Tag Archives: plan

Wanted – 16GB DDR4 RAM (2x 8Gb preferred)

Hi all,

I’m looking to begin my first build, and after some RAM to plan out my setup.
This will be used for the Ryzen 5 2400g processor, so I’d appreciate it you could include model numbers so I can check compatibility.

Please let me know what you have and how much you’re looking for. Preferably I am after 2 x 8GB sticks at 3000 or 3200MHz.

Thanks in advance!

Location: London

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AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac

AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac.

Brand new and still sealed.

Extend your full Apple warranty to 3 years from date of iMac purchase. Your iMac must be within its first year to be able to extend.

Price and currency: £85
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Saffron Walden
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference…

AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac

AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac

AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac.

Brand new and still sealed.

Extend your full Apple warranty to 3 years from date of iMac purchase. Your iMac must be within its first year to be able to extend.

Price and currency: £95
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Saffron Walden
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference…

AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac

AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac

AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac.

Brand new and still sealed.

Extend your full Apple warranty to 3 years from date of iMac purchase. Your iMac must be within its first year to be able to extend.

Price and currency: £95
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Saffron Walden
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference…

AppleCare Protection Plan for iMac

Gigabyte Z370-N ITX Wifi Coffeelake Motherboard

My recent change to coffee lake ITX plan has changed, as I needed more SATA connections so I have returned to ATX format. So my ITX Gigabyte Z370-N wifi board is up for sale.

Website link for the specifications Z370N WIFI (rev. 1.0) | Motherboard – GIGABYTE Global

This is one of a few boards which has onboard 4096×2160 at 60hz HDMI connection, along with 4 SATA, 2 M.2 SSD it truly is an amazing board for its size….

Gigabyte Z370-N ITX Wifi Coffeelake Motherboard

Gigabyte Z370-N ITX Wifi Coffeelake Motherboard

My recent change to coffee lake ITX plan has changed, as I needed more SATA connections so I have returned to ATX format. So my ITX Gigabyte Z370-N wifi board is up for sale.

Website link for the specifications Z370N WIFI (rev. 1.0) | Motherboard – GIGABYTE Global

This is one of a few boards which has onboard 4096×2160 at 60hz HDMI connection, along with 4 SATA, 2 M.2 SSD it truly is an amazing board for its size….

Gigabyte Z370-N ITX Wifi Coffeelake Motherboard

SAP defends S/4HANA HCM upgrade amid questions

SAP’s new plan to extend on-premises ERP human capital management support from 2025 to 2030 is raising eyebrows. That’s because maintaining on-premises systems means migrating to S/4HANA HCM, which complicates the decision-making for on-premises users.

The upgrade won’t be available until 2023, and the license for the S/4HANA HCM only runs until “at least” 2030. This doesn’t prevent the vendor from extending support, but users, for now, don’t know.

SAP said it has about 14,000 on-premises HCM customers, with about 80% outside of North America.

SAP believes the S/4HANA HCM migration is best for these users, arguing that the upgrade cost will be offset by the benefits of the in-memory system.

But cloud-based SAP SuccessFactors remains the ultimate HCM upgrade path for its users. This means uncertainty about whether on-premises systems will continue.

“The important thing is that the intention for this is to make life easier for our customers so that they can run their business in the best possible way,” said Amy Wilson, an SAP product manager, in an interview. “It’s not something that we’ve concocted for any other purpose other than this is what our customers are asking for. We care about them, and we empathize with them,” she said.

But there are questions. “Simply extending support for the existing R/3 SAP HCM would probably be very difficult, especially as support has already been extended from 2020 to 2025,” said Paul Cooper, chairman of the U.K. and Ireland SAP User Group, in a statement in response to questions from TechTarget.

“At this stage, it is far enough out for SAP to be encouraging users to move to S/4, rather than extending the deadline further,” Cooper said.

User-group surveys “highlighted that many users have concerns regarding the integration of legacy [SAP HR] and new apps [SuccessFactors] with S/4HANA, so the S/4 HCM announcement does begin to help address this to an extent,” Cooper said.

But Cooper said the announcement also raises issues.

“However, without seeing the product and more information on its scope, it is difficult to judge the complexity of the migration,” Cooper said. “Projects of this nature are time-consuming, resource-hungry and, therefore, they can be disruptive to an organization. The question for a lot of organizations will be, are they prepared to buy and license ‘on-premises’ software that only has a potential life of seven years and won’t be available until 2023?”

Wilson said the upgrade to S/4HANA HCM should be “nondisruptive.”

It’s not something that we’ve concocted for any other purpose other than this is what our customers are asking for.
Amy Wilsonproduct manager at SAP

“In the on-premises world, there’s technical upgrades and then there’s functional upgrades. When you’re talking about a technical upgrade, there is some work to do and some testing and that sort of thing, but it’s more similar to a cloud update,” Wilson said.

SAP’s plan has drawn sharp criticism from Jarret Pazahanick, an SAP HCM consultant who is managing partner of EIC Experts, based in Houston. He also has a large following on his Global SAP and SuccessFactors LinkedIn groups.

Pazahanick said he believes SAP should have extended its support beyond 2025 for its HCM customers.

SAP’s action is “not customer-centric,” Pazahanick said in an email responding to TechTarget questions.

“They are asking loyal maintenance paying customers to wait at least five years [2023] to upgrade to a new SAP HCM on-premises ‘sidecar’ offering and take full ownership of the migration cost and risk associated with that,” Pazahanick said.

There is no native HCM in S/4HANA, hence the “sidecar” meaning. SAP HCM for S/4HANA will run on a separate instance, but tightly integrated with S/4HANA. SAP said it has the tools and services to support this approach.

“All SAP had to do was make an announcement of, ‘We will support SAP HCM and customers until 2030 on their current offering,’ which would have been simple, clear and, ultimately, what some portion of their customer base wants,” Pazahanick said.

Colleges to share Oracle ERP system in effort to cut costs

Three Vermont private colleges plan to share a cloud-based Oracle ERP system. It’s taking cooperation and agreement to change their business practices. But if it’s successful, the colleges expect to save millions in costs.

What Champlain College, Middlebury College and Saint Michael’s College are doing is rare for private institutions. But as more schools seek ways to control back-office costs, this idea may spread.

The three independent, nonprofit colleges did not have a history of working together. But in 2013, they formed the Green Mountain Higher Education Consortium to examine sharing an ERP system.

“Private liberal arts schools and the education that they offer is becoming more and more unaffordable for many students,” said Corinna Noelke, the consortium’s executive director and a doctorate-holding economist who was director of special projects at Middlebury.

The consortium went through a request-for-proposal process and picked Oracle ERP systems. They will use Oracle’s Human Capital Management Cloud, its ERP Cloud and the Enterprise Performance Management Cloud.

“The schools discovered that they could really work together on one software platform, as long as it allowed them to separate the schools efficiently,” Noelke said.

The implementation begins this year. The three colleges are now using Ellucian systems: One is using Banner, and two are using Colleague. Two of the colleges ran the ERP systems on premises, and the third outsourced.

A goal for the three schools was to implement best practices in a SaaS environment and to take advantage of using shared services.

Using best practices “has nothing to do with your culture and nothing to do with your special niche as a school,” Noelke said.

Public colleges have long shared IT platforms

[Using best practices] has nothing to do with your culture and nothing to do with your special niche as a school.
Corinna Noelkeexecutive director, Green Mountain Higher Education Consortium

Public universities have long shared systems across the various campuses, but it’s rare for nonprofit, private colleges to share services, said Kenneth Green, the founding director of The Campus Computing Project, which runs a continuing study of the role of IT in higher education

The Vermont colleges’ effort “is interesting and it is innovative, and it will be carefully watched,” Green said.

Back-office systems collaboration may be a growing trend in higher education. In a separate effort, over 100 smaller colleges recently banded together to collectively negotiate ERP pricing with major vendors.

“Why can’t we leverage our collective voices with you, the vendors, to get better pricing,” said Carol Smith, CIO of DePauw University and president of the board of directors of the Higher Education Systems & Services Consortium (HESS). This effort to negotiate as a group with ERP systems vendors began in 2016.

Most of the HESS Consortium schools have student full-time-equivalent populations of less than 8,000 and some only a few thousand students. But a goal of HESS is to give its members the contract negotiation clout of a large university system.

Transparency on ERP pricing is one goal

HESS is also working to normalize ERP pricing and services between vendors to make it easier for colleges to conduct apples-to-apples comparisons. The schools, some of which previously have gotten little vendor attention, hope that now changes. They are meeting collectively with their respective vendors to discuss their needs.

Instead of negotiating the ERP contracts independently, and then wondering whether they got a good price, Smith said participating HESS colleges will “feel confident” that they got the best consortium price for the ERP system.

The Green Mountain effort takes the idea of ERP collaboration a step further.

The consortium had four ERP candidates: Oracle, Workday, Unit4 and Campus Management.

In its selection, the Oracle ERP system gained the edge with its pricing, functionality and ability to set up a shared environment, Noelke said.

The Oracle ERP system architecture allows you to be in one instance and have three separate and distinct operations for each of the campuses. Employees at their respective schools don’t see information from other colleges unless they want to have a shared service. Each college will have independent user interfaces and data will be separated, but otherwise, they are operating on one platform.

“The architecture is very elegant and is really letting you be separate where you want to be separate, but also to come together where you want to come together,” Noelke said.

Configurations are being discouraged

The introduction of the SaaS platform is requiring the schools to make substantive changes to their business practices. They are holding workshops involving finance and HR and working with implementation firms. The schools may do some processes differently as they shift to a “best practices environment.” They are holding “process reimagine and redesign” workshops facilitated by CampusWorks Inc., and their implementation contractor is Hitachi Consulting for Oracle.

The basic premise is the schools will only customize configurations where needed, and the departments will have to make a business case for it. As soon as you configure differently between the three schools, it makes it harder to update the system, Noelke said.

The implementations will continue through much of the year. They will have to make “a million little decisions every day” with the implementers.

The three colleges expect to pay less with the Oracle ERP system. They have cut licensing costs by about 20% by acting together. The implementation costs are much less, because they are doing it together, Noelke said. This doesn’t account for long-term productivity gains helped by the elimination or reduction of manual, paper-based processes.

Over an eight-year period — fiscal year 2018 through fiscal year 2025 — buying software together and implementing it together at the same time is saving $20 million versus each school buying the software themselves and implementing it themselves, Noelke said.

Education systems require specialized software related to student needs, such as registration, class schedules and financial assistance. Oracle is developing a new student system using the knowledge they have on needs and requirements from the PeopleSoft product. This work is still in development. The consortium is likely to use Oracle’s approach, but will make a final determination once the development work is completed.

The motivation for these joint efforts is clear. At DePauw, Smith said she personally believes these types of collaborations among private schools will expand.

“We’re here to provide an educational experience for our students, so that they can be the best they can be,” Smith said. “I think we have to try to preserve every ounce of resources that we possibly can.”

SDS, HCI and CDP are key to dream enterprise storage system

What better way to start a new year than to plan and build something brand new? My pet project would be an enterprise storage system. (OK, I really had my eye on that do-it-yourself Ferrari Portofino kit, but this is a storage column after all.)

Unfortunately, my extremely limited engineering abilities and all-thumbs hands mean I won’t be able to cobble my dream enterprise storage system together myself. My imagination doesn’t have those limitations, however, so I’ll describe it here. I want my new storage system to do everything and to do it well.

Some of the newer storage techs that have gotten a foot in the data center door over the past few years share a common theme: Storage has been too hard — hard to buy, hard to set up and configure, hard to use and hard to maintain. Easy, the new industry byword, might be a difficult concept for some storage pros to wrap their heads around. However, today, LUNs are shunned and provisioning is no longer a three-day turnaround, but rather a menu pick for end users.

HCI to the max

Nowadays, if you can’t call your storage hyper-converged or software-defined, it’s probably not really storage — at least not in the 21st-century sense. Given that, my custom-built enterprise storage system would be built around a hyper-converged infrastructure architecture, but with a couple of variations on the HCI theme.

My system would integrate the key components that make HCI, well, HCI — storage, servers and networking. But it would have such closely integrated software-defined storage management with software-defined networking and software-defined servers, everything could be throttled up and down and configured and reconfigured on the fly, so storage performance and capacity could be rejiggered as needed. Every component — CPU, memory, network interface card, network, whatever — can be manipulated. That kind of endless flexibility would allow my system to morph into whatever was necessary at any given moment — to make sophisticated decisions like what data to tier, when to tier it and what to tier it to. It will be one big whole software-defined enchilada.

My HCI system will also let servers outside the architecture access its storage resources. That way legacy gear can be part of the new world order as well. And the enterprise storage system will allow you to carve out storage regions that provide custom media configurations based on need. This means the system would accommodate all kinds of media: really fast flash; fairly fast flash; and pokey, cheap and commodious hard drives.

Cloud access would be built in — of course! — to allow access to multiple cloud providers for live, backup or archive data. This would be enabled by a file system that works like an automatic transmission, shifting transparently among protocols — block, NFS, SMB or object — as required by the apps accessing data. Seriously, users shouldn’t have to go under the hood of the storage machine to get that kind of protocol flexibility. It should just happen.

Built-in backup

If you can’t call your storage hyper-converged or software-defined, it’s probably not really storage — at least not in the 21st-century sense.

I’d also add continuous data protection-based backup, which has been languishing too long on the storage sidelines. It’s time for ongoing data protection that backs up data automatically to other storage systems or the cloud or Venus. Wherever it makes the most sense and recovery is easiest, just as long as you don’t have to do anything but point the system in the right direction. While it really doesn’t matter how it gets done, whether it’s via native software or third-party apps, we definitely want to do away with proprietary formats. So we can recover data with other tools or simple copy commands.

Encryption — in flight and at rest — will be the default. And if I can’t incorporate full-fledged security tools, the system will at least alert users when anything doesn’t quite look kosher, such as off-hours access, sudden activity or unexpected access to secondary data.

Storage, manage thyself

This dream enterprise storage system would also support mega-metadata. It’s an amped-up level of metadata that enables data to be smarter than us, or at least more on the ball than we typically are. So the data knows what to do with itself, what level of protection it needs based on its sensitivity or usefulness, how and when it should be tiered, who can read it and copy it, and when it should self-destruct by pressing its own delete button.

And, of course, all of this should have endless scalability to grow to those elusive n numbers of nodes or whatever — storage, servers, network, you name it. Your starter kit might be the size of a Cracker Jack box, but it should be able to expand to Google-ish dimensions using easy, in-place upgrades to ensure you’re always running on the latest technology.

Truth or fiction?

A lot of the stuff described here is actually available, so it’s not all pipe dream stuff. The problem is you’d be hard pressed to find a single product that has it all. The first vendor that gets there will corner the storage market for sure. OK, maybe not the whole market; maybe just me.

For Sale – Netgear 24 Port switches, cat5e cable and wall plates

Hi Guys n Gals,

After a recent change of plan, my networking gear is up for sale.

1. Netgear Prosafe GS724TP 24 Port switch with POE Gigabit ports – £70 inc post
2. Netgear Prosafe gs724t 24 Port switch Gigabit but no POE – £40 inc post
3. Excel cat5e cable, around 295m. 4 Pair UTP LSOH Solid Cable £30 collection only
4. 2 Reels of cat5e 4 Pair UTP LSOH Solid Cable , around 200m on each.(will confirm brands) £40 for the pair collection only.
5. 11 Eurolite Chrome stainless 1gcat 5e faceplates and 10 keystone jacks £30 inc postage.
6. 9 Excel white single gang faceplates with blanking plates £12.50 inc postage.

Would prefer collection from dudley if possible, but I have put some prices inc postage on some of the items

Price and currency: £various
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: bt/ppg
Location: West Midlands
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.