHD, Dell 7590 i7 UHD touch, Alienware m15 r1 GTX 1070

Hi Adam

I’ll make an offer of £800 for the 7590.

Before you jump to the conclusion it’s a lowball offer it’s because I can get the same spec direct from the Dell outlet for £1295.

Refurbished Cheap Laptops and 2-in-1 PCs: Dell Outlet | Dell UK

The offer is based on the fact that I’d have a contract with Dell so if there’s any repeat of the expanding battery issue (or any other potential long term fault) I can go after Dell from a legal viewpoint, I can’t do that if I buy a unit second hand from a private individual. Legal liability is over and above warranty coverage and is worth that level of difference to me, simplistically if they decide not to undertake a warranty issue as they don’t ‘agree’ with the claim then there’s nothing I can do unless I bought it from them directly.

I realise you’re pretty unlikely to accept the offer but put it out there for you to consider.

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Veeam’s Timashev discusses selling company, next steps

It’s the end of an era at Veeam Software.

Ratmir Timashev and Andrei Baronov are stepping away from the backup, recovery and data management company they founded in 2006. Private equity firm Insight Partners said last week it would acquire Veeam in a transaction that valued Veeam at $5 billion. Timashev said it was his decision to step down from the board of directors and from his position of executive vice president of sales and marketing. He will remain in those roles until the sale closes, likely by the end of the first quarter. Baronov has left his CEO position and will relinquish his spot on the board.

Timashev held the CEO job from 2006 to 2016, and has been the most public face of Veeam. Timashev said he feels he’s leaving Veeam in good hands. For example, William Largent, who has served in various positions since the beginning of the company, returned to the role of CEO.

“At some point, the founders have to step down,” Timashev said in an interview.

He expressed confidence in Insight Partners as the new owner. The firm had invested $500 million in Veeam a year ago and first invested in the company in 2013.

Timashev seemed excited for the future of Veeam, which started in backup for virtual infrastructure and has since expanded to cover cloud and physical environments. It has grown in that time into a billion-dollar annual revenue company and claims 365,000 users and 70,000 partners.

Timashev said Veeam has conquered the VMware backup market and will next tackle the hybrid cloud in its “act two.” He specifically called out four targets in Veeam’s focus: AWS, Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and Google. The transition includes a move to subscription pricing.

Timashev, 53, this week discussed why the founders decided to sell the company, what the sale could mean for customers, and what he plans to do next.

What was behind the decision to sell the company now?

Veeam's Ratmir TimashevRatmir Timashev

Ratmir Timashev: We felt that it’s good timing for us to accelerate our growth globally, but also specifically in the U.S. Insight has been our strategic partner since 2013. But I’ve known Insight since 2001.

We believe right now the whole industry, as well as Veeam, is in a transition to what we call “act two.” For us, “act one” was dominating the highly virtualized, modern, on-premises data center, from the data management and backup point of view. And we’ve done a great job in the last 10 years.

The whole industry and also Veeam is going through a large transition to a hybrid cloud and pay-as-you-go subscription model. It’s a difficult transition, but we believe that we will be successful.

So, we thought that Insight, with the industry experience — and experience with different business models and software companies — would be a great partner to take us to this next level.

Will you still be involved in Veeam?

Timashev: I will be involved in the transition and then my role will be more on a consultant basis.

How long do you see the transition lasting?

Timashev: We don’t know — [at least] until the deal is closed, which is expected by the end of Q1. The transition might [end] sometime after that. But I will not be employed by Veeam when the transaction closes. 

What would you like to see during the transition period? What are some of your goals while you’re still employed with Veeam?

Timashev: We want to make sure that employees understand that not a lot of changes will occur. This acquisition is not about reducing the cost or shrinking the expenses. It’s about growth.

Sometimes when a private equity firm buys a company, in an industry or segment that is not growing, their goal is to reduce the costs. That’s not the case with Veeam because we are in a high growth area with a leading position. And we’re extremely well-positioned to capitalize on this expanding market for us.

We believe that we have a very strong executive management team.

Considering your relationship with Insight, could you have stayed on after the deal closed, as an executive?

Timashev: I could have, but that’s not our plan.

Why, since you’ve been there from the beginning, why is now the time that you want to step away?

Timashev: In general, I want to spend more time with my family and kids. I worked very hard in the last 20, 30 years building two companies. [To start Veeam, the two invested the money they made from selling their first company, Aelita Software, to Quest in 2004.]

Andrei is in a similar position — we are the same age. And we have kids and want to spend more time with family.

Since you’ve been with the company since the beginning, will it be hard to step away?

Timashev: It’s always hard, it’s like a baby. Friends of mine are asking how difficult it is. I asked them, ‘Is it difficult to sell your child for $5 billion?’

Is there anything that’s unfinished that you wish had been completed by now? Do you have any concerns that you hope get resolved in the near future?

Whoever wins this new market is going to dominate. Veeam won the VMware market. When a new market opens up, you only have two, three, four years to win that market.
Ratmir TimashevCo-founder, Veeam Software

Timashev: Not really — right now, we are going through a major transition, which represents some challenges, as well as opportunities. Whoever wins this new market is going to dominate. Veeam won the VMware market. It took us two or three years to win that market and then we basically rode the wave.

When a new market opens up, you only have two, three, four years to win that market. And there will always be three winners — number one, number two, number three, and then there will be a whole bunch of others.

We’re very well-positioned.

So you don’t have your third company in the works yet?

Timashev: We always have some ideas — always definitely to find another billion-dollar market opportunity. And I always say it takes three things to create a successful technology company — to be at the right time, at the right place, and create a brilliant product. And me and Andrei have done it twice now.

So, I’m sure that at some point after taking some time off, we might come up with a new idea.

What do you think the sale means for your customers? Have they expressed any concerns going forward following this news?

Timashev: No, they look very positively [on the sale], especially the U.S. customers. As part of this transaction, we are going to become 100% U.S.-shareholder owned. And with the executive management that is primarily U.S.-based, that news is very positive, especially for our U.S. customers. We have lots of large enterprise customers in the U.S., as well as federal customers, and they are taking this very positively.

What will it take to make your product the best for the hybrid cloud era?

Timashev: We have to follow our playbook. We have done it twice. Back in the ’90s, we won the hearts and minds of Windows administrators [with Aelita]. And then 10 years later in 2008, 2009, we won the hearts and minds of VMware administrators. Now 10 years later, we just have to win the hearts and minds of AWS, Azure, Office 365 and Google users.

What does it take? First, the product has to be brilliant, simple, and we have to listen to our core customers. Our core customer used to be [running] VMware. Now it’s going to be a different buyer — AWS, Azure, Office 365, Google buyer. They have their own budget. Sometimes they belong to IT. Sometimes they belong to DevOps.

We have to offer them the simple, flexible and reliable product. That’s what Veeam is known for: simple, flexible and reliable.

Can you give more detail on what your consultant work for Veeam might entail?

Timashev: Just sitting down with [Insight Partners managing director] Mike Triplett, with Bill Largent on a regular basis, and advising them how to attack this new market, how to play the Veeam playbook to win the new markets of AWS, Azure, Office 365 and Google. Those are four big markets.

Will there be any big changes in terms of Veeam offices? What will happen to the headquarters in Switzerland and the people who work there?

Timashev: No, no big changes. We will be looking at U.S. headquarters. We already have two very large offices in Columbus, Ohio, and in Atlanta, Georgia. We have probably around 400 people in each office. So probably one of those will become the U.S. headquarters.

Our office in Switzerland will continue to operate the way it is now. We are unique in the sense that we have always had our management team very distributed. We don’t really have a single office where everybody needs each other.

What do you see generally, for the future of the backup and recovery market and data protection?

Timashev: The market, if you look laterally, it’s backup and recovery, [but it’s also] data management. We believe that there are other components to data management in addition to backup and recovery — [for example] replication, cloud mobility, governance and compliance, analytics.

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For Sale – Dell 9370 i7 FHD, Dell 7590 i7 UHD touch, Alienware m15 r1 GTX 1070

Hi Adam

I’ll make an offer of £800 for the 7590.

Before you jump to the conclusion it’s a lowball offer it’s because I can get the same spec direct from the Dell outlet for £1295.

Refurbished Cheap Laptops and 2-in-1 PCs: Dell Outlet | Dell UK

The offer is based on the fact that I’d have a contract with Dell so if there’s any repeat of the expanding battery issue (or any other potential long term fault) I can go after Dell from a legal viewpoint, I can’t do that if I buy a unit second hand from a private individual. Legal liability is over and above warranty coverage and is worth that level of difference to me, simplistically if they decide not to undertake a warranty issue as they don’t ‘agree’ with the claim then there’s nothing I can do unless I bought it from them directly.

I realise you’re pretty unlikely to accept the offer but put it out there for you to consider.

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For Sale – 2015 iMac 5K – 24gb Ram, i5, 1tb, Boxed.

Hi all,

Due to a job change, resulting in a work pc, my iMac 5k is surplus to requirements. It’s in great condition, no issues with the screen and will come wiped ready for the new user to setup (as new from Apple). I have the magic mouse and keyboard to go with it (the ones with a lightning charger), along with the original box.
Specs are as follows;
3.2ghz Core i5,
24gb DDR3,
1tb Hard drive,
Radeon R9 M380.

Pictures below show the rest – please note I was using an external Samsung T5 SSD to boot from, which I have subsequently removed. I could include this in the sale if requested.

Any questions please ask.

Collection only from Clapham Junction, London.

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Quantum computing in business applications is coming

Quantum computing may still be in its infancy stages, but it’s rapidly approaching and is already showing significant potential for business applications across several industries.

At MIT Technology Review’s Future Compute conference in December 2019, Alan Baratz, CEO of D-Wave Systems Inc., a Canadian quantum computing company, discussed the benefits of quantum computing in business applications and the new capabilities it can offer.

Editor’s note: The following has been edited for clarity and brevity.

Why should CIOs be thinking about quantum computing in business applications?

Alan Baratz: Quantum computing can accelerate the time to solve the hard problems. If you are in a logistics business and you need to worry about pack and ship or vehicle scheduling; or you’re in aerospace and you need to worry about crew or flight scheduling; or a drug company and you need to worry about molecular discovery computational chemistry, the compute time to solve those problems at scale can be very large.

Typically, what companies do is come up with heuristics — they try to simplify the problem. Well, quantum computing has the potential to allow you to solve the complete problem much faster to get better solutions and optimize your business.

Would you say speed is considered as the most significant factor of quantum computing?

Baratz: Well, sometimes it’s speed, sometimes it’s quality of the solution [or] better solution within the same amount of time. Sometimes, it’s diversity of solution. One of the interesting things about the quantum computer is that maybe you don’t necessarily want the optimal solution but [rather] a set of good solutions that you can then use to optimize other things that weren’t originally a part of the problem. The quantum computer is good at giving you a set of solutions that are close to optimal in addition to the optimal solution.

What’s limiting quantum computing in terms of hardware?

Baratz: Well, up until now, in [D-Wave’s] case, it’s been the size and topology of the system because in order to solve your problem, you have to be able to map it onto the quantum processor. Remember, we aren’t gate-based, so it’s not like you specify the sequence of instructions or the gates. In order to solve your problem in our system, you have to take the whole problem and be able to map it into our hardware. That means with 2,000 qubits and each qubit connected to six others, there’s only certain size problems that you can actually map into our system. When we deliver the Advantage system next year, we double that — over 5,000 qubits [and] each qubit connected to 15 others — so, that will allow us to solve significantly larger problems.

In fact, for a doubling of the processor size, you get about a tripling of the problem size. But we’ve done one other thing: We’ve developed brand new hybrid algorithms [and] these are not types of hybrid algorithms that people typically think about. It’s not like you try to take the problem and divide it into chunks and solve [them]. This is a hybrid approach where we use a classical technique to find the core of the problem, and then we send that off to the quantum processor. With that, we can get to the point where we can solve large problems even with our 5,000-qubit system. We think once we deliver the 5,000-qubit system Advantage [and] the new hybrid solver, we’ll see more and more companies being able to solve real production problems.

Do you think companies are in a race toward quantum computing?

Baratz: No, they’re not because in some cases they’re not aware, and in some cases they don’t understand what’s possible. The problem is there are very large companies that make a lot of noise in the quantum space and their approach to quantum computing is one where it will take many, many years before companies can actually do something useful with the system. And because they’re the loudest out there, many companies think that’s all there is. We’ve been doing a better job of getting the D-Wave message out, but we still have a ways to go.

What excites you most about quantum computing in business settings?

Baratz: First, just the ability to solve problems that can’t otherwise be solved to me is exciting. When I was at MIT, my doctorate was in theory of computation. I was kind of always of the mindset that there are just some problems that you’re not going to be able to solve with one computer. I wouldn’t say quantum computing removes, but [it] reduces that limitation — that restriction — and it makes it possible to solve problems that couldn’t otherwise be solved.

But more than that, the collection of technologies that we have to use to build our system, even that is exciting. As I mentioned during the panel, we develop new superconducting circuit fabrication recipes. And we’re kind of always advancing the state of the art there. We’re advancing the state of the art and refrigeration and how to remove contaminants from refrigerators because it can take six weeks to calibrate a quantum computer. Once you cool it down, would you cool the chip down? Well, if you get contaminants in the refrigerator and you have to warm up the system and remove those contaminants, you’re going to lose two months of compute time. We have systems that run for two and a half, three years and nobody else really has the technology to do that.

It’s been said that one of the main concerns with quantum computers is increased costs. Can you talk a little more about that?

Baratz: Well, there was that power question [from the panel] about when is it going to stop all the power? So, the truth of the matter is our system runs on about 20 kilowatts. The reason is, the only thing we really need power for is the refrigerator — and we can put many chips in one refrigerator. So, as the size of the chip grows, as the number of chips grow, the power doesn’t grow. Power is the refrigerator.

Second, the systems are pricey if you want to buy one [but through] cloud access, anybody can get it. I mean, we even give free time, but we do sell it and currently we sell it at $2,000 an hour, but you can run many, many problems within that amount of time.

Will this be the first technology that CIOs will never have on premises?

Baratz: Oh, never say never. We continue to work on shrinking the size of the system as well so, who knows?

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For Sale – 2015 iMac 5K – 24gb Ram, i5, 1tb, Boxed.

Hi all,

Due to a job change, resulting in a work pc, my iMac 5k is surplus to requirements. It’s in great condition, no issues with the screen and will come wiped ready for the new user to setup (as new from Apple). I have the magic mouse and keyboard to go with it (the ones with a lightning charger), along with the original box.
Specs are as follows;
3.2ghz Core i5,
24gb DDR3,
1tb Hard drive,
Radeon R9 M380.

Pictures below show the rest – please note I was using an external Samsung T5 SSD to boot from, which I have subsequently removed. I could include this in the sale if requested.

Any questions please ask.

Collection only from Clapham Junction, London.

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Vendors detail cloud-based backup past, present, future

It’s safe to say cloud-based backup has gone mainstream.

In the last five years, cloud backup grew from something that organizations often greeted with skepticism to a technology that’s at least a part of many businesses’ data protection plans.

Some of that evolution is a result of users getting more comfortable with the idea of backing up data in the cloud and the security there. Some of it is a result of vendors adding functionality such as security, backup of cloud-born software as a service (SaaS) data and other enhancements. Challenges remain, though.

In part one of this feature, several experts in cloud-based backup detailed how the market has developed and what businesses can expect in the years to come. In part two, executives from backup vendors, including cloud backup pioneers, discuss their impressions of the past, present and future of the technology.

How has cloud-based backup evolved in the last five years?

Eran Farajun, executive vice president, Asigra: [Cloud-based backup has] become a lot more mainstream as a service.

Headshot of Asigra's Eran FarajunEran Farajun

Because it’s become so popular, it’s become a target. So, it’s moved from becoming a defensive mechanism to it becoming an attack vector. It’s a way that people get attacked, which has then caused even more evolution in the last, I would say two or three years, where cloud backup now has to include security and safety elements. Otherwise, you’re not going to be able to recover confidently with it.

Hal Lonas, CTO, Carbonite: We have seen a rise in the popularity of cloud, especially over the past five years as it becomes a more scalable and economical solution for businesses — particularly SMBs that are expanding rapidly. It has also been highly embraced by the service provider and solution market.

Public cloud has also come a long way, especially among highly regulated industries such as healthcare and finance. We’re seeing these organizations turn to the cloud more frequently than before, as it provides an easier and more cost-effective way to meet their recovery time objective and recovery point objective requirements.

Danny Allan, CTO, Veeam: The first perspective of customers was, ‘I’ll just take my backups and [move them] to the cloud,’ and there wasn’t really thought given to what that meant.

We’ve become a lot more efficient about the data movement, both in and out, and secondly, there are now options that didn’t exist in the past. If you need to recover data in the cloud, you can, or you can recover back on premises. And if you are recovering it back on premises, you can do that efficiently.

Headshot of Arcserve's Oussama El-HilaliOussama El-Hilali

Oussama El-Hilali, CTO, Arcserve: [There has been] tremendous evolution both in quantity and quality of the cloud backup. We’ve seen a number of vendors emerge to provide backup to the cloud. We’ve seen the size of the backups grow. We’ve seen the number of people who are interested in going to cloud backup grow as well.

I think one of the fundamental things in data protection has been creating the distance between the primary and secondary data, in case of disaster.

Where are we in the story of cloud-based backup? Is it at the height of its popularity?

Farajun: I don’t think it’s at the height. It’s still growing fairly quickly as an overall service. So, it’s not flat; it’s still growing in double-digit figures year over year.

And I think what lends to its popularity is future evolution. It’ll get more secure. It has to be more secure.

There will be new types of workloads that get included as part of your backup service. For example, backing up machines today is fairly common. Backing up containers is not as common today, but it will be in three to five years.

The cloud market is mature and is fast becoming the infrastructure of choice for many companies, whether at the SMB or enterprise level.
Hal LonasCTO, Carbonite

I think cloud backup for SaaS applications [will grow]. A lot of cloud backup services and vendors support Office 365, Salesforce and G Suite, but as more and more end customers adopt more software as a service, the data itself also has to be protected. So, you’ll see more cloud backup functionality and capabilities protect a broader set of SaaS applications beyond just the big ones.

Lonas: The cloud market is mature and is fast becoming the infrastructure of choice for many companies, whether at the SMB or enterprise level. This can be proven with the popularity of Microsoft Azure, AWS and Google along with other cloud providers.

Right now, many still equate cloud with security and while cloud solves some problems, it is not a complete cure. Rather, we will see more cloud-oriented security solutions protecting cloud assets and their specific issues in the upcoming years.

One of the biggest pain points with cloud adoption today is migrating data to these infrastructures. The good news is that there are a number of tools available now to alleviate the traditional issues related to data loss, hours of downtime and diverted key resources.

Allan: We’re not at the height of its popularity. We’re in early stages of customers sending their data into the cloud. It’s been growing exponentially. I know cloud has been around for 10 years, but it’s only really in the last year that customers are actually sending backup data into the cloud. I would attribute that to intelligent cloud backup — using intelligence to know how to do it and how to leverage it efficiently. 

El-Hilali: It’s a good step, but we’re not at the peak, or anywhere close to the peak.

The reason being is that if you look at the cloud providers, whether it’s public cloud like AWS or companies like us, the features are still evolving. And the refinement is still ongoing.

What do you expect in the cloud backup market in the next five years?

Farajun: I think there will be more consolidation. I think that more of the old-school vendors, the big broad vendors, will continue to add more cloud backup service capability as part of their offerings portfolio. They’ll either acquire companies that do it or they will stand up services that do it themselves. There will be more acquisitions by bigger MSPs that buy smaller MSPs because they deliver cloud backup services and they have the expertise.

I think you’ll see an increase of channel partners bringing [cloud-based backup] back in-house and actually being the service provider instead of just being a broker. And that will happen because it adds more value to their business.

And I think you’ll see unfortunately ransomware attacking more and more backup software, whether it’s delivered as a service or on premises, just because it’s so damaging.

Lonas: Looking ahead, we will see cloud backup and data protection continue to gain popularity, especially as businesses implement cyber-resiliency plans.

More organizations now trust the cloud to be available, secure and meet their business needs. We will continue to see Moore’s Law drive down network and storage costs so that businesses can continue to reduce their on-premises footprint. Some of this change is technical, and some is cultural, as most of us trust the cloud in our personal lives more than businesses do; and we expect to see this trend continue to shift for businesses in the future.

Allan: I think there’s going to be a whole emergence of machine learning-based companies that exist only in the cloud, and all they need is access to your data. In the past, what was the problem with machine learning and artificial intelligence on premises? You had to install it on premises to get access to that data or you needed to pick up petabytes of data and get it to that company. If it’s already there, you can imagine a marketplace emerging that will give you value-added services on top of this data.

El-Hilali: I think the potential for DRaaS will continue to grow and I say that because the availability of the data, the spontaneity of recovery, is becoming more of a need than a good-to-have.

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PowerShell tutorials capture attention of admins in 2019

As 2019 reaches its end, it’s time to look back at the tips and tutorials published this year that mattered the most to the Windows Server audience.

Microsoft has redoubled its efforts to make PowerShell the overarching management tool for workloads no matter where they reside. Interest in automation and PowerShell tutorials that explain how to streamline everyday tasks continue to resonate with readers. In this top-five compilation of the 2019 tips that picked up the most page views, nearly all the articles focus on PowerShell, from learning advanced text manipulation techniques to plumbing the features in the newer, open source version initially dubbed PowerShell Core. But the article that claimed the top spot indicates many administrators have their eyes on a relatively new way to manage resources in their organization.

5. Windows Compatibility module expands PowerShell Core reach

The first PowerShell Core release, version 6.0, arrived in January 2018, but it was a step back in many ways for administrators who had been used to the last Windows PowerShell version, 5.1. This new PowerShell version, developed to also run on the other major operating system platforms of Linux and macOS, lost a fair amount of functionality due to the switch from the Windows-based .NET Framework to the cross-platform .NET Core. The end result was a fair number of cmdlets administrators needed to do their jobs did not run on PowerShell Core.

With any project of this size, there will be growing pains. Administrators can continue to use Windows PowerShell, which Jeffrey Snover said will always be supported by Microsoft and should serve IT workers faithfully for many years to come. But to ease this transition, the PowerShell team released a Windows Compatibility module in late 2018 to close the functionality gap between the Windows and open source versions of PowerShell. This tip digs into the background of the module and how to use it on PowerShell Core to work with some previously incompatible cmdlets.

4. How to use the PowerShell pending reboot module

Among the many perks of PowerShell is its extensibility. Administrative functions that were once out of reach — or laborious to accomplish — can magically appear once you download a module from the PowerShell Gallery. Install a module and you get several new cmdlets to make your administrative life just a bit easier.

For example, after Patch Tuesday rolls around and you’ve applied Microsoft’s updates to all your systems, the patching process generally is not complete — and the system not fully protected from the latest threats — until the machine reboots. A Microsoft field engineer developed a pending reboot module that detects if a Windows system has not rebooted. These insights can help you see which users might require a nudge to restart their machines to make sure your patching efforts don’t go for naught. This tip explains how to install and use the pending reboot cmdlet.

3. How to configure SSL on IIS with PowerShell    

Among its many uses in the enterprise, Windows Server also functions as a web server. Microsoft shops can use the Internet Information Services role in Windows Server to serve up content and host web applications for use across the internet or in a company’s private intranet.

To keep threat actors from sniffing out traffic between your IIS web server and the clients, add HTTPS to encrypt data transmissions to and from the server. HTTPS works in tandem with Transport Layer Security (TLS), the more secure ancestor to Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Most in IT still refer to the certificates that facilitate the encrypted transmissions between servers and clients as SSL certificates. This tip explains how to use PowerShell to deploy a self-signed TLS/SSL certificate to an IIS website, which can come in handy if you spin up a lot of websites in your organization.

2. Hone your PowerShell text manipulation skills

It might seem like a basic ability, but learning how to read text from and write text to files using PowerShell opens up more advanced avenues of automation. There are several cmdlets tailored for use with text files to perform several tasks, including importing text into a file that can then be manipulated for other uses. It’s helpful to know that while text might look the same, Windows PowerShell and PowerShell Core have different ways of dealing with encoding. This tip covers some of the finer details of working with text in PowerShell to broaden your automation horizons.

1. Azure AD Premium P1 vs. P2: Which is right for you?

Most organizations require some way to manage their resources — from user accounts to physical devices, such as printers — and Active Directory has been the tool for the job for many years. Based on Windows Server, the venerable on-premises identity and access management platform handles the allocation and permissions process to ensure users get the right permissions to access what they need.

Microsoft unveiled its cloud-based successor to Active Directory, calling it Azure Active Directory, in 2013. While similar, the two products are not a straight swap. If you use Microsoft’s cloud, either for running VMs in Azure or using the collaboration apps in Office 365, then you’ll use Azure Active Directory to manage resources on those platforms. This tip digs into some of the permutations between the two higher-end editions of Azure Active Directory to help you decide which one might work best for your organization.

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For Sale – Wraith Prism RGB Cooler + Fractal Design Meshify C Blue Panel

I have the Wraith Prism cooler (RGB one) for sale.

Brand new in it’s box and unused.

This cooler comes with thermal pad pre-applied so is ready to go out of the box, no paste needed.

£23.50 delivered.

Also have a brand new in box Replacment Panel for Fractal Design Meshify C case. Colour Deep Blue… see photos.

£16 delivered.

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For Sale – 2015 iMac 5K – 24gb Ram, i5, 1tb, Boxed.

Hi all,

Due to a job change, resulting in a work pc, my iMac 5k is surplus to requirements. It’s in great condition, no issues with the screen and will come wiped ready for the new user to setup (as new from Apple). I have the magic mouse and keyboard to go with it (the ones with a lightning charger), along with the original box.
Specs are as follows;
3.2ghz Core i5,
24gb DDR3,
1tb Hard drive,
Radeon R9 M380.

Pictures below show the rest – please note I was using an external Samsung T5 SSD to boot from, which I have subsequently removed. I could include this in the sale if requested.

Any questions please ask.

Collection only from Clapham Junction, London.

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