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Snowflake files for IPO after months of speculation

After months of speculation, fast-growing cloud data warehouse vendor Snowflake has filed for an IPO.

“All our sources have confirmed that they filed using the JOBS Act approach,” said R “Ray” Wang, founder and CEO of Constellation Research.

The Jumpstart Our Business Act was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2012 and is intended to help fund small businesses by easing securities regulations, including allowing smaller firms to file for IPOs confidentially while testing the market.

“They have ramped up their sales and marketing to match the IPO projections and they’ve made substantial customer progress,” Wang added.

Snowflake, meanwhile, has not yet confirmed that its IPO is now officially in the works.

“No comment” was the official response from the vendor when reached for comment.

Snowflake, founded in 2012 and based in San Mateo, Calif., has appeared to be aiming at an IPO for more than a year.

All our sources have confirmed that they filed using the JOBS Act approach. They have ramped up their sales and marketing to match the IPO projections and they’ve made substantial customer progress.
R ‘Ray’ WangFounder and CEO, Constellation Research

The vendor is in a competitive market that includes Amazon Redshift, Google BigQuery, Microsoft Azure SQL Data Warehouse and SAP Data Warehouse, among others. Snowflake, however, has established a niche in the market and been able to grow from 80 customers when it released its first platform in 2015 to more than 3,400.

“Unlike other cloud data warehouses, Snowflake uses a SQL database engine designed for the cloud, and scales storage and compute independently,” said Noel Yuhanna, analyst at Forrester Research. “Customers like its ease of use, lower cost, scalability and performance capabilities.”

He added that unlike other cloud data warehouses, Snowflake can help customers avoid vendor lock-in by running on multiple cloud providers.

“If the IPO comes through, it will definitely put pressure on the big cloud vendors Amazon, Google and Microsoft who have been expanding their data warehouse solutions in the cloud,” Yuhanna said.

Snowflake has been able to increase its valuation from under $100 million when it emerged from stealth to more than $12 billion by growing its customer base and raising investor capital through eight funding rounds. An IPO has the potential to infuse the company with even more capital, and fundraising is often the chief reason a company goes public.

Other advantages include an exit opportunity for investors, publicity and credibility, a reduced overall cost of capital since private companies often pay higher interest rates to receive bank loans, and the ability to use stock as a means of payment.

Speculation that Snowflake was on a path toward going public gained momentum when Bob Muglia, who took over as CEO of Snowflake in 2014 just before it emerged from stealth, abruptly left the company in April 2019 and was replaced by Frank Slootman.

Before joining Snowflake, Slootman had led ServiceNow and Data Domain through their IPOs, and in October 2019 told an audience in London that Snowflake could pursue an IPO as early as summer 2020.

Three months later, in February 2020, Snowflake raised $479 million in venture capital funding led by Dragoneer Investment Group and Salesforce Ventures, which marked the vendor’s eighth fundraising round and raised the its valuation to more than $12.4 billion.

Even eight funding rounds are rare, and in order to increase valuation beyond venture capital investments, companies are generally left with the option of either going public or getting acquired.

Meanwhile, last week at its virtual user conference Snowflake revealed expanded cloud data warehouse capabilities that included a new integration with Salesforce that will enable Snowflake to more easily connect to different data sources. And the more capabilities Snowflake has, the more attractive it would be to potential investors in an IPO.

“Snowflake, I believe, has been looking at an IPO for a few years now,” Yuhanna said. “They have had a steady revenue streamline for a while, and many large Fortune companies have been using it for critical analytical deployments. Based on our inquiries, it’s the top data warehouse that customers have been asking about besides Amazon Redshift.”

While Snowflake has finally filed for an IPO, the filing is just one step in the process of going public and it’s not certain the vendor will go through with a public offering.

The IPO market, however, has remained active despite the COVID-19 pandemic.

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5 ways COVID-19 changed the data storage market

The past few months have forced the normally conservative data storage world to make on-the-spot adjustments to the ways people buy and use storage.

Recent earnings reports from leading storage companies provided a look at how they adapted to the changes. While they experienced mixed results, clear buying patterns and industry changes emerged in the data storage market. Storage leaders expect many of the changes will remain in place, even after the COVID-19 threat subsides.

The recent earnings calls showed some trends accelerated — such as a move from large data center arrays to hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) and the cloud, and a shift from Capex to Opex spending. It also forced new selling strategies as face-to-face sales calls and conferences gave way to virtual events and virtual meetings between buyers and sellers working remotely.

One major storage CEO even experienced COVID-19 personally.

“I contracted COVID-19 in mid-March,” Pure Storage CEO Charlie Giancarlo said last week on the company’s earnings call. “And that experience has provided me with a deep personal appreciation for this virus and its impact. The changes in people’s lives and livelihoods are truly extraordinary. And our expectations of what is or will be normal are forever changed. Every day, each new report on the crisis brings an uneasy mixture of anxiety, uncertainty and hope about the future.”

Charles Giancarlo, CEO, Pure StorageCharlie Giancarlo

Storage vendors confronted this new normal over the last few months, with their business prospects also filled with uncertainty. Pure came out of it better than its larger direct competitors Dell EMC, NetApp and Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Still, it joined Dell and HPE in declining to give a forecast for this quarter because of uncertainty. NetApp did not give a long-term forecast but predicts a 6% revenue drop this quarter.

The following are some ways the data storage market changed during the first quarter of COVID-19:

Arrays give way to cloud, HCI

Flash array vendor Pure’s revenues increased 12% over last year, to $367 million. Other array vendors didn’t fare so well, while HCI and services revenue grew as organizations shifted to remote work and bought storage remotely.

Dell EMC’s storage revenue fell 5% to $3.8 billion, while its Infrastructure Solutions Group fell 8% overall (servers and networking dropped 10%). But while storage, servers and networking dipped, Dell reported double-digit growth in its VxRail HCI platform that combines those IT infrastructure tiers.

NetApp revenue dropped 12% to $1.4 billion, including a 21% decline in product revenue. NetApp all-flash array revenue of $656 million dropped 3% since last year, while cloud data services of $111 million more than doubled. NetApp claims it has more than 3,500 cloud data services customers.

NetApp CEO George KurianGeorge Kurian

“I would tell you that as we think about the go-forward strategic roadmap, it’s much more tied to software and cloud services,” NetApp CEO George Kurian said.

HPE storage revenues declined 16% since last year.

Hyper-converged infrastructure specialist Nutanix reported an 11% revenue increase to $318.3 million. Dell-owned VMware also reported revenue from its vSAN HCI software increased more than 20%, as did its NSX software-defined networking product.

VDI encore

It’s no surprise that the VDI expansion would lead to HCI sales, because VDI was among the first common use cases for hyper-convergence. One change since the early days of HCI is that now many of those desktops are sold as a cloud service.

Nutanix CEO Dheeraj PandeyDheeraj Pandey

Nutanix CEO Dheeraj Pandey said the increase for VDI and desktop as a service (DaaS) in March and April “brought us back to our roots, when a much larger piece of our business supported virtual desktop workloads.”

VDI also helped flash storage catch on, as a way to deal with boot storms and peak periods required for heavy volume of virtual desktops. Not all flash vendors benefited last quarter, but Pure did.

“Certainly, VDI was one of the major use cases out there,” Pure’s Giancarlo said.

In May, NetApp acquired VDI and DaaS startup CloudJumper to address that market.

Who’s buying? And how?

COVID-19’s impact on storage buying was far from uniform. The pandemic left some industries financially devastated, while others had to expand to keep up.

Dell COO Jeff Clarke said Dell saw demand drop among SMBs and industries such as retail, manufacturing, energy and transportation. But financial services, government, healthcare and life sciences increased spending.

Kurian said NetApp also saw an increase in healthcare spending, driven by the pandemic and a need for digital imaging.

Organizations spending on storage are increasingly going to a utility model, buying storage as a service. Pure’s subscription services jumped 37% year over year to $120 million, making up one-third of its overall revenue.

“What we saw in Q1 was that the urgency was to beef up what they currently had in, and that was largely on prem,” Giancarlo said. “But they wanted the option, they didn’t want to sign on to five years of more on prem or anything along those lines. They wanted the option of being able to move to the cloud at any point in time. And that’s exactly what our Pure as-a-Service is designed to do in several respects.”

While Dell’s overall revenue was flat from last year, its recurring revenue increased 16%, to around $6 billion. That recurring revenue includes utility and as-a-service pricing.

“We have a very, very modern way to consume and digest IT with the very best products in the marketplace,” Clarke said.

Virtualized sales become common

Remote work has changed the way vendors and customers interact. Like with user conferences, sales calls have become a virtual experience.

“Our teams had to be nimble and quickly embrace a new sales motion,” Dell’s Clarke said. “We successfully pivoted to all virtual engagements with hundreds of thousands of virtual customer interactions in the quarter.”

Clarke said there has been no negative impact, as he and his sales team can meet with more customers than in the past.

Nutanix, which shifted its 2020 .NEXT user conference to a virtual event and pushed it until Sept. 8, has also moved in-person regional shows and boot camps online. Pandey said Nutanix has seen no drop-off in qualified leads for its sales team from going virtual.

“We have gone completely virtual and are seeing comparable yield in terms of qualified leads and virtual meetings for our sales organization at less than half the cost,” he said.

Cost-saving: Furloughs, pay cuts, hiring freezes

Unsure of what the immediate future will look like, IT companies are enacting cost reduction plans and realigning their teams.

Dell is implementing a global hiring freeze, reduction in consulting and contractor costs, global travel restrictions and a suspension of its 401(k) match plan.

HPE said it would enact pay cuts across the board, with the executive team taking the biggest reductions. CEO Antonio Neri also said HPE would reduce and realign the workforce as part of a cost reduction plan save more than $1 billion over three years.

Nutanix implemented two nonconsecutive weeks of furloughs for a quarter of its employees and cut executive team members’ salaries by 10%.

Not all the vendors are reducing staff yet, though. NetApp CEO Kurian said the company reached its target goal of adding 200 primary sales reps, a quarter ahead of schedule.

Pure Storage’s Giancarlo said it’s his “personal mission” to avoid layoffs or furloughs through the rest of 2020, although the company did have layoffs — which he called a “rebalancing” — before COVID-19 hit. “We believe we’re going to be able to perform in such a way that we will not have layoffs or furloughs,” he said.

Despite the changes to the data storage market, one constant is data is growing in volume and important in business around the world.

“While we cannot predict when the world will return to normal, the enduring importance of data is clear,” Kurian said.

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For Sale – I9 9900KS, 2080 Super for sale…

for sale specs as below…. only 4 months old.

CASE – NZXT H200 GAMING CASE (WHITE)
CPU – INTEL i9-9900KS (5.0ghz)
MOTHERBOARD – ASUS ROG STRIX Z390-I GAMING
RAM – Corsair 16GB VENGEANCE DDR4 3600MHz
GPU – 8GB NVIDIA GEFORCE RTX 2080 SUPER RTX
STORAGE – 1TB SAMSUNG EVO 970 M.2 NVMe
PSU – CORSAIR 650W VS SERIES
COOLING – CORSAIR H60 2018 HYDRO SERIES + 3 Case Fans + Artic uprated Thermal CPU paste
LED STRIP LIGHTS 50CM

Still under 1 years manufacturer warranty.

PRICE – £2200.

Location
Newcastle upon tyne
Price and currency
£2200
Delivery cost included
Delivery is NOT included
Prefer goods collected?
I have no preference
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Bank Transfer

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Fallout from HIMSS20 cancellation continues

It’s been two months since the annual HIMSS Global Health Conference & Exhibition was canceled, but attendees and exhibitors are still expressing frustration over how the cancellation was handled.

HIMSS called off the event for the first time in 58 years due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That decision created a quick-fire controversy, as the nonprofit announced the news four days before the conference was to kick off and three days after President Donald Trump was announced as an event speaker.

But how HIMSS, an organization with 80,000 members that is closely linked with the health IT community, managed and communicated the cancellation cleanup has had more staying power. Attendees and exhibitors said they received few details from the organization and had to press HIMSS to provide clarity into how refunds would be handled. Along with poor communication, HIMSS did not provide exhibitors or attendees with the option for refunds.

“You have to pursue them and when you do, it’s an iron wall of legal policies,” said Ryan Plasch, vice president of growth and strategy at AI voice assistant company Saykara in Seattle. “For health tech companies like ours and other innovators, there was no reprieve. We asked for a refund, they cited their legal policy in the contract.” Saykara was scheduled to attend the event as an exhibitor.

When asked about the lack of communication and the lack of refund options, a HIMSS spokesperson said the organization had no comment at this time.

Lack of communication

Initially, HIMSS planned to offer no financial recourse, providing exhibitors with no contingency plan and providing attendees with an option of rolling over the cost of the HIMSS20 ticket to next year’s event. Eventually on April 8, HIMSS said it would give a partial credit to exhibitors dividing between HIMSS21 and HIMSS22.

Plasch said he was “extremely disappointed” in the poor communication from HIMSS on refund opportunities. He’s not alone: On Tuesday, 21 health IT companies that planned to exhibit at HIMSS20, including Saykara, sent HIMSS CEO Harold Wolf a letter expressing anger at how it handled the situation and requested a 100% refund of exhibitor fees.

“The decision to cancel due to COVID-19 was the right one to keep attendees and in particular our healthcare professionals safe in these unprecedented times,” the letter stated. “However, we take issue with the conduct of the HIMSS organization in the subsequent management of the finances related to this situation. Because of this, we decided to reach out to other similarly affected organizations, many of who have complained directly to you, but who have not felt listened to and we have joined together with them to send you this letter.”

You have to pursue them and when you do, it’s an iron wall of legal policies.
Ryan PlaschVice president of growth and strategy, Saykara

In its FAQ, HIMSS said that, when it comes to exhibitor booth and sponsorship refunds, it “must follow and honor the terms of exhibitor contracts, which include a force majeure clause. As a not-for-profit, and because of its obligations to other parties, HIMSS will honor its partners’ rights but, unfortunately, is not in a position to issue cash refunds beyond those provided in our contracts.”

HIMSS outlined the force majeure clause for exhibitors in the event’s terms and conditions stating, “In the event that the performance by HIMSS or the venue or any part of the exhibit area thereof is unavailable … HIMSS shall not be liable to refund, indemnify, or reimburse the Exhibitor in respect of any fees paid, damage or loss, direct or indirect, arising as a result thereof.”

In its letter, the 21 exhibitors rejected the explanation, stating, “All of us were shocked and angry that HIMSS took the decision to retain 100% of the money paid for exhibition space rental citing Force Majeure and the fact you are a Not for Profit; however, we fail to see why being a Not for Profit should exempt HIMSS from acting fairly, honourably and professionally.”

A media contact for HIMSS said she had not seen the letter and could not comment.

John Moore, founder and managing partner of Chilmark Research, a health IT consultancy in Boston, said he received minimal communication from HIMSS regarding refund opportunities. Moore has attended several HIMSS conferences.

“I had to hunt them down and, even then, they were very difficult to reach,” Moore said. “You couldn’t get ahold of anyone for a couple of months.”

Maree Beare, founder of symptom checker startup Wanngi in Australia, found communication from HIMSS regarding refunds to be lacking. Beare, who was attending HIMSS for the first time, said she expected a full refund for the cost of her ticket and had to reach out to HIMSS organizers directly to learn that wasn’t the case.

“I think people were not communicated to correctly at all,” she said.

Lack of refund options

It wasn’t until one month after the event was canceled that exhibitors received a consolation. HIMSS offered to split 25% of exhibitors’ “total spend from HIMSS20” between the next two years, with 15% applied to HIMSS21 and 10% applied to HIMSS22. Startups and “university row” exhibitors were given the opportunity to split 100% of their total spend evenly between HIMSS21 and HIMSS22.

Saykara’s Plasch said he felt “empty handed and almost brushed aside” by HIMSS. Plasch said HIMSS’ response was a stark contrast to another event the vendor was scheduled to attend just a couple of weeks later, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) annual meeting, which draws roughly 30,000 attendees or 15,000 fewer than HIMSS.

Within a week of canceling, Plasch said AAOS conference organizers provided Saykara with three refund options.

“You could get a 100% refund, you could apply credits to next year with some incentives, or you could elect to do some online virtual things with free advertisement,” Plasch said. “Without even asking, we got that.”

From HIMSS, Plasch said he’s received “curt” responses to inquiries and said his company is feeling “disenfranchised as a result of the experience.”

As an attendee, Chilmark’s Moore said the consultancy’s tickets to HIMSS20 weren’t eligible for a refund but were automatically made applicable to next year’s event. However, tickets aren’t transferable to other employees right now, meaning Moore could lose the value of that ticket if an employee that planned to attend HIMSS20 leaves the company before the HIMSS21 event.

Roughly 10 Chilmark employees were planning to attend HIMSS20, and at about $1,500 each, Moore hoped HIMSS would’ve offered more options to those affected by the cancellation.

“HIMSS was pretty amateurish to say the least,” Moore said. “The HIMSS conference brings in, I don’t know how many millions into HIMSS … and this is the best they can do? It’s a bit of a joke.”

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Looker analytics platform adding app development capability

Looker is maintaining a focus on application development as it continues to add new features to its analytics platform six months after its last major release and three months after it finally joined forces with Google Cloud.

The vendor, which was founded in 2012 and is based in Santa Cruz, Calif., was acquired by Google for $2.6 billion in June 2019, just four days before Tableau was purchased by Salesforce for $15.7 billion. Unlike Tableau, however, which serves a largely on-premises customer base and delivers platform updates quarterly, Looker is entirely cloud-based and therefore, beyond its one major update each year, delivers new and upgraded features throughout the year.

Looker 7, released in November 2019, included a new application development framework and enhanced embedded BI capabilities. Since then, Looker has kept adding to its set of tools for application developers, enhancing the power of its no-code query capabilities and providing new ways to embed analytics into the applications customers use in their everyday workflows.

“Developers are their bread and butter,” said Mike Leone, senior analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group. “It’s all about enabling developers to seamlessly, intelligently and rapidly incorporate analytics at scale into modern applications. This is and has been a top priority for Looker.”

Meanwhile, as Looker has continued to build up its analytics platform, the vendor’s acquisition was finalized. The purchase closed so recently, however, that there hasn’t yet been any obvious evidence of collaboration between Looker and Google Cloud, analysts said.

Developers are their bread and butter. It’s all about enabling developers to seamlessly, intelligently and rapidly incorporate analytics at scale into modern applications. This is and has been a top priority for Looker.
Mike LeoneSenior analyst, Enterprise Strategy Group

“I have not seen anything yet to suggest that they’ve made a dramatic change yet in their approach,” said Dave Menninger, research director of data and analytics research at Ventana Research.

He added, however, that Looker and Google Cloud share a lot of similarities and the two are a natural fit. In particular, the way Looker uses its LookML language to enable developers to build applications without having to write complex code fits in with Google Cloud’s focus.

“Looker has found a good partner in Google in the sense that Looker is really targeted at building custom apps,” Menninger said. “Looker is all about the LookML language and constructing these analyses, these displays that are enhanced by the LookML language. And a large part of Google, the Google Cloud Platform division, is really focused on that developer community. So Looker fits into that family well.”

Leone, meanwhile, also said he’s still waiting to see Google’s influence on Looker but added that he expects to hear more about their integration in the near future.

And collaboration, according to Pedro Arellano, Looker’s vice president of product marketing, is indeed on the horizon. The two are working together on new features, and given that Looker is entirely cloud-based and that Looker and Google Cloud not only had a strong partnership before they joined forces but had 350 shared customers, Looker’s integration into the Google Cloud portfolio is proceeding more rapidly than it might have had Looker had a host of on-premises customers.

“It’s exciting to talk with the product teams and understand where the potential integration points are and think about these really exciting thing that we’ll be able to develop, some things that I expect will be out in a relatively short amount of time,” Arellano said. “That work case is happening, and it’s absolutely something we’re doing today.”

As far as features Looker has added to the analytics platform since last fall, one of the key additions is the Slack integration the vendor unveiled at the time Looker 7 was released but was still in beta testing. The tool delivers insights directly into customers’ Slack conversations.

Beyond the Slack integration, Looker has added to its extension network, which is its low-code/no-code tool set for developers. Among the latest new tools are the Data Dictionary, which pulls up metadata about fields built by developers using the LookML model and displays them in a digestible format, as well as tools that help developers customize user interfaces and create dashboard extensions such as adding a chat widget.

In terms of query power, Looker has developed what it calls aggregate awareness, a feature that uses augmented intelligence and machine learning to reduce the amount of time it takes a user to run a query and helps them run more focused queries.

“We really think of Looker as a platform for developing and building and deploying any kind of data experience that our customers might imagine,” Arellano said. “We recognize that we can’t anticipate all the data experiences they might come up with. We’re very focused on the developers because these are the people that are building those experiences.”

In addition to the new features Looker has added since the release of Looker 7, the vendor put together the Looker COVID-19 Data Block, a free hub for data related to the ongoing pandemic that includes data models and links to public sources such Johns Hopkins University, the New York Times and the COVID Tracking Project. The hub uses LookML to power frequent updates and deliver the data in prebuilt dashboards.

“This was an opportunity to do good things with technology and with data,” Arellano said.

As Looker continues to enhance its analytics platform, one of its next areas the vendor says it will focus on will be the platform’s mobile capabilities.

Mobile has long been a difficult medium for BI vendors with data difficult to digest on the small screens of phones and tablets. Many, as a result, have long ignored mobile. Recently, however, vendors such as Yellowfin and MicroStrategy have made significant investments in their mobile capabilities, and Arellano said that Looker plans to offer an improved mobile experience sometime in the second half of 2020.

That fits in with what Leone expects from Looker now that it’s under the Google Cloud umbrella, which is a broadening of the vendor’s focus and capabilities.

“I think, individually, they were behind a few of the leaders in the space, but the Google acquisition almost instantly brought them back on par with direct competition,” he said. “Google’s influence will be beneficial, especially around the ideas of democratizing analytics/insights, faster on-ramp and a much wider vision that incorporates a powerful AI vision.”

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For Sale – CyberPower PC / NZXT Fans / WIFI Card

I bought a custom gaming rig off amazon and got a new pc so this one is surplus to requirements.
Has 5 months parts warranty, 1 year 5 months labour warranty and lifetime tech help from cyber power (will send receipt and invoices etc) pc is:
I5-8400
MSI AERO 6GB 1060
H310 pro MSI MOTHERBOARD MATX
8gb 2666mhz ram
400w PSU
250gb Samsung evo SSD and 1TB seagate 3.5 HDD
WiFi card
NO OS
Masterbox Lite 5 case

£400

Kept in great condition, did a good clean with an IT Duster.
Ran perfectly and no…

CyberPower PC / NZXT Fans / WIFI Card

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For Sale – Ubiquiti TOUGHSwitch PoE / EVGA 750Ti GFX

Ubiquiti ToughSwitch/EdgeSwitch XP Gigabit Managed 5 Port PoE Switch 24V – £30

  • Been in use for about 18 months – works great – selling because I’ve bought the Unifi 8 port switch. Good used condition – see pic.

Ubiquiti N-SW NanoSwitch 4-Port Gigabit PoE Switch – £25 SOLD

  • Used for about 5 mins – bought the wrong thing about a year ago and missed the returns window. Immaculate condition in original box.

EVGA NVIDIA GTX 750 Ti SC 2 GB SuperClocked Graphics Card – £45

  • Bought this to play FarCry 4 a couple of years ago, only used it for this, probably had 50 hours use total. Perfect condition.

I also have a Ubiquiti EdgeRouter Lite (currently in use) that I’m looking to replace with a USG. Let me know if interest and I’ll upload a pic in line with forum rules.

All prices include P&P, will send insured snail mail unless buyer wants to pay the difference for next day. Happy for cash on collection too.

Location
Milton Keynes
Price and currency
£various
Delivery cost included
Delivery Is Included
Prefer goods collected?
I have no preference
Advertised elsewhere?
Not advertised elsewhere
Payment method
BT or cash

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For Sale – Dell E7450 14″ Ultrabook Laptop (Intel i5-5300 8GB 512GB SSD)

I’m not the original owner. I’ve had for about 13 months. According to Dell website it was made in March 2016.
The i7 one mentioned above has less RAM, no SSD and is in much worse condition (cracked case in corner).
I think my price is fair given the condition and I even accepted an offer of £225 from vrackdc above but they withdrew.

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For Sale – HP Pavilion 15.6”, i7, 256 GB SSD, GTX 1050Ti

HP Pavilion 15-cs1506sa, used for about four months for work and a little gaming (DOTA2).

Full HD screen, backlit keyboard, some small marks from normal wear but nothing major in the slightest.

Two USB ports, one HDMI, ethernet, headphone, SD slot. Battery is great, can last the whole day working, and also charges very quickly (at least compared to what I’m used to!).

Will post some pictures up tomorrow.

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For Sale – For parts or complete. Desktop CAD/Photoshop etc. i7, Nvidia quadro…

Selling my project PC. Has been used (successfully) as a CCTV server for the past 18 months – 2 years without ever being pushed. All parts were bought new but no retail packaging. Please assume no warranty. No operating system installed either. Selling as we’ve now upgraded to a dedicated Xeon server. Parts listed below.

Generic desktop tower case.
Supermicro C7H270-CG-ML motherboard.
Intel i7 7700 3.6 ghz with stock cooler.
PNY Nvidia quadro M2000 4gb.
Kingston hyperx fury DDR4 16gb RAM (2x8gb).
Seagate Skyhawk 4tb HDD (NO OS).
ACBEL 300w PSU.

Aside from the PSU this a solid machine with decent potential. Could easily be used for gaming with one or two changes and could be used for CAD or photoshop as is (or just change PSU). This handled HIKVision and up to 56 cameras (we had 13 on screen at any one time, could handle more) but admittedly struggled with playback on any more than four cameras at once (All 4K cameras). The case has a dent or two in it but entirely useable. Did intend to keep it for the Mrs for her photography but she’s bought a MacBook instead.

Cost around £2000 new. Asking £700 including postage but collection preferred (from Plymouth). Very open to offers as I’ve struggled to price this up to be honest.

Cheers, Chocky.

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