Tag Archives: long

Billion BiPAC 7800N

Billion BiPAC 7800N router for sale. Excellent performer for those on long lines.

Includes box and power supply + a couple of microfilters I had.

£29 with Royal Mail 2nd signed for included

Price and currency: £29
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT / cash
Location: Cambridge
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference…

Billion BiPAC 7800N

RGB keyboard

Hey all

I am after an RGB keyboard, don’t mind what brand as long as its in good condition.

Ideally after one with dedicated media keys.

Thanks

Location: Colchester

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RGB keyboard

RGB keyboard

Hey all

I am after an RGB keyboard, don’t mind what brand as long as its in good condition.

Ideally after one with dedicated media keys.

Thanks

Location: Colchester

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all…

RGB keyboard

Billion BiPAC 7800N

Billion BiPAC 7800N router for sale. Excellent performer for those on long lines.

Includes box and power supply + a couple of microfilters I had.

£29 with Royal Mail 2nd signed for included

Price and currency: £29
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT / cash
Location: Cambridge
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference…

Billion BiPAC 7800N

Billion BiPAC 7800N

Billion BiPAC 7800N router for sale. Excellent performer for those on long lines.

Includes box and power supply + a couple of microfilters I had.

£29 with Royal Mail 2nd signed for included

Price and currency: £29
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT / cash
Location: Cambridge
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference…

Billion BiPAC 7800N

For Sale – ASUS PCE-AC88 – Dual-band AC3100 4×4 Wi-Fi

Top of the range PCI-E WiFi card. Comes boxed with short & long bracket, driver disc and all paperwork. This card is very fast and will max your connection out.

Mint condition with 22 months of warranty remaining.

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Price and currency: £65
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT,PPG
Location: Chorley
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Billion BiPAC 7800N

Billion BiPAC 7800N router for sale. Excellent performer for those on long lines.

Includes box and power supply + a couple of microfilters I had.

£29 with Royal Mail 2nd signed for included

Price and currency: £29
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT / cash
Location: Cambridge
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Gemalto Sentinel flaws could lead to ICS attacks

A long disclosure and remediation process between security researchers and a hardware token vendor resulted in patches for  dangerous flaws that could have led to attacks on critical infrastructure.

Researchers from Kaspersky Lab ICS CERT said they decided to investigate Gemalto Sentinel USB tokens after penetration tests showed the “solution provides license control for software used by customers and is widely used in ICS and IT systems.”

“The solution’s software part consists of a driver, a web application and a set of other software components. The hardware part is a USB token. The token needs to be connected to a PC or server on which a software license is required,” Kasperksy researchers wrote in a report. “From researchers’ viewpoint, [the Gemalto Sentinel software] exhibited a rather curious behavior in the system: it could be remotely accessed and communicated with on open port 1947. The protocol type was defined by the network packet header — either HTTP or a proprietary binary protocol was used. The service also had an API of its own, which was based on the HTTP protocol.”

Kaspersky ICS CERT ultimately found 14 vulnerabilities in Gemalto SafeNet Sentinel tokens, the most critical of which “can be used without local privilege escalation — the vulnerable process runs with system privileges, enabling malicious code to run with the highest privileges.”

Vladimir Dashchenko, head of the ICS CERT vulnerability research team at Kaspersky Lab, told SearchSecurity this issue needs attention because “some of the ICS vendors use such license managers for SCADA software.”

“Some vulnerabilities that we found allow remote code execution, meaning an attacker can access someone else’s computing device and make their own changes. For example, vulnerabilities can provide an attacker with the ability to execute malicious code and take complete control of an affected system with the same privileges as the user running the application,” Dashchenko said via email. “Some vulnerabilities are denial-of-service (DoS) vulnerabilities, meaning an attacker has the ability to shut down a machine or network, making it unavailable to its intended users. DoS does not cause machine or network shutdown. It stops the vulnerable process. However in some cases it could possibly cause denial of service for the machine.”

Paul Brager Jr., technical product security leader at Houston-based Baker Hughes and former cybersecurity project manager focused on ICS at Booz Allen Hamilton, said the “potential implications and risks for ICS are not trivial.” 

“Open ports that allow remote interaction with engineering workstations or servers that run human machine interface or other process-oriented software licenses managed by this solution could lead to an impact to the software itself, the control assets that are managed by the software, or both,” Brager told SearchSecurity. “Worst case scenario is an impact to the processes that are being governed by the licensed solution — some of which could be critical operating processes. Also given the care that is required when patching, the risks could persist for some time.”

Gemalto Sentinel disclosure and patching

The timeline of the disclosure and patching and issues with communication from Gemalto caught the attention of the researchers. According to Kaspersky, the first set of vulnerabilities was reported to Gemalto in early 2017, but it wasn’t until late June “in response to our repeated requests” that Kaspersky received a reply.

Dashchenko clarified the timeline and noted that although Gemalto claimed it “notified all of its customers of the need to update the driver via their account dashboards; we were contacted by several developers of software that use this server, and it became clear they were not aware about the issue.”

“We have informed and sent to the vendor information regarding all of the identified vulnerabilities. In early 2017, we sent information about 11 vulnerabilities and in late June the vendor informed us that a patch had been released and information about the vulnerabilities that had been closed, along with a new version of the driver, could be found on the company’s internal user portal. On June 26, we informed Gemalto of the suspicious functionality and of three more vulnerabilities. On July 21, the vendor released a private notice about a new driver version — without any mention of the vulnerabilities closed.”

Gemalto did not respond to requests for comment at the time of this post.

Dashchenko added that Gemalto Sentinel is a “very popular licensing solution,” and noted that an advisory from Siemens listed 16 solutions that need patching against these issues.

Ken Modeste, global principal engineer at Chicago-based Underwriters Laboratories, said patching ICS is complex so users may be wary of the Gemalto Sentinel issues.

The risk associated with either down time or inadvertent failures … will typically be too high for end-users to accept.
Ken Modesteglobal principal engineer at Chicago-based Underwriters Laboratories

“Factory automation and connected control systems are vetted, tested, reliable systems. Deploying patches that have not seen significant runtime and test time can cause significant issues. Most of the implemented systems have requirements around safety, reliability and uptime. Therefore, deploying a patch to software or an embedded product can affect an operational system,” Modeste told SearchSecurity. “The risk associated with either down time or inadvertent failures associated with a patch of either the inherent device or software, or its interaction with other devices and software, will typically be too high for end-users to accept.”

Moreno Carullo, co-founder and CTO of Nozomi Networks, an ICS cybersecurity company headquartered in San Francisco, said patching is especially important because “while blocking port 1947 is an option to mitigate the problem, it is also not a solution that is suited for all business processes.”

“Blocking this port could result in the cessation of integral services as well,” Carullo told SearchSecurity. “ICS operators could have strong visibility into the network by applying technologies that are able to monitor the traffic passively to detect anomalies or suspicious activities. These technologies should also be integrated with the firewall to increase the needed visibility in such scenarios.”

Brager said the risks of patching the Gemalto Sentinel issues “could be significant, given the pervasiveness of the SafeNet solution in both enterprise and OT/ICS environments.”

“Particularly concerning is the pervasiveness of the solution in control system environments, and what could potentially mean for assets that leverage the SafeNet dongle solution to operate,” Brager said. “In those instances, patching those systems can be a significant (and time consuming) undertaking. Enterprise patching may not be nearly as complex and critical, but it too comes with its own sets of risks.”

For Sale – Billion BiPAC 7800N

Billion BiPAC 7800N router for sale. Excellent performer for those on long lines.

Includes box and power supply + a couple of microfilters I had.

£29 with Royal Mail 2nd signed for included

Price and currency: £29
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT / cash
Location: Cambridge
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

NVMe flash storage doesn’t mean tape and disk are dying

Not long ago, a major hardware vendor invited me to participate in a group chat where we would explore the case for flash storage and software-defined storage. On the list of questions sent in advance was that burning issue: Has flash killed disk? Against my better judgment, I accepted the offer. Opinions being elbows, I figured I had a couple to contribute.

I joined a couple of notable commentators from the vendor’s staff and the analyst community, who I presumed would echo the talking points of their client like overzealous high school cheerleaders. I wasn’t wrong.

Shortly after it started, I found myself drifting from the nonvolatile memory express (NVMe) flash storage party line. I also noted that software-defined storage (SDS) futures weren’t high and to the right in the companies I was visiting, despite projections by one analyst of 30%-plus growth rates over the next couple years. Serious work remained to be done to improve the predictability, manageability and orchestration of software-defined and hyper-converged storage, I said, and the SDS stack itself needed to be rethought to determine whether the right services were being centralized.

Yesterday’s silicon tomorrow

I also took issue with the all-silicon advocates, stating my view that NVMe flash storage might just be “yesterday’s silicon storage technology tomorrow,” or at least a technology in search of a workload. I wondered aloud whether NVMe — that the “shiny new thing” — mightn’t be usurped shortly by capacitor-backed dynamic RAM (DRAM) that’s significantly less expensive and faster. DRAM also has much lower latency than NVMe flash storage because it’s directly connected to the memory channel rather than the PCI bus or a SAS or SATA controller.

The vendor tried to steer me back into the fold, saying “Of course, you need the right tool for the right job.” Truer words were never spoken. I replied that silicon storage was part of a storage ecosystem that would be needed in its entirety if we were to store the zettabytes of data coming our way. The vendor liked this response since the company had a deep bench of storage offerings that included disk and tape.

I then took the opportunity to further press the notion that disk isn’t dead any more than tape is dead, despite increasing claims to the contrary. (I didn’t share a still developing story around a new type of disk with a new form factor and new data placement strategy that could buy even more runway for that technology. For now, I am sworn to secrecy, but once the developers give the nod, readers of this column will be the first to know.)

I did get some pushback from analysts about tape, which they saw as completely obsoleted in the next generation, all-silicon data center. I could have pushed them over to Quantum Corp. for another view.

The back story

A few columns back, I wrote something about Quantum exiting the tape space based on erroneous information from a recently released employee. I had to issue a retraction, and I contacted Quantum and spoke with Eric Bassier, senior director of data center products and solutions, who set the record straight. Seems Quantum — like IBM and Spectra Logic — is excited about LTO-8 tape technology and how it can be wed to the company’s Scalar tape products and StorNext file system.

Bassier said Quantum was “one of only a few storage companies [in 2016] to demonstrate top-line growth and profitability,” and its dedication to tape was not only robust, it succeeded with new customers seeking to scale out capacity. In addition to providing a dense enterprise tape library, the Scalar i6000 has 11,000 or more slots, a dual robot and as many as 24 drives in a single 19-inch rack frame, all managed with web services using representational state transfer, or RESTful API calls.

Quantum, like IBM and Spectra Logic, is articulating a product strategy that has fingers in all the popular storage buckets.

Quantum was also hitting the market with a 3U rack-mountable, scalable library capable of delivering 150 TB uncompressed LTO-7 tape storage or 300 TB uncompressed LTO-8 in storage for backup, archive or additional secondary storage for less frequently used files and objects. Add compression and you more than double these capacity numbers. That, Bassier asserted, was more data than many small and medium-sized companies would generate in a year.

Disk also has a role in Quantum’s world; its DXi product provides data deduplication that’s a significant improvement over the previous-generation model. It offers performance and density improvements through the application of SSDs and 8 TB HDDs, as well as a reduction in power consumption.

All the storage buckets

Quantum, like IBM and Spectra Logic, is articulating a product strategy that has fingers in all the popular buckets, including tape, disk and NVMe flash storage. After years of burying their story under a rock by providing OEM products to other vendors who branded them as their own, 90% of the company’s revenue is now derived from the Quantum brand.

Bottom line: We might eventually get to an all-silicon data center. In the same breath, I could say that we might eventually get that holographic storage the industry has promised since the Kennedy administration. For planning 2018, your time is better spent returning to basics. Instead of going for the shiny new thing, do the hard work of understanding your workload, then architecting the right combination of storage and software to meet your needs. Try as you might, the idea of horizontal storage technology — one size fits most — with simple orchestration and administration, remains elusive.

That’s my two elbows.