Tag Archives: multicloud

Nuage Networks, Talari SD-WAN tack on multi-cloud connectivity

Software-defined WAN vendors are rushing to enhance their SD-WAN platforms with multi-cloud support, as more enterprises and service providers migrate their workloads to the cloud. This week, both Nuage Networks and Talari made multi-cloud connectivity announcements of their own.

Nuage Networks, a Nokia company, updated its SD-WAN platform — Virtualized Network Services — to better support SaaS and multi-cloud connectivity.

The platform enhancement moves to address three specific pain points among customers, according to Hussein Khazaal, Nuage’s vice president of marketing and partnerships. The three points, multi-cloud connectivity, value-added services and end-to-end security, are already available to customers.

“It’s a single platform that you can deploy today and get connectivity to software as a service,” Khazaal said. “We support customers as they send traffic directly from the branch to the SaaS application.”

In addition to multi-cloud connectivity, Nuage VNS offers customers the option to add value-added services — or virtual network functions (VNFs) — that can be embedded within the SD-WAN platform, hosted in x86 customer premises equipment (CPE) or through service chaining (a set of network services interconnected through the network to support an application). These VNFs are available from more than 40 third-party partners and can include services like next-generation firewalls, voice over IP and WAN optimization, Khazaal said.

While many service providers are leaning toward the VNF and virtual CPE approach, the process isn’t simple, according to Lee Doyle, principal analyst at Doyle Research.

“Many service providers are finding the vCPE and VNF approach side to be challenging,” Doyle said. “Those with the resources can, and will, pursue it, and that’s where Nuage could be a piece of the puzzle.”

When it comes to enterprise customers, however, the VNF approach is less attainable, both Doyle and Khazaal noted.

“Nuage is one piece of the puzzle that a customer might add if they’re able to do it themselves,” Doyle said. “But most customers don’t want to piece together different elements.”

For smaller enterprise customers, Khazaal recommended using the option with embedded features, like stateful firewall and URL filtering, built into the SD-WAN platform.

Although Nuage has more than 400 enterprise customers, according to a company statement, its primary market is among service providers. Nuage counts more than 50 service providers as partners that offer managed SD-WAN services — including BT, Cogeco Peer 1, Telefónica and Vertel — and has been a proven partner for service providers over the years, Doyle said.

“Nuage is a popular element of service providers’ managed services strategies, including SD-WAN,” he said. “These enhancements will be attractive mainly to the service providers.”

Nuage VNS is available now with perpetual and subscription-based licenses, and varies based on desired features and capabilities.

Talari launches Cloud Connect for SaaS, multi-cloud connectivity

In an additional multi-cloud move, Talari updated its own SD-WAN offering with Talari Cloud Connect, a platform that supports access to cloud-based and SaaS applications.

Talari also named five accompanying Cloud Connect partners: RingCentral, Pure IP, Evolve IP, Meta Networks and Mode. These partners will run Talari’s Cloud Connect point of presence (POP) technology in their own infrastructure, creating a tunnel from the customer’s Talari software into the cloud or SaaS service, according to Andy Gottlieb, Talari’s co-founder and chief marketing officer.

“The technology at the service provider is multi-tenant, so they only have to stand up one instance to support multiple customers,” Gottlieb said. Meantime, enterprises can use the Cloud Connect tunnel without having to worry about building infrastructure in the cloud, which reduces costs and complexity, he added.

Talari’s partner list reflects the demands of both customers and service providers, he said. Unified communications vendors like RingCentral, for example, require reliable connectivity and low latency for their applications. Meta Networks, on the other hand, offers cloud-based security capabilities, which enterprises are increasingly adding to their networks. Talari SD-WAN already supports multi-cloud connectivity to Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure.

Talari Cloud Connect will be available at the end of October. The software comes at no additional charge for Talari customers with maintenance contracts or with subscriptions, Gottlieb said. Also, Cloud Connect partners can use the Cloud Connect POP software free of charge to connect to Talari SD-WAN customers, he added.

Panzura tackles multi-cloud data management

Panzura is expanding beyond cloud file services to multi-cloud data management with its new Vizion.ai option, which is designed to enable customers to search, analyze and control data on premises and off premises.

The Campbell, Calif., company’s CEO, Patrick Harr, said the vendor built its Vizion.ai software-as-a-service (SaaS) offering on a new hyperscale multi-cloud data engine orchestrated by Kubernetes. Vizion.ai embeds machine learning and policy functionality for data analytics and control. It features an open API for third-party developers to use the Panzura technology with their own applications, such as internet of things and security monitoring.

Panzura initially focused on helping enterprises shift from legacy file-based NAS systems to object storage in public and private clouds. The vendor sells Freedom NAS filer appliances that cache active data in flash drives for fast access, while shifting colder data to object storage. Users can also run the software in virtual machines (VMs) on their own hardware or on public cloud servers.

With the new Vizion.ai SaaS option, Panzura consolidates and centralizes metadata to facilitate fast indexing in its Freedom NAS products, third-party NAS filers, SaaS applications and public cloud storage. The company integrated open source Elasticsearch technology to enable the distributed search capability.

“We’ve had a lot of requests in the past for how to search data in a multi-cloud fashion. And when I say multi-cloud, I’m not only talking Amazon, Azure and Google. I’m also talking about private cloud,” Harr said.

Visibility into third-party storage

Harr said the Vizion.ai multi-cloud data management service gains visibility into third-party storage through connector technology the company is offering to the open source community. Users download a small VM and plug the software into their Dell EMC, NetApp or Windows filers. The software crawls the NAS systems, takes a snapshot of the metadata and uploads the indices into the Vizion.ai service, Harr said.

Panzura plans to support a private managed option for customers to use the Vizion.ai index, search and analytics capabilities on premises in secure environments, the CEO added. That support is expected by the end of 2018.

Panzura built algorithms for machine learning to examine data access patterns to let the software recommend the most cost-effective storage location, Harr said. Users can look at heat maps of hot, warm and cold data. And they can use the technology for audit purposes, because they can see who has accessed the data at specific times, he said.

The Vizion.ai capabilities extend to restoring data from snapshots and cloning data for test and development. A customer might want to move a select workload’s data to the optimal cloud, such as Google for machine learning, Harr said.

Panzura’s multi-cloud data management effort

Harr said Panzura started designing its new hyperscale multi-cloud data management platform two years ago to be able to service billions of files and objects across multiple clouds. So far, more than 100 customers tested a private beta version of the Vizion.ai service.

Panzura opened its Vizion.ai beta to the public this week. When the service goes live in October, Vizion.ai multi-cloud data management will be priced based on gigabytes of data indexed and managed, Harr said. The company will have a free version for customers to index and search 1 GB of metadata.

Beta tester Prosper Funding, a San Francisco-based peer-to-peer lending company, started using Panzura’s hybrid cloud technology in 2016. Fabian Duarte, a senior storage engineer working out of Prosper’s Phoenix office, said the company deploys Panzura to make content available for collaboration from any data center and for long-term archiving on AWS.

Prosper tested Vizion.ai by uploading streams of content from AWS tiers, where it stores 3 PB of data, Duarte said. Prosper asked Panzura for access to hotter data in the local cache through a URL-enabled link that a user could click to open the file. The system downloads and rehydrates the file into the Panzura platform’s retrieval folder, Duarte said.

The Vizion.ai service looks promising, Duarte said, and Prosper will likely purchase it. He said its index and search could benefit customer service representatives who need to access call logs for training, playback or other purposes. The Vizion.ai service could also assist departments that deal with access log and audit information for compliance and risk management. Duarte said Prosper has been testing the uploading and manipulation of content inside the file system to track usage patterns.

“We’ve already gone through the route of using tools like Active Directory for multifactor authentication,” he said. “But now, to have the visibility to see who’s working on files, moving files, trying to access files allows us a greater level of granularity to bring an additional level of security.”

The usage-tracking info collected by Vizion.ai could show the cost to rehydrate archived content and determine which content is a good candidate to move to cheaper cloud storage, Duarte said.

Panzura Vizion.ai architectural diagram
Where Panzura Vizion.ai fits in.

Hybrid cloud data management

“With Vizion.ai, Panzura has the potential to evolve from the traditional cloud storage gateway use case toward global hybrid cloud data management,” Gartner research director Julia Palmer wrote in an email.

Legacy gateways and other hybrid storage products, until recently, have focused on backup, archiving and tiering data to the cloud, Palmer said. They wrote data in a proprietary format that other vendors’ technology couldn’t use.

Steven Hill, a senior analyst at 451 Research, said Panzura’s traditional competitors include cloud NAS and gateway companies such as Actifio, Ctera Networks, Microsoft’s Avere Systems, Nasuni and SoftNAS, along with Dell EMC, Hewlett Packard Enterprise and IBM.

“Today, there are dozens of vendors in the secondary storage market that are merging file and object as part of a more advanced storage architecture that focuses on the problems of information management, security and protection, rather than providing traditional ‘dumb’ storage,” Hill wrote in an email.

VMware HCX makes hybrid, multi-cloud more attainable

LAS VEGAS — VMware HCX attempts to drive migration to hybrid and multi-cloud architectures, but IT administrators are still hesitant to make the switch due to concerns around cost and complexity.

Before doing product evaluations and determining if VMware Hybrid Cloud Extension (HCX) is a good option for workload migration, admins must figure out if the cloud meets their current and future business needs. What is the organization trying to accomplish with its existing deployments?

For example, consider a near-end-of-support vSphere 5.5 environment: Is the goal to seamlessly migrate those workloads from the current environment to the cloud without an on-premises upgrade? Or, is successfully migrating hundreds of VMs or large amounts of storage the objective?

Determining the ultimate goal and whether a private cloud, hybrid cloud, public cloud or multi-cloud makes the most sense is a decision that admins must make on a case-by-case basis.

Cloud cost and complexity concerns

The ongoing fee associated with using cloud services is just one of the cost concerns, experts said in a session here at VMworld 2018. During the migration, admins have to worry about whether they’ll need to change IPs, the potential of running into compatibility issues, and the responsibility of ensuring business continuity and disaster recovery.

“Even after we meet all their requirements, we’ve seen in any organization all kinds of inertia about getting going,” said Allwyn Sequeira, senior vice president and general manager of hybrid cloud services at VMware. “People think they need to go buy high-bandwidth pipes to connect from on-prem to the cloud. People think they need to do an assessment of applications to see if this is an app that should be moved to the cloud.”

App dependencies and mapping are certainly important issues to consider. With more VMs, the environment is more complex; it’s easier to break something during migration.

Even when a certain vendor or product addresses their concerns, admins need buy-in from networking, security, compliance and governance teams before moving forward with the cloud.

The introduction of VMware HCX is the vendor’s attempt to remove some of the roadblocks keeping organizations from adopting hybrid and multi-cloud environments.

What is VMware HCX, and what are its use cases?

VMware HCX, also known as NSX Hybrid Connect, is a platform that enables admins to migrate VMs and applications between vSphere infrastructures with at least version 5.0 and newer and from on-premises environments to the cloud.

The top use cases of VMware HCX include consolidating and modernizing the data center, extending the data center to the cloud, and disaster recovery.

“HCX gives you freedom of choice,” said Nathan Thaler, director of cloud platforms at MIT in Cambridge, Mass. “You can move your workload into a cloud provider as long it works for you, and then you can move it out without any lock-in. We’ve moved certain VMs between multiple states and without any network downtime.”

Thaler did caution organizations to avoid using virtual hardware beyond the highest level of compatibility with the oldest cloud environment.

Disaster recovery to the cloud, while maybe not as front of mind as other popular use cases, is key in the event of a natural disaster.

“We wanted to be able to have resiliency whether it’s an East Coast event or a West Coast event,” said HCX customer Gary Goforth, senior systems engineer at ConnectWise Inc., a business management software provider based in Tampa, Fla.

VMware HCX-supported features include Encrypted vMotion, vSphere Replication and scheduled migrations. The functionality itself seems to be what admins are really looking for.

“We wanted a fairly simple, easy way to implement a cloud,” Goforth said. “We wanted to do it with minimal to no downtime and to handle a bulk migration of our virtual machines.”

In terms of the VMware HCX roadmap, the vendor is working on constructs to move workloads across different clouds, Sequeira said.

“It’s all about interconnecting data centers to each other,” he said. “Ultimately, at the end of the day, where you run is going to become less important than what services you need.”

Juniper Contrail battles Cisco ACI, VMware NSX in the cloud

SAN FRANCISCO — Juniper Networks has extended its Contrail network virtualization platform to multicloud environments, competing with Cisco and VMware for the growing number of enterprises running applications across public and private clouds.

The Juniper Contrail Enterprise Multicloud, introduced this week at the company’s NXTWORK conference, is a single software console for orchestrating, managing and monitoring network services across applications running on cloud-computing environments. The new product, which won’t be available until early next year, would compete with the cloud versions of Cisco’s ACI and VMware’s NSX.

Also at the show, Juniper announced that it would contribute the codebase for OpenContrail, the open source version of the software-defined networking (SDN) overlay, to The Linux Foundation. The company said the foundation’s networking projects would help drive OpenContrail deeper into cloud ecosystems.

Contrail Enterprise Multicloud stems, in part, from the work Juniper has done over several years with telcos building private clouds, Juniper CEO Rami Rahim told analysts and reporters at the conference.

“It’s almost like a bad secret — how embedded we have been now with practically all — many — telcos around the world in helping them develop the telco cloud,” Rahim said. “We’ve learnt the hard way in some cases how this [cloud networking] needs to be done.”

Is Juniper’s technology enough to win?

Technologically, Juniper Contrail can compete with ACI and NSX, IDC analyst Brad Casemore said. “Juniper clearly has put considerable thought into the multicloud capabilities that Contrail needs to support, and, as you’d expect from Juniper, the features and functionality are strong.”

Cisco and VMware have marketed their multicloud offerings aggressively. As such, Juniper will have to raise and sustain the marketing profile of Contrail Enterprise Multicloud.
Brad Casemoreanalyst, IDC

However, Juniper will need more than good technology when competing for customers. A lot more enterprises use Cisco and VMware products in data centers than Juniper gear. Also, Cisco has partnered with Google to build strong technological ties with the Google Cloud Platform, and VMware has a similar deal with Amazon.

“Cisco and VMware have marketed their multicloud offerings aggressively,” Casemore said. “As such, Juniper will have to raise and sustain the marketing profile of Contrail Enterprise Multicloud.”

Networking with Juniper Contrail Enterprise Multicloud

Contrail Enterprise Multicloud comprises networking, security and network management. Companies can buy the three pieces separately, but the new product lets engineers manage the trio through the software console that sits on top of the centralized Contrail controller.

For networking in a private cloud, the console relies on a virtual network overlay built on top of abstracted hardware switches, which can be from Juniper or a third party. The system also includes a virtual router that provides links to the physical underlay and Layer 4-7 network services, such as load balancers and firewalls. Through the console, engineers can create and distribute policies that tailor the network services and underlying switches to the needs of applications.

Contrail Enterprise Multicloud capabilities within public clouds, including Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform and Microsoft Azure, are different because the provider controls the infrastructure. Network operators use the console to program and control overlay services for workloads through the APIs made available by cloud providers. The Juniper software also uses native cloud APIs to collect analytics information. 

Other Juniper Contrail Enterprise Multicloud capabilities

Network managers can use the console to configure and control the gateway leading to the public cloud and to define and distribute policies for cloud-based virtual firewalls.

Also accessible through the console is Juniper’s AppFormix management software for cloud environments. AppFormix provides policy monitoring and application and software-based infrastructure analytics. Engineers can configure the product to handle routine networking tasks.

The cloud-related work of Juniper, Cisco and VMware is a recognition that the boundaries of the enterprise data center are being redrawn. “Data center networking vendors are having to redefine their value propositions in a multicloud world,” Casemore said.

Indeed, an increasing number of companies are reducing the amount of hardware and software running in private data centers by moving workloads to public clouds. Revenue from cloud services rose almost 29% year over year in the first half of 2017 to more than $63 billion, according to IDC.

Cisco cloud VP calls out trends in multicloud strategy

Large enterprises have quickly embraced multicloud strategy as a common practice — a shift that introduces opportunities, as well as challenges.

Cisco has witnessed this firsthand, as the company seeks a niche in a shifting IT landscape. Earlier this year, Cisco shuttered Intercloud Services, its failed attempt to create a public cloud competitor to Amazon Web Services (AWS). Now, Cisco’s bets are on a multicloud strategy to draw from its networking and security pedigree and sell itself as a facilitator for corporate IT’s navigation across disparate cloud environments.

In an interview with SearchCloudComputing, Kip Compton, vice president of Cisco’s cloud platforms and solutions group, discussed the latest trends with multicloud strategy and where Cisco plans to fit in the market.

How are your customers shifting their view on multicloud strategy?

Kip Compton: It started with the idea that each application is going to be on separate clouds. It’s still limited to more advanced customers, but we’re seeing use cases where they’re spanning clouds with different parts of an application or subsystems, either for historical reasons or across multiple applications, or taking advantage of the specific capabilities in a cloud.

Hybrid cloud was initially billed as a way for applications to span private and public environments, but that was always more hype than reality. What are enterprises doing now to couple their various environments?

Compton: The way we approach hybrid cloud is as a use case where you have an on-prem data center and a public data center and the two work together. Multicloud, the definition we’ve used, is at least two clouds, one of which is a public cloud. In that way, hybrid is essentially a subset of multicloud for us.

Azure Stack is a bit of an outlier, but hybrid has changed a bit for most of our customers in terms of it not being tightly coupled. Now it is deployments where they have certain codes that run in both places, and the two things work together to deliver an application. They’re calling that hybrid, whereas in the early days, it was more about seamless environments and moving workloads between on prem and the public cloud based on load and time of day, and that seems to have faded.

What are the biggest impediments to a successful multicloud strategy?

Compton: Part of it is what types of problems do people talk about to Cisco, as opposed to other companies, so I acknowledge there may be some bias there. But there are four areas that are pretty reliable for us in customer conversations.

First is networking, not surprisingly, and they talk about how to connect from on prem to the cloud. How do they connect between clouds? How do they figure out how that integrates to their on-prem connectivity frameworks?

Then, there’s security. We see a lot of companies carry forward their security posture as they move workloads; so virtual versions of our firewalls and things like that, and wanting to align with how security works in the rest of their enterprise.

The third is analytics, particularly application performance analytics. If you move an app to a completely different environment, it’s not just about getting the functionality, it’s about being performant. And then, obviously, how do you monitor and manage it [on] an ongoing basis?

The trend we see is [customers] want to take advantage of the unique capabilities of each cloud, but they need some common framework, some capability that actually spans across these cloud providers, which includes their on-prem deployment.

Where do you draw the line on that commonality between environments?

Compton: In terms of abstraction, there was a time where a popular approach was — I’ll call it the Cloud Foundry or bring-your-own-PaaS [platform as a service] approach — to say, ‘OK, the way I’m going to have portability is I’m not going to write my application to use any of the cloud providers’ APIs. I’m not going to take advantage of anything special from AWS or Azure or anyone.’

That’s less popular because the cloud providers have been fairly successful at launching new features developers want to use. We think of it more like a microservices style or highly modular pattern, where, for my application to run, there’s a whole bunch of things I need: messaging queues, server load, database, networking, security plans. It’s less to abstract Amazon’s networking, and it’s more to provide a common networking capability that will run on Amazon.

You mentioned customers with workloads spanning multiple clouds. How are those being built?

Compton: What I referred to are customers that have an application, maybe with a number of different subsystems. They might have an on-prem database that’s a business-critical system. They might do machine learning in Google Cloud Platform with TensorFlow, and they might look to deliver an experience to their customers through Alexa, which means they need to run some portion of the application in Amazon. They’re not taking their database and sharding it across multiple clouds, but those three subsystems have to work together to deliver that experience that the customer perceives as a single application.

What newer public cloud services do you see getting traction with your customers?

Compton: A few months ago, people were reticent to use [cloud-native] services because portability was the most important thing — but now, ROI and speed matter, so they use those services across the board.

A few months ago, people were reticent to use [cloud-native] services because portability was the most important thing — but now, ROI and speed matter, so they use those services across the board.
Kip Comptonvice president, Cisco’s cloud platforms and solutions group

We see an explosion of interest in serverless. It seems to mirror the container phenomenon where everybody agrees containers will become central to cloud computing architectures. We’re reaching the same point on serverless, or function as a service, where people see that as a better way to create code for more efficient [use of] resources.

The other trend we see: a lot of times people use, for example, Salesforce’s PaaS because their data is there, so the consumption of services is driven by practical considerations. Or they’re in a given cloud using services because of how they interface with one of their business partners. So, as much as there are some cool new services, there are some fairly practical points that drive people’s selection, too.

Have you seen companies shift their in-house architectures to accommodate what they’re doing in the public cloud?

Compton: I see companies starting new applications in the cloud and not on prem. And what’s interesting is a lot of our customers continue to see on-prem growth. They have said, ‘We’re going to go cloud-first on our new applications,’ but the application they already have on prem continues to grow in resource needs.

We also see interest in applying the cloud techniques to the on-prem data center or private cloud. They’re moving away from some of the traditional technologies to make their data center work more like a cloud, partially so it’s easier to work between the two environments, but also because the cloud approach is more efficient and agile than some of the traditional approaches.

And there are companies that want to get out of running data centers. They don’t want to deal with the real estate, the power, the cooling, and they want to move everything they can into Amazon.

What lessons did Cisco learn from the now-shuttered Intercloud?

Compton: The idea was to build a global federated IaaS [infrastructure as a service] that, in theory, would compete with AWS. At that time, most in the industry thought that OpenStack would take over the world. It was viewed as a big threat to AWS.

Today, it’s hard to relate to that point of view — obviously, that didn’t happen. In many ways, cloud is about driving this brutal consistency, and by having global fabrics that are identical and consistent around the world, you can roll out new features and capabilities and scale better than if you have a federated model.

Where we are now in terms of multicloud and strategy going forward — to keep customers and partners and large web scale cloud providers wanting to either buy from us or partner with us — it’s solving some of these complex networking and security problems. Cisco has value in our ability to solve these problems [and] link to the enterprise infrastructures that are in place around the world … that’s the pivot we’ve gone through.

Trevor Jones is a senior news writer with SearchCloudComputing and SearchAWS. Contact him at tjones@techtarget.com.