Tag Archives: last

Microsoft Open Data Project adopts new data use agreement for datasets

Datasets compilation for Open Data

Last summer we announced Microsoft Research Open Data—an Azure-based repository-as-a-service for sharing datasets—to encourage the reproducibility of research and make research data assets readily available in the cloud. Among other things, the project started a conversation between the community and Microsoft’s legal team about dataset licensing. Inspired by these conversations, our legal team developed a set of brand new data use agreements and released them for public comment on Github earlier this year.

Today we’re excited to announce that Microsoft Research Open Data will be adopting these data use agreements for several datasets that we offer.

Diving a bit deeper on the new data use agreements

The Open Use of Data Agreement (O-UDA) is intended for use by an individual or organization that is able to distribute data for unrestricted uses, and for which there is no privacy or confidentiality concern. It is not appropriate for datasets that include any data that might include materials subject to privacy laws (such as the GDPR or HIPAA) or other unlicensed third-party materials. The O-UDA meets the open definition: it does not impose any restriction with respect to the use or modification of data other than ensuring that attribution and limitation of liability information is passed downstream. In the research context, this implies that users of the data need to cite the corresponding publication with which the data is associated. This aids in findability and reusability of data, an important tenet in the FAIR guiding principles for scientific data management and stewardship.

We also recognize that in certain cases, datasets useful for AI and research analysis may not be able to be fully “open” under the O-UDA. For example, they may contain third-party copyrighted materials, such as text snippets or images, from publicly available sources. The law permits their use for research, so following the principle that research data should be “as open as possible, as closed as necessary,” we developed the Computational Use of Data Agreement (C-UDA) to make data available for research while respecting other interests. We will prefer the O-UDA where possible, but we see the C-UDA as a useful tool for ensuring that researchers continue to have access to important and relevant datasets.

Datasets that reflect the goals of our project

The following examples reference datasets that have adopted the Open Use of Data Agreement (O-UDA).

Location data for geo-privacy research

Microsoft researcher John Krumm and collaborators collected GPS data from 21 people who carried a GPS receiver in the Seattle area. Users who provided their data agreed to it being shared as long as certain geographic regions were deleted. This work covers key research on privacy preservation of GPS data as evidenced in the corresponding paper, “Exploring End User Preferences for Location Obfuscation, Location-Based Services, and the Value of Location,” which was accepted at the Twelfth ACM International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp 2010). The paper has been cited 147 times, including for research that builds upon this work to further the field of preservation of geo-privacy for location-based services providers.

Hand gestures data for computer vision

Another example dataset is that of labeled hand images and video clips collected by researchers Eyal Krupka, Kfir Karmon, and others. The research addresses an important computer vision and machine learning problem that deals with developing a hand-gesture-based interface language. The data was recorded using depth cameras and has labels that cover joints and fingertips. The two datasets included are FingersData, which contains 3,500 labeled depth frames of various hand poses, and GestureClips, which contains 140 gesture clips (100 of these contain labeled hand gestures and 40 contain non-gesture activity). The research associated with this dataset is available in the paper “Toward Realistic Hands Gesture Interface: Keeping it Simple for Developers and Machines,” which was published in Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Question-Answer data for machine reading comprehension

Finally, the FigureQA dataset generated by researchers Samira Ebrahimi Kahou, Adam Atkinson, Adam Trischler, Yoshua Bengio and collaborators, introduces a visual reasoning task for research that is specific to graphical plots and figures. The dataset has 180,000 figures with 1.3 million question-answer pairs in the training set. More details about the dataset are available in the paper “FigureQA: An Annotated Figure Dataset for Visual Reasoning” and corresponding Microsoft Research Blog post. The dataset is pivotal to developing more powerful visual question answering and reasoning models, which potentially improve accuracy of AI systems that are involved in decision making based on charts and graphs.

The data agreements are a part of our larger goals

Microsoft Research Open Data project was conceived from the start to reflect Microsoft Research’s commitment to fostering open science and research and to achieve this without compromising the ethics of collecting and sharing data. Our goal is to make it easier for researchers to maintain provenance of data while having the ability to reference and build upon it.

The addition of the new data agreements to Microsoft Research Open Data’s feature set is an exciting step in furthering our mission.

Acknowledgements: This work would not have been possible without the substantial team effort by — Dave Green, Justin Colannino, Gretchen Deo, Sarah Kim, Emily McReynolds, Mario Madden, Emily Schlesinger, Elaine Peterson, Leila Stevenson, Dave Baskin, and Sergio Loscialo.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

For Sale – Microsoft Surface Laptop 2 i5 8gb 256gb 13.5”, cobalt blue colour

As title says

have this laptop for sale. Was bought only last week and not registered with Microsoft yet so all the warranty available

really sleek looking and light laptop with great screen and keyboard

used and will be sticking to Mac OS!

excellent condition fully boxed

will get photos up in the next day or two

looking for £850 delivered
NOW 750 DELIVERED

pics attached

Go to Original Article
Author:

Customize Excel and track notes in Outlook—here’s what’s new to Microsoft 365 in November

In today’s workplace, change is the new normal. To keep up, we all need to evolve and improve. Last month at the Ignite conference in Orlando, Florida, we announced a ton of Microsoft 365 innovations designed to put artificial intelligence (AI) and automation technologies to work for you. And we’ll continue to innovate across the Microsoft 365 experience, so our customers always have the best tools to navigate an increasingly distributed and fast-paced world. But to succeed at work today, organizations need more than great tools. They need to foster a culture of learning where their people can continue to develop essential skills. We want to help, so this month we introduced The Art of Teamwork toolkit, an interactive curriculum that uses the five attributes of the world’s most successful teams to help your team create and foster healthy team dynamics. We hope you’ll use it—and future educational support coming your way in 2020—to help your organization continue to succeed.

Let’s take a look at what else is new in November.

New features for personal productivity and collaboration

App updates to give you more choice and help you stay in the flow of work across devices and apps.

Keep track of Sticky Notes in Outlook on the web—Sticky Notes allows you to capture ideas, notes, and important info across the apps you already use. Now you can conveniently view, edit, and create notes directly in Outlook for the web, making it easier than ever to keep track of your notes as you go through email. Sticky Notes in Outlook for the web will begin rolling out next month to all users.

Animated image of Sticky Notes being used in Outlook on the web.

Switch to a darker OneNote canvas with Dark Mode—From complex travel schedules to killer meal plans, OneNote is like a second brain to help you track it all. So it should look the way you want. We’re excited to announce that a Dark Mode option is now rolling out for OneNote 2016. Using Dark Mode helps make both the product and your notes more legible, and can improve readability in low light environments, provide better contrast, and reduce eye strain. Dark Mode is available for all Office 365 subscribers and non-volume licensing Office 2019 customers.

Also, in response to feedback over the past year, we’re pleased to announce that we’re continuing mainstream support for OneNote 2016 beyond October 2020—so you can continue using the version of OneNote that works best for you.

Animated image of Dark Mode being used in OneNote.

Collaborate without disrupting a shared workbook with Sheet View—Earlier this month, we announced Sheet View in Excel, a new way of letting users create customized views without disrupting others, so collaboration is seamless. Sheet View allows users to sort and filter the data they need, and then select an option to make those changes visible just to themselves or to everyone working in the document. Once selecting to make changes just for yourself, that filter and sort will not affect other collaborators’ view of the workbook. All your cell level edits propagate through the file regardless of your view, so you can make all your edits right in your personal Sheet View. Sheet View is rolling out to all users using Excel on the web over the next few weeks.

Animated image of Sheet View being selected by an Excel user.

Upload files to Forms questions for added context—Sometimes you’d like respondents to a form to upload or attach files to provide important information or context when answering questions. Now Microsoft Forms enables you to allow users to include file uploads. With this new feature, you can easily create a resume collection form, a claim form, or a photography competition form. To get started, click the drop-down menu to add advanced question types and select File upload. Once you successfully add a file upload question, a folder will be automatically created in your OneDrive or SharePoint.

Animated image of a file being uploaded in Microsoft Forms.

The new Productivity Score, simplified licensing, and the latest Windows 10 release

New capabilities to help you transform workplace productivity, tap into the power of the cloud, and simplify licensing.

Transform how work gets done with insights from Microsoft Productivity Score—At Ignite, we announced Productivity Score to help deliver visibility into how your organization works. Productivity Score identifies where you can enable improved employee and technology experiences—so people can reach their goals, and actions to update skills and systems, so everyone can do their best work.

For example, Productivity Score can recommend user training around how to better collaborate as well as provide IT with documentation to configure external sharing and fine-tune policies, remove problem agents, or upgrade hardware to reduce friction. Join the private preview by filling out the form and see your score in the first week of December 2019.

Screenshot of Productivity Score in the Microsoft 365 admin center.

Leverage advanced security offerings with the U.S. Government Community Clouds—Earlier this month, we announced the general availability of Microsoft Cloud App Security and Azure Advanced Threat Protection (ATP) for U.S. Government GCC High customers. The release of these services delivers advanced security functionality for customers while enabling them to meet increased compliance and security standards. Eligible customers will need a GCC High account or an Azure Government account to purchase Microsoft Cloud App Security and/or Azure ATP licenses. To start a trial for either service within EMS E5, please work with your account team.

Simplified licensing for Windows 10 co-management—We’re bringing System Center Configuration Manager (ConfigMgr) and Microsoft Intune together in a new, unified product called Microsoft Endpoint Manager that delivers a seamless, end-to-end management solution without the complexity of a migration or disruption. We’re also excited to announce that the simplified licensing makes Microsoft Intune user licenses available to ConfigMgr customers to co-manage their existing Windows 10 PCs. The change in licensing terms are expected to go into effect in early December 2019.

Announcing Microsoft Endpoint Manager

Learn how we’re integrating Microsoft Intune, Configuration Manager, and more into a single solution called Microsoft Endpoint Manager.

Watch the video

Get the latest version of Windows 10—Windows 10 version 1909 is now available—offering new capabilities and enhancements, intelligent security, simplified updates, flexible management, and enhanced productivity. Highlights include the new Windows Search experience in Explorer, the new cloud clipboard with history viewing, support for third-party digital assistants, processor enhancements, additional customization for kiosk mode, and more. Version 1909 is rolling out now for consumers and IT admins.

As always, everything we create for Microsoft 365 is designed to help you and your organization achieve more by being more productive. Over the last 12 months, we worked hard to build an increasingly seamless experience that uses AI and automation to help you collaborate across platforms, streamline your workflow, harness organizational knowledge, and stay ahead of ever-evolving security threats.

We look forward to bringing you so much more innovation and educational tools in the year to come. Equipped with incredible tech and the right educational support, there’s no end to what you can achieve.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Aviso introduces version 2.0 of AI-guided sales platform

Aviso announced version 2.0 of its artificial intelligence guided sales platform last week. The new version is aimed at lowering costs and reducing the time that sales reps spend working on CRM databases by providing them with AI tools that predict deal close probabilities and guide next best actions.

Algorithmic-guided selling using AI technology and existing sales data to guide sellers through deals is a new but increasingly popular technology. Nearly 51% of sales organizations have already deployed or plan to deploy algorithmic-guided selling in the next five years, according to a 2019 Gartner survey.

Aviso’s 2.0 sales platform uses AI tools to prioritize sales opportunities and analyze data from sources including CRM systems, emails, user calendars, chat transcripts and support and success tools to deliver real-time insights and suggest next best action for sales teams. The support and success tools are external offerings that Aviso’s platform can connect with, including customer support tools like Zendesk or Salesforce Service Cloud, and customer success tools like Gainsight or Totango, according to Amit Pande, vice president of marketing at Aviso.

The forecasting and sales guidance vendor claims the new version will help sales teams close 20% more deals and reduce spending on non-core CRM licenses by 30% compared with conventional CRM systems. The cost reduction calculation is based on “the number of non-core licenses that can be eliminated, as well as additional costs such as storage and add-ons that can be eliminated when underutilized or unused licenses are eliminated,” Pande said.

According to Aviso, new AI-based features in version 2.0 of its sales platform include:

  • Deal Execution Tools, a trio of tools meant to assist in finalizing deals. Bookings Timeline uses machine learning to calculate when deals will close based on an organization’s unique history. Each booking timeline also includes the top factors that influence the prediction. Opportunity Acceleration helps sales teams determine which opportunities carry the highest probability of closing early if they are pulled into the current quarter. Informed Editing is intended to limit typos and unsaved changes during entry of data. The tool gives users contextual help before they commit to edits, telling them what quarter or whose forecast they are updating. Changes and edits are automatically saved by the software.
  • Deal and Forecast Rooms enable users to do what-if analysis, use scenario modeling and automatically summarize forecast calls and deal review transcripts.
  • Coaching Rooms help sales managers improve sales rep performance with data from past and current deals and from team activity in Deal and Forecast Rooms. 
  • Nudges provide reminders for sales reps through an app on mobile devices. Nudges also offer recommendation for course corrections, and potential next steps based on insights from the specific deal.

Aviso’s 2.0 sales platform is currently in beta with select customers.

Cybersecurity company FireEye has been using the Aviso platform for several years and is among the selected customers. Andy Pan, director of Americas and public sector sales operations at FireEye, said the Aviso platform has helped FireEye operate in a more predictive measure through some of its new AI-driven features. “The predictive features helps us review both the macro business as a whole, and the deal-specific features provides guided pathways towards the inspection of deals.”

Other sales forecasting tools vendors in the market include Salesforce and Clari. Sales forecasting feature from Salesforce enables organizations to make forecasts specific to their needs and let managers track their team’s performance. Clari’s product includes features such as predictive forecasting, which uses AI-based projection to see the team’s achievement at the end of the quarter, and history tracking to see who last made changes to the forecast.

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – Apple MacBook Pro 15” 2.9 GHz Intel Core i9, 32GB 2400 MHz DDR4, Radeon Pro 560X 4GB, 1TB SSD. Screen water damage :(

I bought this last year – October 08 2108 at Apple Bluwater at a retail cost of £3689. I’m upgrading as I need more internal storage. I use it regularly, switching between my desktop machine and the laptop. It all works perfectly – with one flaw – the screen (see below).

The bad news is that the screen has water damage when I got caught in the rain and my laptop bag leaked. Despite a careful drying out process, there are spots on the screen which refuse to go away. It looks much worse on light screens than on dark (see attached pics) but doesn’t affect the performance at all. It doesn’t bother me and I often use an external screen anyway when I’m doing my heavy graphics work or use my desktop iMac. This was a couple of months ago and I’ve been using it every day since then. I’ve had repair quotes of about £580 but didn’t want to be without my machine for any length of time so didn’t bother.

You are welcome to test the machine to check it out and it all comes with the original box and power adaptor. I can also provide proof of purchase as well if necessary. Allowing for the water damage, I’m after £2150. Similar perfect machines seem to be around the £3000 mark so there is a saving even if you decided to get the screen fixed.

I haven’t ordered my new machine yet but just wanted to test the water first with this before committing to buy the new machine. If a deal is agreed, you may need to wait a few days for my new machine to arrive.

I would prefer collection as the buyer can then check the machine fully to be confident in his / her purchase.

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – Apple MacBook Pro 15” 2.9 GHz Intel Core i9, 32GB 2400 MHz DDR4, Radeon Pro 560X 4GB, 1TB SSD. Screen water damage :(

I bought this last year – October 08 2108 at Apple Bluwater at a retail cost of £3689. I’m upgrading as I need more internal storage. I use it regularly, switching between my desktop machine and the laptop. It all works perfectly – with one flaw – the screen (see below).

The bad news is that the screen has water damage when I got caught in the rain and my laptop bag leaked. Despite a careful drying out process, there are spots on the screen which refuse to go away. It looks much worse on light screens than on dark (see attached pics) but doesn’t affect the performance at all. It doesn’t bother me and I often use an external screen anyway when I’m doing my heavy graphics work or use my desktop iMac. This was a couple of months ago and I’ve been using it every day since then. I’ve had repair quotes of about £580 but didn’t want to be without my machine for any length of time so didn’t bother.

You are welcome to test the machine to check it out and it all comes with the original box and power adaptor. I can also provide proof of purchase as well if necessary. Allowing for the water damage, I’m after £2150. Similar perfect machines seem to be around the £3000 mark so there is a saving even if you decided to get the screen fixed.

I haven’t ordered my new machine yet but just wanted to test the water first with this before committing to buy the new machine. If a deal is agreed, you may need to wait a few days for my new machine to arrive.

I would prefer collection as the buyer can then check the machine fully to be confident in his / her purchase.

Go to Original Article
Author:

DevOps security shifts left, but miles to go to pass hackers

DevOps security processes have matured within enterprises over the last year, but IT shops still have far to go to stem the tide of data breaches.

DevOps teams have built good security habits almost by default as they have increased the frequency of application releases and adopted infrastructure and security automation to improve software development. More frequent, smaller, automated app deployments are less risky and less prone to manual error than large and infrequent ones.

Microservices management and release automation demand tools such as infrastructure as code and configuration management software to manage infrastructure, which similarly cut down on human error. Wrapped up into a streamlined GitOps process, Agile and DevOps techniques automate the path to production while locking down access to it — a win for both security and IT efficiency.

However, the first six months of 2019 saw such a flood of high-profile data breaches that at least one security research firm called it the worst year on record. And while cybersecurity experts aren’t certain how trustworthy that measurement is — there could just be more awareness of breaches than there used to be, or more digital services to attack than in past years — they feel strongly that DevOps security teams still aren’t staying ahead of attackers, who have also learned to automate and optimize what they do.

Adrian Sanabria, advocate at Thinkst Applied ResearchAdrian Sanabria

“The attackers have innovated, and that’s one of the problems with our industry — we’re at least five years behind the attackers,” said Adrian Sanabria, advocate at Thinkst Applied Research, a cybersecurity research and software firm based in South Africa. “We’re in a mode where we’re convinced, with all this VC money and money spent on marketing, that we have to wait for a product to be available to solve these problems … and they’re never going to be ready in time.”

DevOps security tools aren’t enough

A cybersecurity tool is only as good as how it’s used, Sanabria said, citing the example of a Target breach in 2013, where security software detected potentially malicious activity, but IT staff didn’t act on its warnings. In part, this was attributed to alert fatigue, as IT teams increasingly deal with a fire hose of alerts from various monitoring systems. But it also has to do with IT training, Sanabria said.

“In the breach research I’ve done, generally everyone owned [the tools] they needed to own,” he said. “They either didn’t know how to use it, hadn’t set it up correctly, or they had some kind of process issue where the [tools] did try to stop the attacks or warn them of it, [but] they either didn’t see the alert or didn’t act on the alert.”

The attackers have innovated, and that’s one of the problems with our industry — we’re at least five years behind the attackers.
Adrian SanabriaAdvocate, Thinkst Applied Research

DevOps security, or DevSecOps, teams have locked down many of the technical weak points within infrastructure and app deployment processes, but all too often, the initial attack takes a very human form, such as a spoofed email that seems to come from a company executive, directing the recipient to transfer funds to what turns out to be an attacker’s account.

“Often, breaches don’t even require hacking,” Sanabria said. “It requires understanding of financial processes, who’s who in the company and the timing of certain transactions.”

Preventing such attacks requires that employees be equally familiar with that information, Sanabria said. That lack of awareness is driving a surge in ransomware attacks, which rely almost entirely on social engineering to hold vital company data hostage.

Collaboration and strategy vital for DevOps security

Thus, in a world of sophisticated technology, the biggest problems remain human, according to experts — and their solutions are also rooted in organizational dynamics and human collaboration, starting with a more strategic, holistic organizational approach to IT security.

Jeremy Pullen, PolodisJeremy Pullen

“Technology people don’t think of leadership skills and collaboration as primary job functions,” said Jeremy Pullen, CEO of Polodis, a digital transformation consulting firm in Atlanta. “They think the job is day-to-day technical threat remediation, but you can’t scale your organization when you have people trying to do it all themselves.”

An overreliance on individual security experts within enterprises leads to a ‘lamppost effect,’ where those individuals overcompensate for risks they’re familiar with, but undercompensate in areas they don’t understand as well, Pullen said. That kind of team structure also results in the time-honored DevOps bugaboo of siloed responsibilities, which increases security fragility in the same way it dampens application performance and infrastructure resilience.

“Developers and operations may be blind to application security issues, while security tends to focus on physical and infrastructure security, which is most clearly defined in their threat models,” Pullen said. “Then it becomes a bit of a game of Whac-a-Mole … where you’re trying to fix one thing and then another thing pops up, and it gets really noisy.”

Instead, DevSecOps teams must begin to think of themselves and their individual job functions as nodes in a network rather than layers of a stack, Pullen said, and work to understand how the entire organization fits together.

“Everyone’s unclear about what enterprise architecture is,” he said. “They stick Jenkins in the middle of a process but might not understand that they need to separate that environment into different domains and understand governance boundaries.”

Effective DevOps security requires more team practice

Strategically hardening applications and IT management processes to prevent attacks is important, but organizations must also strategically plan — and practice — their response to ongoing security incidents that can and will still happen.

“Cybersecurity so far has been focused on solitary study and being the best technical practitioner you can be, and building stand-alone applications and infrastructure to the best technical standard, which reminds me of golf,” said Nick Drage, principal consultant at Path Dependence Ltd., a cybersecurity consulting firm based in the U.K., in a presentation at DevSecCon in Seattle last month. “But in reality, cybersecurity is a fight with an opponent over territory — much more like American football.”

As long as security is practiced by isolated individuals, it will be as effective as taking the football field armed with golf clubs, Drage said. Instead, the approach should be more team-oriented, cooperative, and, especially, emphasize team practice to prepare for ‘game time.’

This is the future of governance — controlling risk on the human side of our systems.
Charles BetzAnalyst, Forrester Research

American football defenses are particularly instructive for DevOps security strategy ideas about defense in depth, Drage said in his presentation. Among other things, they demonstrate that an initial incursion into a team’s territory — yards gained — does not amount to a breach — points scored. IT teams should also apply that thinking as they try to anticipate and respond to threats — how to protect the ‘end zone,’ so to speak, and not just their half of the field.

Thinkst’s Sanabria uses a different analogy — the DevOps security team as firefighters.

“We’re not going to get good at this if we don’t practice it,” he said. “We buy all the tools, but imagine firefighters if they’d never donned the suits, never driven the truck, never used the hose and they’re not expecting the amount of force and it knocks them down. Going out to their first fire would look like a comedy.”

And yet that’s exactly what happens with many enterprise IT security teams when they must respond to incidents, Sanabria said, in part because companies don’t prioritize experiential learning over informational training.

The good news is that IT analysts expect the next wave of DevOps security to look very much like chaos engineering used in many organizations to improve system resiliency, but with a human twist. Organizations have begun to emerge such as OpenSOC, which sets up training workshops, including simulated ransomware attacks, for companies to practice security incident response. Companies can also do this internally by treating penetration tests as real attacks, otherwise known as red teaming. Free and open source tools such as Infection Monkey from Guardicore Labs also simulate attack scenarios.

Charles Betz, Forrester ResearchCharles Betz

Tech companies such as such as Google already practice their own form of human-based chaos testing, where employees are selected at random for a ‘staycation,’ directed to take a minimum of one hour to answer work emails, or to intentionally give wrong answers to questions, to test the resiliency of the rest of the organization.

“Despite the implications of the word ‘chaos,’ some companies are already presenting chaos engineering to their risk management leaders and auditors,” said Charles Betz, analyst at Forrester Research. “This is the future of governance — controlling risk on the human side of our systems.”

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – MacBook Air 2017 13″/Core i5/8GB/128GB, AppleCare until 16/05/2020, battery cycle count 7!

Selling my MacBook Air 2017 13″/Core i5/8GB/128GB. Last of the original (non-Retina) MagSafe 2 Airs, two USB 3.0 and a Thunderbolt 2 port. Running macOS Catalina. AppleCare until 16/05/2020. Just the Air and the MagSafe, no packaging. Superb condition throughout. Battery cycle count 7!

£475 delivered.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Microsoft is awarded Zscaler’s Technology Partner of the Year for 2019

Last week at Zscaler’s user conference, Zenith Live, Microsoft received Zscaler’s Technology Partner of the Year Award in the Impact category. The award was given to Microsoft for the depth and breadth of integrations we’ve collaborated with Zscaler on and the positive feedback received from customers about these integrations.

Together with Zscaler—a Microsoft Intelligent Security Association (MISA) member—we’re focused on providing our joint customers with secure, fast access to the cloud for every user. Since partnering with Zscaler, we’ve delivered several integrations that help our customers better secure their environments, including:

  • Azure Active Directory (Azure AD) integration to extend conditional access policies to Zscaler applications to validate user access to cloud-based applications. We also announced support for user provisioning of Zscaler applications to enable automated, policy-based provisioning and deprovisioning of user accounts with Azure AD.
  • Microsoft Intune integration that allows IT administrators to provision Zscaler applications to specific Azure AD users or groups within the Intune console and configure connections by using the existing Intune VPN profile workflow.
  • Microsoft Cloud App Security integration to discover and manage access to Shadow IT in an organization. Zscaler can be leveraged to send traffic data to Microsoft’s Cloud Access Security Broker (CASB) to assess cloud services against risk and compliance requirements before making access control decisions for the discovered cloud apps.

“We’re excited to see customers use Zscaler and Microsoft solutions together to deliver fast, secure, and direct access to the applications they need. The Technology Partner of the Year Award is a testament of Microsoft’s commitment to helping customers better secure their environments.”
—Punit Minocha, Vice President of Business Development at Zscaler

“The close collaboration between our teams and deep integration across Zscaler and Microsoft solutions help our joint customers be more secure and ensure their users stay productive. We’re pleased to partner with Zscaler and honored to be named Zscaler’s Technology Partner of the Year.”
—Alex Simons, Corporate Vice President of Program Management at Microsoft

We’re thrilled to be Zscaler’s Technology Partner of the Year in the Impact category and look forward to our continued partnership and what Zscaler.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

Microsoft releases 18M building footprints in Africa to enable AI Assisted Mapping

In the last ten years, 2 billion people were affected by disasters according to the World Disasters report 2018. In 2017, 201 million people needed humanitarian assistance and 18 million were displaced due to weather related disasters. Many of these disaster-prone areas are literally “missing” from the map, making it harder for first responders to prepare and deliver relief efforts.

Since the inception of Tasking Manager, the Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT) community has mapped at an incredible rate with 11 million square kilometers mapped in Africa alone. However, large parts of Africa with populations prone to disasters still remain unmapped — 60% of the 30 million square kilometers.

Under Microsoft’s AI for Humanitarian Action program, Bing Maps together with Microsoft Philanthropies is partnering with HOT on an initiative to bring AI Assistance as a resource in open map building. The initiative focuses on incorporating design updates, integrating machine learning, and bringing new open building datasets into Tasking Manager.

The Bing Maps team has been harnessing the power of Computer Vision to identify map features at scale. Building upon their work in the United States and Canada, Bing Maps is now releasing country-wide open building footprints datasets in Uganda and Tanzania. This will be one of the first open building datasets in Africa and will be available for use within OpenStreetMap (OSM).

In Tasking Manager specifically, the dataset will be used to help in task creation with the goal of improving task completion rates. Tasking Manager relies on ‘ML enabler’ to connect with building datasets through an API. This API-based integration makes it convenient to access not just Africa building footprints, but all open building footprints datasets from Bing Maps through ML Enabler, and thus the OpenStreetMap ecosystem.

“Machine learning datasets for OSM need to be open. We need to go beyond identifying roads and buildings and open datasets allow us to experiment and uncover new opportunities. Open Building Dataset gives us the ability to not only explore quality and validation aspects, but also advance how ML data assists mapping.”
– Tyler Radford (Executive Director, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team)

Africa presented several challenges: stark difference in landscape from the United States or Canada, unique settlements such as Tukuls, dense urban areas with connected structures, imagery quality and vintage, and lack of training data in rural areas. The team identified areas with poor recall by leveraging population estimates from CIESIN. Subsequent targeted labeling efforts across Bing Maps and HOT improved model recall especially in rural areas. A two-step process with semantic segmentation followed by polygonization resulted in 18M building footprints — 7M in Uganda and 11M in Tanzania.

Extractions Musoma, TanzaniaExtractions in Musoma, Tanzania

Bing Maps is making this data open for download free of charge and usable for research, analysis and of course, OSM. In OpenStreetMap there are currently 14M building footprints in Uganda and Tanzania (the last time our team counted). We are working to determine overlaps.

We will be making the data available on Github to download. The CNTK toolkit developed by Microsoft is open source and available on GitHub as well. The ResNet3 model is also open source and available on GitHub. The Bing Maps computer vision team will be presenting the work in Africa at the annual International State of the Map conference in Heidelberg, Germany and at the HOT Summit.

– Bing Maps Team

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center