Tag Archives: more

For Sale – Vega 64 Liquid Cooled Edition

Hi there,

I am selling my Vega 64 LC. Been using it for more than 6 months, and since I am going to move abroad for the next semester I won’t be needing it anymore.

Perfect condition, comes with the original receipt, the original box and all the original accessories.

If you live in or around Brighton feel free to come to test the card.

Price and currency: £650
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: Paypal, Cash, Transfer
Location: Brighton, UK
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Alienware 13r3, OLED, NVIDIA 1060, 32GB Ram

My Alienware 13r3 is up for sale. A little bit more than two years old.

I have used it for video editing but I need a bigger screen.

I7-6700 processor
32GB RAM
512 GB ssd
nvidia 1060 video card
OLED screen

one of the speakers does not work but I ordered a spare from the states but haven`t had the time to fit them.

Price is 950GBP the lowest you can find.

Thanks for Looking

Price and currency: 950
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: cash or BT
Location: Northwood
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
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Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Microsoft Azure Dev Spaces, Google Jib target Kubernetes woes

To entice developers to create more apps on their environments, major cloud platform companies will meet them where they live.

Microsoft and Google both released tools to help ease app development on their respective platforms, Microsoft Azure and the Google Cloud Platform. Microsoft’s Azure Dev Spaces and Google Jib help developers build applications for the Kubernetes container orchestrator and Java environments and represent a means to deliver simpler, developer-friendly technology.

Microsoft’s Azure Dev Spaces, now in public preview, is a cloud-native development environment for the company’s Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS), where developers can work on applications while connected with the cloud and their team. These users can build cloud applications with containers and microservices on AKS and do not deal with any infrastructure management or orchestration, according to Microsoft.

As Kubernetes further commoditizes deployment and orchestration, cloud platform vendors and public cloud providers must focus on how to simplify customers’ implementation of cloud-native development methods — namely DevOps, CI/CD and microservices, said Rhett Dillingham, an analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy in Austin, Texas.

“Azure Dev Spaces has the potential to be one of Microsoft’s most valuable recent developer tooling innovations, because it addresses the complexity of integration testing and debugging in microservices environments,” he said.

Edwin Yuen, analyst, Enterprise Strategy GroupEdwin Yuen

With the correct supporting services, developers can fully test and deploy in Microsoft Azure, added Edwin Yuen, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group in Milford, Mass.

“This would benefit the developer, as it eases the process of container development by allowing them to see the results of their app without having to set up a Docker or Kubernetes environment,” he said.

Meanwhile, Google’s Jib containerizer tool enables developers to package a Java application into a container image with the Java tools they already know to create container-based advanced applications. And like Azure Dev Spaces, it handles a lot of the underlying infrastructure and orchestration tasks.

It’s about simplifying the experience … the developer is eased into the process by using existing tools and eliminating the need to set up Docker or Kubernetes.
Edwin Yuenanalyst, Enterprise Strategy Group

Integration with Java development tools Maven and Gradle means Java developers can skip the step to create JAR, or Java ARchive, files and then containerize them, Yuen said.

“Like Azure Dev Spaces, it’s about simplifying the experience — this time, not the laptop jump, but the jump from JAR to container,” he said. “But, again, the developer is eased into the process by using existing tools and eliminating the need to set up Docker or Kubernetes.”

Jib also extends Google’s association with the open source community to provide Java developers an easy path to containerize their apps while using the Google Cloud Platform, Yuen added.

For Sale – i7 7700K Delidded+Relidded / MSI Z270 Gaming M3 / 16GB Patriot Viper 3000MHz DDR4

Selling the core of my main gaming rig as I’m doing more productivity stuff than gaming these days. It consists of:
1) An i7 7700K which has been delidded, Thermal Grizzly Conductonaut applied between the die and the heatspreader, and then relidded with high temperature black silicone adhesive.

2) An MSI Z270 Gaming M3, with backplate.

3) 16GB (2x8GB) of Patriot Viper 3000Mhz RAM, model number PVE416G300C6KBL.

Photos:

Imgur
Imgur
Imgur
Imgur

All in fully working condition. Only what you see in the photos will be supplied (no additional accessories). This setup is still just about as good as it gets in terms of frame rates in the latest games.

Price and currency: £400
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Sheffield, UK
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Team collaboration secondary in Workplace by Facebook app

Facebook pitches Workplace as a team collaboration app, but businesses have found the product more useful as an intranet that helps build community across large workforces with many remote and part-time employees.

In recent months, Facebook has stepped up efforts to position its business platform as a competitor to cloud-based collaboration apps like Slack and Microsoft Teams. Recently, for example, the social media company added to Workplace by Facebook third-party business software and made it easier to deploy instant messaging.

But the Workplace users interviewed for this story do not have the platform integrated with many business apps and have not seen widespread adoption of Workplace Chat, the messaging tool.

Instead, most of those Workplace users continue to rely on platforms like Microsoft Skype for Business for unified communications (UC), while using Workplace primarily for companywide announcements and for promoting collaboration across departments.

Facebook arranged interviews with Weight Watchers, Farmers Insurance and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) for this story. Heineken USA and Rooftop Housing Group, a 200-person nonprofit based in Evesham, England, were contacted independently. More than 30,000 organizations use the Workplace by Facebook app.

Workplace by Facebook app a better intranet

Only 10% of Weight Watchers employees work at a desk in an office. The World Wildlife Fund has 80 offices around the world. Two-thirds of Heineken workers in the United States are based out of regional offices, which they visit once or twice a week.

These organizations turned to the Workplace by Facebook app because it was a mobile-centric platform that most employees would intuitively know how to use based on the popularity of consumer Facebook.

“For someone who only works two hours a week for the company, we wanted them to be able to intuitively get what the platform was, understand how to use it and take to engage in it,” said Stacie Sherer, senior vice president of corporate communications at Weight Watchers.

Similar to consumer Facebook, Workplace lets users like, comment and share posts. Since deploying Workplace, employees engage with company news more frequently and are more likely to post updates about their own team’s work, the users said.

“Whether you’re in the field, or whether you’re working in finance, or whether you’re working in an administrative role, it has allowed [staff] to feel more part of WWF and our work,” said Kate Cooke, head of network communications at the World Wildlife Fund. (The platform is free for nonprofits.)

The tool has increased collaboration among teams and departments that would have otherwise never interacted. Weight Watchers employees based in different parts of the country have discussed best practices for helping clients. Recently, the Armenian branch of WWF posted about a communications campaign that other offices ended up copying.

Business integrations aren’t central to how companies use Workplace

In May, Facebook unveiled roughly 50 integrations with SaaS apps such as Jira, HubSpot and SurveyMonkey, following the lead of platforms like Slack, Microsoft Teams and Cisco Webex Teams. But for the most part, the organizations interviewed for this story haven’t begun taking advantage of those integrations.

The users, however, do have Workplace integrated with cloud storage apps, such as Box and Google Drive, and web conferencing platforms, such as Zoom, which can be used to live stream meetings and events to Workplace. Those integrations had been available before the May announcement.

Microsoft, Cisco and Slack have marketed their team collaboration apps as hubs for getting work done. Those apps let users, for example, approve expense reports and message with colleagues from the same interface.

The Workplace by Facebook app offers similar functionality, but users are not adopting the app primarily for that reason.

“We really focused it on that engagement perspective to start and really using it as a communication channel,” said Jacqueline Leahy, director of internal corporate communications at Heineken USA. “We have not started to really use it in terms of managing projects.”

Workplace Chat adoption lags

None of the Workplace users rely on the app as their primary instant messaging platform. Most have other UC clients deployed, such as Microsoft Skype for Business, and don’t view Workplace as a replacement for those tools.

At Weight Watchers, for example, the technology and product teams use Slack, integrated with Confluence and Jira, while others in the organization communicate through WhatsApp or text messaging. Sherer said the company was looking into boosting adoption of Workplace Chat.

In fact, Workplace may be inadvertently contributing to a communication channel overload within some organizations. Rooftop Housing Group, for example, now has three or four different ways to instant message, including Workplace Chat, Microsoft Skype for Business and a Mitel softphone client.

“We now need to find organizational defaults,” said John Rockley, the nonprofit’s head of communications and marketing. “Otherwise, we’ve got too many separate channels.”

How Artificial Intelligence Could Prevent Natural Disasters

On May 27, a deluge dumped more than 6 inches of rain in less than three hours on Ellicott City, Maryland, killing one person and transforming Main Street into what looked like Class V river rapids, with cars tossed about like rubber ducks. The National Weather Service put the probability of such a storm at once in 1,000 years. Yet, “it’s the second time it’s happened in the last three years,” says Jeff Allenby, director of conservation technology for Chesapeake Conservancy, an environmental group.

Floods are nothing new in Ellicott City, located where two tributaries join the Patapsco River. But Allenby says the floods are getting worse, as development covers what used to be the “natural sponge of a forest” with paved surfaces, rooftops, and lawns. Just days before the May 27 flood, the US Department of Homeland Security selected Ellicott City—on the basis of its 2016 flood—for a pilot program to deliver better flood warnings to residents via automated sensors.

Recently, Allenby developed another tool to help predict, plan, and prepare for future floods: a first-of-its-kind, high-resolution map showing what’s on the ground—buildings, pavement, trees, lawns—across 100,000 square miles from upstate New York to southern Virginia that drain into Chesapeake Bay. The map, generated from aerial imagery with the help of artificial intelligence, shows objects as small as 3 feet square, roughly 1,000 times more precise than the maps that flood planners previously used. To understand the difference, imagine trying to identify an Uber driver on a crowded city street using a map that can only display objects the size of a Walmart.

Creating the map consumed a year and cost $3.5 million, with help from Microsoft and the University of Vermont. Allenby’s team pored over aerial imagery, road maps, and zoning charts to establish rules, classify objects, and scrub errors. “As soon as we finished the first data set,” Allenby says, “everyone started asking ‘when are you going to do it again?’” to keep the map fresh.

Enter AI. Microsoft helped Allenby’s team train its AI for Earth algorithms to identify objects on its own. Even with a robust data set, training the algorithms wasn’t easy. The effort required regular “pixel peeping”—manually zooming in on objects to verify and amend the automated results. With each pass, the algorithm improved its ability to recognize waterways, trees, fields, roads, and buildings. As relevant new data become available, Chesapeake Conservancy plans to use its AI to refresh the map more frequently and easily than the initial labor-intensive multi-million dollar effort.

Now, Microsoft is making the tool available more widely. For $42, anyone can run 200 million aerial images through Microsoft’s AI for Earth platform and generate a high-resolution land-cover map of the entire US in 10 minutes. The results won’t be as precise in other parts of the country where the algorithm has not been trained on local conditions—a redwood tree or saguaro cactus looks nothing like a willow oak.

A map of land use around Ellicott City, Maryland, built with the help of artificial intelligence (left) offers far more detail than its predecessor (right).

Chesapeake Conservancy

To a society obsessed with location and mapping services—where the physical world unfolds in the digital every day—the accomplishment may not seem groundbreaking. Until recently, though, neither the high-resolution data nor the AI smarts existed to make such maps cost-effective for environmental purposes, especially for nonprofit conservation organizations. With Microsoft’s offer, AI on a planetary scale is about to become a commodity.

Detailed, up-to-date information is paramount when it comes to designing stormwater management systems, Allenby says. “Looking at these systems with the power of AI can start to show when a watershed” is more likely to flood, he says. The Center for Watershed Protection, a nonprofit based in Ellicott City, reported in a 2001 study that when 10 percent of natural land gets developed, stream health declines and it begins to lose its ability to manage runoff. At 20 percent, runoff doubles, compared with undeveloped land. Allenby notes that paved surfaces and rooftops in Ellicott City reached 19 percent in recent years.

Allenby says the more detailed map will enable planners to keep up with land-use changes and plan drainage systems that can accommodate more water. Eventually, the map will offer “live dashboards” and automated alerts to serve as a warning system when new development threatens to overwhelm stormwater management capacity. The Urban Forestry Administration in Washington, DC, has used the new map to determine where to plant trees by searching the district for areas without tree cover where standing water accumulates. Earlier this year, Chesapeake Conservancy began working with conservation groups in Iowa and Arizona to develop training sets for the algorithms specific to those landscapes.

The combination of high-resolution imaging and sensor technologies, AI, and cloud computing is giving conservationists deeper insight into the health of the planet. The result is a near-real-time readout of Earth’s vital signs, firing off alerts and alarms whenever the ailing patient takes a turn for the worse.

Others are applying these techniques around the world. Global Forest Watch (GFW), a conservation organization established by World Resources Institute, began offering monthly and weekly deforestation alerts in 2016, powered by AI algorithms developed by Orbital Insight. The algorithms analyze satellite imagery as it’s refreshed to detect “patterns that may indicate impending deforestation,” according to the organization’s website. Using GFW’s mobile app, Forest Watcher, volunteers and forest rangers take to the trees to verify the automated alerts in places like the Leuser Ecosystem in Indonesia, which calls itself “the last place on Earth where orangutans, rhinos, elephants and tigers are found together in the wild.”

The new conservation formula is also spilling into the oceans. On June 4, Paul Allen Philanthropies revealed a partnership with the Carnegie Institution of Science, the University of Queensland, the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, and the private satellite company Planet to map all of the world’s coral reefs by 2020. As Andrew Zolli, a Planet vice president, explains: For the first time in history, “new tools are up to the [planetary] level of the problem.”

By the end of 2017, Planet deployed nearly 200 satellites, forming a necklace around the globe that images the entire Earth every day down to 3-meter resolution. That’s trillions of pixels raining down daily, which could never be transformed into useful maps without AI algorithms trained to interpret them. The partnership leverages the Carnegie Institution’s computer-vision tools and the University of Queensland’s data on local conditions, including coral, algae, sand, and rocks.

“Today, we have no idea of the geography, rate, and frequency of global bleaching events,” explains Greg Asner, a scientist at Carnegie’s Department of Global Ecology. Based on what is known, scientists project that more than 90 percent of the world’s reefs, which sustain 25 percent of marine life, will be extinct by 2050. Lauren Kickham, impact director for Paul Allen Philanthropies, expects the partnership will bring the world’s coral crisis into clear view and enable scientists to track their health on a daily basis.

In a separate coral reef project, also being conducted with Planet and the Carnegie Institution, The Nature Conservancy is leveraging Carnegie’s computer vision AI to develop a high-resolution map of the shallow waters of the Caribbean basin. “By learning how these systems live and how they adapt, maybe not our generation, but maybe the next will be able to bring them back,” says Luis Solorzano, The Nature Conservancy’s Caribbean Coral Reef project lead.

Mapping services are hardly new to conservation. Geographic Information Systems have been a staple in the conservation toolkit for years, providing interactive maps to facilitate environmental monitoring, regulatory enforcement, and preservation planning. But, mapping services are only as good as the underlying data, which can be expensive to acquire and maintain. As a result, many conservationists resort to what’s freely available, like the 30-meter-resolution images supplied by the United States Geological Survey.

Ellicott City and the Chesapeake watershed demonstrate the challenges of responding to a changing climate and the impacts of human activity. Since the 1950s, the bay’s oyster reefs have declined by more than 80 percent. Biologists discovered one of the planet’s first marine dead zones in Chesapeake Bay in the 1970s. Blue crab populations plunged in the 1990s. The sea level has risen more than a foot since 1895, and, according to a 2017 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report, may rise as much as 6 feet by the end of this century.

Allenby joined the Chesapeake Conservancy in 2012 when technology companies provided a grant to explore the ways in which technology could help inform conservation. Allenby sought ways to deploy technology to help land managers, like those in Ellicott City, improve upon the dated 30-meter-resolution images that FEMA also uses for flood planning and preparation.

In 2015, Allenby connected with the University of Vermont—nationally recognized experts in generating county-level high-resolution land-cover maps—seeking a partner on a bigger project. They secured funding from a consortium of state and local governments, and nonprofit groups in 2016. The year-long effort involved integrating data from such disparate sources as aerial imagery, road maps, and zoning charts. As the data set came together, a Conservancy board member introduced Allenby to Microsoft, which was eager to demonstrate how its AI and cloud computing could be leveraged to support conservation.

“It’s been the frustration of my life to see what we’re capable of, yet how far behind we are in understanding basic information about the health of our planet,” says Lucas Joppa, Microsoft’s chief environmental scientist, who oversees AI for Earth. “And to see that those individuals on the front line solving society’s problems, like environmental sustainability, are often in organizations with the least resources to take advantage of the technologies that are being put out there.”

The ultimate question, however, is whether the diagnoses offered by these AI-powered land-cover maps will arrive in time to help cure the problems caused by man.


More Great WIRED Stories

Financial firms, vendors push self-service software delivery

The heavily regulated financial industry requires more help with software delivery than any other. In particular, self-service software delivery appeals to firms that frequently revise codebases to accommodate policy changes and other forces.

“People don’t like writing [help desk] tickets. And, often, engineers don’t want to interact with other people at all,” said Niko Kurtti, a production engineer at Ottawa-based e-commerce platform vendor Shopify, who was half-joking at the recent QCon conference in New York City. “It’s just easier to have the machine take care of it.”

A handful of companies have stepped up to address this issue. Atomist has added self-service features to its Software Delivery Machine (SDM), with its API for Software that manages the different parts of the DevOps pipeline.

“It’s more like self-service with guardrails,” said Rod Johnson, CEO and co-founder of Atomist, based in San Francisco. “They want things to be easy and quick, but also regulated.”

Atomist adheres to the policies companies uniquely apply to their system. So, for example, if Atomist wants to add a security scan for errant open source code, rather than update each microservice by hand, Atomist makes the change once and replicates it across all the system’s services. The self-service software aspect of Atomist helps developers and DevOps teams consistently create projects and avoid IT help desk tickets — or tickets with other departments in the organization — to test or add new features.

Another entry into the self-service space is LaunchDarkly, based in Oakland, Calif., which sells a management platform for developers and operations teams to control the feature lifecycle from conception to delivery. The company’s software integrates release management into the development process and focuses on delivery. It puts all the potential features into the release and allows developers to flip a switch on features and functions for different end users. This lets a common code set deliver different functions and test different code simultaneously, rather than multiple different releases and code branches.

Rod Johnson, CEO, AtomistRod Johnson

Other examples of companies that sell similar products include startups Netsil, which focuses on monitoring Kubernetes and Docker-based microservices apps; Mobincube, which primarily targets mobile app development; and Bonitasoft, which comes out of the business process management and workflow engine world.

Some enterprises, though, choose to skip this product class and roll out their own self-service software delivery options, with scripts and integration with native tools.

Pulumi doesn’t necessarily aim to compete directly in the automation space, but it does want to standardize cloud app development and shares the idea of defining things like configuration in code, rather than YAML. Also, CloudBees and the Jenkins community have a complementary service, Jenkins X, which integrates Kubernetes with Jenkins.

Atomist addresses software delivery as a per-organization or per-team concern, rather than per project, which enables customers to apply consistent policies and governance. It provides a consistent model to automate tasks that matter to software teams, such as project creation and dependency updates.

CI/CD evolves with code automation and containers

Atomist is applying programming language concepts to add a new kind of automation and predictability to software delivery.
Mik KerstenCEO, Tasktop Technologies

With SDM, Atomist is creating a programmable pipeline that bridges a gap between coding languages and delivery pipelines, which some view as the next big innovation to follow CI/CD.

“Atomist is applying programming language concepts to add a new kind of automation and predictability to software delivery,” said Mik Kersten, CEO of Tasktop Technologies, a DevOps toolmaker based in Vancouver, B.C.

To date, the worlds of application code and CI/CD have been disconnected and based on completely different technologies and paradigms. Atomist’s programmable domain models span the application to deployment, so DevOps shops can use and code automations and directly interact with events in the pipeline through Slack, Kersten noted.

The ability to code automations is particularly attractive, said one software architect for a New York investment bank, who declined to be identified. “That would save our developers and DevOps [teams] lots of time and effort,” he said.

Atomist pledged SDM’s support for Docker and Kubernetes at the DockerCon 2018 conference in San Francisco last month. With this support, any Atomist user’s SDM would respond to code change events from the Atomist platform, automatically build new Docker containers as required and deploy them into the right Kubernetes environments based on that user’s unique software delivery needs established via their own policies.

“The actual management of containers within the software delivery process has been lacking in the market so far,” said Edwin Yuen, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group in Milford, Mass. “By integrating Dockerized apps and K8s into their SDM, as well as ChatOps and other tools, Atomist is looking to help operationalize container deployments, which is the next area of focus, as container applications go into broader adoption.”

For Sale – Vega 64 Liquid Cooled Edition

Hi there,

I am selling my Vega 64 LC. Been using it for more than 6 months, and since I am going to move abroad for the next semester I won’t be needing it anymore.

Perfect condition, comes with the original receipt, the original box and all the original accessories.

If you live in or around Brighton feel free to come to test the card.

Price and currency: £650
Delivery: Goods must be exchanged in person
Payment method: Paypal, Cash, Transfer
Location: Brighton, UK
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

RADWIN and Microsoft announce strategic partnership to deliver innovative TV White Space solutions | Stories

The partnership will help make broadband more affordable and accessible for underserved and unserved customers in the rural U.S. and around the world

REDMOND, Wash. — July 2, 2018 — On Monday, RADWIN and Microsoft Corp. announced a new strategic partnership to address the rural broadband gap. RADWIN, a world leader in delivering high-performance broadband wireless access solutions, will be developing and introducing to the market TV White Space solutions to deliver broadband internet to unserved communities. Focused on introducing innovative technologies into the TV White Space market, the partnership will expand the TV White Space ecosystem, making broadband more affordable and accessible for customers in the rural U.S. and around the world. This partnership is part of Microsoft’s Airband Initiative, which aims to expand broadband coverage using a mixture of technologies including TV White Space.

Broadband is a vital part of 21st century infrastructure. Yet, only about half of the world’s population is connected to the internet. New cloud services and other technologies make broadband connectivity a necessity to starting and growing small businesses and taking advantage of advances in agriculture, telemedicine and education. According to findings by the Boston Consulting Group, a connectivity model that uses a combination of technologies, including TV White Space, can reduce the cost of extending broadband coverage in rural communities. TV White Space is an important part of the solution, creating broadband connections in UHF bands and enabling communication in challenging rural terrains and highly vegetated areas, all while protecting broadcasters and other licensees from harmful interference.

“The TV White Space radio ecosystem is rapidly growing, and we are excited to work with RADWIN to bring innovative technologies to market at a global scale,” said Paul Garnett, senior director of the Microsoft Airband Initiative. “Our partnership with RADWIN, a recognized global leader in fixed wireless broadband access, will help address the rural broadband gap for residents and businesses, enabling farmers, healthcare professionals, educators, business leaders and others to fully participate in the digital economy.”

“RADWIN is a leading provider of broadband access solutions, enabling service providers globally to connect unserved and underserved homes and businesses,” said Sharon Sher, RADWIN’s president and CEO. “We are therefore very excited to be Microsoft’s partner in leading a global effort to connect rural communities and grow the TVWS ecosystem in the U.S. and around the world. The addition of innovative TV White Space solutions to RADWIN’s portfolio, which complements our sub-6GHz and mmWave fixed wireless offering, would enable our service provider customers and partners to extend their footprint by connecting more remote subscribers in challenging deployment use cases, penetrating through terrain obstructions and vegetation, and therefore helping to close the digital divide.”

In addition to the partnerships with companies like RADWIN, Microsoft’s Airband Initiative invests in partnerships with internet service providers (ISPs) and other telecommunications companies, introduces innovative solutions for rural connectivity, and provides digital skills training for people in newly connected communities. RADWIN and Microsoft will be introducing the innovative TV White Space solutions to these Airband Initiative partners, as well as to the global telecommunications industry, during the second half of 2019.

About RADWIN

RADWIN is a leading provider of broadband wireless solutions. Deployed in over 150 countries, RADWIN’s solutions power applications including fixed wireless access, backhaul, private network connectivity, video surveillance transmission as well as delivering broadband on the move for trains, vehicles and vessels. RADWIN’s solutions are adopted and deployed by tier 1 service providers globally as well as by large corporations.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, +1 (425) 638-7777,

rrt@we-worldwide.com

RADWIN Media Contact, Tammy Levy, Marketing Communications Manager, +972-3-766-2916, pr@radwin.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com.Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

Slack outages raise reliability concerns

Slack’s more than three-hour outage this week was the latest in a string of crashes that have left some analysts wondering whether the site’s uptime problems could scare away enterprise customers.

Analysts warned if the Slack outages continue, rivals Microsoft, Cisco and Atlassian could use them as a reason for companies to avoid the fast-growing startup.

“I think the recent outages certainly open up an avenue of attack by Slack’s competitors and will raise red flags for customers and prospects as to whether they can rely on the app for business-critical communications,” said Irwin Lazar, an analyst at Nemertes Research, based in Mokena, Ill.

Whether Slack is suffering only growing pains, as opposed to a severe flaw in its technology, is difficult to determine without insight into the exact cause of each incident. Slack said this week’s outage was due to “a bug included in an offline batch process of data.”

Last month, Slack said it had suffered only four significant disruptions since May 2017. But when contacted again on Thursday, a Slack spokesperson said the company had done another review and identified eight major Slack outages in that time frame.

That list of outages includes more than two hours last Oct. 31, almost an hour on Jan. 9, about 2.5 hours on May 21 and roughly 20 minutes on May 23. Despite the troubles, Slack has yet to announce the leader of a safety engineering team it formed in March to improve its uptime.

In an interview last month, a Slack representative acknowledged the company’s rapid growth has been challenging to keep up with at times. Since January 2015, the company has grown from 1.1 million daily users to 8 million regular users today.

“To be frank, we’re still learning as we go,” said Julia Grace, senior director of infrastructure engineering at Slack, based in San Francisco. “This is such a complex piece of software. We’re operating at a global scale. We’re learning and evolving and growing and making the service better along the way.”

Some analysts pointed out that Slack’s performance was much worse when it was starting out.

“Once upon a time, in the very, very, very early days of Slack, they were built on a model that couldn’t scale,” said Michael Facemire, an analyst at Forrester Research. “You remember those outages; you remember the old days when [Slack] would be down, and it would be down for very perceivable amounts of time.”

Nevertheless, with tech powerhouses Cisco and Microsoft as competitors, Slack can no longer afford to look weak. Companies are unlikely to standardize on a collaboration vendor with an uptime record significantly less than rivals.

“I’m sure Slack is well-aware of the criticality of any downtime,” said Larry Cannell, an analyst at Gartner. “Nevertheless, if you are trying to use Slack, then this is a big deal to you. These types of collaboration tools have become primary communication channels.”

Slack recently updated its status page to make it simpler and less confusing, a company spokesperson said. Now, the only outages listed there reflect instances when no one was able to connect to the service. That appears to have led the company to redefine some connectivity troubles as “incidents” or “notices.”

Under the previous classification scheme, the number of Slack-reported outages had jumped from nine in 2016 to 38 in 2017. This year, the vendor had been on pace to reach 24. However, the recent reporting changes have made it difficult to compare this year’s numbers with those in the past.

“Delivering a reliable service is our primary commitment to our customers, and we take these types of incidents very seriously,” the Slack spokesperson said. “We continue to learn from outages through rigorous postmortem processes so we can improve the availability, reliability, and stability of our service moving forward.”

Slack publishes the percentage of time its app was online every month. An uptime of 99.75% in October 2017 was the worst of the last 12 months. In June, the percentage so far is 99.82%, the fourth time since 2013 that the app’s monthly uptime fell below 99.9%.

Microsoft Office 365’s worst worldwide uptime percentage since early 2016 was 99.97% during the second quarter of 2017.

“As we get more reliant on the cloud, even 99.8% uptime just isn’t enough for us,” said Wayne Kurtzman, an analyst at IDC. “Slack’s base is very active on social media and Reddit, which makes any Slack outage stand out.”