Tag Archives: read

For Sale – Sandisk 500gb Ultra 3D SSD , Brand New

Brand new Sandisk Ultra 3D 500gb SSD
560mb/s Read 530 mb/s Write

This is a warranty replacement direct from sandisk.

Unfortunately they could not provide me with the same model that was faulty so they have sent a newer model, this is of no use to me as the faulty drive was 1 of 4 in a raid array so this will not work.

£85 shipped, (no offers because I could replace the HDD in my laptop with it)
IMG_20180718_141130.jpg

Price and currency: £85
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Paypal gift
Location: Bridgwater
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Sandisk 500gb Ultra 3D SSD , Brand New

Brand new Sandisk Ultra 3D 500gb SSD
560mb/s Read 530 mb/s Write

This is a warranty replacement direct from sandisk.

Unfortunately they could not provide me with the same model that was faulty so they have sent a newer model, this is of no use to me as the faulty drive was 1 of 4 in a raid array so this will not work.

£85 shipped, (no offers because I could replace the HDD in my laptop with it)
IMG_20180718_141130.jpg

Price and currency: £85
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Paypal gift
Location: Bridgwater
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Sandisk 500gb Ultra 3D SSD , Brand New

Brand new Sandisk Ultra 3D 500gb SSD
560mb/s Read 530 mb/s Write

This is a warranty replacement direct from sandisk.

Unfortunately they could not provide me with the same model that was faulty so they have sent a newer model, this is of no use to me as the faulty drive was 1 of 4 in a raid array so this will not work.

£85 shipped, (no offers because I could replace the HDD in my laptop with it)
IMG_20180718_141130.jpg

Price and currency: £85
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Paypal gift
Location: Bridgwater
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Salesforce’s Marc Benioff calls for a national privacy law

Since June, when Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff authored a widely read opinion piece for Politico calling for a national privacy law for personal  data — a  stance that runs counter to that of many tech vendors — California passed data privacy legislation echoing the European Union’s groundbreaking GDPR.

Benioff, who had earlier backed a more radical data privacy ballot measure that tech giants like Facebook opposed, threw his clout behind the California bill, even though that measure is not quite as stringent as the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation).

Amid boom times for data and the lack of U.S. regulation making it easier for companies to consume and monetize customer data, Benioff put the giant San Francisco-based CRM software vendor at the vanguard of the U.S. data privacy movement.

Meanwhile, the GDPR extended beyond the Atlantic and affected many U.S.-based companies that have international customers.

Between the regulatory changes around the world and consumer distrust of technology companies after recent episodes of breaches and data misuse, a national personal data privacy law such as the one Benioff envisions could be on the horizon.

But what that would look like in the U.S. is unclear, given Silicon Valley’s virtually unregulated reign and Congress’ apparent lack of appetite up to now for tech regulation.

And a big question for observers of the mercurial Benioff is whether it’s relatively easier for a company like Salesforce, which acts as a data processor and doesn’t monetize data directly, to call for stricter data privacy regulation

‘Bit of a paradox’

Salesforce declined to make Benioff available for this story. But Lindsey Finch, senior vice president of global privacy at Salesforce, said in an interview with SearchSalesforce that the kind of corporate transparency Benioff calls for in the Politico piece can be hard to achieve.

Headshot of Salesforce CEO Marc BenioffMarc Benioff

In his article, Benioff beseeches companies to be clearer about how they use customers’ data and to make terms of service concise and comprehensible.

But, as a click on the Salesforce website shows, the company’s terms of service for using cookies on a browser comprises more than 5,000 words of legal terminology. It’s more concise than some competitors’ pages, but it’s doubtful the average consumer would take the time to read 16 pages of legalese.

“This is something the industry struggles with,” Finch, a lawyer and former privacy counsel for General Electric, said. “On one hand, privacy laws like GDPR require very detailed information be provided. On the other hand, consumers want something concise and understandable. There’s a bit of a paradox of what laws legally require and what consumers can reasonably digest.”

Finch also responded to the potential criticism that Salesforce’s position in favor of strict personal data privacy is somewhat convenient because even though the company acts as a data processor for thousands of organizations, its customers’ data doesn’t directly affect its bottom line.

Lindsey Finch, senior vice president, global privacy, at SalesforceLindsey Finch

“We are a data processor in delivering our services to our customers and processing data on their behalf, but we are also a data controller in terms of running our business,” Finch said. “While our core business is delivering services as a data processor, we also have a lot of responsibilities as a controller as well.”

Data controllers are the companies directly affected by GDPR regulation and have to maintain their personal data protections up to the EU standards.

With some 10,000 employees, Salesforce is the biggest employer in San Francisco.                                    

Finch also elaborated on another key point in Benioff’s Politico piece — that a national personal data privacy law in the U.S., while using GDPR as a template, should be “tailored to our own traditions, values and rule of law.”

“We’re seeing this explosion of data and on the one hand you have individuals, either in a business or personal capacity, and what they want is a more personalized experience,” Finch said. “But at the same time they’re demanding that companies they do business with are more trustworthy than ever before.”

“We see an opportunity with something like GDPR,” she added. “What we’re advocating for in the U.S. is to look at how data is handled from the perspective of the end consumer and the types of things they’d reasonably expect or want to know about how their data is handled.”

The unregulated data landscape

Meanwhile, although the internet seems like a ubiquitous staple of everyday life, it’s still relatively new and matching regulation — which often gets drawn out through the political system — with the pace of innovation can be a difficult quandary.

“We’re seeing a backlash to this ‘Wild West’ approach to data and seeing the first signs of a more orderly digital economy,” said Steve Wilson, a data privacy expert and vice president and principal analyst at Constellation Research Inc. “You can’t have everyone for themselves when it comes to data.”

I’m seeing respect for GDPR and movement on this. Businesses understand that GDPR is an opportunity to get your [stuff] together.
Steve Wilsonvice president and principal analyst, Constellation Research

Wilson argued that widespread data breaches and concerns about Facebook’s use of data are laying the groundwork for an eventual national personal data privacy law, but others in the data privacy field still see any significant regulation as years away — if it materializes in the U.S. at all.

Another privacy expert, Ted Claypoole, a partner at the North Carolina firm Womble Bond Dickinson and a veteran data and privacy lawyer, was less sanguine on a national privacy law’s chances here.

“I think [a national privacy law] is unlikely and if it comes it will be a while from now,” Claypoole said. “If citizens don’t push for this and go collectively to Congress and demand this be changed, it won’t be. In 10 or 15 years it’ll be too hard to do because businesses are built on using data.”

One of the main reasons for Claypoole’s pessimism is his view that U.S. citizens don’t care much about personal data privacy — or if they do, their actions contradict their sentiment.

“People say one thing then jump on Facebook or give away data for a 20% off Chipotle coupon,” he said, referring to the popular Mexican food chain.

Wilson agreed that the U.S. has lagged behind on setting national privacy standards, but said he’s bullish on the response to GDPR and the movement toward better data regulation in the U.S. — starting with California.

“America has taken 20 years to get nowhere on this, but I’m not cynical about this,” Wilson said. “I’m seeing respect for GDPR and movement on this. Businesses understand that GDPR is an opportunity to get your [stuff] together.”

Wilson also said Salesforce is in a better position than companies like Facebook or Google to take the moral high ground on data privacy because Salesforce doesn’t directly make money from personal data, but that the CRM vendor still owns an important stake in the issue.

“A cynic would say that Salesforce can separate itself from the hurly burly of data and that’s fine, but they do have an important role in the custodianship of data,” Wilson said.

Data is valuable

Whether a national privacy law is a realistic goal or an idealistic dream, the national conversation on data privacy is shifting.

The California law AB 375 is a significant first step and could be a substantial one, as it would make U.S. companies abide by the California regulation if they do any business in California — similar to how companies not based in the EU still need to adhere to GDPR if they have a customer based in the EU.

“It’s not really about privacy. It’s about data being an important commodity in the digital economy and we can’t have a ‘Wild West’ anymore,” Wilson said. “We need some restraint and control and enterprise modesty. We see this attitude toward data because it’s so valuable.”

For Sale – Sandisk 500gb Ultra 3D SSD , Brand New

Brand new Sandisk Ultra 3D 500gb SSD
560mb/s Read 530 mb/s Write

This is a warranty replacement direct from sandisk.

Unfortunately they could not provide me with the same model that was faulty so they have sent a newer model, this is of no use to me as the faulty drive was 1 of 4 in a raid array so this will not work.

£85 shipped, (no offers because I could replace the HDD in my laptop with it)
IMG_20180718_141130.jpg

Price and currency: £85
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: Paypal gift
Location: Bridgwater
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Dell Latitude E6440 i5-4300m £60

There are a few “issues” so please read below carefully. Overall condition I would say is a C
-The lcd has a few pressure marks (I have highlighted them in the pics), makes 0 difference in usage. Can barely see them.
-Missing one screw and a little crack on the bottom plastic base.

It is fully working and works how it should.

DELL E6440
Battery holds charge. In the bios of the dell, the health is showing as excellent.

specs:
i5 4300m
Toshiba harddrive, showing 465gb capacity.
4gb ram
Screen Size: 14″ 1600×900
DVD+RW MULTI RECORDER
windows 7 ultimate 64bit (with sticker under battery)

av 2018 #

Price and currency: 80
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Birmingham
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Dell Latitude E6440 i5-4300m £70

There are a few “issues” so please read below carefully. Overall condition I would say is a C
-The lcd has a few bruising/pressure marks (I have highlighted them in the pics), makes 0 difference in usage. Can barely see them.
-Missing one screw and a little crack by one of the screws on the bottom plastic base.

It is fully working and works how it should.

DELL E6440
Battery holds charge. In the bios of the dell, the health is showing as excellent.

specs:
i5 4300m
Toshiba harddrive, showing 465gb capacity.
4gb ram
Screen Size: 14″ 1600×900
DVD+RW MULTI RECORDER
windows 7 ultimate 64bit (with sticker under battery)

av 2018 #

Price and currency: 80
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Birmingham
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Challenges of blockchain muddle understanding of the technology

I have read many articles and generalized argle-barg on the topic of blockchain and cryptocurrencies, and a couple things stand out: Nobody has a great definition for either, and the two are often so thoroughly conflated that most attempts at cogent definitions are pointless..

Nobody seems to agree on what a blockchain is — or isn’t — except in some loose, arm-flapping way. That lack of understanding represents one of the most significant challenges of blockchain. Cryptocurrencies are mostly understood in that “I’ll know it when I see it” way, where we agree on a vague idea without understanding the core of the idea. If you ask the average person about blockchain or cryptocurrencies, and to the extent that she is aware of either, the answer you’ll probably get is simple: bitcoin.

Conceptually, of course, the idea of a blockchain is like the idea of one of its main components: cryptography. Cryptography is understood as a monolithic thing in only the most abstracted macro sense possible, where different types of cryptography — among them symmetrical, asymmetrical or public key — are all implemented in vastly different manners.

Blockchains are the same: The bitcoin blockchain underpinning the popular currency bearing its name is not the same as the Ethereum blockchain upon which the cryptocurrency Ether sits. And this is where not having good definitions of what we’re talking about hurts the larger conversation around how this technology can add value outside of currency applications.

What are the challenges of blockchain in an evolving marketplace?

At its core, a blockchain is a distributed system of recording and storing transaction records. Think of it as a superdatabase — one where each participant maintains, calculates and updates new entries. More importantly, nodes work together to verify the information is truthful, thus providing security and a permanent audit trail.

How blockchain works

So, with that concept in mind, we can broaden our understanding of the technology. Ethereum wasn’t designed as a one-trick pony to run a monetary application like its bitcoin cousin; rather, it’s more of an application platform, using virtual tokens in the place of cash. Instead of simply trading currency, one might trade cat videos, for instance.

And if those cat videos were traded on a blockchain platform, everyone would be able to verify who first introduced a particular video into the system and each person who modified that video or reintroduced a bad copy. You could have the most distributed and verifiable cat video platform ever created. Luckily, there are many more use cases for this technology than just a cat video distribution platform.

In world of medical records — or, for argument’s sake, network configuration changes — we see a unique opportunity to improve many aspects of the use, transfer and security of those records.

What if we could guarantee the records introduced to the system are authentic? Note that I didn’t say accurate, because you can easily authenticate bad data when it’s introduced to a system. But let’s say we introduce our records, and they are accurate.

We go to a new doctor who would normally need to have paperwork from us to authorize the retrieval of those records, and transferring the records often takes longer than would be ideal. Waiting for the requesting doctor to send the forms to the records’ holder and get a response back can take significant effort. And even if the systems are the same, with easy access afforded to the requisite records, those records could have been tampered with or have errors and incomplete data.

The same thing could happen with a blockchain-based system, but there would be a distributed record of the tampering — something that would be all but impossible to hide. In this way, your records could be made available to everyone with a reason to see them, with each view, change and movement recorded in a permanent and tamper-resistant system.

There are challenges even beyond the implementation of our hypothetical configuration system on top of blockchain. Disparate systems would have to be combined into a ubiquitous and fairly homogeneous platform. There would have to be standards applied to the introduction of data in the first place: Bad data in; bad data out. But, in this case, it would potentially become a permanent fixture. There are also challenges in the blockchain implementation itself — the applications on top of it notwithstanding.

And those challenges are substantial.

Adding more nodes and records makes the ledger more complex

I have to agree that today’s applicability of the technology to networking is just not there. Where I disagree, however, is in the assertion that there is no need for it, or that it cannot, or should not, ever be applied to the problem of network management.

One of the challenges of blockchain is in its very nature: the distributed ledger. Because every endpoint has to have a copy of the entire blockchain, and that blockchain is constantly growing as more things are added, the system gets slower, taking up more space. If the same sort of system was implemented under a medical records system, you can see where it would become untenable very quickly.

Each blockchain implementation is different, but derivative, so this is a problem that is likely fixable. But it has to be accounted for in the beginning. Different implementations have already begun to solve this inherent weakness.

That brings us to another issue: Changing blockchains after the fact is not an easy task. Imagine a time where our network configuration data sits on a system in which a significant bug is found.

How does that system get patched? How does the blockchain adapt? And how do the requisite changes affect the integrity of the records’ data sitting on the system? These are difficult problems to solve, and they’re even harder to anticipate upfront. Most of the major blockchain implementations have gone through some amount of retrograde “shoulda-woulda-coulda,” and it’s likely we’ll fail to anticipate every possible problem in the initial rollout of any system.

Networking and the challenges of blockchain: Can they be overcome?

Blockchain technology, as it applies to networking, is very much a work in progress. GlobalData analyst Mike Fratto rejected blockchain technology, saying the ledger is “untested, unproven and overly complex, making it unsuitable for networking.”

While I disagree with Fratto’s assessment in a broad sense, I have to agree that today’s applicability of the technology to networking is just not there. Where I disagree, however, is in the assertion that there is no need for it, or that it cannot, or should not, ever be applied to the problem of network management.

I was prepared for the inevitable conclusion there are no viable production-ready blockchain implementations out in the wild. Had I come to that conclusion, however, I would have been almost entirely incorrect. I have talked with several large companies that are either developing or actively using blockchain technologies of one type or another — most seem to be based on the Linux Foundation’s Hyperledger platform, in close orbit with IBM. Most of the applications I was able to get information on are related to supply chain security in one way or another.

Tracking the ingredients used in a product from field to store shelf is one popular example. Securing critical manufacturing parts from creation through shipping and onto final build is another. These use cases are not from hyperbolic tech startups or boutique manufacturers; they are from large, established, blue-chip and Fortune 500 companies not given to flights of fancy in their supply chain. As these installations become more widespread, I imagine we will start to see more published case studies, leading to more installations. For now, however, a lot of these remain in the shadows, happily ensconced behind nondisclosure agreements.

The hype today may be all around the various cryptocurrencies that exist in the market, from the bitcoins and Ethers of the world to the nascent and opaque world of boutique vanity coins. The real excitement and potential lies not in the coins, however, but in the application of the underlying technology — including overcoming the challenges of blockchain — to everyday IT challenges.

For Sale – Dell Latitude E6440 i5-4300m £80

There are a few “issues” so please read below carefully. Overall condition I would say is a C
-The lcd has a few bruising/pressure marks (I have highlighted them in the pics), makes 0 difference in usage. Can barely see them.
-Missing one screw and a little crack by one of the screws on the bottom plastic base.

It is fully working and works how it should.

DELL E6440
Battery holds charge. In the bios of the dell, the health is showing as excellent.

specs:
i5 4300m
Toshiba harddrive, showing 465gb capacity.
4gb ram
Screen Size: 14″ 1600×900
DVD+RW MULTI RECORDER
windows 7 ultimate 64bit (with sticker under battery)

av 2018 #

Price and currency: 80
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Birmingham
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Blu ray drive

Internal or external, its to read one disc, so cheap as possible please.

Location: Essex

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by…

Blu ray drive