Tag Archives: properly

How to Monitor Hyper-V Performance with PowerShell

Virtual machines can quickly lose speed and efficiency unless managed properly. Using PowerShell, you can monitor Hyper-V performance so you can keep on top of your performance levels and ensure your Hyper-V VMs are running optimally at all times.

In my last article, I demonstrated how to work with performance counters but from a WMI (Windows Management Instrumentation) perspective, using the corresponding Win32 classes with Get-CimInstance. Today I want to circle back to using Get-Counter to retrieve performance counter information but as part of a toolmaking process. I expect that when you are looking at performance counters, you do so on a very granular level. That is, you are only interested in data from a specific counter. I am too. In fact, I want to develop some tooling around a performance counter so that I can quickly get the information I need.

Getting Started

I’m using Hyper-V running on my Windows 10 desktop, but there’s no reason you can’t substitute your own Hyper-V host.

You should be able to test my code by setting your own value for $Computer.

Hyper-V Performance Counters

Of all the Hyper-V performance counters, the one that interests me is part of the Hyper-V Dynamic Memory VM set.

Dynamic Memory Counters

I am especially interested in the pressure related counters. This should give me an indication if the virtual machine is running low on memory. You sometimes see this in the Hyper-V management console when you look at the memory tab for a given virtual machine. Sometimes you’ll see a Low status. I want to be able to monitor these pressure levels from PowerShell.

After a little research, I found the corresponding WMI class.

Memory Counters via WMI and CIM

As you can see SRV2 is running a bit high. One of the benefits of using a WMI class instead of Get-Counter is that I can create a filter.

High Memory Pressure VM

Building Tools With What We’ve Done So Far

One tool I could create would be to turn this one line command into a function, perhaps adding the Hyper-V host as a parameter. I could set the function to run in a PowerShell scheduled job.

Another option would be to register a WMI event subscription. This is an advanced topic that we don’t have room to cover in great detail. But here is some sample code.

The code is checking every 30 seconds (within 30) for instances of the performance counter where the current pressure value is greater or equal to 80. I am registering the event subscription on my computer.  As long as my PowerShell session is open, any time a VM goes above 80 for Current Pressure, information is logged to a CSV file.

When using an Action scriptblock, you won’t see when the event is raised with Get-Event. The only way I can tell is by looking at the CSV file.

image

To manually stop watching, simply unregister the event.

Using this kind of event subscription has a number of other applications when it comes to managing Hyper-V. I expect I’ll revisit this topic again.

But there’s one more technique I want to share before we wrap up for today.

Usually, I am a big believer in taking advantage of PowerShell objects in the pipeline. Using Write-Host is generally frowned upon. But there are always exceptions and here is one of them.  I want a quick way to tell if a virtual machine is under pressure. Color coding will certainly catch my eye.  Instead of writing objects to the pipeline, I’ll write a string of information to the console. But I will color code it depending on the value of CurrentPressure. You will likely want to set your own thresholds. I wanted settings so that I’d have something good to display.

It wouldn’t take much to turn this into a function and create a reusable tool.

Colorized Performance Counters

I have at least one other performance monitoring tool technique I want to share with you but I think I’ve given you plenty to try out for today so I’ll cover that in my next article.

Wrap-Up

Have you built any custom tools for your Hyper-V environment? Do you find these types of tools helpful? Would you like us to do more? Let us know in the comments section below!

Thanks for reading!

Wanted – Low profile HDMI gfx card and WiFi card

Off of the top of my head (and I will need to check this properly) I have lying around here.

1) i5-2500S
2) i3-3220
3)4GB (2x2GB), 8GB (2x4GB) and 16GB (2x8GB or 4x4GB).
4) 64GB SSD
5) 120GB SSD

I dont have a cooler though,

Also do you have a case sorted? I have a Prodigy M in white somewhere.

I am trying to think on the video card front, would a 750ti work for minecraft?

Apple High Sierra patch undone by macOS update

A critical patch for a vulnerability in Apple’s macOS High Sierra may not be properly applied if a user also updates the system software.

The vulnerability, which was made public on Nov. 28, could allow a malicious user to bypass authentication dialogs and even potentially acquire root system privileges. Apple released the High Sierra patch the following day, but users have reported the patch being undone depending on system updates that were applied.

According many users on Twitter — and first reported by Wired — if the Apple system was running macOS 10.13.0 and not the newer 10.13.1 version, the High Sierra patch would be undone after the system update was applied. Additionally, re-installing the High Sierra patch after the system update would require a reboot to properly apply the fix, but users were not getting the notification that a restart was necessary.

Apple has since updated its patch notes to include these issues: “If you recently updated from macOS High Sierra 10.13 to 10.13.1, reboot your Mac to make sure the Security Update is applied properly.”

MacLemon, a Mac sysadmin and independent security researcher, said the system update downgrading the High Sierra patch shouldn’t be surprising.

It’s part of Apple growing carelessness for the Mac in general.
MacLemona Mac sysadmin and independent security researcher

“It’s mostly expected that an older updated installed over a newer system downgrades components. The failure here is that Apple doesn’t show the Security Update 2017-001 again after reinstalling 10.13.1,” MacLemon told SearchSecurity via Twitter Direct Message. “It’s part of Apple growing carelessness for the Mac in general. Since they changed the development process to release on time instead of when done Mac OS X/OS X/macOS quality and stability has been in steady decline. Banana software shipped green that ripens at the customer.”

Because of the confusion surrounding the High Sierra patch and the macOS update, users may not know if the patch was applied properly and whether or not they are protected against the root password flaw, as Marc Rogers, head of SecOps for DefCon and head of infosec for Cloudflare, said on Twitter.

Experts suggested checking for software updates and ensuring systems have been rebooted.

Root passwords and the High Sierra patch

When the High Sierra root flaw was first announced, an early suggestion from experts was to create a password for the root user. However, MacLemon noted this could cause security issues as well.

Additionally, Adam Nichols, principal of software security at Grimm, said creating this password would not be a full fix anyway.

Mixer comes to Minecraft

UPDATE: This feature is now out of beta and launches properly today with the 1.2.5 release! Weeee!

The 1.2.5 beta is BURSTING AT THE SEAMS with great new Minecraft features (though it really shouldn’t be bursting at all – that’s probably a bug). One of these new features is incorporating Mixer. Mixer is a livestreaming platform for sharing and broadcasting live video directly from in your games! It’s a great way to interact with other players – take a look at the video above for a better idea of how it works with Minecraft.

In the Beta, you’ll now be able to launch a Mixer broadcast from within Minecraft. Better yet, you can make certain parts of your game interactive via buttons on Mixer! So, for example, if you were doing a parkour run, you could use the /mixer command to let your viewers vote on what obstacles spawn in your path! Please don’t spawn a brick wall for me to run face-first into. Yes, I know it’ll be funny. Please don’t do it anyway.

UPDATE: The Mixer team have put together a map specifically for this purpose! You can get it here! Some streamers have already been testing these interactivity tools out during the beta, so check out TangoTek, Impulse5V, YourMCAdmin and Direwolf to see what’s possible or join in the fun!

Mixer is part of the 1.2.5 beta on Android, Windows 10 and Xbox One (later this week). When the update launches fully, later this year, we’ll be bringing these Mixer features to more Minecraft platforms. A separate mod for Java players will be coming later this year as well.

To see how you can use Mixer in Minecraft, and how to make your own interactive broadcast, head over to this page on the official Mixer site!