Tag Archives: People

7 smart tech developments for people who are blind or have low vision | Microsoft On The Issues

It’s estimated that there are about 36 million people in the world who are blind, and a further 216 million who live with moderate to severe visual impairments. Although the World Health Organization points out that up to 80% of vision impairment around the world is avoidable with better access to treatment, the number of people who are blind or have low vision is rising as the global population ages.

But technology is playing a vital role in tearing down barriers, and artificial intelligence is making real inroads into improving accessibility.

Here are seven examples of how smart technology can be a game-changer, allowing everyone to interact with the world in new ways.

[Subscribe to Microsoft on the Issues for more on the topics that matter most.]

The eye in AI

As we’ve reported, Microsoft’s Seeing AI is an app designed to help people with low vision or who are blind. It enhances the world around the user with rich audio descriptions. It can read a handwritten note or scan a barcode and then tell the user what the product is. Point a camera at something and the app will describe how many people it can see and where they are in the image – center, top left and so on.

3-D Sound Maps

YouTube Video

For a sighted person, walking along the street can mean taking in every detail that surrounds them. Microsoft Soundscape replicates that behavior by building a detailed audio map that relates what’s taking place around a person with visual impairment.

It creates layers of context and detail by drawing on location data, sound beacons and synthesized 3-D stereo sound to build a constantly updating 3-D sound map of the surrounding world.

Knowledge at your fingertips

Braille has been used for nearly 200 years as a tactile way of reading with fingertips. It has now jumped from the page to the screen with the updated version of Narrator, the screen-reader for Microsoft Windows, supporting digital Braille displays and keyboards.

Outside of Microsoft’s efforts, Braille touchscreens that work in the same way as tablets have already proved popular among students and teachers. At the Assistive Technology Industry Association’s 2019 conference in Orlando, Florida, innovations on display included the BraiBook, a Braille e-reader that fits into the palm of a hand, and even an electronic toy called the Braille Buzz, designed to teach Braille to preschoolers.

Beacons of change

Bluetooth beacons, such as those being used by the company Foresight Augmented Reality, act like highly precise, personalized guides for people who are blind or partially sighted. While basic GPS technology can take users to a location, beacons mounted in a store, restaurant or public building can guide them to the entrance of the building in question. And when the user is inside, other beacons can direct them to the bathroom or other important facilities.

Electric vehicles

The European Union is taking no chances with people’s safety. New legislation means electric vehicles have to be audible  at low speeds and while reversing. Some manufacturers are already incorporating artificial noise into their electric vehicles.

Smart Glasses

Researchers at Ajman University in the United Arab Emirates are working on the development of a set of smart glasses that can use AI to read, provide navigation information and potentially identify faces. Glasses are connected to a smartphone through a processing unit, allowing the system to function without an internet connection.

These smart glasses are still in the early stages of development but are said to work with a reading accuracy rate of 95%.

AI for Accessibility

Microsoft’s AI for Accessibility program was launched last year, with a $25 million commitment to put Microsoft technology in the hands of start-ups, developers, researchers and non-profits in order to drive innovation and amplify human capability for people with disabilities. The program is continuously looking at new projects to support.

For more on these innovations and accessibility initiatives at Microsoft, visit microsoft.com/en-us/accessibility and follow @MSFTIssues on Twitter.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

New Everbridge CEO talks education, NC4 acquisition

The new Everbridge CEO said he wants people to understand the importance of a critical event management platform.

“It just needs to be something everyone has, because it does save lives,” said David Meredith, previously the COO of Rackspace. He took over on July 15 for Jaime Ellertson, the Everbridge CEO since 2011 who is transitioning to the role of executive chairman of the board.

“We need to get out there as the leader and we need to be more aggressive in having conversations like we’re having today, and educating people about what are the best practices, and how they can best prepare,” Meredith said.

Two weeks into his time as CEO, Everbridge acquired NC4 Inc., a risk intelligence provider that Meredith said will improve his company’s Critical Event Management (CEM) suite. The two companies had previously been partners.

“A lot of acquisitions, companies may be competing with each other or they’re maybe in an adjacent space, but they haven’t worked together very much,” said Karl Kotalik, who will be general manager of NC4 after serving as its president and CEO. “We’ve been exchanging information for years, not just together, but in combination with customers.”

The NC4 acquisition gives Everbridge 10 products it sells as a SaaS company, Meredith said. Everbridge, which is based in Burlington, Mass., claims about 4,700 enterprise customers. The company now has about 950 employees, including the entire team of more than 70 workers from NC4, which is based in El Segundo, Calif. The acquisition payment was $83 million in cash and Everbridge stock, and it’s expected to fully close at the end of the third quarter.

We need to really be more proactive in terms of educating the marketplace on what can be done to keep people safe and keep businesses running.
David MeredithCEO, Everbridge

NC4 claimed more than 300 customers. One hundred of those customers are in the Fortune 500. About 50% of NC4 customers were also Everbridge users as well. Kotalik said the acquisition will help NC4 “scale down” into Everbridge’s base for smaller companies that still need risk intelligence.

Meredith said he wants Everbridge to be for CEM what Salesforce is for customer relationship management, in a “platform that really makes the ecosystem” around CRM.

“You can have one place to get all the data if you are an enterprise, or a state, local or federal government,” Meredith said. “Then if something is happening, we can move very quickly to manage that with the rest of the tools in the suite.”

We recently spoke with Meredith and Kotalik to discuss their plans for the Critical Event Management suite and NC4.

What led you to take the Everbridge CEO job?

David MeredithDavid Meredith

David Meredith: I’ve known of Everbridge as a customer for years and was a very happy and satisfied customer. What pulled me into this role, first and foremost, is the mission of Everbridge — the mission of keeping people safe and businesses running faster. It’s a very powerful draw. We are a mission-driven company.

The technology is the leader in the space. They used to say you’d never get fired for hiring IBM in technology. And in the critical event management space, Everbridge is the leader and I think it’s safe to say you would never get fired for picking Everbridge. If you look at the ability to scale, the global reach, the resiliency, the fact that we’re a public company, our size, the breadth of our offerings, we’re the clear leader in the space, and that’s very exciting.

But I still think there’s a lot of room to grow from there.

What is it about the technology that makes Everbridge a leader?

Meredith: Everbridge has been investing heavily on building out our technology platform and doing acquisitions as well. If you look at the Critical Event Management suite, critical event management, or CEM, is an area that we’re sort of a pioneer in. It starts with a single pane of glass, and this is our Visual Command Center, and that’s where we can aggregate thousands and thousands of pieces of data. The ability to curate all that data, using technology, machine learning, artificial intelligence, as well as expert human analysts, [create] that added level of validation.

Our systems are extremely scalable. We’ve moved everything to the cloud now and we’re very resilient. … We have the ability to deliver the messages when you need them in a timely manner, and we’ve got backups in place at every level of the supply chain. We’re the leader in that.

Everbridge and NC4 were partners previously — how did you work together in the past?

Karl KotalikKarl Kotalik

Karl Kotalik: I started NC4 18 years ago, right after 9/11. … A natural partnership developed about 10 years ago because Everbridge was already emerging as the leader in mass notification and communication — at the time they called it unified communications. And NC4, our specialty, we were very focused on risk intelligence. We were emerging as the leader in real-time event incident monitoring, all hazards — everything from water main breaks and one-alarm fires and shootings up to terrorist attacks, hurricanes, tornadoes, major floods.

We were getting the information, but to deliver it at scale, to the large customers we were serving, we needed that assist from Everbridge. So, we partnered, where we did something really well, on the front end of the process, and Everbridge handled the downstream messaging, unified communications to people who needed to know. And they started getting into more response and coordination, and they’ve grown the CEM platform today.

When you’re partnered, you’re not coordinating on strategy. It’s a nice relationship, but we realized we could do so much more coming together. … Putting the two together is a killer combination. And a lot of the work had already been done because of the partnerships with these large enterprises.

How has the integration been going?

Kotalik: Everbridge has had access to every iteration and evolution of our APIs going back 10 years, and they’ve seen our data streams and fed it to their platforms over all these years. So, their development team, their product management team, their operations team, understand the [kind and volume of data NC4 deals in]. We’re doing 700 incidents a day on critical events.

You might think of a critical event as something big, but a critical event for an individual customer could be as minor as a water main break. But [it’s a major event] if it’s across the street and you’re a data center and you depend on that water pressure for the cooling of the equipment in the data center. With the CEM platform, to very quickly orchestrate all the mitigation steps you want to take, shutting down the servers, turning on alternate cooling systems, whatever those steps are, not being able to do that, could turn that into a disaster. It could take down your customers and you don’t want to do that.

Where do you see the CEM suite progressing? Is there anything you want to see added?

Meredith: We have a whole roadmap that we’re going to continue to be building out. There are some big market drivers that we’re tapping into. One is internet of things. There’s going to be 75 billion connected devices in the next six years. One of the things Everbridge does, in addition to keeping your employees or citizens or customers safe, we also help to keep your assets and things safe as well. And that’s going to get much more complex with the advent of more IoT.

Another big trend we see is around mobility. If you look at what’s happening with the workforce today, in the next few years, over 70% of U.S. workers are going to be mobile. If you’re trying to keep your employees safe, it’s not as simple as when everyone is just in one building, from 9 to 5. Now they’re spread everywhere, working from home and other places.

Big data is another one. I think NC4 is a great example where aggregating all that data, being able to curate it, sort through it, and get to actionable intelligence for our customers as quickly as possible, even to the point of being predictive, is going to be strategically important for us. We’re going to continue to invest and drive more analytics-type solutions out of all the data that we have and all the data that we see.

Photo of Everbridge's Global Operations Center
Everbridge’s Global Operations Center at its headquarters in Burlington, Mass., tracks critical events worldwide, 24/7.

What are you seeing as trends in customers?

Meredith: One big trend, and another reason I was drawn to the company, is Everbridge is really creating a network effects business.

We recently announced that the state of Florida did a five-year renewal with us. So, what happens when you win a state like Florida? Over the years, we’ve added 64 of 67 counties as customers. We’ve added 26 cities, including the 10 largest in Florida, almost 50 corporations, 15 state agencies, almost 20 higher education universities [and] 29 healthcare organizations.

When you start to add all that on, it creates this network effect, where when something happens, it’s all interrelated — you’ve got emergency responders, you’ve got the state, the county, the city, transportation. If there’s a hurricane in Florida, all of these groups are impacted. Our ability to have all of them on our platform is really powerful. It’s beneficial to them, it’s beneficial to us. That’s really that ecosystem effect, that network effect we create.

We just announced that we won the country of Australia as a customer. If you think about what I just talked about with Florida, now we’re doing it for the country of Australia — the states, the cities, the healthcare, the higher education, the corporations and tying all that together.

What’s really interesting, looking forward, the European Union has come out and said all of the EU countries need to have population alerting systems in place in the next few years, so that’s an opportunity for us to take what we’ve done in Australia and other countries and now move faster in terms of spreading that in Europe.

We’re getting all this data coming in from all these sources. The data is the lifeblood of the system. As you’re looking at that Visual Command Center — and we’re getting data from our analysts, we’re getting data from the web, from our customers — it allows us to be much more accurate in terms of false positives and false negatives. There have been some highly publicized examples recently about false alarms and how disruptive that can be. With NC4, you’ve got 24/7 analysts looking at all the feeds, highly trained, highly skilled, and can say, ‘I’m looking at all my data, I’m curating all the data and this is not a critical event. This is a false alarm.’

Or, alternatively, potentially minutes can save lives. And being able to shrink that time and know something is really happening, know we’re getting into a critical event, and be able to get people to safety, be able to protect your assets, that is very important and has a huge impact in terms of the overall return on investment the customer makes in a platform like this.

What else have you learned as Everbridge CEO in a month and what are your short- and long-term plans?

Meredith: Having been in technology for many years now, I will say, you need great people, you need great technology; you also need timing to line up. Unfortunately, we’re at a period now, we have the data — unfortunately, it’s up in terms of weather events, in terms of cyber, malware attacks, terrorist attacks. The rate’s increasing.

We’re creating a whole new category. We need to really be more proactive in terms of educating the marketplace on what can be done to keep people safe and keep businesses running. … We’ve got to be out there and educating and talking about the story. I really believe if you’re a Global 2000 or Fortune 1000 company, really every one of those companies should have technology and plans in place for what to do in the event of a critical event, whether they use Everbridge or not.

Do you think that not enough people and organizations know about what you do?

Meredith: I think that’s correct. When we go talk to a company, a lot of times, it’s not that they already have a solution, but they have maybe a couple point solutions and they’ve sort of jury-rigged some standard operating procedures. We don’t see the level of preparation that you would like to see. It’s something that you don’t want to ever have to use, but you want to have it in place.

Kotalik: We will go in to customers and they won’t even realize they can get real-time information that’s impacting their travelers, their assets, their locations, in enough time to really mitigate. When they hear the stories about how it saved lives or it reduced downtime, it stopped an event from turning into a disaster for the company because they were able to mitigate it, that helps drive our business for these less sophisticated organizations that haven’t really thought about this. They don’t think they have a big enough budget or enough people.

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7 smart tech developments for people who are blind or have low vision | Microsoft On The Issues

It’s estimated that there are about 36 million people in the world who are blind, and a further 216 million who live with moderate to severe visual impairments. Although the World Health Organization points out that up to 80% of vision impairment around the world is avoidable with better access to treatment, the number of people who are blind or have low vision is rising as the global population ages.

But technology is playing a vital role in tearing down barriers, and artificial intelligence is making real inroads into improving accessibility.

Here are seven examples of how smart technology can be a game-changer, allowing everyone to interact with the world in new ways.

[Subscribe to Microsoft on the Issues for more on the topics that matter most.]

The eye in AI

As we’ve reported, Microsoft’s Seeing AI is an app designed to help people with low vision or who are blind. It enhances the world around the user with rich audio descriptions. It can read a handwritten note or scan a barcode and then tell the user what the product is. Point a camera at something and the app will describe how many people it can see and where they are in the image – center, top left and so on.

3-D Sound Maps

YouTube Video

For a sighted person, walking along the street can mean taking in every detail that surrounds them. Microsoft Soundscape replicates that behavior by building a detailed audio map that relates what’s taking place around a person with visual impairment.

It creates layers of context and detail by drawing on location data, sound beacons and synthesized 3-D stereo sound to build a constantly updating 3-D sound map of the surrounding world.

Knowledge at your fingertips

Braille has been used for nearly 200 years as a tactile way of reading with fingertips. It has now jumped from the page to the screen with the updated version of Narrator, the screen-reader for Microsoft Windows, supporting digital Braille displays and keyboards.

Outside of Microsoft’s efforts, Braille touchscreens that work in the same way as tablets have already proved popular among students and teachers. At the Assistive Technology Industry Association’s 2019 conference in Orlando, Florida, innovations on display included the BraiBook, a Braille e-reader that fits into the palm of a hand, and even an electronic toy called the Braille Buzz, designed to teach Braille to preschoolers.

Beacons of change

Bluetooth beacons, such as those being used by the company Foresight Augmented Reality, act like highly precise, personalized guides for people who are blind or partially sighted. While basic GPS technology can take users to a location, beacons mounted in a store, restaurant or public building can guide them to the entrance of the building in question. And when the user is inside, other beacons can direct them to the bathroom or other important facilities.

Electric vehicles

The European Union is taking no chances with people’s safety. New legislation means electric vehicles have to be audible  at low speeds and while reversing. Some manufacturers are already incorporating artificial noise into their electric vehicles.

Smart Glasses

Researchers at Ajman University in the United Arab Emirates are working on the development of a set of smart glasses that can use AI to read, provide navigation information and potentially identify faces. Glasses are connected to a smartphone through a processing unit, allowing the system to function without an internet connection.

These smart glasses are still in the early stages of development but are said to work with a reading accuracy rate of 95%.

AI for Accessibility

Microsoft’s AI for Accessibility program was launched last year, with a $25 million commitment to put Microsoft technology in the hands of start-ups, developers, researchers and non-profits in order to drive innovation and amplify human capability for people with disabilities. The program is continuously looking at new projects to support.

For more on these innovations and accessibility initiatives at Microsoft, visit microsoft.com/en-us/accessibility and follow @MSFTIssues on Twitter.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Amazon, Intel, NBCUniversal spill buying secrets at HR Tech 2018

LAS VEGAS — Amazon’s talent acquisition organization has more than 3,500 people, including 2,000 recruiters, and is very interested in testing out new technology. That is probably welcome news to vendors here at HR Tech 2018. But Amazon and other big HR technology users warned against being dazzled by vendors’ products and recommended following a disciplined and tough evaluation process.

“I think it’s important to stay abreast with what’s happening in the market,” said Kelly Cartwright, the head of recruiting transformation at Amazon. “I’m really, really passionate about doing experiments and pilots and seeing whether or not something can work,” she said, speaking on a talent acquisition technology panel at HR Tech 2018.

It’s important to “block out time and take those [vendor] calls and listen to what those vendors have to say because one of them actually might have a solution for you that can be a game changer,” Cartwright said.

A warning about new HR tech

But Cartwright also had a clear warning for attendees at the HR Tech 2018. It won’t help to make the investment in a new technology until “you really clarify” what it is you want to use it for, she said.

What has to happen first in investigating HR trends and new technologies is to “start with a clear problem that you’re trying to solve for,” Cartwright said. She illustrated her point with example questions: Is the problem improving diversity in the pipeline? Or is it ensuring that there are enough potential candidates visiting your recruiting website?

Endorsing this approach was Gail Blum, manager of talent acquisition operations at NBCUniversal, who appeared with Cartwright on the panel.

Blum said NBCUniversal may not always have the budget for a particular new HR technology, but vendors increasingly are offering free pilots. Companies can choose to take a particular problem “and see if that new tool or vendor has the ability to solve that,” she said.

Attendees walk through the expo area at the 2018 HR Technology Conference
New HR tech is in abundance at the 2018 HR Technology Conference & Expo

New tech that doesn’t integrate is next to useless

Critical to any new HR technology is its ability to integrate with existing talent systems, such as an applicant tracking system, Blum said. She wants to know: Will the system have a separate log-in? “That’s always something that we ask upfront with all of these vendors.”

“If you are requiring everyone to have to go to two different systems the usage probably isn’t going to be great,” Blum said, who said that was their experience from some previous rollouts. If the systems don’t integrate, a new technology addition “isn’t really going to solve your problem in the end,” she said.      

There was no disagreement on this panel at HR Tech 2018 about the need to be rigorous with vendors to avoid being taken in by a shiny new technology.

We ask really invasive questions of the vendors.
Allyn Baileytalent acquisition capability adoption transformation leader, Intel

If Intel is going to partner with a talent vendor “it’s a long-term play,” said Allyn Bailey, talent acquisition capability adoption transformation leader at the chipmaker.

“We ask really invasive questions of the vendors,” Bailey said. “The vendors really hate it when we do it,” she said.

But Bailey said they will probe a vendor’s stability, their financing and whether they are positioning themselves to gather some big-name customers and then sell the business. “That freaks me out because my investment with that vendor is around that partnership to build a very customized solution to meet my needs,” she said. 

TechTarget, the publisher of SearchHRSoftware, is a media partner for HR Tech 2018.

Two seconds to take a bite out of mobile bank fraud with Artificial Intelligence

The future of mobile banking is clear. People love their mobile devices and banks are making big investments to enhance their apps with digital features and capabilities. As mobile banking grows, so does the one aspect about it that can be wrenching for customers and banks, mobile device fraud. 

image

Problem: To implement near real-time fraud detection

Most mobile fraud occurs through a compromise called a SIM swap attack in which a mobile number is hacked. The phone number is cloned and the criminal receives all the text messages and calls sent to the victim’s mobile device. Then login credentials are obtained through social engineering, phishing, vishing, or an infected downloaded app. With this information, the criminal can impersonate a bank customer, register for mobile access, and immediately start to request fund transfers and withdrawals.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) models have the potential to dramatically improve fraud detection rates and detection times. One approach is described in the Mobile bank fraud solution guide.  It’s a behavioral-based AI approach and can be much more responsive to changing fraud patterns than rules-based or other approaches.

The solution: A pipeline that detects fraud in less than two seconds

Latency and response times are critical in a fraud detection solution. The time it takes a bank to react to a fraudulent transaction translates directly to how much financial loss can be prevented. The sooner the detection takes place, the less the financial loss.

To be effective, detection needs to occur in less than two seconds. This means less than two seconds to process an incoming mobile activity, build a behavioral profile, evaluate the transaction for fraud, and determine if an action needs to be taken. The approach described in this solution is based on:

  • Feature engineering to create customer and account profiles.
  • Azure Machine Learning to create a fraud classification model.
  • Azure PaaS services for real-time event processing and end-to-end workflow.

The architecture: Azure Functions, Azure SQL, and Azure Machine Learning

Most steps in the event processing pipeline start with a call to Azure Functions because functions are serverless, easily scaled out, and can be scheduled.

The power of data in this solution comes from mobile messages that are standardized, joined, and aggregated with historical data to create behavior profiles. This is done using the in-memory technologies in Azure SQL.  

Training of a fraud classifier is done with Azure Machine Learning Studio (AML Studio) and custom R code to create account level metrics.

Recommended next steps

Read the Mobile bank fraud solution guide to learn details on the architecture of the solution. The guide explains the logic and concepts and gets you to the next stage in implementing a mobile bank fraud detection solution. We hope you find this helpful and we welcome your feedback.

Plan to map UK’s network of heart defibrillators could save thousands of lives a year

Thousands of people who are at risk of dying every year from cardiac arrest could be saved under new plans to make the public aware of their nearest defibrillator.

There are 30,000 cardiac arrests outside of UK hospitals annually but fewer than one-in-10 of those survive, compared with a 25% survival rate in Norway, 21% in North Holland, and 20% in Seattle, in the US.

A new partnership between the British Heart Foundation (BHF), Microsoft, the NHS and New Signature aims to tackle the problem by mapping all the defibrillators in the UK, so 999 call handlers can tell people helping a cardiac arrest patient where the nearest device is.

Ambulance services currently have their own system of mapping where defibrillators are located but this is not comprehensive.

It is hoped the partnership can evolve to capture heart data from cardiac arrest patients

“There is huge potential ahead in the impact that technology will have in digitally transforming UK healthcare,” said Clare Barclay, Chief Operating Officer at Microsoft. “This innovative partnership will bring the power of Microsoft technology together with the incredible vision and life-saving work of BHF and the NHS. This project, powered by the cloud, will better equip 999 call handlers with information that can make the difference between life and death and shows the potential that innovative partnerships like this could make to the health of the nation.”

Cardiac arrest occurs when the heart fails to pump effectively, resulting in a sudden loss of blood flow. Symptoms include a loss of consciousness, abnormal or absent breathing, chest pain, shortness of breath and nausea. If not treated within minutes, it usually leads to death.

Defibrillators can save the life of someone suffering from a cardiac arrest by providing a high-energy electric shock to the heart through the chest wall. This allows the body’s natural pacemaker to re-establish the heart’s normal rhythm.

However, defibrillators are used in just 2% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, often because bystanders and ambulance services don’t know where the nearest device is located.

Owners of the tens of thousands of defibrillators in workplaces, train stations, leisure centres and public places across the country will register their device with the partnership. That information will be stored in Azure, Microsoft’s cloud computing service, where it will be used by ambulance services during emergency situations. The system will also remind owners to check their defibrillators to make sure they are in working order.

It is hoped that the partnership can evolve to enable defibrillators to self-report their condition, as well as capture heart data from cardiac arrest patients that can be sent to doctors.

Simon Gillespie, Chief Executive of the BHF, said: “Every minute without CPR or defibrillation reduces a person’s chance of surviving a cardiac arrest by around 10%. Thousands more lives could be saved if the public were equipped with vital CPR skills, and had access to a defibrillator in the majority of cases.

Everything you need to know about Microsoft’s cloud

“While we’ve made great progress in improving the uptake of CPR training in schools, public defibrillators are rarely used when someone suffers a cardiac arrest, despite their widespread availability. This unique partnership could transform this overnight, meaning thousands more people get life-saving defibrillation before the emergency services arrive.”

Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England, added: “This promises to be yet another example of how innovation within the NHS leads to transformative improvements in care for patients.”

The defibrillation network will be piloted by West Midlands Ambulance Service and the Scottish Ambulance Service, before being rolled out across the UK.

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Seven ways to make your internship a success, even after it’s over – Microsoft Life

Nurture your connections

If you haven’t already, use LinkedIn to connect with all the people you worked with in a meaningful way during your time as an intern—your manager, other people on your team, employees you collaborated with in other parts of the company, and fellow interns. Make recommendations and give endorsements where appropriate—this is good professional etiquette, and it will also help you obtain those endorsements from others. If there are connections doing work that interests you, follow their progress and consider engaging with and sharing their content or updates.

In addition to strengthening your LinkedIn network, consider setting up an in-person or Skype check-in session with anyone who was particularly influential or impactful to you—a mentor, an advisor, or a manager. This will give you a chance to build the relationship.

Follow up on projects

Did you work on a project that taught you something valuable during your internship? Ask for an update after your internship ends. This shows the people who you worked with that you are interested and invested in the project’s outcome and success and that you value following up. It also gives you a reason to reach out, give them an update about what you are doing or working on, and perhaps nurture relationships that can help your career down the road. Also, learning what the outcome of the project was will help you incorporate the work you did into your resume and LinkedIn profile and allow you to tell the full story, including the impact of the work.

Showcase your work

Speaking of telling the full story . . . you put in the hard work, built new skills, and had a successful internship. Now you want to make sure that you showcase it so that others, such as recruiters and hiring managers, can clearly see your experience.

Before or soon after your internship is over, update your resume and LinkedIn profile to reflect the role. As you think about what you accomplished during your internship and frame it for your resume, include projects that you worked on, focus on transferable skills, incorporate appropriate terms and keywords, and put some thought into your social media presence.

Keep these tips in mind as you move through your internship adventure, and of course don’t forget to have fun!

For Sale – 2017 13” MacBook Pro (Space Grey) – 2.3GHz i5, 8GB RAM, 128GB HDD

Hi

I am sure a lot of people have claimed because it is actually a consumer right. I am sure you could find out plenty of information online. I think AppleCare is apple’s way of simplifying things – you can just take it into their store anytime. But just so you know, I have never known Apple to turn away any of their hardware……I have had a 3 year old iPad sorted by then FOC but that could be few and far between.

I will provide an email confirmation print out as proof of purchase.