Tag Archives: response

Wanted – 27inch gaming monitor

Hi

Am after 27 inch gaming monitor with the following requirements:

1ms response time
HDMI DVI or and VGA

£150 max spend.

Thanks

Location: Bury, Greater Manchester

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Wanted – 27inch gaming monitor

Hi

Am after 27 inch gaming monitor with the following requirements:

1ms response time
HDMI DVI or and VGA

£150 max spend.

Thanks

Location: Bury, Greater Manchester

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – 27inch gaming monitor

Hi

Am after 27 inch gaming monitor with the following requirements:

1ms response time
HDMI DVI or and VGA

£150 max spend.

Thanks

Location: Bury, Greater Manchester

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Microsoft statement on separating families at the southern border – Microsoft on the Issues

On Monday Microsoft issued the following statement:

In response to questions we want to be clear: Microsoft is not working with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or U.S. Customs and Border Protection on any projects related to separating children from their families at the border, and contrary to some speculation, we are not aware of Azure or Azure services being used for this purpose. As a company, Microsoft is dismayed by the forcible separation of children from their families at the border. Family unification has been a fundamental tenet of American policy and law since the end of World War II. As a company Microsoft has worked for over 20 years to combine technology with the rule of law to ensure that children who are refugees and immigrants can remain with their parents. We need to continue to build on this noble tradition rather than change course now. We urge the administration to change its policy and Congress to pass legislation ensuring children are no longer separated from their families. 

Microsoft statement on separating families at the southern border – Microsoft on the Issues

On Monday Microsoft issued the following statement:

In response to questions we want to be clear: Microsoft is not working with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or U.S. Customs and Border Protection on any projects related to separating children from their families at the border, and contrary to some speculation, we are not aware of Azure or Azure services being used for this purpose. As a company, Microsoft is dismayed by the forcible separation of children from their families at the border. Family unification has been a fundamental tenet of American policy and law since the end of World War II. As a company Microsoft has worked for over 20 years to combine technology with the rule of law to ensure that children who are refugees and immigrants can remain with their parents. We need to continue to build on this noble tradition rather than change course now. We urge the administration to change its policy and Congress to pass legislation ensuring children are no longer separated from their families. 

Microsoft statement on separating families at the southern border – Microsoft on the Issues

On Monday Microsoft issued the following statement:

In response to questions we want to be clear: Microsoft is not working with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or U.S. Customs and Border Protection on any projects related to separating children from their families at the border, and contrary to some speculation, we are not aware of Azure or Azure services being used for this purpose. As a company, Microsoft is dismayed by the forcible separation of children from their families at the border. Family unification has been a fundamental tenet of American policy and law since the end of World War II. As a company Microsoft has worked for over 20 years to combine technology with the rule of law to ensure that children who are refugees and immigrants can remain with their parents. We need to continue to build on this noble tradition rather than change course now. We urge the administration to change its policy and Congress to pass legislation ensuring children are no longer separated from their families. 

ASUS VG236 LCD Gaming monitor

3D monitor with 120Hz, 1080, 2ms response time,

Price and currency: 70
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Amazon vouchers/ Paypal gift/bank transfer
Location: Gloucester
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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By replying to…

ASUS VG236 LCD Gaming monitor

BenQ XL2411Z eSports Gaming Monitor

Looking to sell my BenQ eSports monitor which is 144hz and 1ms response, it is excellent for console users/PC gamers, I have used it and it is excellent and a highly recommended monitor by most professional/competitive gamers.

It is fully boxed and will be sent via courier as its pretty big, postage is included in the price.

lt will cost around £20 to post I would imagine, if not slightly more so £150 if anyone can collect, it is as new condition and never moved since taken out the box,…

BenQ XL2411Z eSports Gaming Monitor

IT monitoring, org discipline polish Nasdaq DevOps incident response

Modern IT monitoring can bring together developers and IT ops pros for DevOps incident response, but tools can’t substitute for a disciplined team approach to problems.

Dev and ops teams at Nasdaq Corporate Solutions LLC adopted a common language for troubleshooting with AppDynamics’ App iQ platform. But effective DevOps incident response also demanded focus on the fundamentals of team building and a systematic process for following up on incidents to ensure they don’t recur.

“We had some notion of incident management, but there was no real disciplined way for following up,” said Heather Abbott, senior vice president of corporate solutions technology, who joined the New York-based subsidiary of Nasdaq Inc. in 2014. “AppDynamics has [affected] how teams work together to resolve incidents … but we’ve had other housekeeping to do.”

Shared IT monitoring tools renew focus on incident resolution

Heather Abbott, NasdaqHeather Abbott

Nasdaq Corporate Solutions manages SaaS offerings for customers as they shift from private to public operations. Its products include public relations, investor relations, and board and leadership software managed with a combination of Amazon Web Services and on-premises data center infrastructure, though the on-premises infrastructure will soon be phased out.

In the past, Nasdaq’s dev and ops teams used separate IT monitoring tools, and teams dedicated to different parts of the infrastructure also had individualized dashboard views. The company’s shift to cross-functional teams, focused on products and user experience as part of a DevOps transformation, required a unified view into system performance. Now, all stakeholders share the AppDynamics App iQ interface when they respond to an incident.

With a single source of information about infrastructure performance, there’s less finger-pointing among team members during DevOps incident response, which speeds up problem resolution.

“You can’t argue with the data, and people have a better ongoing understanding of the system,” Abbott said. “So, you’re not going in and hunting and pecking every time there’s a complaint or we’re trying to improve something.”

DevOps incident response requires team vigilance

Since Abbott joined Nasdaq, incidents are down more than 35%. She cited the IT monitoring tool in part, but also pointed to changes the company made to the DevOps incident response process. The company moved from an ad hoc process of incident response divided among different departments to a companywide, systematic cycle of regular incident review meetings. Her team conducts weekly incident review meetings and tracks action items from previous incident reviews to prevent incidents from recurring. Higher levels of the organization have a monthly incident review call to review quality issues, and some of these incidents are further reviewed by Nasdaq’s board of directors.

We always need to focus on blocking and tackling … but as we move toward more complex microservices-based architectures, we’ll be building things into the platform like Chaos Monkey.
Heather Abbottsenior vice president of corporate solutions technology, Nasdaq

And there’s still room to improve the DevOps incident response process, Abbott said.

“We always need to focus on blocking and tackling,” she said. “We don’t have the scale within my line of business of Amazon or Netflix, but as we move toward more complex microservices-based architectures, we’ll be building things into the platform like Chaos Monkey.”

Like many companies, Nasdaq plans to tie DevOps teams with business leaders, so the whole organization can work together to improve customer experiences. In the past, Nasdaq has generated application log reports with homegrown tools. But this year, it will roll out AppDynamics’ Business iQ software, first with its investor-relations SaaS products, to make that data more accessible to business leaders, Abbott said.

AppDynamics App iQ will also expand to monitor releases through test, development and production deployment phases. Abbott said Nasdaq has worked with AppDynamics to create intelligent release dashboards to provide better automation and performance trends. “That will make it easy to see how system performance is trending over time, as we introduce change,” he said.

While Nasdaq mainly uses AppDynamics App iQ, the exchange also uses Datadog, because it offers event correlation and automated root cause analysis. AppDynamics has previewed automated root cause analysis based on machine learning techniques. Abbott said she looks forward to the addition of that feature, perhaps this year.

Beth Pariseau is senior news writer for TechTarget’s Cloud and DevOps Media Group. Write to her at bpariseau@techtarget.com or follow @PariseauTT on Twitter.

Fancy Bears hackers target International Olympic Committee

The International Olympic Committee has had its email stolen again, this time in a response to its ban on Russia from the 2018 Winter Olympics.

A hacking group that calls itself Fancy Bears posted email messages allegedly from officials at the International Olympic Committee (IOC), the U.S. Olympic Committee (USOC) and other associated groups, like the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). There’s no confirmation yet that the email messages are authentic, but Fancy Bears focuses on anti-doping efforts that got Russia banned from this year’s Olympic Games.

“The national anti-doping agencies of the USA, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and other countries joined WADA and the USOC under the guidance of iNADO [Institute of National Anti-Doping Organisations],” Fancy Bears said on its website. “However, the genuine intentions of the coalition headed by the Anglo-Saxons are much less noble than a war against doping. It is apparent that the Americans and the Canadians are eager to remove the Europeans from the leadership in the Olympic movement and to achieve political dominance of the English-speaking nations.”

Fancy Bears is believed to be the same hacking group known as Fancy Bear that claimed responsibility for the 2016 hack on the U.S. Democratic National Committee, which interfered in the 2016 presidential election. Fancy Bear hackers have been linked to Russia’s military intelligence unit, the GRU, by American intelligence officials.

The batch of email messages Fancy Bears posted is from 2016 through 2017 and mainly focuses on discrediting Canadian lawyer Richard McLaren, who led the investigation into Russia’s widespread cheating in previous Olympic Games. It was because of the findings in his investigation that many Russian athletes are banned from the 2018 games in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

The IOC declined to comment on the “alleged leaked documents” and whether or not they are legitimate.

It’s not clear how Fancy Bears allegedly breached the IOC email. However, in 2016, the same group targeted WADA with a phishing scheme and released documents that focused on previous anti-doping efforts following the 2016 Summer Olympics. In that case, the hacking group released the medical records for U.S. Olympic athletes Simone Biles, Serena and Venus Williams and Elena Delle Donne. The medical records showed that these athletes were taking prohibited medications, though they all obtained permission to use them and, thus, were not violating the rules. This release happened in the midst of McLaren’s investigation into the widespread misconduct by Russian athletes.

In one email released in this week’s dump, IOC lawyer Howard Stupp complained that the findings from McLaren’s investigation were “intended to lead to the complete expulsion of the Russian team” from the 2016 Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro and now from the 2018 Pyeongchang Games.

The 2018 Winter Olympic Games are set to start on Feb. 9, 2018, in South Korea.

In other news:

  • A former contractor at the U.S. National Security Agency has agreed to plead guilty to stealing classified information. Harold Martin is scheduled to plead guilty to one count of willful retention of nation defense information at a federal court in Baltimore on Jan. 22. Martin, who was indicted in February 2017, is accused of stealing highly sensitive government information — including national defense data — from the NSA and other agencies for 20 years. Martin could serve up to 10 years in prison and have to pay a fine of up to $250,000. Martin was employed by several private companies and worked as a contractor for various U.S. government agencies from 2003 to 2016, during which time he maintained top-secret security clearance. With his top-secret clearance, Martin was able to access highly sensitive government data, and he collected both physical and digital documents, which he stored in his home and car, according to the documents released by the court. There is no indication yet about what, if anything, Martin did with the information he stole.
  • Facebook now offers an encrypted group chat tool, despite the widespread government criticism of encrypted messaging systems. The tool, called Asynchronous Ratcheting Tree, or ART, was developed by Oxford University’s Katriel Cohn-Gordon, Cas Cremers, Luke Garratt and Kevin Milner, as well as Facebook’s Jon Millican. In their paper about ART, “On Ends-to-Ends Encryption: Asynchronous Group Messaging with Strong Security Guarantees,” the group noted that the communication app for only two users is secure, but group messaging is not. “An adversary who compromises a single group member can intercept communications indefinitely,” the group said about group messaging. “One reason for this discrepancy in security guarantees, despite the large body of work on group key agreement, is that most existing protocol designs are fundamentally synchronous, and thus cannot be used in the asynchronous world of mobile communications.” With the ART protocol, a user can participate in a group message securely, even after one participating user is compromised. The ability comes from the use of different asymmetric keys. Technical details on the protocol can be found in the group’s proof of concept.
  • Cisco introduced a technology called Encrypted Traffic Analytics (ETA), which identifies malware in encrypted traffic without intercepting and decrypting the data. According to Cisco’s white paper, ETA is “derived by using new types of data elements or telemetry that are independent of protocol details, such as the lengths and arrival times of messages within a flow. These data elements have the attractive property of applying equally well to both encrypted and unencrypted flows.” The product has been in trials since the summer of 2017 and is now being rolled out to enterprise routing platforms. Cisco estimated that, by 2020, 80% of all traffic will be encrypted, and ETA aims to solve the problem of security scanners not being able to sift through that traffic for malware. Cisco said ETA uses “multilayer machine learning,” advanced statistical modeling and enhanced telemetry to detect malware.