Tag Archives: plays

For Sale – Asus Gaming Laptop

Asus laptop plays games great. +
Comes with original charger only. No box but will be well packed for delivery. Collect in person welcome.

Fully working, spec is

Intel Core i5 7300HQ 7th Gen
8gb DDR4 2400Mhz
128gb SSD and a 1Tb Hard Drive
Geforce GTX 1050 2gb
Full 1920×1080 HD Screen
Keyboard backlit with red LEDs
Windows 10

[​IMG]

Price and currency: 425
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: cash paypal if fees covered
Location: stoke on trent
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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Chief data officer role: Searching for consensus

Big data continues to be a force for change. It plays a part in the ongoing drama of corporate innovation — in some measure, giving birth to the chief data officer role. But consensus on that role is far from set.

The 2018 Big Data Executive Survey of decision-makers at more than 50 blue-chip firms found 63.4% of respondents had a chief data officer (CDO). That is a big uptick since survey participants were asked the same question in 2012, when only 12% had a CDO. But this year’s survey, which was undertaken by business management consulting firm NewVantage Partners, disclosed that the background for a successful CDO varies from organization to organization, according to Randy Bean, CEO and founder of NewVantage, based in Boston.

For many, the CDO is likely to be an external change agent. For almost as many, the CDO may be a long-trusted company hand. The best CDO background could be that of a data scientist, line executive or, for that matter, a technology executive, according to Bean.

In a Q&A, Bean delved into the chief data role as he was preparing to lead a session on the topic at the annual MIT Chief Data Officer and Information Quality Symposium in Cambridge, Mass. A takeaway: Whatever it may be called, the chief data officer role is central to many attempts to gain business advantage from key emerging technologies. 

Do we have a consensus on the chief data officer role? What have been the drivers?

Randy Bean: One principal driver in the emergence of the chief data officer role has been the growth of data.

Randy Bean, CEO, NewVantage PartnersRandy Bean

For about a decade now, we have been into what has been characterized as the era of big data. Data continues to proliferate. But enterprises typically haven’t been organized around managing data as a business asset.

Additionally, there has been a greater threat posed to traditional incumbent organizations from agile data-driven competitors — the Amazons, the Googles, the Facebooks.

Organizations need to come to terms with how they think about data and, from an organization perspective, to try to come up with an organizational structure and decide who would be a point person for data-related initiatives. That could be the chief data officer.

Another driver for the chief data officer role, you’ve noted, was the financial crisis of 2008.

Bean: Yes, the failures of the financial markets in 2008-2009, to a significant degree, were a data issue. Organizations couldn’t trace the lineage of the various financial products and services they offered. Out of that came an acute level of regulatory pressure to understand data in the context of systemic risk.

Banks were under pressure to identify a single person to regulators to address questions about data’s lineage and quality. As a result, banks took the lead in naming chief data officers. Now, we are into a third or fourth generation in some of these large banks in terms of how they view the mandate of that role.

Isn’t that type of regulatory driver somewhat spurred by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which recently went into effect? Also, for factors defining the CDO role, NewVantage Partners’ survey highlights concerns organizations have about being surpassed by younger, data-driven upstarts. What is going on there?

Bean: GDPR is just the latest of many previous manifestations of this. There have been the Dodd-Frank regulations, the various Basel reporting requirements and all the additional regulatory requirements that go along with classifying banks as ‘too large to fail.’

That is a defensive driver, as opposed to the offensive and innovation drivers that are behind the chief data officer role. On the offensive side, the chief data officer is about how your organization can be more data-driven, how you can change its culture and innovate. Still, as our recent survey finds, there is defensive aspect, even there. Increasingly, organizations perceive threat coming from all kinds of agile, data-driven competitors.

Organizations need to come to terms with how they think about data and, from an organization perspective, to try to come up with an organizational structure and decide who would be a point person for data-related initiatives. That could be the chief data officer.
Randy BeanCEO and founder, NewVantage

You have written that big data and AI are on a continuum. That may be worthwhile to emphasize, as so much attention turns to artificial intelligence these days.

Bean: A key point is that big data has really empowered artificial intelligence.

AI has been around for decades. One of the reasons why it hasn’t gained traction is, in its aspects as a learning mechanism, it requires large volumes of data. In the past, data was only available in subsets or samples or in very limited quantities, and the corresponding learning on the part of the AI was slow and constrained.

Now, with the massive proliferation of data and new sources — in addition to transactional information, you also now have sensor data, locational data, pictures, images and so on — that has led to the breakthrough in AI in recent years. Big data provides the data that is needed to train the AI learning algorithms.

So, it is pretty safe to say there is no meaningful artificial intelligence without good data — without an ample supply of big data.

And it seems to some of us, on this continuum, you still need human judgment.

Bean: I am a huge believer in the human element. Data can help provide a foundation for informed decision-making, but ultimately it’s the combination of human experience, human judgment and the data. If you don’t have good data, that can hamper your ability to come to the right conclusion. Just having the data doesn’t lead you to the answer.

One thing I’d say is, just because there are massive amounts of data, it hasn’t made individuals or companies any wiser in and of itself. It’s just one element that can be useful in decision-making, but you definitely need human judgment in that equation, as well.

i7-4790 PC, looking for laptop

Before i sell it i thought i’d try for a trade.

I bought this PC for gaming and design work, it plays games fine, latest one i played was farcy 5, all on ultra and it played lovely (i don’t know much about gaming pcs etc, so don’t really know if that is a good stat or not )

Works great for my design work but it’s not used much and a second laptop would be more useful.

Specs are

Motherboard – Gigabyte GA-B85-HD3
CPU – Intel Core i7-4790, 3800 MHz
GPU Video – nVIDIA GeForce GTX 970
16GB…

i7-4790 PC, looking for laptop

Teens play an active role in their own online safety, new Microsoft research shows – Microsoft on the Issues

It’s fundamental that each of us plays a critical role in our own online safety, and young people and teens are no exception. Adults could take a cue from teens in this area, however, as teenagers are more likely to act in response to online risk, defend others and ask for help, according to preliminary results of a new Microsoft study.

Nine in 10 teens polled said they acted in response to an online risk; nearly two-thirds (65 percent) said they stood up for others in the digital space, and more than three quarters (77 percent) asked for help when they encountered online abuse. That compares to 84 percent of adults who acted in response to an online risk, 59 percent who defended someone else and 60 percent who asked for help. Teens outpaced adults across all three categories. In addition, 56 percent of teens said they knew where to go for help with an uncomfortable online situation, compared to just one-third of adults.

Microsoft study expands research launched last year
The findings are from Microsoft’s latest research on digital civility — encouraging safer and healthier online interactions. The study, “Civility, Safety and Interaction Online — 2017,” polled teens ages 13-17 and adults ages 18-74 in 23 countries. This year’s results build on a study done last year that surveyed the same age groups in 14 countries. In 2017, there were 11,584 teens and adults polled in total.

Indeed, it’s up to young people – with solid guidance from parents, teachers, technology companies and others – to understand their digital rights and responsibilities, to recognize the risks and benefits of their online communications and transactions, and to realize the personal and ethical implications of their online behavior. These are some of the reasons Microsoft organized its pilot Council for Digital Good this year.

Council for Digital Good members want to improve life online for all
Last month, we welcomed to Microsoft’s Redmond, Washington, campus 15 teens from across the U.S., selected to explore the state of digital civility and how to foster a kinder, more respectful and empathetic web.

Council members have embraced their assignments and dove into how to go about making changes for the better when it comes to online life. In addition to drafting individual written manifestos for responsible online behavior, the teens created artistic representations of their manifestos after they returned home. We’ve received two rap songs, one video of an interpretative dance, several visual arts projects, animations and other imaginative creations.

Here is a photo of an artistic manifesto from Erin, a 15-year-old from Michigan, as well as a link to a video produced by 16-year-old Rees from Maryland. We’ll make other council members’ projects available on our website and other online properties soon.

Council for Digital Good teen artwork
Erin’s manifesto artwork.
Student video screenshot saying
A screenshot from Rees’ manifesto video.

And, teen council members were in demand before they even arrived on campus for the two-day August summit. We let nongovernmental organizations and other partner groups know that we were forming the council, and that it would be in operation for about 12 months. Several NGOs expressed interest in tapping our teens for their thoughts and perspectives about various campaigns and other work that their groups were planning.

New Thorn PSA aims to raise awareness of ‘sextortion’
One such organization was Thorn, which asked for teen council members’ feedback on a public service announcement (PSA) it was developing about “sextortion.”

Sextortion takes place when someone threatens to distribute private and sensitive material if a victim fails to provide money, or images of a sexual nature or sexual favors. (The perpetrator may also threaten to harm a victim’s friends or family members by using information obtained from the victim’s electronic devices unless the victim complies with the abuser’s demands.)

Thorn wants to make teens aware of common tactics used in sextortion, to destigmatize the issue by raising awareness, and to promote open conversations with trusted adults so teens have a stronger safety net in place if something goes wrong. Thorn held an online focus group with our teens in late July, just days before council members arrived for the Council for Digital Good summit.

Thorn’s new PSA launched Tuesday, and Microsoft is helping to draw attention to this clever and informative resource that benefited from the teens’ input. Council members liked the approach and imagery, saying that the cat video animation made it easier to broach a sensitive subject. While still in development, the teens said the PSA was a resource they would promote on social media and share with their friends. We congratulate Thorn on the new video, and look forward to hearing of many tens of thousands of views and “likes.”

Materials like the new Thorn PSA are essential to generate interest among teens and young people to safeguard their online reputations and to help instill safer online habits and practices. For more about Thorn’s mission, visit the Thorn website.

To learn more about online safety, Microsoft’s Council for Digital Good and digital civility, visit Microsoft’s website, review our resources, “like” us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

[1] Countries surveyed: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Russia, South Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States and Vietnam.

Tags: Council for Digital Good, Online Safety

Microsoft establishes Quantum Centre at the University of Copenhagen – University of Copenhagen

06 September 2017

Partnership

The University of Copenhagen plays a central role in an ambitious Microsoft multi-million dollar investment.
Today, the tech company and the University signed a long-term collaboration agreement on the development of a general-purpose, scalable quantum computer. This is a project which opens up tremendous new opportunities for science and technology.

The Niels Bohr Institute’s Centre for Quantum Devices (Qdev), headed by Professor Charles Marcus, will be pivotal in the collaboration between Microsoft and the University of Copenhagen.

The Niels Bohr Institute’s Centre for Quantum Devices (Qdev), headed by Professor Charles Marcus, will be pivotal in the collaboration between Microsoft and the University of Copenhagen.

By virtue of a new collaboration agreement with the University of Copenhagen, Microsoft is intensifying its investment at the Niels Bohr Institute. Microsoft employees will be working closely with the Institute’s researchers to develop and build the world’s first general-purpose, scalable quantum computer. The task for the Microsoft employees is to turn knowledge gained from research into tangible reality. The announcement of this deepened partnership, which includes the expansion of facilities at the University’s North Campus, will further establish Niels Bohr’s Copenhagen as a global epicentre for quantum mechanics in perfect alignment with the vision of Greater Copenhagen as a global hub for science and innovation.

“The University of Copenhagen’s quantum research contributes to placing Danish research at the very top, which was evidenced today by the IT giant, Microsoft, expanding its investment in a Quantum development centre in Denmark. It’s a perfect example of how a university can create value in collaboration with the business sector from all over the world,” says the Danish Minister for Higher Education and Science, Søren Pind.

Basic research and business meet

For Thomas Bjørnholm, Prorector for Research and Innovation at the University of Copenhagen, today’s multi-year agreement with Microsoft is the culmination of a sustained and extremely focused research partnership within quantum technology.

“When a company such as Microsoft chooses to situate and invest heavily into a research development center at the University of Copenhagen, it’s because we’ve had a significant focus on building up one of the world’s leading quantum research environments. We’re very proud of this and are confident that it will reinforce a strengthened perception of Denmark as an attractive destination for international investments,” the Prorector says.

It started with Bohr

The Niels Bohr Institute’s Centre for Quantum Devices (Qdev), headed by Professor Charles Marcus, will be pivotal in the collaboration between Microsoft and the University of Copenhagen. The research at the Institute draws on Niels Bohr’s own research into quantum physics and is amplified by Microsoft’s investment in state-of-the-art laboratories and specialized Quantum equipment and tools at the University of Copenhagen over the coming years. This, in turn, makes the University of Copenhagen and Denmark an increasingly attractive destination for global Quantum talent.

“The critical pillars for successful and productive Quantum research already exist at the University of Copenhagen – an aligned vision between Microsoft and the University, an exceptional team of top Quantum researchers, a broad and deep pool of post doctorate and student talent, and a solid baseline of facilities and equipment dedicated to Quantum research. We look forward to harnessing this to make impressive advancements in the research and development of a useful, scalable quantum computer capable of transforming the global economy and solving the world’s hardest problems,” says David Pritchard, Chief of Staff for the Artificial Intelligence and Research division at Microsoft.

One of four centres

Together with the effort and activities across Qdev and Microsoft, the other quantum research centres at the University of Copenhagen, including the Centre for Quantum Optics (Quantop), the Centre for Quantum Photonics, the Villum Centre for the Mathematics of Quantum Theory (Qmath) and the Quantum Innovation Centre (QuBiz), will augment the open Quantum research that the University will generate, further propelling the University into the global Quantum spotlight.

In addition to establishing ‘Station Q Copenhagen’ via this new chapter of Microsoft and the University’s partnership, Microsoft has also established partnerships with universities in the Netherlands, Australia and the United States. Station Q Copenhagen is one of only four prestigious experimental Station Q sites in the world, alongside Purdue University, Delft University of Technology, and the University of Sydney.

Computers based on quantum technology have the potential to solve and execute complex mathematical calculations much faster than any existing computer built with ordinary bits. Bits that are based on quantum particles, known as qubits, will –when stabilised and integrated into a computer– generate unprecedented performance. This will translate into the ability to create significant opportunities and tackle pressing challenges like global warming, material and drug design, IT security and encryption, and more.

Main points of the collaboration agreement

• Microsoft is establishing state-of-the-art Microsoft research and development laboratories at the University of Copenhagen North campus in close proximity to the Niels Bohr Institute.

• Presently, over a dozen Microsoft employees ranging from engineers to developers are situated at the University of Copenhagen. Over the course of the new long-term agreement, the size of this team will grow, partnered with University personnel in the development of a topological quantum computer.

• In addition to the multi-million dollar investment in state-of-the-art facilities and equipment, Microsoft is also committing to significant quantum research funding at the University of Copenhagen.

• The collaboration between the University of Copenhagen and Microsoft will be based at the Centre for Quantum Devices (Qdev) and helmed by Professor Charles Marcus. Charles Marcus is Microsoft’s Scientific Director of Station Q Copenhagen.

• An agreement capturing the elements of the collaboration has been signed covering the license rights to Microsoft and the University of Copenhagen. The agreement reflects the interests of the parties and takes into account applicable legislation and guidelines in this area.

The collaboration between the University of Copenhagen and Microsoft is a landmark example of the science and research made capable by joining public and private interests. Together, via this new phase of the partnership, the team is poised to make critical strides in topological quantum computing in furtherance of the quantum economy – locally and globally.

Contact

Prorector for Research and Innovation Thomas Bjørnholm tel.: + 45 28 75 18 35

Communications adviser Christian Hedegaard tel.: + 45 31 14 87 82



For Sale – Gaming HTPC

This PC is in fantastic condition and only a few months old! A great gaming rig that plays pretty much everything in ultra settings at 1080p – 60fps. Performances is buttery smooth with titles like Overwatch, (Modded) Minecraft, Forza Horizon 3, Rocket League and Planet Coaster… it also breezes though everyday tasks like browsing the web, watching movies or streaming.

Here’s the specifications:

Microsoft Windows 10 Home
Corsair Carbide Air 240 MATX + 3 Corsair SP120 Fans
Corsair RM650x Modular PSU
Intel Pentium G4560 Kaby Lake Processor
ASUS Prime B250M-Plus Motherboard
Crucial Ballistix Sport LT 8GB DDR4/2400
Zotac NVidia GeForce 1050GTX Ti 4GB GDDR5
Seagate Barracuda 1TB SATA3 Hard Disk
TP-Link Archer T9E AC1900 Dual Band WiFi

PC is boxed with protective films on the window ready to be delivered or collected.

No offers to buy components!
No time wasters!
Open to reasonable offers!
Any questions about this PC don’t hesitate to ask!

IMG_20170812_112500.jpg

IMG_20170812_112522.jpg

Price and currency: £425
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Newport
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.