Tag Archives: members

FIN7 members arrested after stealing 15 million credit card records

FBI indictments unsealed Wednesday detailed the alleged crimes of three members of the FIN7 cybercrime gang who have been arrested and are in custody in Seattle.

Ukrainian nationals Dmytro Fedorov, Fedir Hladyr and Andrii Kopakov were arrested by the FBI and are in custody. Each has been charged with 26 federal offenses, including conspiracy, wire fraud, computer hacking, access device fraud and aggravated identity theft.

The FBI described the three hackers as “high-ranking members” of the FIN7 cybercrime organization — also known as the Carbanak Group — in a press release. The FIN7 group has been connected with attacks on more than 100 businesses and data breaches across 47 states in which “more than 15 million customer card records from over 6,500 individual point-of-sale terminals at more than 3,600 separate business locations” were stolen.

The FBI admitted it didn’t expect FIN7 to disappear following these arrests, but framed the indictments as a major blow to the group.

“The naming of these FIN7 leaders marks a major step toward dismantling this sophisticated criminal enterprise,” Jay Tabb, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Seattle field office, said in a statement.  “As the lead federal agency for cyber-attack investigations, the FBI will continue to work with its law enforcement partners worldwide to pursue the members of this devious group, and hold them accountable for stealing from American businesses and individuals.”

However, security vendor FireEye wrote in a blog post that while FIN7 may pause activity for a short time, the group would continue in one form or another.

“Depending on the organizational and communication structure of the group, it is also plausible that multiple subgroups could form and carry out independent operations in the future. Recent campaigns, as well as those using tactics that were atypical for historical FIN7 campaigns, such as the SEC [Securities and Exchange Commission] campaigns with widespread targeting, may be representative of semi-autonomous groups pre-existing within, or cooperating with, the FIN7 criminal organization,” FireEye researchers wrote. “Certain malware families and techniques transcend strictly defined threat groups, and may be re-used by developers and operators as they transition between organizations and campaigns.”

FIN7 activity

According to the FBI announcement, FIN7 primarily targeted companies in the “restaurant, gaming and hospitality industries,” across the U.S., U.K., France and Australia. The FBI described FIN7’s methods as using spear phishing, adding that the group “accompanied emails with telephone calls intended to further legitimize the email” in order to trick users into installing Carbanak malware.

FireEye expanded on this based on its history of FIN7 activity, saying the group was connected to attacks across the U.S. and Europe in the hospitality, restaurant, travel, education, gaming, construction, energy, retail, finance, telecom, high-tech, government, software and business service industries.

Kimberly Goody, cybercrime analysis manager at FireEye, based in Milpitas, Calif., also clarified the distinction between Carbanak malware and the commonly used Carbanak Group name via Twitter.

The FBI noted that FIN7 even made attempts to appear legitimate.

“FIN7 used a front company, Combi Security, purportedly headquartered in Russia and Israel, to provide a guise of legitimacy and to recruit hackers to join the criminal enterprise,” the FBI wrote. “Combi Security’s website indicated that it provided a number of security services such as penetration testing. Ironically, the sham company’s website listed multiple U.S. victims among its purported clients.”

FireEye confirmed some of FIN7’s job postings through Combi Security.

“While the recruitment of unwitting individuals as puppets has been a common component of at least some criminal schemes — for example, reshipping mules who are recruited through postings on career sites advertising attractive work-from-home jobs — FIN7’s veiling of full-scale financial compromises as legitimate offensive security engagements is particularly notable,” FireEye researchers wrote. “The apparent success of Combi Security in recruiting unsuspecting individuals in this manner, may lead to more of this type of technical recruitment by cyber criminals in the future.”

Russian intelligence officers indicted for DNC hack

The Department of Justice announced Friday the indictment of 12 members of Russia’s GRU intelligence agency in relation to the 2016 breaches of the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.

The grand jury indictment, which is part of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference with the 2016 presidential election, claimed the 12 intelligence officers were engaged in a “sustained effort” to hack into the Democratic National Committee (DNC), the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and the Clinton campaign. The DNC hack led to confidential emails becoming public via WikiLeaks, which negatively impacted the Clinton campaign and Democratic Party.

The grand jury indictment alleged the Russian intelligence officers, operating under the online personas “DCLeaks” and “Guccifer 2.0,” leaked information through another entity known as “Organization 1.” The indictment does not mention WikiLeaks by name.

The Justice Department claimed that in 2016, members of Unit 26165 in the Russian government’s Main Intelligence Directorate (GRU) began spearphishing campaign officials and volunteers for Clinton’s presidential campaign; intelligence officers were able to steal usernames and passwords and use those credentials to obtain confidential emails and compromise other systems. The threat actors used similar techniques in the DNC hack as well as the breach of the DCCC’s network.

In addition, the Justice Department claimed Unit 26165, with members of the GRU’s Unit 74455, conspired to release the stolen emails and data in order to influence the election. According to the Department of Justice, Unit 74455 also “conspired to hack into the computers of state boards of elections, secretaries of state, and US companies that supplied software and other technology related to the administration of elections to steal voter data stored on those computers.”

The indictment accused the following individuals of being part of Unit 26165 and Unit 74455, and engaging in the DNC hack and other malicious activity: Viktor Borisovich Netyksho, Boris Alekseyevich Antonov, Dmitriy Sergeyevich Badin, Ivan Sergeyevich Yermakov, Aleksey Viktorovich Lukashev,  Sergey Aleksandrovich Morgachev, Nikolay Yuryevich Kozachek, Pavel Vyacheslavovich Yershov, Artem Andreyevich Malyshev, Aleksandr Vladimirovich Osadchuk, Aleksey Aleksandrovich Potemkin and Anatoliy Sergeyevich Kovalev.

The 12 GRU officers are accused of 11 criminal counts, including criminal conspiracy against the United States “through cyber operations by the GRU that involved the staged release of stolen documents for the purpose of interfering with the 2016 president election”; aggravated identity theft; conspiracy to launder money; and criminal conspiracy for attempting to hack into certain state boards of elections, secretaries of state, and vendors of U.S. election equipment and software.

The Justice Department emphasized there is “no allegation in the indictment that the charged conduct altered the vote count or changed the outcome of the 2016 election,” and no allegation that any American was a knowing participant in the alleged criminal activity.

Microsoft to acquire Bonsai in move to build ‘brains’ for autonomous systems – The Official Microsoft Blog

Group shot of Bonsai's team members
Bonsai’s team members. Photo courtesy of Bonsai.

With AI’s meteoric rise, autonomous systems have been projected to grow to more than 800 million in operation by 2025. However, while envisioned in science fiction for a long time, truly intelligent autonomous systems are still elusive and remain a holy grail. The reality today is that training autonomous systems that function amidst the many unforeseen situations in the real world is very hard and requires deep expertise in AI — essentially making it unscalable.

To achieve this inflection point in AI’s growth, traditional machine learning methodologies aren’t enough. Bringing intelligence to autonomous systems at scale will require a unique combination of the new practice of machine teaching, advances in deep reinforcement learning and leveraging simulation for training. Microsoft has been on a path to make this a reality through continued AI research breakthroughs; the development of the powerful Azure AI platform of tools, services and infrastructure; advances in deep learning including our acquisition of Maluuba, and the impressive efficiencies we’ve achieved in simulation-based training with Microsoft Research’s AirSim tool. With software developers at the center of digital transformation, our pending acquisition of GitHub further underscores just how imperative it is that we empower developers to break  through and lead this next wave of innovation.

Today we are excited to take another major step forward in our vision to make it easier for developers and subject matter experts to build the “brains”— machine learning modelfor autonomous systems of all kinds with the signing of an agreement to acquire Bonsai. Based in Berkeley, California, and an M12 portfolio company, Bonsai has developed a novel approach using machine teaching that abstracts the low-level mechanics of machine learning, so that subject matter experts, regardless of AI aptitude, can specify and train autonomous systems to accomplish tasks. The actual training takes place inside a simulated environment.

The company is building a general-purpose, deep reinforcement learning platform especially suited for enterprises leveraging industrial control systems such as robotics, energy, HVAC, manufacturing and autonomous systems in general. This includes unique machine-teaching innovations, automated model generation and management, a host of APIs and SDKs for simulator integration, as well as pre-built support for leading simulations all packaged in one end-to-end platform.

Bonsai’s platform combined with rich simulation tools and reinforcement learning work in Microsoft Research becomes the simplest and richest AI toolchain for building any kind of autonomous system for control and calibration tasks. This toolchain will compose with Azure Machine Learning running on the Azure Cloud with GPUs and Brainwave, and models built with it will be deployed and managed in Azure IoT, giving Microsoft an end-to-end solution for building, operating and enhancing “brains” for autonomous systems.

What I find exciting is that Bonsai has achieved some remarkable breakthroughs with their approach that will have a profound impact on AI development. Last fall, they established a new reinforcement learning benchmark for programming industrial control systems. Using a robotics task to demonstrate the achievement, the platform successfully trained a simulated robotic arm to grasp and stack blocks on top of one another by breaking down the task into simpler sub-concepts. Their novel technique performed 45 times faster than a comparable approach from Google’s DeepMind. Then, earlier this year, they extended deep reinforcement learning’s capabilities beyond traditional game play, where it’s often demonstrated, to real-world applications. Using Bonsai’s AI Platform and machine teaching, subject matter experts from Siemens, with no AI expertise, trained an AI model to autocalibrate a Computer Numerical Control machine 30 times faster than the traditional approach. This represented a huge milestone in industrial AI, and the implications when considered across the broader sector are just staggering.

To realize this vision of making AI more accessible and valuable for all, we have to remove the barriers to development, empowering every developer, regardless of machine learning expertise, to be an AI developer. Bonsai has made tremendous progress here and Microsoft remains committed to furthering this work. We already deliver the most comprehensive collection of AI tools and services that make it easier for any developer to code and integrate pre-built and custom AI capabilities into applications and extend to any scenario. There are over a million developers using our pre-built Microsoft Cognitive Services, a collection of intelligent APIs that enable developers to easily leverage high-quality vision, speech, language, search and knowledge technologies in their apps with a few lines of code. And last fall, we led a combined industry push to foster a more open AI ecosystem, bringing AI advances to all developers, on any platform, using any language through the introduction of the Open Neural Network Exchange (ONNX) format and Gluon open source interface for deep learning.

We’re really confident this unique marriage of research, novel approach and technology will have a tremendous effect toward removing barriers and accelerating the current state of AI development. We look forward to having Bonsai and their team join us to help realize this collective vision.

Tags: , ,

Microsoft to acquire Bonsai in move to build ‘brains’ for autonomous systems – The Official Microsoft Blog

Group shot of Bonsai's team members
Bonsai’s team members. Photo courtesy of Bonsai.

With AI’s meteoric rise, autonomous systems have been projected to grow to more than 800 million in operation by 2025. However, while envisioned in science fiction for a long time, truly intelligent autonomous systems are still elusive and remain a holy grail. The reality today is that training autonomous systems that function amidst the many unforeseen situations in the real world is very hard and requires deep expertise in AI — essentially making it unscalable.

To achieve this inflection point in AI’s growth, traditional machine learning methodologies aren’t enough. Bringing intelligence to autonomous systems at scale will require a unique combination of the new practice of machine teaching, advances in deep reinforcement learning and leveraging simulation for training. Microsoft has been on a path to make this a reality through continued AI research breakthroughs; the development of the powerful Azure AI platform of tools, services and infrastructure; advances in deep learning including our acquisition of Maluuba, and the impressive efficiencies we’ve achieved in simulation-based training with Microsoft Research’s AirSim tool. With software developers at the center of digital transformation, our pending acquisition of GitHub further underscores just how imperative it is that we empower developers to break  through and lead this next wave of innovation.

Today we are excited to take another major step forward in our vision to make it easier for developers and subject matter experts to build the “brains”— machine learning modelfor autonomous systems of all kinds with the signing of an agreement to acquire Bonsai. Based in Berkeley, California, and an M12 portfolio company, Bonsai has developed a novel approach using machine teaching that abstracts the low-level mechanics of machine learning, so that subject matter experts, regardless of AI aptitude, can specify and train autonomous systems to accomplish tasks. The actual training takes place inside a simulated environment.

The company is building a general-purpose, deep reinforcement learning platform especially suited for enterprises leveraging industrial control systems such as robotics, energy, HVAC, manufacturing and autonomous systems in general. This includes unique machine-teaching innovations, automated model generation and management, a host of APIs and SDKs for simulator integration, as well as pre-built support for leading simulations all packaged in one end-to-end platform.

Bonsai’s platform combined with rich simulation tools and reinforcement learning work in Microsoft Research becomes the simplest and richest AI toolchain for building any kind of autonomous system for control and calibration tasks. This toolchain will compose with Azure Machine Learning running on the Azure Cloud with GPUs and Brainwave, and models built with it will be deployed and managed in Azure IoT, giving Microsoft an end-to-end solution for building, operating and enhancing “brains” for autonomous systems.

What I find exciting is that Bonsai has achieved some remarkable breakthroughs with their approach that will have a profound impact on AI development. Last fall, they established a new reinforcement learning benchmark for programming industrial control systems. Using a robotics task to demonstrate the achievement, the platform successfully trained a simulated robotic arm to grasp and stack blocks on top of one another by breaking down the task into simpler sub-concepts. Their novel technique performed 45 times faster than a comparable approach from Google’s DeepMind. Then, earlier this year, they extended deep reinforcement learning’s capabilities beyond traditional game play, where it’s often demonstrated, to real-world applications. Using Bonsai’s AI Platform and machine teaching, subject matter experts from Siemens, with no AI expertise, trained an AI model to autocalibrate a Computer Numerical Control machine 30 times faster than the traditional approach. This represented a huge milestone in industrial AI, and the implications when considered across the broader sector are just staggering.

To realize this vision of making AI more accessible and valuable for all, we have to remove the barriers to development, empowering every developer, regardless of machine learning expertise, to be an AI developer. Bonsai has made tremendous progress here and Microsoft remains committed to furthering this work. We already deliver the most comprehensive collection of AI tools and services that make it easier for any developer to code and integrate pre-built and custom AI capabilities into applications and extend to any scenario. There are over a million developers using our pre-built Microsoft Cognitive Services, a collection of intelligent APIs that enable developers to easily leverage high-quality vision, speech, language, search and knowledge technologies in their apps with a few lines of code. And last fall, we led a combined industry push to foster a more open AI ecosystem, bringing AI advances to all developers, on any platform, using any language through the introduction of the Open Neural Network Exchange (ONNX) format and Gluon open source interface for deep learning.

We’re really confident this unique marriage of research, novel approach and technology will have a tremendous effect toward removing barriers and accelerating the current state of AI development. We look forward to having Bonsai and their team join us to help realize this collective vision.

Tags: , ,

Macbook Pro Late 2013 15″ Retina 2.6GHz i7

Just to see if there is any interest from forum members before it is advertised elsewhere.

Macbook Pro in excellent condition in original box with all internal packaging.
Late 2013
15″ Retina Display
2.6 GHz Core i7 processor
16Gb RAM
Cycle Count 623

Comes with hard cover and new laptop bag (unused)

This will be posted RMSD which is included in price

If there is no interest shown the MacBook will be advertised elsewhere tomorrow evening.

Price and currency: £780
Delivery:

Macbook Pro Late 2013 15″ Retina 2.6GHz i7

Something extraordinary happened in Washington, D.C., yesterday – Microsoft on the Issues

Something extraordinary happened in Washington, D.C., yesterday.

Members of Congress took the same position as members of the European Parliament. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce approvingly quoted a statement by the European Commission. Business groups and big companies agreed with consumer and privacy advocates. Faculty from Harvard joined with professors from Princeton. Professors from Duke joined rivals from the University of North Carolina, while those at Berkeley sided with Stanford. And Fox News agreed with the American Civil Liberties Union.

What’s the occasion for such agreement between so many people with different points of view? It was the filing of amicus briefs with the U.S. Supreme Court in the landmark Microsoft case that will decide whether the U.S. government can use a search warrant to force a company to seize a customer’s private emails stored in Ireland and import them to the United States. On Thursday, 289 different groups and individuals from 37 countries signed 23 different legal briefs supporting Microsoft’s position that Congress never gave law enforcement the power to ignore treaties and breach Ireland’s sovereignty in this way. How could it? The government relies on a law that was enacted in 1986, before anyone conceived of cloud computing.

This is not to say that law enforcement never needs to access emails in other countries. Since we filed this lawsuit in 2013, we’ve said repeatedly that there are times when this is necessary to protect public safety.

But as 51 prominent computer scientists explained in their legal brief yesterday, emails are stored in known physical locations, on hard drives, in datacenter facilities. When the U.S. government requires a tech company to execute a warrant for emails stored overseas, the provider must search a foreign datacenter and make a copy abroad, and then import that copy to the United States. This creates a complex issue with huge international consequences. It shouldn’t be resolved by taking the law to a place it was never intended to go.

If anyone had doubts that this case has international ramifications, they were laid to rest by the list of governments that last month or this week either joined amicus briefs or made public statements supporting key parts of Microsoft’s position. The list includes Ireland, France, the European Commission, European privacy regulators and members of the European Parliament, to name just some of those involved. Supreme Court cases almost never garner this level of engagement from foreign governments and officials.

As these officials have explained, the U.S. Department of Justice’s attempt to seize foreign customers’ emails from other countries ignores borders, treaties and international law, as well as the laws those countries have in place to protect the privacy of their own citizens. As the French government stated on Monday, it’s a path that creates “a significant risk of conflict of laws.” And as the tech sector appreciates all too well, that’s a conflict that will leave tech companies and consumers caught in the middle.

It’s also a path that will lead to the doorsteps of American homes by putting the privacy of U.S. citizens’ emails at risk. If the U.S. government obtains the power to search and seize foreign citizens’ private communications physically stored in other countries, it will invite other governments to do the same thing. If we ignore other countries’ laws, how can we demand that they respect our laws? That’s part of why public interest groups, such as the Brennan Center for Justice and the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, are watching this case so closely.

The DOJ’s position also bodes ill for the U.S. economy and American jobs. Right now, U.S. companies are world leaders in providing cloud services. That leadership position is based on trust. But if the U.S. government can assert this type of unilateral power to reach into datacenters that are operated by U.S. companies in other countries, foreign countries and foreign customers will question their ability to trust American companies.

Ultimately the courts – including the Supreme Court – can decide only whether the DOJ’s approach passes muster under current law. That’s a blunt instrument. The courts are not able to write a new law. Under our Constitution, only Congress can do that, using its tools to craft a nuanced solution that balances all the competing concerns by enacting a statute for the 21st century.

Everyone on both sides of this case agrees that these are real problems that need real solutions. But they need to be crafted with a scalpel, not a meat cleaver.

And as so many groups across the political spectrum and countries now agree, let’s hope the Supreme Court leaves it to Congress to do just that.

Find all 23 amicus briefs here.

Find the full list of signatories here.

Microsoft’s brief can be viewed here.

Tags: data privacy, datacenters, U.S. Supreme Court, warrant

Microsoft advances Microsoft Software & Systems Academy expansion goals with Quantico ribbon-cutting ceremony – Microsoft on the Issues

Microsoft set a vision to empower transitioning military service members and the veteran community with the opportunity to receive relevant training that could lead to meaningful careers. On Monday, the company held its ribbon-cutting ceremony for the opening of Microsoft Software & Systems Academy (MSSA) on Marine Corps Base Quantico. With the program’s growing availability, service members from coast to coast will be able to participate in technical training and career development. MSSA Quantico will focus specifically on meeting the growing demand for cybersecurity professionals.

The ceremony, which was held at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, started with welcoming remarks from Col. Joseph M. Murray, Commander, Marine Corps Installations National Capital Region – Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia. Other speakers included U.S. Rep. Rob Wittman; Dr. Barry Butler, president of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU); Marc Langlois, senior director, Department of Navy at Microsoft; and Brig. Gen. Kurt W. Stein, director of Marine and Family programs, Headquarters Marine Corps.

Barry Butler, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University president, delivers remarks at Quantico
Dr. Barry Butler, president of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, delivers remarks at the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Microsoft Software and Systems Academy (MSSA) at Quantico on Jan. 8, 2018.

“Your courage. Your dedication to others. Your ability to work together as a tight knit team. Your adaptability and accountability – these are qualities you have developed in the most challenging of environments,” said Marc Langlois, senior director, Department of Navy at Microsoft, speaking to the first cohort of students for MSSA Quantico.

“MSSA Quantico Cohort A, we don’t just think you are ready to learn. We know you are ready.”

Rep. Wittman also spoke to the group about the importance of programs like MSSA to train our transitioning service members and veterans.

“What a great combination of innovation and creation from the private side to the public side, who are putting that together for the betterment of our nation… [MSSA] is the first step of many steps of developing this skill set that exists here in the Marine Corps.”

The Quantico campus is the first of four scheduled MSSA launches in early 2018 on the Eastern Seaboard, and will complete Microsoft’s 2015 goal of opening nine regions servicing 14 bases. In the months ahead, Microsoft will open MSSA programs at Camp Lejeune, Naval Station Norfolk, and the Jacksonville Community Campus (near Naval Air Station Jacksonville and Naval Station Mayport).

Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Ronald Green speaks with Rep. Rob Wittman
Marine Corps Sgt. Maj. Ronald Green, left, speaks with Rep. Rob Wittman following the ribbon-cutting ceremony for MSSA at Quantico on Jan. 8, 2018.

Since launching MSSA in November 2013 at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in the state of Washington, Microsoft has worked with education partners ERAU and St. Martin’s University to create a successful and proven model for reskilling our nation’s heroes and preparing them for meaningful careers in technology. This cornerstone of the DoD Skillbridge program helps the industry overall, helps veterans and helps our country build a stronger workforce to compete on the world stage. In the past four years, the company has grown its hiring partner network to more than 240 companies, including Dell, Expedia, Accenture, Capgemeni and the Department of Defense, with an average starting salary of $70,000.

To learn more about MSSA at Quantico, visit military.microsoft.com/mssa.

Marine Corps Base Quantico ceremonial platoon presents the colors
The Marine Corps Base Quantico ceremonial platoon presents the colors during the ribbon-cutting ceremony for MSSA at Quantico on Jan. 8, 2018.

Tags: Education and Jobs, military, MSSA, veterans

For Sale – NEW Razer Kraken Pro V2 Headset

Hi All. New here so will be willing to go first for mods or extremely trusted members. Else I will take PayPal at an extra cost to cover the fees and you will be covered by buyer’s protection

Price and currency: £65 BT or £70 PayPal non-gift
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT/PayPal
Location: Birmingham, collection available and will personally deliver within 10 miles.
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Dell Optiplex 7010 w/ Intel Core I7 3770 & 128GB SSD & 12GB DDR3

Looking to sell My Dell 7010. This was a family members old system so never saw much heavy use. I could swap out the 128GB SSD for a 160GB HDD for £30 less if you have your own storage. The desktop is in very good condition and could easily be made into a very capable gaming machine with a low powered card like the 1050 ti.

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[​IMG]
[​IMG]

Price and currency: 200
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT / Paypal
Location: Northampton
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.