Tag Archives: Network

Declaration Networks Group and Microsoft announce agreement to deliver broadband internet to rural communities in Virginia and Maryland

The project will expand Declaration Networks’ broadband network, providing access to currently unconnected people, using TV White Spaces and other technologies

REDMOND, Wash. — April 24, 2018 — On Tuesday, Declaration Networks Group Inc. (DNG) and Microsoft Corp. announced a new agreement to deliver broadband internet access to approximately 65,000 people on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, including Accomack and Northampton Counties, and Garrett County, Maryland, over the next three years. This partnership is part of Microsoft’s Rural Airband Initiative.

There are 19.4 million people living in rural America without broadband access, including nearly 30 percent of the people in rural Virginia and 6 percent of the people in rural Maryland. Under its NeuBeam™ brand, DNG delivers high-speed internet and voice services using a combination of advanced wireless technologies, including TV White Spaces. Microsoft and DNG aim to address the rural broadband gap for residents and businesses, allowing unserved regions to fully participate in the digital economy through access to technology and services that will enable farmers, healthcare professionals, educators, business leaders and others in the community.

“This partnership with Declaration Networks will help close the rural broadband gap for 65,000 people living on the Eastern Shore of Virginia and in Garrett County, Maryland,” said Shelley McKinley, Microsoft’s head of Technology and Corporate Responsibility. “Broadband is essential for agriculture, education, business and healthcare. Microsoft’s Airband initiative is focused on bringing this necessity to 2 million people in rural America by 2022 and accelerating the national priority of closing the broadband gap.”

“DNG and Microsoft share a commitment to establishing quality broadband solutions for rural America,” said Bob Nichols, CEO of DNG. “Our partnership reflects a shared vision that focuses on an effective plan to align stakeholders, technology and resources for a sustainable path to address the digital divide.”

Closing the rural broadband gap is strongly supported by Virginia and Maryland leaders:

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam said, “As a native of the Eastern Shore, I am thrilled that Microsoft is taking action to bring new broadband connectivity to communities that need it. This new effort, in addition to ongoing efforts in state government, will help bridge the digital divide. Connecting rural communities will help create jobs, grow our economy and improve our quality of life. I am happy to celebrate this positive step forward as we work to make our commonwealth work better for all Virginians, no matter who you are or where you live.”

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan said, “Reliable access to high-speed internet is critical for Maryland’s small businesses, families and students to thrive in our 21st century economy. We are working diligently to eliminate the rural broadband gap and ensure that all Marylanders have the opportunity to access trusted, cost-effective broadband solutions.”

U.S. Sen. Mark R. Warner said, “Millions of Americans, particularly in rural America, lack broadband access — a precondition to meaningful participation in the digital economy. That’s millions of people unable to participate in e-commerce, enroll in online courses, receive tele-health services, and get on-demand services. It also means millions of people unable to hone programming skills, engage in telework, or modernize rural industries with broadband. Broadband access doesn’t guarantee a community success, but not having it guarantees that companies aren’t going to even consider you. I applaud efforts like these that seek to close the digital divide, including through innovative last-mile services.”

U.S. Rep. John K. Delaney said, “As the only former CEO of a publicly traded company currently serving in Congress, I know how critical it is to position our businesses, workers and families to best compete in a global digital market. Closing the broadband gap is a critical piece of successful education, entrepreneurship and innovation, and I applaud DNG and Microsoft’s investment in the communities of Garrett County.”

U.S. Rep. Scott Taylor said, “We live in a digital age, where the internet is no longer considered a luxury but a necessary part of everyday life. The widespread lack of internet on the Eastern Shore and across rural Virginia makes these populations especially vulnerable by limiting their access to education, medicine and information services. Thanks to DNG and Microsoft, we can finally begin the process of expanding broadband networks throughout rural Virginia to equip residents, businesses and professionals with the tools needed to succeed in a 21st century economy.”

In addition to commercial partnerships with local companies like Declaration, Microsoft’s Rural Airband Initiative includes digital skills training for people in newly connected communities and access to royalty-free patents. Proceeds from Airband connectivity projects will be reinvested into the program to expand broadband to more rural areas.

About Declaration Networks Group

DNG successfully deploys and operates broadband local access solutions in underserved markets with a combination of advanced fiber and wireless to deliver high speed Internet and voice services to residential and business customers. DNG is a recognized leader in developing sustainable broadband eco-systems through cooperative local partnerships that leverage combined resources towards shared goals, to increase access to affordable, quality broadband service and allowing customers to “connect to what matters.” For more information, please visit www.declarationnetworks.com and www.neubeam.com.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) enables digital transformation for the era of an intelligent cloud and an intelligent edge. Its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, +1 (425) 638-7777,

rrt@we-worldwide.com

DNG Media Inquiries, Barry S. Toser, EVP of Sales & Marketing, +1 (703) 850-7172,
barry@declarationnetworks.com

 

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com.Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

The post Declaration Networks Group and Microsoft announce agreement to deliver broadband internet to rural communities in Virginia and Maryland appeared first on Stories.

looking for a cheap 5 port managed gigabit swtich

As above, looking for a cheap managed network swtich for home network traffic analysis…

Anyone got anything before I go and buy a new one

TIA

Location: Colchester

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers…

looking for a cheap 5 port managed gigabit swtich

Packerland Broadband and Microsoft announce agreement to deliver broadband internet to rural communities in Wisconsin and Michigan

The project will extend Packerland’s network, delivering broadband access to approximately 82,000 people in underserved areas, utilizing TV White Spaces, Wi-Fi and other technologies.

WASHINGTON — Feb. 25, 2018 — At the National Governors Association’s winter meeting in Washington, D.C., Microsoft President Brad Smith announced a new agreement between Packerland Broadband, a division of CCI Systems Inc., and Microsoft Corp. to provide broadband internet access to approximately 82,000 people living in rural regions of northern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan over the next four years.

People with access to broadband have better educational, business, agricultural and health care opportunities. Unfortunately, for the more than 19.4 million people living in rural communities across America without broadband access, these opportunities remain out of reach. The Packerland-Microsoft partnership will bring essential broadband services to the region, where on average more than 43 percent of people living in rural Wisconsin and 34 percent of people living in rural Michigan lack adequate access to broadband, and the economic and educational opportunities it enables. The Packerland partnership is part of Microsoft’s TechSpark Wisconsin program to introduce digital initiatives, including the Rural Airband Initiative, to foster greater economic opportunity and job creation in northeast Wisconsin.

“This partnership with Packerland Broadband will help us address the rural broadband gap in northern Wisconsin and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula,” said Brad Smith, president of Microsoft. “Broadband has become the electricity of the 21st century, essential for education, business, agriculture and health care. Microsoft’s Airband Initiative is focused on bringing this necessity of life to 2 million people in rural counties by 2022.”

“Partnering with Microsoft allows us to bring new services and push our services further into the rural landscape in our region and beyond,” said Cory Heigl, vice president of Packerland Broadband. “We are the people we serve, and in this part of the world, we want to make an impact for the better. Our partnership with Microsoft will help us to influence lives by improving at-home education, enhancing economic opportunities, keeping up with health care advancements and furthering the agricultural innovation of our rural communities.”

“The mission of TechSpark Wisconsin is to bring new digital solutions to our region,” said Microsoft TechSpark Wisconsin Manager Michelle Schuler. “Packerland Broadband and Microsoft are making it possible for people living in rural Wisconsin to have the same opportunities to live, learn and work as people living in connected cities. That’s win-win for the people living here and the region’s economy.”

CCI Systems, Inc. CEO John Jamar said, “We have been focused on making life better by connecting people through innovative communications networks, and we are enthused to team up with our friends at Microsoft to accelerate that.”

Packerland will use a mix of technologies to provide broadband to its customers in rural communities, including TV White Spaces and Wi-Fi hardware developed with support from Microsoft, to extend the reach of its existing hybrid fiber-coax and wireless delivery platforms. Packerland expects to cover approximately 33,750 people by the end of 2019, and approximately 82,000 people by 2022. As part of the Packerland-Microsoft project, Packerland will provide Windows devices, Office 365 and other cloud-based services to small businesses, consumers and students, as well as digital literacy skills training. Packerland will also leverage Microsoft Azure as part of its operations management.

Microsoft is an advocate for closing the rural broadband gap in the U.S. Through its Rural Airband Initiative, Microsoft aims to deliver broadband to 2 million people by 2022 through commercial partnerships with local companies like Packerland, leveraging a mixture of technologies including TV White Spaces, and through patent sharing. The initiative also includes digital skills training for people in newly connected communities. Proceeds from Airband connectivity projects will be reinvested to provide additional rural areas with broadband.

About Packerland Broadband

Packerland Broadband was founded in 2007 as a division of employee owned CCI Systems, Inc. and is based in Iron Mountain, Michigan. The mission has been to provide reliable high-speed connectivity to rural areas, striving to service this population and enabling them to access internet services that fit their lifestyle. With a vision of bridging the digital divide, Packerland delivers modern telecommunications services to more than 60 rural communities throughout Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. For more information, visit www.packerlandbroadband.com.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) is the leading platform and productivity company for the mobile-first, cloud-first world, and its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777,

rrt@we-worldwide.com

Cory Heigl, Vice President at Packerland Broadband, (906) 776-2634, Cory.Heigl@packerlandbroadband.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com.Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

 

The post Packerland Broadband and Microsoft announce agreement to deliver broadband internet to rural communities in Wisconsin and Michigan appeared first on Stories.

Netgear Nighthawk R8000 AC3200 Router

For sale here is my old wifi router as i’ve upgraded to a mesh wifi network system.

  • AC 3200 Wifi upto 3.2 Gbps
  • Tri-Band for improved signal
  • Smart Parental controls
  • USB Ports for sharing hard drives or printers etc
  • 1Ghz Dual core processor for faster performance of WAN/LAN Processing
  • VPN gateway
  • Beamforming+ technology
  • 4x Gigabit ports
  • 1x Internet port
  • Dynamic QOS
  • 6x Antennas which can be directed to suit your room/home

Router can still be…

Netgear Nighthawk R8000 AC3200 Router

Netgear Nighthawk R8000 AC3200 Router

For sale here is my old wifi router as i’ve upgraded to a mesh wifi network system.

  • AC 3200 Wifi upto 3.2 Gbps
  • Tri-Band for improved signal
  • Smart Parental controls
  • USB Ports for sharing hard drives or printers etc
  • 1Ghz Dual core processor for faster performance of WAN/LAN Processing
  • VPN gateway
  • Beamforming+ technology
  • 4x Gigabit ports
  • 1x Internet port
  • Dynamic QOS
  • 6x Antennas which can be directed to suit your room/home

Router can still be…

Netgear Nighthawk R8000 AC3200 Router

Netgear Nighthawk R8000 AC3200 Router

For sale here is my old wifi router as i’ve upgraded to a mesh wifi network system.

  • AC 3200 Wifi upto 3.2 Gbps
  • Tri-Band for improved signal
  • Smart Parental controls
  • USB Ports for sharing hard drives or printers etc
  • 1Ghz Dual core processor for faster performance of WAN/LAN Processing
  • VPN gateway
  • Beamforming+ technology
  • 4x Gigabit ports
  • 1x Internet port
  • Dynamic QOS
  • 6x Antennas which can be directed to suit your room/home

Router can still be…

Netgear Nighthawk R8000 AC3200 Router

Netgear Nighthawk R8000 AC3200 Router

For sale here is my old wifi router as i’ve upgraded to a mesh wifi network system.

  • AC 3200 Wifi upto 3.2 Gbps
  • Tri-Band for improved signal
  • Smart Parental controls
  • USB Ports for sharing hard drives or printers etc
  • 1Ghz Dual core processor for faster performance of WAN/LAN Processing
  • VPN gateway
  • Beamforming+ technology
  • 4x Gigabit ports
  • 1x Internet port
  • Dynamic QOS
  • 6x Antennas which can be directed to suit your room/home

Router can still be…

Netgear Nighthawk R8000 AC3200 Router

Cisco Assurance services verify intent-based networking

Cisco has introduced a policy-centric layer of network analytics for the data center, campus and the wireless LAN, providing customers with additional intelligence to pinpoint problems and fix them. The latest technology represents a significant advancement in Cisco’s march toward intent-based networking.

Cisco’s Assurance analytics, launched on Tuesday, focuses on the nonpacket data the company’s Tetration network monitoring and troubleshooting software doesn’t cover. Unlike Tetration, Assurance keeps tabs on policies created in Cisco software to control the network’s infrastructure, such as switches, firewalls and load balancers.

Cisco Assurance is the latest step in the company’s intent-based networking (IBN) initiative, which is centered around creating policies that tell software what an operator wants the network to do. The application then makes the infrastructure changes.

The engine behind Cisco Assurance services

Cisco’s latest layer of analytics for the data center is called the Network Assurance Engine, which Cisco has tied to its software-defined networking (SDN) architecture, called Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI). The new technology is virtualized software that network operators deploy on any server.

Once installed, the software logs into the ACI controller, called the Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC), which shares network policies, switch configurations and the data-plane state with the Assurance Engine.

At that point, the software creates a map of the entire ACI fabric and then builds a mathematical model that spans underlays, overlays and virtualization layers. The model establishes the network state, which Assurance compares to what operators want the network to do based on policies they’ve created.

“If a network engineer used flawed logic in expressing intent, the Assurance Engine would find that flaw when the intent is translated to network state,” said Shamus McGillicuddy, an analyst for Enterprise Management Associates, based in Boulder, Colo.

Other vendors, such as Forward Networks and Veriflow, also build models of network state and then perform analytics to spot discrepancies with a network operator’s intent. Cisco’s differentiator is the integration with its APIC policy controller, which creates a closed-loop system for ensuring operator intent matches network state, McGillicuddy said.

Knowing where an engineer’s policies have “gone off the rails” is a big help in keeping networks running smoothly, said Andrew Froehlich, the president of consulting firm West Gate Networks, based in Loveland, Colo. “For network administrators, this is a huge win, because it will help them to pinpoint where problems are occurring when people start shouting the network is slow.”

Cisco has tied the analytics engine to a troubleshooting library of what the company has identified as the most common network failure scenarios. As a result, when an engineer makes a change to the network, the Assurance Engine can determine, based on its knowledge base, where the modification could create a problem.

Initially, the Assurance Engine will cover only the Nexus 9000 switches required for an ACI fabric. Later in the quarter, Cisco plans to extend the software’s capabilities to firewalls, load balancers and other network services from Cisco or partners.

Cisco Assurance services for the campus

For the campus, Cisco has added its new analytics engine to version 1.1 of the Digital Network Architecture (DNA) Center — Cisco’s software console for distributing policy-based configurations across wired and wireless campus networks. DNA Center, which costs $77,000, requires the use of Cisco Catalyst switches and Aironet access points. Companies using DNA Center have to buy a subscription license for each network device attached to the software.

The Assurance analytics in the latest release of DNA Center draws network telemetry data from the APIC-EM controller, the campus network version of the ACI controller used in the data center. The model created from the data lets operators monitor applications, switches, routers, access points and end-user devices manufactured by Cisco partners, such as Apple.

As the data center software, the Cisco Assurance services for the campus are focused on troubleshooting and remediation. Later in the quarter, Cisco will add similar features to the cloud-based management console of the Meraki wireless LAN. Problems the Meraki analytics will help solve will include dropped traffic, latency and access-point congestion.

Today, most operators manage networks by programming switches and scores of other devices manually, usually via a command-line interface. Proponents of IBN claim the new paradigm is more flexible and agile in accommodating the needs of modern business applications. In the future, Cisco, Juniper Networks and others want to use machine learning and artificial intelligence to have networks fix common problems without operator involvement.

Despite progress vendors have made in developing IBN systems, enterprises are just beginning to roll out the methodology in their operations. Gartner predicted the number of commercial deployments will be in the hundreds through mid-2018, increasing to more than 1,000 by the end of next year.

Selecting network configuration software for automation

Ivan Pepelnjak, blogging in IP Space, explored what network configuration software is best for automation. Ansible, Chef and Puppet are commonly cited network configuration software options, with Salt becoming increasingly commonplace and CFEngine used occasionally. According to Pepelnjak, most network engineers prefer Ansible. Chef and Puppet focus mainly on configuration and state management and don’t make changes unless necessary and tend to manage dependencies — such as creating groups and then accounts within a group.

In Pepelnjak’s view, managing configuration and soft state services is a good goal but doesn’t go far enough. Among network configuration software, Ansible is unique, aiding in device provisioning, validating network topologies, upgrading software, helping with compliance and generating reports. Engineers can often get started more quickly with Ansible, learning the basics in a matter of hours. “Maybe it’s just our mentality, or maybe we have to do things a bit different because of the huge blast radius of our mistakes. In any case, Ansible (which is just a generic automation/orchestration framework) fits better to our way of doing things,” he said.

Read more of Pepelnjak’s thoughts on network configuration software.

New developments in endpoint detection and response

Jon Oltsik, an analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group in Milford, Mass., reflected on a 2016 project where he interviewed 30 enterprises about endpoint security strategies. At the time, Oltsik came up with a concept he termed a continuum of endpoint tools, with advanced threat detection at one end and endpoint detection and response (EDR) on the other end.

Based on the interviews, Oltsik and his colleague guessed that 75% to 80% of the market would steer toward advanced protection, while the remainder would pursue EDR. He also predicted that vendors would work to bridge the gap with combined offerings.

Now, in 2018, Oltsik said that the hypothesis has mostly played out. ESG research indicates that 87% of organizations are planning to buy comprehensive endpoint security suites and 28% of cybersecurity professionals identified EDR as the most attractive feature of the offerings. He projected that EDR will now undergo additional market segmentation. Traditional EDR, anchored by on-premises infrastructure, will continue as a niche market for high-security industries. A lighter, “trigger-based” version of EDR — one that collects data when a behavioral anomaly occurs — will appeal to purchasers in the midmarket, he said.

Managed EDR may also appear, with subsegments, catering to companies that want full EDR capabilities but lack personnel to oversee it. “Rather than default to a product, security managers really need to assess their needs, resources, and skills before making an EDR decision. There will be a lot of options to choose from, so CISOs must choose wisely,” Oltsik said.

Dig deeper into Oltsik’s predictions about EDR.

Streamlining with SD-WAN and network functions virtualization

Mike Fratto, an analyst at GlobalData in Sterling, Va., said he’s heard commentary about stand-alone SD-WAN disappearing, instead becoming just another feature on routers and firewalls. Although he said many vendors will eventually consolidate features like these into a single appliance, he does not see the end of single-function SD-WAN devices.

That’s because enterprise IT teams like bespoke products and many teams like the ability to swap out older stand-alone products for newer offerings as they become available.

Second, the shift to software-defined everything will let enterprises rely more on virtualized instances of SD-WAN. This will permit companies to consolidate network functions into fewer appliances.

Third is the fact that enterprise IT teams are often loath to replace tried and true systems with new options that may not be as capable.

“What enterprises want — what they would pay for but will likely never get — is an environment of deep management integration across multiple vendor products which could ultimately reduce operational overhead, unlock more efficient workflows, and generate significant operational cost savings along with way,” Fratto said. “Here’s where managed service providers have a unique advantage, provided they dedicate the resources to creating a portal that integrates the management functions across vendor products,” he added.

Explore more of Fratto’s ideas on SD-WAN as a stand-alone product.

ThousandEyes-Juniper pact focuses on hybrid WANs

ThousandEyes has deployed its network performance monitoring agents on routers and customer premises equipment, or CPE, made by Juniper Networks to improve visibility for hybrid WANs and other extended networks.

ThousandEyes software, running as virtual network functions on NFX250 branch routers, will support a wide range of capabilities, the companies said, including gauging network health and confirming traffic paths. Among other capabilities, the agents probe latency and bandwidth, monitor MPLS and automate outage detection. They also can report connection errors for FTP, HTTP, Session Initiation Protocol and Real-Time Transport Protocol-based applications, and carry out root-cause analysis for problems stemming from domain name system and Border Gateway Protocol routing.

The proliferation of hybrid WANs, SD-WAN and SaaS offerings, as well as ongoing consolidation of data centers, means enterprises face visibility challenges with their extended networks. The addition of ThousandEyes’ software is aimed at eliminating some of those challenges, said Mihir Maniar, vice president of product management for Juniper Networks. 

“As more and more of our customers move to cloud-centric networks to realize its cost and agility promises, the migration — often to a hybrid public-private environment — can also bring new network blind spots that, if left unchecked, can wreak havoc on service delivery, application development, SLAs [service-level agreements] and the overall end-user experience,” Maniar said in a statement.

Cloud revenues soar 25% in Q3: IDC

Sales of cloud infrastructure products, such as Ethernet and servers, surged in the third quarter of 2017, growing 25.5% year over year and reaching $11.3 billion, according to the most recent study by IDC. The firm’s Worldwide Quarterly Cloud IT Infrastructure Tracker found that public cloud investments fueled most of the sales increase, representing 68% of all cloud IT infrastructure sales during the quarter. Storage platforms generated the highest growth, with revenue up 45% over the same quarter in 2016.

IDC said all regions of the world, except for Latin America, experienced double-digit growth in cloud infrastructure spending, with the fastest growth in Asia-Pacific and in Central and Eastern Europe. Private cloud revenues reached $3.6 billion, an annual increase of 13.1%. Noncloud IT infrastructure sales, meantime, rose 8% to $14.2 billion.

“2017 has been a strong year for public cloud IT infrastructure growth, accelerating throughout the year,” said Kuba Stolarski, research director for computing platforms at IDC, in a statement.

“While hyperscalers such as Amazon and Google are driving the lion’s share of the growth, IDC is seeing strong growth in the lower tiers of public cloud and continued growth in private cloud on a worldwide scale,” he added.

New Intel and AMD platforms launched in 2017 will provide a further boost to the cloud segment, Stolarksi said, as providers and enterprises take steps to upgrade their IT infrastructures.

Lambda MSA issues preliminary optical specification

The 100G Lambda Multi-Source Agreement, or MSA Group, released preliminary interoperability specifications based on 100 Gbps pulse amplitude modulation 4-based optical technology. The new optical interface specification is intended for next-generation networking equipment and is suitable for tasks requiring increased bandwidth and greater bandwidth density.

In addition to ensuring optical receivers from multiple vendors can work together, the new spec increases the distances supported by both 100 Gigabit Ethernet and 400 GbE  systems from the 500 meters currently specified in the IEEE 802.3 Ethernet standard to up to 10 kilometers for 100 GbE and up to 2 kilometers over duplex single-mode fiber for 400 GbE.

The Lambda MSA group is comprised of major networking vendors, such as Arista Networks, Broadcom, Cisco and Juniper Networks, as well as major enterprises, such as Alibaba and Nokia. Final specifications will be released later in 2018, the MSA Group said.