Tag Archives: problem

For Sale – £1199 – 15 Inch MacBook Pro (2017) [i7 2.9GHz, RX 560, 512GB, AppleCare + extras!]

Hi Richard, no problem at all – happy to answer any questions

@OldG Nitro

Why was the MacBook originally sent back to Apple for repair (when the damage to the screen was done etc) & has it ever been sent back to them other than that time?

I turned on the laptop one time and one of the speakers fuzzed and just blew. Bit of an out of the ordinary issue, but I took it back to Apple to fix. They replaced what’s known as the top cover (keyboard, trackpad, battery, speakers and IO ports), but in the process damaged the display and the headphone jack. I then returned the laptop, where they replaced the display and top cover again, but this didn’t resolve the problem with the headphone jack, so in the end they replaced the logic board (CPU, GPU, RAM, SSD and controllers for IO devices). Essentially, everything inside this laptop has been replaced at some point.​

Have you had any other issues with it?

Other than the above problems, nothing​

Are there any issues with the screen, dead pixels etc?

None from what I can see – there may be the odd hairline scratch that you can pick up in specific lighting conditions, but this would be because I clean the display fairly regularly.​

Any problems with the keyboard (from what I’ve seen a known issue)?

I haven’t personally experienced any, but as I’ve mentioned, this laptop didn’t get much use as I’ve got a desktop for when I’m home, and work provided me with a 15 inch pro.​

Is the AppleCare transferable to a new owner?

From memory, it acts like an extended version of the original warranty, and is tied to the serial number of the machine. However, should anything go wrong, I’d be more than happy to help out with any problems.​

I forgot to add, can you please take a couple of close up photos of the 2 tiny marks you pointed out on the case?

I’ll get a couple of photos taken as soon as possible for you ​

A couple of other closing thoughts: I now use a Surface Book for all of my university work (I’m able to take notes in class without hoarding tonnes of paper handouts), and by far, the more premium machine is the MacBook. If I could afford to keep both, I absolutely would. The only reason I use the Surface device at the moment is because of the ability to annotate my lecture handouts, of which I have a lot. In every other sense, the MacBook is a better device.
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For Sale – £1199 – 15 Inch MacBook Pro (2017) [i7 2.9GHz, RX 560, 512GB, AppleCare + extras!]

Hi Richard, no problem at all – happy to answer any questions

@OldG Nitro

Why was the MacBook originally sent back to Apple for repair (when the damage to the screen was done etc) & has it ever been sent back to them other than that time?

I turned on the laptop one time and one of the speakers fuzzed and just blew. Bit of an out of the ordinary issue, but I took it back to Apple to fix. They replaced what’s known as the top cover (keyboard, trackpad, battery, speakers and IO ports), but in the process damaged the display and the headphone jack. I then returned the laptop, where they replaced the display and top cover again, but this didn’t resolve the problem with the headphone jack, so in the end they replaced the logic board (CPU, GPU, RAM, SSD and controllers for IO devices). Essentially, everything inside this laptop has been replaced at some point.​

Have you had any other issues with it?

Other than the above problems, nothing​

Are there any issues with the screen, dead pixels etc?

None from what I can see – there may be the odd hairline scratch that you can pick up in specific lighting conditions, but this would be because I clean the display fairly regularly.​

Any problems with the keyboard (from what I’ve seen a known issue)?

I haven’t personally experienced any, but as I’ve mentioned, this laptop didn’t get much use as I’ve got a desktop for when I’m home, and work provided me with a 15 inch pro.​

Is the AppleCare transferable to a new owner?

From memory, it acts like an extended version of the original warranty, and is tied to the serial number of the machine. However, should anything go wrong, I’d be more than happy to help out with any problems.​

I forgot to add, can you please take a couple of close up photos of the 2 tiny marks you pointed out on the case?

I’ll get a couple of photos taken as soon as possible for you ​

A couple of other closing thoughts: I now use a Surface Book for all of my university work (I’m able to take notes in class without hoarding tonnes of paper handouts), and by far, the more premium machine is the MacBook. If I could afford to keep both, I absolutely would. The only reason I use the Surface device at the moment is because of the ability to annotate my lecture handouts, of which I have a lot. In every other sense, the MacBook is a better device.
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Author:

For Sale – £1299 – 15 Inch MacBook Pro (2017) [i7 2.9GHz, RX 560, 512GB, AppleCare + extras!]

Hi Richard, no problem at all – happy to answer any questions

@OldG Nitro

Why was the MacBook originally sent back to Apple for repair (when the damage to the screen was done etc) & has it ever been sent back to them other than that time?

I turned on the laptop one time and one of the speakers fuzzed and just blew. Bit of an out of the ordinary issue, but I took it back to Apple to fix. They replaced what’s known as the top cover (keyboard, trackpad, battery, speakers and IO ports), but in the process damaged the display and the headphone jack. I then returned the laptop, where they replaced the display and top cover again, but this didn’t resolve the problem with the headphone jack, so in the end they replaced the logic board (CPU, GPU, RAM, SSD and controllers for IO devices). Essentially, everything inside this laptop has been replaced at some point.​

Have you had any other issues with it?

Other than the above problems, nothing​

Are there any issues with the screen, dead pixels etc?

None from what I can see – there may be the odd hairline scratch that you can pick up in specific lighting conditions, but this would be because I clean the display fairly regularly.​

Any problems with the keyboard (from what I’ve seen a known issue)?

I haven’t personally experienced any, but as I’ve mentioned, this laptop didn’t get much use as I’ve got a desktop for when I’m home, and work provided me with a 15 inch pro.​

Is the AppleCare transferable to a new owner?

From memory, it acts like an extended version of the original warranty, and is tied to the serial number of the machine. However, should anything go wrong, I’d be more than happy to help out with any problems.​

I forgot to add, can you please take a couple of close up photos of the 2 tiny marks you pointed out on the case?

I’ll get a couple of photos taken as soon as possible for you ​

A couple of other closing thoughts: I now use a Surface Book for all of my university work (I’m able to take notes in class without hoarding tonnes of paper handouts), and by far, the more premium machine is the MacBook. If I could afford to keep both, I absolutely would. The only reason I use the Surface device at the moment is because of the ability to annotate my lecture handouts, of which I have a lot. In every other sense, the MacBook is a better device.
Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – 15 Inch MacBook Pro (2017) [i7 2.9GHz, RX 560, 512GB, AppleCare + extras!]

Hi Richard, no problem at all – happy to answer any questions

@OldG Nitro

Why was the MacBook originally sent back to Apple for repair (when the damage to the screen was done etc) & has it ever been sent back to them other than that time?

I turned on the laptop one time and one of the speakers fuzzed and just blew. Bit of an out of the ordinary issue, but I took it back to Apple to fix. They replaced what’s known as the top cover (keyboard, trackpad, battery, speakers and IO ports), but in the process damaged the display and the headphone jack. I then returned the laptop, where they replaced the display and top cover again, but this didn’t resolve the problem with the headphone jack, so in the end they replaced the logic board (CPU, GPU, RAM, SSD and controllers for IO devices). Essentially, everything inside this laptop has been replaced at some point.​

Have you had any other issues with it?

Other than the above problems, nothing​

Are there any issues with the screen, dead pixels etc?

None from what I can see – there may be the odd hairline scratch that you can pick up in specific lighting conditions, but this would be because I clean the display fairly regularly.​

Any problems with the keyboard (from what I’ve seen a known issue)?

I haven’t personally experienced any, but as I’ve mentioned, this laptop didn’t get much use as I’ve got a desktop for when I’m home, and work provided me with a 15 inch pro.​

Is the AppleCare transferable to a new owner?

From memory, it acts like an extended version of the original warranty, and is tied to the serial number of the machine. However, should anything go wrong, I’d be more than happy to help out with any problems.​

I forgot to add, can you please take a couple of close up photos of the 2 tiny marks you pointed out on the case?

I’ll get a couple of photos taken as soon as possible for you ​

A couple of other closing thoughts: I now use a Surface Book for all of my university work (I’m able to take notes in class without hoarding tonnes of paper handouts), and by far, the more premium machine is the MacBook. If I could afford to keep both, I absolutely would. The only reason I use the Surface device at the moment is because of the ability to annotate my lecture handouts, of which I have a lot. In every other sense, the MacBook is a better device.
Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – 15 Inch MacBook Pro (2017) [Fully Specced – 512GB]

Hi Richard, no problem at all – happy to answer any questions

@OldG Nitro

Why was the MacBook originally sent back to Apple for repair (when the damage to the screen was done etc) & has it ever been sent back to them other than that time?

I turned on the laptop one time and one of the speakers fuzzed and just blew. Bit of an out of the ordinary issue, but I took it back to Apple to fix. They replaced what’s known as the top cover (keyboard, trackpad, battery, speakers and IO ports), but in the process damaged the display and the headphone jack. I then returned the laptop, where they replaced the display and top cover again, but this didn’t resolve the problem with the headphone jack, so in the end they replaced the logic board (CPU, GPU, RAM, SSD and controllers for IO devices). Essentially, everything inside this laptop has been replaced at some point.​

Have you had any other issues with it?

Other than the above problems, nothing​

Are there any issues with the screen, dead pixels etc?

None from what I can see – there may be the odd hairline scratch that you can pick up in specific lighting conditions, but this would be because I clean the display fairly regularly.​

Any problems with the keyboard (from what I’ve seen a known issue)?

I haven’t personally experienced any, but as I’ve mentioned, this laptop didn’t get much use as I’ve got a desktop for when I’m home, and work provided me with a 15 inch pro.​

Is the AppleCare transferable to a new owner?

From memory, it acts like an extended version of the original warranty, and is tied to the serial number of the machine. However, should anything go wrong, I’d be more than happy to help out with any problems.​

I forgot to add, can you please take a couple of close up photos of the 2 tiny marks you pointed out on the case?

I’ll get a couple of photos taken as soon as possible for you ​

A couple of other closing thoughts: I now use a Surface Book for all of my university work (I’m able to take notes in class without hoarding tonnes of paper handouts), and by far, the more premium machine is the MacBook. If I could afford to keep both, I absolutely would. The only reason I use the Surface device at the moment is because of the ability to annotate my lecture handouts, of which I have a lot. In every other sense, the MacBook is a better device.
Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – 15 Inch MacBook Pro (2017) [Fully Specced – 512GB]

Hi Richard, no problem at all – happy to answer any questions

@OldG Nitro

Why was the MacBook originally sent back to Apple for repair (when the damage to the screen was done etc) & has it ever been sent back to them other than that time?

I turned on the laptop one time and one of the speakers fuzzed and just blew. Bit of an out of the ordinary issue, but I took it back to Apple to fix. They replaced what’s known as the top cover (keyboard, trackpad, battery, speakers and IO ports), but in the process damaged the display and the headphone jack. I then returned the laptop, where they replaced the display and top cover again, but this didn’t resolve the problem with the headphone jack, so in the end they replaced the logic board (CPU, GPU, RAM, SSD and controllers for IO devices). Essentially, everything inside this laptop has been replaced at some point.​

Have you had any other issues with it?

Other than the above problems, nothing​

Are there any issues with the screen, dead pixels etc?

None from what I can see – there may be the odd hairline scratch that you can pick up in specific lighting conditions, but this would be because I clean the display fairly regularly.​

Any problems with the keyboard (from what I’ve seen a known issue)?

I haven’t personally experienced any, but as I’ve mentioned, this laptop didn’t get much use as I’ve got a desktop for when I’m home, and work provided me with a 15 inch pro.​

Is the AppleCare transferable to a new owner?

From memory, it acts like an extended version of the original warranty, and is tied to the serial number of the machine. However, should anything go wrong, I’d be more than happy to help out with any problems.​

I forgot to add, can you please take a couple of close up photos of the 2 tiny marks you pointed out on the case?

I’ll get a couple of photos taken as soon as possible for you ​

A couple of other closing thoughts: I now use a Surface Book for all of my university work (I’m able to take notes in class without hoarding tonnes of paper handouts), and by far, the more premium machine is the MacBook. If I could afford to keep both, I absolutely would. The only reason I use the Surface device at the moment is because of the ability to annotate my lecture handouts, of which I have a lot. In every other sense, the MacBook is a better device.
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Author:

How Microsoft re-envisioned the data warehouse with Azure Synapse Analytics

About four years ago, the Microsoft Azure team began to notice a big problem troubling many of its customers. A mass migration to the cloud was in full swing, as enterprises signed up by the thousands to reap the benefits of flexible, largescale computing and data storage. But the next iteration of that tech revolution, in which companies would use their growing stores of data to get more tangible business benefits, had stalled.

Technology providers, including Microsoft, have built a variety of systems to collect, retrieve and analyze enormous troves of information that would uncover market trends and insights, paving the way toward a new era of improved customer service, innovation and efficiency.

But those systems were built independently by different engineering teams and sold as individual products and services. They weren’t designed to connect with one another, and customers would have to learn how to operate them separately, wasting time, money and precious IT talent.

“Instead of trying to add more features to each of our services, we decided to take a step back and figure out how to bring their core capabilities together to make it easy for customers to collect and analyze all of their increasingly diverse data, to break down data silos and work together more collaboratively,” said Raghu Ramakrishnan, Microsoft’s chief technology officer for data.

At its Ignite conference this week in Orlando, Florida, Microsoft announced the end result of a yearslong effort to address the problem: Azure Synapse Analytics, a new service that merges the capabilities of Azure SQL Data Warehouse with new enhancements such as on-demand query as a service.

Microsoft said this new offering will help customers put their data to work much more quickly, productively and securely by pulling together insights from all data sources, data warehouses and big data analytics systems. And, the company said, with deeper integration between Power BI and Azure Machine Learning, Azure Synapse Analytics can reduce the time required to process and share that data, speeding up the insights that businesses can glean.

What’s more, it will allow many more businesses to take advantage of game-changing technologies like data analytics and artificial intelligence, which are helping scientists to better predict the weather, search engines to better understand people’s intent and workers to more easily handle mundane tasks.

This newest effort to break down data silos also builds on other Microsoft projects, such as the Open Data Initiative and Azure Data Share, which allows you to share data from multiple sources and even other organizations.

Microsoft said Azure Synapse Analytics is also designed to support the increasingly popular DevOps strategy, in which development and operations staff collaborate more closely to create and implement services that work better throughout their lifecycles.

YouTube Video

A learning process

Azure Synapse Analytics is the result of a lot of work, and a little trial and error.

At first, Ramakrishnan said, the team developed highlevel guidelines showing customers how to glue the systems together themselves. But they quickly realized that was too much to ask.

“That required a lot of expertise in the nitty gritty of our platforms,” Ramakrishnan said. Customers made it overwhelmingly clear that we needed to do better.”

So, the company went back to the drawing board and spent an additional two years revamping the heart of its data business, Azure SQL Data Warehouse, which lets customers build, test, deploy and manage applications and services in the cloud.

A breakthrough came when the company realized that customers need to analyze all their data in a single service, without having to copy terabytes of information across various systems to use different analytic capabilities – as has traditionally been the case with data warehouses and data lakes.

With the new offering, customers can use their data analytics engine of choice, such as Apache Spark or SQL, on all their data. That’s true whether it’s structured data, such as rows of numbers on spreadsheets, or unstructured data, such as a collection of social media posts.

This project was risky. It involved deep technical surgery: completely rewriting the guts of the SQL query processing engine to optimize it for the cloud and make it capable of instantly handling big bursts of work as well as very large and diverse datasets.

It also required unprecedented integration among several teams within Microsoft, some of whom would have to make hard choices. Established plans had to be scrapped. Resources earmarked for new features would be redirected to help make the entire system work better.

“In the beginning, the conversations were often heated. But as we got into the flow of it, they became easier. We began to come together,” Ramakrishnan said.

Microsoft also had to make sure that the product would work for any company, regardless of employees’ technical expertise.

“Most companies can’t afford to hire teams of 20 people to drive data projects and wire together multiple systems. There aren’t even enough skilled people out there to do all that work,” said Daniel Yu, director of product marketing for Azure Data and Artificial Intelligence.

Making it easy for customers

Customers can bring together various sources of data into a single feed with Azure Synapse Analytics Studio, a console – or single pane of glass that will allow a business professional with minimal technical expertise to locate and collect data from multiple sources like sales, supply chain, finance and product development. They can then choose how and where to store that data, and they can use it to create reports through Microsoft’s popular Power BI analytics service.

In a matter of hours, Azure Synapse will deliver useful business insights that used to take days or even weeks and months, said Rohan Kumar, corporate vice president for Azure Data.

“Let’s say an executive wants a detailed report on sales performance in the eastern U.S. over the last six months,” Kumar said. Today, a data engineer has to do a lot of work to find where that data is stored and write a lot of brittle code to tie various services together. They might even have to bring in a systems integrator partner. With Azure Synapse, there’s no code required. It’s a much more intuitive experience.”

The complexity of the technical problems Azure Synapse addressed would be hard to overstate. Microsoft had to meld multiple independent components into one coherent form factor, while giving a wide range of people – from data scientists to line of business owners – their preferred tools for accessing and using data.


With Azure Synapse, there’s no code required. It’s a much more intuitive experience.”

~ Rohan Kumar, corporate vice president for Azure Data


That includes products like SQL Server, the open source programming interface Apache Spark, Azure Data Factory and Azure Data Studio, as well as notebook interfaces preferred by many data professionals to clean and model data.

“Getting all those capabilities to come together fluidly, making it run faster, simpler, eliminating overlapping processes – there was some scary good stuff getting done,” Ramakrishnan said.

The result is a data analytics system that will be as easy to use as a modern mobile phone. Just as the smartphone replaced several devices by making all of their core capabilities intuitively accessible in a single device, the Azure Synapse “smartphone for data” now allows a data engineer to build an entire end-to-end data pipeline in one place. It also enables data scientists and analysts to look at the underlying data in ways that are natural to them.

And just as the phone has driven waves of collaboration and business innovation, Azure Synapse will free up individuals and companies to introduce new products and services as quickly as they can dream them up, Microsoft said.

“If we can help different people view data through a lens that is natural to them, while it’s also visible to others in ways natural to them, then we will transform the way companies work,” Ramakrishnan said. That’s how we should measure our success.

Top photo: Rohan Kumar, corporate vice president for Azure Data, says Azure Synapse will deliver useful business insights that used to take days or even weeks and months. Photo by Scott Eklund/Red Box Pictures.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

HR execs and politicians eye student debt relief

Student debt relief is not only an election issue in the 2020 race for president, but a problem for HR managers. Some firms, including a hospital in New York, are doing something about it.

Montefiore St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital began offering a student loan relief program this year for its non-union employees. It employs 1,500 people and provides employees 32 vacation days a year.

Most employees don’t take all that time off, said Dan Bengyak, vice president of administrative services at the not-for-profit medical center with hospitals in Newburgh and Cornwall. He oversees HR, IT and other administrative operations.

In February, the hospital detailed its plan to apply paid time off to student debt relief. Employees in the Parents Plus Loan program had the option as well. The hospital set two sign-up windows, the first in May. Forty employees signed up. The next window is in November.

The program “has been extremely well received and it definitely has offered us a real competitive advantage in the recruiting world,” Bengyak said. He believes it will help with retention as well.

The maximum employee contribution for student debt relief is $5,000. The hospital also provides tuition help. This combination “offers significant financial assistance,” to employees seeking advanced degrees, Bengyak said.

A SaaS platform handles payments

The hospital uses Tuition.io, a startup founded in 2013 and based in Santa Monica, Calif. The platform manages all of the payments to the loan services. Its users pay a lump sum to cover the cost of the assistance. The employer doesn’t know the amount of the employee’s debt. The platform notifies the employee when a payment is posted.

It definitely has offered us a real competitive advantage in the recruiting world.
Dan BengyakVP of administrative services, Montefiore St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital

Payments can be made as a monthly contribution, a lump sum on an employment anniversary or other methods, according to Scott Thompson, CEO at Tuition.io.

Tuition.io also analyzes repayment data, which can show the program’s retention impact, according to Thompson.

“Those individuals who are participating in this benefit stay longer with the employer — they just do,” he said. 

About one in five students has over $100,000 in debt and is, by definition, broke, Thompson said. They can’t afford an employer’s 401K program or buy a house. Employees with a burdensome loan “are always looking for a new job that pays you more money because you simply have to,” he said.

Legislation in pipeline

The amount of student loan debt is in excess of $1.5 trillion and exceeds credit card and auto debt combined, said Robert Keach, a past president at the American Bankruptcy Institute, in testimony at a recent U.S. House Judiciary Committee hearing on bankruptcy. More than a quarter of borrowers are in delinquency or default, he said. Student loan debt is expected to exceed $2 trillion by 2022.

“High levels of post-secondary education debt correlate with lower earnings, lower rates of home ownership, fewer automobile purchases, higher household financial distress, and delayed marriage and family formation, among other ripple effects,” Keach said.

Congress is considering legislation that may make it easier for firms to help employees with debt. One example is the Employer Participation in Repayment Act, a bill that has bipartisan support in both chambers. It would enable employers to give up to $5,250 annually per employee, tax free.

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Troubleshoot common VM live migration errors

Problem solve
Get help with specific problems with your technologies, process and projects.

VM live migration errors in Hyper-V include connection issues, virtual switch mismatches and incompatible hardware. Learn more about these common errors and how to resolve them.


Although there are many things that can cause VM live migrations to fail, there are some issues that are especially…

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$(“.errorMessageInput”).each(function() {
if ($(this).hasClass(“hidden”)) {
$(this).removeClass(“errorMessageInput hidden”).addClass(“sign-up-error-msg hidden”);
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$(this).removeClass(“errorMessageInput”).addClass(“sign-up-error-msg”);
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common. Some of the more prevalent VM live migration issues include failed attempts to connect to the destination server, unsupported protocol versions, virtual switch mismatches and incompatible hardware.

One of the more common issues that occurs during a VM live migration involves an error message popping up when you attempt to connect to the destination host. An example of this error is shown in Figure A.

Hyper-V error
Figure A. Hyper-V displays an error saying it couldn’t connect to the destination server.

The error message cautions you to make sure the Windows Remote Management (WinRM) port is open on the destination host. WinRM uses port 5985 (HTTP) and port 5986 (HTTPS).

If the required firewall ports are open, there are a couple of other things you can check. Make sure the WinRM service is running on the destination host. You should also make sure domain name system resolution is working properly and that you’re able to correctly resolve both the computer name and the fully qualified domain name of the remote host.

Unsupported protocol version

Another common VM live migration issue is an unsupported protocol version. An example of this error is shown in Figure B.

VM migration error
Figure B. The operation failed because of an unsupported protocol version.

This error occurs because older versions of Hyper-V don’t support some of the latest VM features. Entering the following command displays the version of each VM on a given Hyper-V host:

Get-VM * | Select-Object Name, Version

The error shown in Figure B occurs if you try to move a version 8.0 VM to a Hyper-V server running Windows Server 2012 R2. Windows Server 2012 R2 doesn’t support VM versions above 5.0.

Virtual switch mismatch

Live migrations can also fail if the destination host doesn’t contain a virtual switch with the same name as the one the VM is using. This error varies depending on whether you’re attempting the live migration using Hyper-V Manager or PowerShell.

In modern versions of Hyper-V Manager, a virtual switch mismatch isn’t a showstopper. Instead, the wizard will inform you of the problem and give you a chance to pick a different virtual switch, as shown in Figure C.

Hyper-V virtual switch
Figure C. Hyper-V gives you a chance to pick a different virtual switch.

If you attempt the migration using PowerShell, then Hyper-V will simply produce an error.

Incompatible hardware

Another somewhat common VM live migration issue is when the destination computer isn’t compatible with the VM’s hardware requirements. This error occurs because the source and destination Hyper-V hosts are running on hardware that is significantly different.

In most cases, you can correct the problem by using processor compatibility mode. Using processor compatibility mode tells the Hyper-V host to run the VM using only basic CPU features rather than attempting to use any advanced CPU features. Once processor compatibility mode is enabled, live migration will usually work. Incidentally, it’s almost always possible to turn processor compatibility mode back off once the VM live migration is complete.

Enable processor compatibility mode.
Figure D. You can fix some VM live migration errors by enabling processor compatibility mode.

You can turn on processor compatibility mode from Hyper-V Manager by right-clicking on the VM and choosing the settings command from the shortcut menu. When the VM’s settings window opens, expand the processor container and then select the compatibility sub-container. Now, just select the Migrate to a physical computer with a different processor version checkbox, as shown in Figure D.

These are just a few of the conditions that can cause live migration errors in Hyper-V. If you experience a really stubborn VM live migration error, take a moment to make sure the clocks on the Hyper-V hosts and the domain controllers are all in sync with one another.

Dig Deeper on Microsoft Hyper-V management

How to tackle an email archive migration for Exchange Online

Problem solve
Get help with specific problems with your technologies, process and projects.

A move from on-premises Exchange to Office 365 also entails determining the best way to transfer legacy archives. This tutorial can help ease migration complications.


A move to Office 365 seems straightforward enough until project planners broach the topic of the email archive…

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*/
function renameErrorMsgClass() {
$(“.errorMessageInput”).each(function() {
if ($(this).hasClass(“hidden”)) {
$(this).removeClass(“errorMessageInput hidden”).addClass(“sign-up-error-msg hidden”);
} else {
$(this).removeClass(“errorMessageInput”).addClass(“sign-up-error-msg”);
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* before return
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function validateThis(v, form) {
var validateReturn = urValidation.validate(v, form);
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return validateReturn;
}

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* DoC pop-up window js – included in moScripts.js which is not included in responsive page
*/
$(“#inlineRegistration”).on(“click”,”a.consentWindow”, function(e) {
window.open(this.href, “Consent”, “width=500,height=600,scrollbars=1”);
e.preventDefault();
});

migration.

Not all organizations keep all their email inside their messaging platform. Many organizations that archive messages also keep a copy in a journal that is archived away from user reach for legal reasons.

The vast majority of legacy archive migrations to Office 365 require third-party tools and must follow a fairly standardized process to complete the job quickly and with minimal expense. Administrators should migrate mailboxes to Office 365 first and then the archive for the fastest way to gain benefits from Office 365 before the archive reingestion completes.

An archive product typically scans mailboxes for older items and moves those to longer term, cheaper storage that is indexed and deduplicated. The original item typically gets replaced with a small part of the message, known as a stub or shortcut. The user can find the email in their inbox and, when they open the message, an add-in retrieves the full content from the archive.

Options for archived email migration to Office 365

The native tools to migrate mailboxes to Office 365 cannot handle an email archive migration. When admins transfer legacy archive data for mailboxes, they usually consider the following three approaches:

  1. Export the data to PST archives and import it into user mailboxes in Office 365.
  2. Reingest the archive data into the on-premises Exchange mailbox and then migrate the mailbox to Office 365.
  3. Migrate the Exchange mailbox to Office 365 first, then perform the email archive migration to put the data into the Office 365 mailbox.

Option 1 is not usually practical because it takes a lot of manual effort to export data to PST files. The stubs remain in the user’s mailbox and add clutter.

Option 2 also requires a lot of labor-intensive work and uses a lot of space on the Exchange Server infrastructure to support reingestion.

That leaves the third option as the most practical approach, which we’ll explore in a little more detail.

Migrate the mailbox to Exchange Online

When you move a mailbox to Office 365, it migrates along with the stubs that relate to the data in the legacy archive. The legacy archive will no longer archive the mailbox, but users can access their archived items. Because the stubs usually contain a URL path to the legacy archive item, there is no dependency on Exchange to view the archived message.

Some products that add buttons to restore the individual message into the mailbox will not work; the legacy archive product won’t know where Office 365 is without further configuration. This step is not usually necessary because the next stage is to migrate that data into Office 365.

Transfer archived data

Legacy archive solutions usually have a variety of policies for what happens with the archived data. You might configure the system to keep the stubs for a year but make archive data accessible via a web portal for much longer.

There are instances when you might want to replace the stub with the real message. There might be data that is not in the user’s mailbox as a stub but that users want on occasion.

We need tools that not only automate the data migration, but also understand these differences and can act accordingly.

We need tools that not only automate the data migration, but also understand these differences and can act accordingly. The legacy archive migration software should examine the data within the archive and then run batch jobs to replace stubs with the full messages. In this case, you can use the Exchange Online archive as a destination for archived data that no longer has a stub.

Email archive migration software connects via the vendor API. The software assesses the items and then exports them into a common temporary format — such as an EML file — on a staging server before connecting to Office 365 over a protocol such as Exchange Web Services. The migration software then examines the mailbox and replaces the stub with the full message.

migration dashboard
An example of a third-party product’s dashboard detailing the migration progress of a legacy archive into Office 365.

Migrate journal data

With journal data, the most accepted approach is to migrate the data into the hidden recoverable items folder of each mailbox related to the journaled item. The end result is similar to using Office 365 from the day the journal began, and eDiscovery works as expected when following Microsoft guidance.

For this migration, the software scans the journal and creates a database of the journal messages. The application then maps each journal message to its mailbox. This process can be quite extensive; for example, an email sent to 1,000 people will map to 1,000 mailboxes.

After this stage, the software copies each message to the recoverable items folder of each mailbox. While this is a complicated procedure, it’s alleviated by software that automates the job.

Legacy archive migration offerings

There are many products tailored for an email archive migration. Each has its own benefits and drawbacks. I won’t recommend a specific offering, but I will mention two that can migrate more than 1 TB a day, which is a good benchmark for large-scale migrations. They also support chain of custody, which audits the transfer of all data

TransVault has the most connectors to legacy archive products. Almost all the migration offerings support Enterprise Vault, but if you use a product that is less common, then it is likely that TransVault can move it. The TransVault product accesses source data either via an archive product’s APIs or directly to the stored data. TransVault’s service installs within Azure or on premises.

Quadrotech Archive Shuttle fits in alongside a number of other products suited to Office 365 migrations and management. Its workflow-based process automates the migration. Archive Shuttle handles fewer archive sources, but it does support Enterprise Vault. Archive Shuttle accesses source data via API and agent machines with control from either an on-premises Archive Shuttle instance or, as is more typical, the cloud version of the product.

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