Tag Archives: native

Cisco and Google deepen collaboration partnership

Developers from Cisco and Google have been working together to build native integrations between the Cisco Webex web conferencing and team collaboration platform and the productivity apps in G Suite. The partnership should help both vendors compete against rival Microsoft.

G Suite users will soon be able to schedule and join Webex meetings from Google Calendar with one click. The integration works on Cisco video conferencing hardware and within Google Chrome, without requiring downloads or guest accounts.

Cisco Webex Teams, which competes with Slack and Microsoft Teams, lets users collaborate in real time using Google Docs, Sheets and Slides — the G Suite equivalents of Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint. That eliminates the need for users to upload a revised version of a file to Webex Teams after every edit.

Developers, meanwhile, can add Cisco calling and meeting capabilities to Android apps using the Webex Teams Android software development kit. For example, a pair of augmented reality smart glasses could be connected to Webex, so the wearer can stream a video feed from the device into a web conference.

“While Google and Microsoft compete with full portfolios of personal productivity and team collaboration, Cisco only has the team collaboration elements,” said Alan Lepofsky, principal analyst at Constellation Research, based in Cupertino, Calif. “So, deeper integration between Webex and Gmail, Google Calendar and Google Drive makes a lot of sense.”

Cisco and Google plan future integrations  

While Cisco’s collaboration portfolio also integrates with the productivity tools of Microsoft Office 365, those links are based on Microsoft’s public APIs. In contrast, Cisco and Google have been working directly together to create seamless connections between their portfolios.

Public APIs “tend to be semi-limiting at times,” said Sri Srinivasan, vice president and general manager of Cisco’s team collaboration group. “With Google, it looks like one between Google and Webex.”

Cisco and Google are currently exploring ways to use Google’s AI technology within Webex for tasks such as transcription, translation, meeting notes and project management. Cisco was also one of several vendors to adopt Google’s new AI platform for contact centers last month.

Amy Chang, who replaced Rowan Trollope as head of Cisco’s $5 billion collaboration technology group in May, worked at Google for seven years before founding relationship intelligence firm Accompany.

“For Cisco, it certainly makes a great deal of sense to expand these partnerships to improve their ability to compete with Microsoft,” said Irwin Lazar, analyst at Nemertes Research, based in Mokena, Ill. “Same for Google, who lacks the broad UC [unified communications] suite, video conferencing and contact center offerings that Cisco provides.”

Google expands presence in enterprise market

Google is working on additional Google Calendar integrations with the web conferencing vendors Arkadin, GoToMeeting, LogMeIn, Dialpad, RingCentral, Vidyo and Vonage. Google also recently made its online meetings platform, Hangouts Meet, interoperable with Microsoft Skype for Business and hardware from Cisco and Polycom.

At the same time that Google is tightening partnerships with Cisco and other vendors, the consumer tech giant has been building out its collaboration portfolio with products such as Hangouts Meet and Hangouts Chat, a team collaboration app.

Last month, Google announced a beta program for a new enterprise telephony product based on WebRTC, called Google Voice for G Suite. If that platform proves successful, Google will be in a position to provide all of the core unified communications technologies that businesses require: voice, messaging and web conferencing.

It was surprising to see Google launch a stand-alone voice product, rather than position Google Voice as a virtual service within G Suite that could tie into existing enterprise telephony systems, Lazar said. The move could bring them into closer competition with Cisco, a leading provider of business telephony. 

Block Party | Microsoft Story Labs

As a native of Stockholm, Melin heard about the trial projects with Minecraft back in his hometown. During his next visit to Sweden, he made an appointment at Mojang to chat about some ideas. By the summer of 2012, Bui and Winters were on a flight to Nairobi to meet with Melin and U.N.-Habitat’s new hire, Westerberg, who would oversee the development of a Minecraft-based public space program with global ambitions soon to be known as Block by Block.

“One of most exciting parts is that Minecraft can bring millions of people into a debate about public space and make it more of a mainstream conversation,” said Melin. “We want people to ask their parents and politicians, ‘Why isn’t public space working in my city?’”

Westerberg, whose background is in digital communications for non-governmental organizations, took on more and more responsibilities around Block by Block, until it became his whole job. Also Swedish by birth, he lived in Zimbabwe for a few years during his youth and first recognized the depth of inequality when other kids on his soccer team had to play with borrowed shoes, or none at all. He said, “We knew that we couldn’t just host some workshops and pat ourselves on the back. From the start, we focused on the program’s methodology so that it would be able to build its own momentum and eventually take on a life of its own.”

The goals were relatively straightforward. Working with Minecraft collectives, U.N.-Habitat builds Minecraft models of public spaces that are slated for redevelopment. The models are then used in workshops in which participants are trained in the use of Minecraft and then asked to re-design the public space models in groups. On the final day of the workshop, the groups come together with other stakeholders to prioritize the top ideas. The community-developed Minecraft models are then used to inspire the final designs of the public spaces and, ultimately, the construction work.

Cities can be drivers of innovation and great contributors to economic growth. But done badly, cities cause social disparity and huge environmental problems. That’s true in the slums of Nairobi or Kathmandu but also in the sprawling cities of North America.

The first Block by Block projects were in Nairobi. After a trial project at Silanga sports field, they moved on to Dandora, a once well-planned area that had degenerated to near slum status and is known for its high crime rate and as the location of the largest garbage dump in East Africa.

Block by Block teamed up with a variety of local organizations to revitalize Dandora’s public spaces, initially focusing on creating a “model street” that would influence other improvements in the neighborhood. Proposals built in Minecraft in the Block by Block workshop led to upgrading a main street, clearing ditches, planting trees and now building gateways along the corridor.

“Designing in Minecraft allowed people in Dandora to explore the merits of various design alternatives and visualize their ideas,” said Westerberg. “The process also encouraged people to develop a broader understanding of the urban environment, speak in public with greater confidence and improve community relations.” For many participants, it was the first time they had publicly expressed opinions about local issues.

Melin added, “Minecraft is a tool that is increasing community engagement in public space projects by enabling participants to express themselves in a visual way, develop skills, network with other people from the community and provide new ways to influence the policy agenda.”

U.N.-Habitat and Mojang set out the grand goal of 300 Block by Block projects in the coming years. However, they found that they didn’t have the human resources or capital to hit that target within their desired timeline.

Then, Mojang was acquired by Microsoft in 2014. After careful consideration and planning, Microsoft and Mojang re-launched the Block by Block Foundation as an official 501(c)(3) nonprofit in 2016.

“As a nonprofit, Block by Block can now accept donations, and we can focus on the growth of that charity and making sure it gets everything it needs to succeed. Like all organizations, it must continue to evolve,” said David Boker, a senior director on the Minecraft team who celebrated 20 years with Microsoft while in Hanoi.

U.N.-Habitat signed a long-term agreement with the foundation in August 2016, ensuring sustainable funding for Block by Block for years to come. The board now meets three times a year to approve public space projects, which will be funded by the foundation.

In 2016, Block by Block held community participation workshops using Minecraft in Indonesia, Madagascar, India, Kosovo, Mexico, Nepal, the U.S., Ecuador and Lebanon. There are currently more than 650 applications for Block by Block projects around the world.

The Block by Block project at the public market in Mitrovica, Kosovo, was designated as the site for the first board meeting in the field. The bridge over the river in Mitrovica in Northern Kosovo is a symbol of traditional ethnic division between the Serbian and Albanian communities. The project aimed to revitalize the city market neighborhoods around the bridge, one of few areas in the city where the two communities meet.

Using Minecraft to devise urban design improvements for the city market and both river banks helped local stakeholders and citizens to think of Mitrovica as one city.

“It not only democratized the development process but really gave people ownership over the space,” said Winters, who was on-site for the project. “There are a lot of new residents in the area, and Block by Block gave them a path to come together in a positive way. They even created one of the first skate parks in Kosovo.”

Hanoi was the kickoff project for 2017 and a chance for the board to re-convene and plan for the upcoming year while getting to witness the first Block by Block in Vietnam. The project goal was to design secure and friendly public spaces in the burgeoning, working-class neighborhood of Kim Chung, especially as many of the local girls must travel many miles to reach the school and need to have a safe zone around the buildings.

Prior to the workshop, the schoolgirl participants did “safety walks” to score the surrounding areas in various categories including “can see and be seen,” “can hear and be heard” and “able to get away.”

Problem areas that emerged included: inadequate lighting, dark corners where criminals can hide and piles of garbage in the streets. They judged the tunnel under the five-lane highway to be particularly challenging.

“I hate the tunnel and never like to walk through it by myself, but I have to do it at least twice per day when I go to school,” said 15-year-old Nguyen Ngoc Anh. “We have lots of ideas how to make it nicer so that people will learn to treat it better and then it can be a safer place for everyone.”

As for the workshop itself, the 45 girls divided into seven teams and Christelle Lahoud, a Lebanese architect and urban planner who works for U.N.-Habitat, ran the day’s events.

“I have no specific background in Minecraft but was still able to teach everyone how to use it in an hour or so,” said Lahoud. “Then they were able to start creating their designs.”

They sat four to six at a desktop computer, as they built out their designs in Minecraft atop a model of the neighborhood around their school. Phan Thi Ngoc Huyen, also 15, said, “It was really fun and exciting to have an idea and then be able to make it to show to adults.”

The true significance of the day became clear as the teams of girls presented not only their findings but interactive 3D models built in Minecraft. By improving the security, the girls will have a chance at more inclusion and participation in their education. But there was another level to the experience. By presenting these findings to local government officials, U.N.-Habitat officials, architects and others, the girls are building their confidence in using technology, expressing their ideas and learning that their views matter.

Prior to Block by Block, Westerberg had long searched for a way to use technology to engage youth in the development process. “We found a language that kids enjoy and understand which is important because they are the majority in many places and will grow up to be the adults in the city,” he said. “Minecraft is not just a game. It is a co-creation tool to build better cities and better communities with more equal societies.”

Deirdre Quarnstrom, director of Minecraft Education, who is also on the board, said, “In the workshops we saw valuable ideas for better lighting and safer walkways. The students were able to communicate specific safety improvements to city planners through their Minecraft designs. I see the same increase in student voice and shifting power dynamic when I visit classrooms using Minecraft as part of their curriculum as well.”

Quarnstrom agreed that the workshops and other game-based learning offer numerous indirect impacts too. “Participation also builds confidence in youth and in girls who are often left out of planning and design conversations. They see that they have the potential to make a difference. And this confidence encourages girls to use technology and express their ideas.”

“Minecraft inspires people to be creative,” said Winters. “For some, they have never been able to express that side of themselves before. You can take a complex idea, and easily create a virtual world.” Phan Thi Ngoc Huyen added, “Games are usually fantasy. It was nice to use a game for the real world.”

The ideas that the girls presented to the board, other NGOs and Vietnamese politicians ranged from play areas to a women-only coffee shop to a shelter with a camera that does facial identification at the door. There were plans for unbreakable streetlights in the tunnel, a tree house shelter (why not?) and a free phone to call for help. Other general improvements included street benches, trash cans, improved signage, lighted walkways, security fences along a stream, murals in the tunnel, flower beds and cutting back overgrown hedges. They even talked about converting abandoned structures into public restrooms.

Dr. Nguyen Quay of U.N.-Habitat Vietnam said, “It was great to see how this engages young minds in creative thinking.” But the girls still expect to see their plans come to fruition. They even came up with a group slogan: “Just take action.”

Sometimes Block by Block funds the construction of the projects. Sometimes they fund the workshop and the municipality funds the construction. But the ultimate goal for every project is for the methodology to go viral. They want it to get to the point where Block by Block need not be involved at all.

“That’s when we’ll start to see real scale and growth,” said Westerberg. “People are recognizing the value of participation and value of Minecraft in this process. It’s already gaining momentum. We can accomplish more by educating people than by trying to fund it all ourselves.”

He said, “Now, in Nairobi, the local government is going to upgrade 60 public spaces. At first they didn’t even think about public spaces. It took us two years to get the line in the budget for public spaces, and it was still at zero. Now, after all of the Block by Block workshops, they see the impact and are going to fund all of these new developments themselves.”

The inspiration goes both ways, Bui mused. “We grew into this. Our community brought us into all of these experiences. We continue to listen to the community and are busy figuring out other cool things we can do with Minecraft.”

When asked what is the most common thing that they see across all of the Block by Block projects, Winters responded immediately. “People are shocked and always say, ‘Who knew kids would have such good ideas?’”

Bui smiled. “And we always answer, ‘We did.’”

Block Party | Microsoft Story Labs

As a native of Stockholm, Melin heard about the trial projects with Minecraft back in his hometown. During his next visit to Sweden, he made an appointment at Mojang to chat about some ideas. By the summer of 2012, Bui and Winters were on a flight to Nairobi to meet with Melin and U.N.-Habitat’s new hire, Westerberg, who would oversee the development of a Minecraft-based public space program with global ambitions soon to be known as Block by Block.

“One of most exciting parts is that Minecraft can bring millions of people into a debate about public space and make it more of a mainstream conversation,” said Melin. “We want people to ask their parents and politicians, ‘Why isn’t public space working in my city?’”

Westerberg, whose background is in digital communications for non-governmental organizations, took on more and more responsibilities around Block by Block, until it became his whole job. Also Swedish by birth, he lived in Zimbabwe for a few years during his youth and first recognized the depth of inequality when other kids on his soccer team had to play with borrowed shoes, or none at all. He said, “We knew that we couldn’t just host some workshops and pat ourselves on the back. From the start, we focused on the program’s methodology so that it would be able to build its own momentum and eventually take on a life of its own.”

The goals were relatively straightforward. Working with Minecraft collectives, U.N.-Habitat builds Minecraft models of public spaces that are slated for redevelopment. The models are then used in workshops in which participants are trained in the use of Minecraft and then asked to re-design the public space models in groups. On the final day of the workshop, the groups come together with other stakeholders to prioritize the top ideas. The community-developed Minecraft models are then used to inspire the final designs of the public spaces and, ultimately, the construction work.

Cities can be drivers of innovation and great contributors to economic growth. But done badly, cities cause social disparity and huge environmental problems. That’s true in the slums of Nairobi or Kathmandu but also in the sprawling cities of North America.

The first Block by Block projects were in Nairobi. After a trial project at Silanga sports field, they moved on to Dandora, a once well-planned area that had degenerated to near slum status and is known for its high crime rate and as the location of the largest garbage dump in East Africa.

Block by Block teamed up with a variety of local organizations to revitalize Dandora’s public spaces, initially focusing on creating a “model street” that would influence other improvements in the neighborhood. Proposals built in Minecraft in the Block by Block workshop led to upgrading a main street, clearing ditches, planting trees and now building gateways along the corridor.

“Designing in Minecraft allowed people in Dandora to explore the merits of various design alternatives and visualize their ideas,” said Westerberg. “The process also encouraged people to develop a broader understanding of the urban environment, speak in public with greater confidence and improve community relations.” For many participants, it was the first time they had publicly expressed opinions about local issues.

Melin added, “Minecraft is a tool that is increasing community engagement in public space projects by enabling participants to express themselves in a visual way, develop skills, network with other people from the community and provide new ways to influence the policy agenda.”

U.N.-Habitat and Mojang set out the grand goal of 300 Block by Block projects in the coming years. However, they found that they didn’t have the human resources or capital to hit that target within their desired timeline.

Then, Mojang was acquired by Microsoft in 2014. After careful consideration and planning, Microsoft and Mojang re-launched the Block by Block Foundation as an official 501(c)(3) nonprofit in 2016.

“As a nonprofit, Block by Block can now accept donations, and we can focus on the growth of that charity and making sure it gets everything it needs to succeed. Like all organizations, it must continue to evolve,” said David Boker, a senior director on the Minecraft team who celebrated 20 years with Microsoft while in Hanoi.

U.N.-Habitat signed a long-term agreement with the foundation in August 2016, ensuring sustainable funding for Block by Block for years to come. The board now meets three times a year to approve public space projects, which will be funded by the foundation.

In 2016, Block by Block held community participation workshops using Minecraft in Indonesia, Madagascar, India, Kosovo, Mexico, Nepal, the U.S., Ecuador and Lebanon. There are currently more than 650 applications for Block by Block projects around the world.

The Block by Block project at the public market in Mitrovica, Kosovo, was designated as the site for the first board meeting in the field. The bridge over the river in Mitrovica in Northern Kosovo is a symbol of traditional ethnic division between the Serbian and Albanian communities. The project aimed to revitalize the city market neighborhoods around the bridge, one of few areas in the city where the two communities meet.

Using Minecraft to devise urban design improvements for the city market and both river banks helped local stakeholders and citizens to think of Mitrovica as one city.

“It not only democratized the development process but really gave people ownership over the space,” said Winters, who was on-site for the project. “There are a lot of new residents in the area, and Block by Block gave them a path to come together in a positive way. They even created one of the first skate parks in Kosovo.”

Hanoi was the kickoff project for 2017 and a chance for the board to re-convene and plan for the upcoming year while getting to witness the first Block by Block in Vietnam. The project goal was to design secure and friendly public spaces in the burgeoning, working-class neighborhood of Kim Chung, especially as many of the local girls must travel many miles to reach the school and need to have a safe zone around the buildings.

Prior to the workshop, the schoolgirl participants did “safety walks” to score the surrounding areas in various categories including “can see and be seen,” “can hear and be heard” and “able to get away.”

Problem areas that emerged included: inadequate lighting, dark corners where criminals can hide and piles of garbage in the streets. They judged the tunnel under the five-lane highway to be particularly challenging.

“I hate the tunnel and never like to walk through it by myself, but I have to do it at least twice per day when I go to school,” said 15-year-old Nguyen Ngoc Anh. “We have lots of ideas how to make it nicer so that people will learn to treat it better and then it can be a safer place for everyone.”

As for the workshop itself, the 45 girls divided into seven teams and Christelle Lahoud, a Lebanese architect and urban planner who works for U.N.-Habitat, ran the day’s events.

“I have no specific background in Minecraft but was still able to teach everyone how to use it in an hour or so,” said Lahoud. “Then they were able to start creating their designs.”

They sat four to six at a desktop computer, as they built out their designs in Minecraft atop a model of the neighborhood around their school. Phan Thi Ngoc Huyen, also 15, said, “It was really fun and exciting to have an idea and then be able to make it to show to adults.”

The true significance of the day became clear as the teams of girls presented not only their findings but interactive 3D models built in Minecraft. By improving the security, the girls will have a chance at more inclusion and participation in their education. But there was another level to the experience. By presenting these findings to local government officials, U.N.-Habitat officials, architects and others, the girls are building their confidence in using technology, expressing their ideas and learning that their views matter.

Prior to Block by Block, Westerberg had long searched for a way to use technology to engage youth in the development process. “We found a language that kids enjoy and understand which is important because they are the majority in many places and will grow up to be the adults in the city,” he said. “Minecraft is not just a game. It is a co-creation tool to build better cities and better communities with more equal societies.”

Deirdre Quarnstrom, director of Minecraft Education, who is also on the board, said, “In the workshops we saw valuable ideas for better lighting and safer walkways. The students were able to communicate specific safety improvements to city planners through their Minecraft designs. I see the same increase in student voice and shifting power dynamic when I visit classrooms using Minecraft as part of their curriculum as well.”

Quarnstrom agreed that the workshops and other game-based learning offer numerous indirect impacts too. “Participation also builds confidence in youth and in girls who are often left out of planning and design conversations. They see that they have the potential to make a difference. And this confidence encourages girls to use technology and express their ideas.”

“Minecraft inspires people to be creative,” said Winters. “For some, they have never been able to express that side of themselves before. You can take a complex idea, and easily create a virtual world.” Phan Thi Ngoc Huyen added, “Games are usually fantasy. It was nice to use a game for the real world.”

The ideas that the girls presented to the board, other NGOs and Vietnamese politicians ranged from play areas to a women-only coffee shop to a shelter with a camera that does facial identification at the door. There were plans for unbreakable streetlights in the tunnel, a tree house shelter (why not?) and a free phone to call for help. Other general improvements included street benches, trash cans, improved signage, lighted walkways, security fences along a stream, murals in the tunnel, flower beds and cutting back overgrown hedges. They even talked about converting abandoned structures into public restrooms.

Dr. Nguyen Quay of U.N.-Habitat Vietnam said, “It was great to see how this engages young minds in creative thinking.” But the girls still expect to see their plans come to fruition. They even came up with a group slogan: “Just take action.”

Sometimes Block by Block funds the construction of the projects. Sometimes they fund the workshop and the municipality funds the construction. But the ultimate goal for every project is for the methodology to go viral. They want it to get to the point where Block by Block need not be involved at all.

“That’s when we’ll start to see real scale and growth,” said Westerberg. “People are recognizing the value of participation and value of Minecraft in this process. It’s already gaining momentum. We can accomplish more by educating people than by trying to fund it all ourselves.”

He said, “Now, in Nairobi, the local government is going to upgrade 60 public spaces. At first they didn’t even think about public spaces. It took us two years to get the line in the budget for public spaces, and it was still at zero. Now, after all of the Block by Block workshops, they see the impact and are going to fund all of these new developments themselves.”

The inspiration goes both ways, Bui mused. “We grew into this. Our community brought us into all of these experiences. We continue to listen to the community and are busy figuring out other cool things we can do with Minecraft.”

When asked what is the most common thing that they see across all of the Block by Block projects, Winters responded immediately. “People are shocked and always say, ‘Who knew kids would have such good ideas?’”

Bui smiled. “And we always answer, ‘We did.’”

DELL U3014 30″ Monitor

Dell u3014 monitor in excellent condition.

Runs at a native 2560 x 1600 ,Brilliant monitor with hardware calibration ,perfect for photo editing .etc

HDMI,DP,mDP,DVI inputs

Dont have the original box but i have another i can courier the monitor in.

[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]

Price and currency: 390
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment…

DELL U3014 30″ Monitor

Kubernetes storage projects dominate CNCF docket

Enterprise IT pros should get ready for Kubernetes storage tools, as the Cloud Native Computing Foundation seeks ways to support stateful applications.

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) began its quest to develop container storage products this week when it approved an inception-level project called Rook, which connects Kubernetes orchestration to the Ceph distributed file system through the Kubernetes operator API.

The Rook project’s approval illustrates the CNCF’s plans to emphasize Kubernetes storage.

“It’s going to be a big year for storage in Kubernetes, because the APIs are a little bit more solidified now,” said CNCF COO Chris Aniszczyk. The operator API and a Container Storage Interface API were released in the alpha stage with Kubernetes 1.9 in December. “[The CNCF technical board is] saying that the Kubernetes operator API is the way to go in [distributed container] storage,” he said.

Rook project gave Prometheus a seat on HBO’s Iron Throne

HBO wanted to deploy Prometheus for Kubernetes monitoring, and it ideally would have run the time-series database application on containers within the Kubernetes cluster, but that didn’t work well with cloud providers’ persistent storage volumes.

Illya Chekrygin, UpboundIllya Chekrygin

“You always have to do this careful coordination to make sure new containers only get created in the same availability zone. And if that entire availability zone goes away, you’re kind of out of luck,” said Illya Chekrygin, who directed HBO’s implementation of containers as a senior staff engineer in 2017. “That was a painful experience in terms of synchronization.”

Moreover, when containers that ran stateful apps were killed and restarted in different nodes of the Kubernetes cluster, it took too long to unmount, release and remount their attached storage volumes, Chekrygin said.

Rook was an early conceptual project in GitHub at that time, but HBO engineers put it into a test environment to support Prometheus. Rook uses a storage overlay that runs within the Kubernetes cluster and configures the cluster nodes’ available disk space as a giant pool of resources, which is in line with how Kubernetes handles CPU and memory resources.

Rather than synchronize data across multiple specific storage volumes or locations, Rook uses the Ceph distributed file system to stripe the data across multiple machines and clusters and to create multiple copies of data for high availability. That overcomes the data synchronization problem, and it avoids the need to unmount and remount external storage volumes.

“It’s using existing cluster disk configurations that are already there, so nothing has to be mounted and unmounted,” Chekrygin said. “You avoid external storage resources to begin with.”

At HBO, a mounting and unmounting process that took up to an hour was reduced to two seconds, which was suitable for the Kubernetes monitoring system in Prometheus that scraped telemetry data from the cluster every 10 to 30 seconds.

However, Rook never saw production use at HBO, which, by policy, doesn’t put prerelease software into production. Instead, Chekrygin and his colleagues set up an external Prometheus instance that received a relay of monitoring data from an agent inside the Kubernetes cluster. That worked, but it required an extra network hop for data and made Prometheus management more complex.

“Kubernetes provides a lot of functionality out of the box, such as automatically restarting your Pod if your Pod dies, automatic scaling and service discovery,” Chekrygin said. “If you run a service somewhere else, it’s your responsibility on your own to do all those things.”

Kubernetes storage in the spotlight

Kubernetes is ill-equipped to handle data storage persistence … this is the next frontier and the next biggest thing.
Illya Chekryginfounding member, Upbound

The CNCF is aware of the difficulty organizations face when they try to run stateful applications on Kubernetes. As of this week, it now owns the intellectual property and trademarks for Rook, which currently lists Quantum Corp. and Upbound, a startup in Seattle founded by Rook’s creator, Bassam Tabbara, as contributors to its open source code. As an inception-level project, Rook isn’t a sure thing, more akin to a bet on an early stage idea. It has about a 50-50 chance of panning out, CNCF’s Aniszczyk said.

Inception-level projects must update their presentations to the technical board once a year to continue as part of CNCF. From the inception level, projects may move to incubation, which means they’ve collected multiple corporate contributors and established a code of conduct and governance procedures, among other criteria. From incubation, projects then move to the graduated stage, although the CNCF has yet to even designate Kubernetes itself a graduated project. Kubernetes and Prometheus are expected to graduate this year, Aniszczyk said.

The upshot for container orchestration users is Rook will be governed by the same rules and foundation as Kubernetes itself, rather than held hostage by a single for-profit company. The CNCF could potentially support more than one project similar to Rook, such as Red Hat’s Gluster-based Container Native Storage Platform, and Aniszczyk said those companies are welcome to present them to the CNCF technical board.

Another Kubernetes storage project that may find its way into the CNCF, and potentially complement Rook, was open-sourced by container storage software maker Portworx this week. The Storage Orchestrator Runtime for Kubernetes (STORK) uses the Kubernetes orchestrator to automate operations within storage layers such as Rook to respond to applications’ needs. However, STORK needs more development before it is submitted to the CNCF, said Gou Rao, founder and CEO at Portworx, based in Los Altos, Calif.

Kubernetes storage seems like a worthy bet to Chekrygin, who left his three-year job with HBO this month to take a position as an engineer at Upbound.

“Kubernetes is ill-equipped to handle data storage persistence,” he said. “I’m so convinced that this is the next frontier and the next biggest thing, I was willing to quit my job.”

Beth Pariseau is senior news writer for TechTarget’s Cloud and DevOps Media Group. Write to her at bpariseau@techtarget.com or follow @PariseauTT on Twitter.

VMware NSX-T updates include new firewalls, load balancing

VMware made significant changes to NSX-T 2.0, released in November, adding native support for microsegmentation and containers, and will follow up shortly with NSX 2.1, expected by February 2018.

VMware brings many different but extremely useful tools to the table in these NSX-T releases. From a large infrastructure point of view, they provide more features and flexibility to design the network the way administrators and security teams want them to be designed.

There are two versions of NSX: NSX for vSphere and NSX-T. NSX for vSphere is more widely deployed; NSX T focuses on multi-hypervisor and cloud-native environments. In this article, we’ll look at what’s different between NSX-T 1.0 and 2.1.

NSX-T updates ease firewall management

The major news in VMware NSX-T’s latest versions is support for microsegmentation. Micro-segmentation is a big deal because it provides a new security paradigm for the cloud and large-scale environments.

Historically, firewalls were mostly a north-south proposition — i.e., inbound and outbound traffic from the rest of the internet/network. With NSX, firewall rules can be applied to individual VMs, groups of VMs and many other scenarios that were once difficult or not possible.

IT departments typically devote about 8% of their budgets to perimeter security. These rules also follow the VM as it moves around. In short, it helps harden the interior infrastructure that’s usually the soft spot for attackers. Think about it as a hard exterior shell with a soft inner shell. It changes the game. No other cloud vendor has anything like this.

VMware brings many different but extremely useful tools to the table in these NSX-T releases.

Now that everything is automated, you can easily implement firewall rules and manage them all centrally. Alongside this new firewall is the distributed network encryption between VMs/containers — when all items are within the same virtual domain, of course. Again, this functionality helps stop things like network eavesdropping by undesirables.

The complexity is without a doubt the overriding issue. Manually managing VMs in a massive environment becomes complex, if not unfeasible. With NSX, the network traffic and associated management for east-west traffic can be implemented more easily. It used to be quite complex to implement firewalls at the VM level, but not anymore.

VMware adds container support

Other big news in VMware NSX-T 2.x is native support for containers. This was a critical addition due to the undeniable ownership of containerization by the Docker-based infrastructure.

Along with VMware doubling down on BOSH/Pivotal as an orchestration platform, version 2.1 supports both Pivotal Cloud Foundry and Pivotal Container Service.

Extend on premises to the cloud

These developments feed into NSX Cloud, one of the VMware Cloud Services the company rolled out at VMworld in August 2017. NSX Cloud provides consistent networking and security for applications running in multiple private and public clouds via a single management console and common API. This is interesting, as this is a service no one else offers. It allows NSX to be expanded beyond the local borders of the infrastructure and allows the NSX domain to be expanded beyond the local network into major cloud providers. In other words, it expands on premises into the cloud. AWS is already supported and Azure support is on the roadmap. It brings such functionality as discovery.

Added content packs ease troubleshooting

Alongside this is the inclusion of Log Insight. Log Insight, as the name suggests, collects or logs key information from the NSX environment. “Great,” you might say. “So what?” Content packs are the answer. Content packs are add-ins that can be included in Log Insight and they help drill down and troubleshoot problems within the NSX environment. Don’t forget that we are talking about your network here; it may be virtual, but it’s still critical.

New VMware NSX-T load balancing feature

Finally, one major thing that came in 2.1 was NSX load balancing. Over time, it’s clear that many other features will be added to help NSX reach or exceed feature parity with other software load balancers.

What makes it even better is that VMware is very much pushing an API first environment. Infrastructure in code is where it’s at. The revised 2.0/2.1 API has been heavily reworked, making features easier to consume and access.