Tag Archives: rules

Wanted – Cheap/free HDMI monitor for teaching with Raspberry Pis

Didn’t see anything against the rules for threads like this. Mods, please accept my apologies in advance and remove this thread if I’m breaking any rules.

I’m teaching some children some computer science basics in my neighbourhood. We have some Raspberry Pi Zeros (edited on 12/07./2018 to reflect we have Pi Zeros, not Pis!), but no dedicated display units. I’ve been using my TV for this, but the number of children has increased, so we need additional displays. The only requirement, is they be able to accept an HDMI input, and work.

I’m looking for something as cheap as possible. I can make a small donation to charity or pay a small cost for anyone supplying a monitor.

I can collect from Berkshire or Bristol by arrangement.

Location: Bracknell, Berkshire

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – Cheap/free HDMI monitor for teaching with Raspberry Pis

Didn’t see anything against the rules for threads like this. Mods, please accept my apologies in advance and remove this thread if I’m breaking any rules.

I’m teaching some children some computer science basics in my neighbourhood. We have some Raspberry Pis, but no dedicated display units. I’ve been using my TV for this, but the number of children has increased, so we need additional displays. The only requirement, is they be able to accept an HDMI input, and work.

I’m looking for something as cheap as possible. I can make a small donation to charity or pay a small cost for anyone supplying a monitor.

I can collect from Berkshire or Bristol by arrangement.

Location: Bracknell, Berkshire

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – Cheap/free HDMI monitor for teaching with Raspberry Pis

Didn’t see anything against the rules for threads like this. Mods, please accept my apologies in advance and remove this thread if I’m breaking any rules.

I’m teaching some children some computer science basics in my neighbourhood. We have some Raspberry Pis, but no dedicated display units. I’ve been using my TV for this, but the number of children has increased, so we need additional displays. The only requirement, is they be able to accept an HDMI input, and work.

I’m looking for something as cheap as possible. I can make a small donation to charity or pay a small cost for anyone supplying a monitor.

I can collect from Berkshire or Bristol by arrangement.

Location: Bracknell, Berkshire

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – Cheap/free HDMI monitor for teaching with Raspberry Pis

Didn’t see anything against the rules for threads like this. Mods, please accept my apologies in advance and remove this thread if I’m breaking any rules.

I’m teaching some children some computer science basics in my neighbourhood. We have some Raspberry Pis, but no dedicated display units. I’ve been using my TV for this, but the number of children has increased, so we need additional displays. The only requirement, is they be able to accept an HDMI input, and work.

I’m looking for something as cheap as possible. I can make a small donation to charity or pay a small cost for anyone supplying a monitor.

I can collect from Berkshire or Bristol by arrangement.

Location: Bracknell, Berkshire

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – Cheap/free HDMI monitor for teaching with Raspberry Pis

Didn’t see anything against the rules for threads like this. Mods, please accept my apologies in advance and remove this thread if I’m breaking any rules.

I’m teaching some children some computer science basics in my neighbourhood. We have some Raspberry Pis, but no dedicated display units. I’ve been using my TV for this, but the number of children has increased, so we need additional displays. The only requirement, is they be able to accept an HDMI input, and work.

I’m looking for something as cheap as possible. I can make a small donation to charity or pay a small cost for anyone supplying a monitor.

I can collect from Berkshire or Bristol by arrangement.

Location: Bracknell, Berkshire

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – OCZ 60GB SSD

My deal was accepted seemingly after Sprdee’s was accepted.

Usamir told me to send payment, I check the thread again and he’s also asking Sprdee to send payment. It seems like he’s asking two people to send the payment for 1 item and whoever sends it first gets it.

Considering Sprdee was first and has seemingly had an offer accepted I backed out.

You recently made a post that stated that, “Please keep all correspondence on thread as dealing via PM carries a trading ban for both buyer an seller”. Yet this seems to be exactly what has happened, judging by Sprdee claiming “we had a deal”.

Office 365 compliance features keep data locked down

Stricter guidelines for compliance regarding messaging retention are forthcoming thanks to rules such as the EU…

General Data Protection Regulation. Administrators new to Office 365 must learn the nuance of this service’s features to prepare for these changes.

Office 365 compliance features differ with those of on-premises systems, such as Exchange Server. The tools to identify, retain and remove data are built in to the Office 365 Security & Compliance Center. This portal enables businesses to keep data for as long as necessary without third-party tools or extra storage, and it works across Microsoft’s cloud services.

This article looks at the Office 365 compliance features, where they lack and how admins can adjust for these shortcomings.

Master the Office 365 Security & Compliance Center

Until recently, Office 365 mirrored its on-premises counterpart — IT managers administered and managed compliance within each individual service. To keep data in Exchange Online, the admin would adjust settings in the Exchange Admin Center with terminology specific to Exchange. It works the same with SharePoint Online.

The Security & Compliance Center changes all this. It uses a unified portal to manage compliance functionality across the Office 365 suite. Admins use the portal to create policies for all data within the Office 365 tenant. Admins also use this section to perform discovery and searches across multiple services within Office 365.

Office 365 Security & Compliance Center
Figure 1: Admins use the Security & Compliance Center to handle compliance tasks for data across the Office 365 suite.

Admins use the Security & Compliance Center to manage data in several areas. Your organization might need more than one of these Office 365 compliance features.

  • Data loss prevention (DLP): This section identifies sensitive content automatically and prevents users from uploading or sharing the data externally or internally.
  • Data governance: This area sets policies across Office 365. It works to define how long to keep, and when to remove, data. Admins can also archive data or mark it for supervision review.
  • Classifications: This section lets admins define labels to tag content in OneDrive, SharePoint and Exchange services. These labels work with the data governance function to categorize data and apply preservation rules.
  • Sensitive information types: These definitions automatically match data, such as credit card or Social Security numbers. Built-in definitions cover most financial, medical, health and personal data, and admins can also add customized definitions. DLP functions and classifications use these definitions to auto detect sensitive data.

Understand the capabilities of Office 365 compliance features

An enterprise’s most common compliance requirement is to keep all data for a certain amount of time. Most organizations must retain data for five to 10 years, although the requirement is longer for some.

With an on-premises mailbox server, organizations typically use email journaling for compliance purposes. An email journal makes a copy of every email message — this includes the message envelope and BCC recipients — on a separate system. The business retains the copy for as long as necessary.

[embedded content]

How to build new labels in Office 365
then publish them with a policy.

Organizations on Office 365 do not need a product that copies and stores data from Exchange or SharePoint. If a worker alters or removes data from the mailbox, SharePoint sites or OneDrive for Business, data governance keeps the original in Office 365.

In Figure 2, an admin creates a policy that targets all Office 365 data. The preservation lock feature prevents the Office 365 administrator from removing the policy to add an extra layer of security.

Office 365 policies
Figure 2: This policy protects data in all areas of the Office 365 suite.

Use DLP to hinder leaks

Many organizations with on-premises messaging servers try to prevent disclosures of sensitive data in email with edge-based DLP tools. But edge-based DLP tools only defend the email gateway and do not account for other ways users share sensitive information. Unless it integrates with OneDrive or SharePoint, an edge-based DLP tool does not scan documents included as a link, rather than an attachment, in email.

Office 365 DLP works across both Exchange and SharePoint and prevents sensitive data from being uploaded and shared. For example, admins can configure Office 365 DLP to prevent users from sending a list of credit card numbers to a OneDrive for Business account. Alternatively, admins can set a DLP policy to stop users from sharing credit card numbers with external guests.

New DLP policy
Figure 3: This Office 365 DLP policy sends an alert if the content includes insurance information or passport numbers.

The classifications feature identifies and marks this sensitive data for retention and removal. Autolabel policies can search for data across Exchange, SharePoint and OneDrive by keyword. The admin can further adjust settings in sensitive information types to mark data and remove it.

GDPR requirements put end-user data in the spotlight

As organizations around the world prepare for major new data privacy rules to take effect, their biggest challenge is taking stock of data and how they use it.

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which goes into effect in May 2018, governs the storage and processing of individuals’ personal data. For IT departments, this regulation means they must review their handling of employees’ and customers’ information to ensure it meets new security requirements. Endpoint management products play an important role in helping IT get ready for GDPR requirements, but many of these tools don’t yet have all the capabilities they need, experts said.

“It’s going to be a huge risk if the organization is not able to control data that’s part of GDPR,” said Danny Frietman, co-founder of MobileMindz, an enterprise mobility consultancy in the Netherlands. “A lot of companies will not be able to cope with the magnitude of that change.”

GDPR is a European Union (EU) regulation that aims to protect Europe residents’ data, but it has worldwide ramifications. U.S.-based companies that have branches in the EU, use consultants based in the EU or have customers in the EU, for example, will all have to comply. GDPR would come into play for most organizations when it comes to protecting their employees’ and customers’ personally identifiable information (PII), such as home address, IP address or bank account details.

The role of endpoint management tools in GDPR

Some of the end-user computing (EUC) technologies IT can use to ensure GDPR compliance include information and identity management and enterprise mobility management (EMM).

Mobile and desktop management tools allow administrators to implement the following technologies and features:

  • encryption;
  • multifactor authentication;
  • application blacklisting;
  • per-user security policies; and
  • alerts that identify noncompliant activities.

Specifically for mobile devices, IT can use capabilities such as the following:

  • remote wipe to remove a user’s information once they leave the company;
  • containerization to separate personal and corporate information and ensure that IT only accesses the identifiable data it really needs; and
  • threat defense tools to be proactive about potential breaches.

MobileMindz, for instance, uses Apperian for mobile application management and adopted its enterprise app store to ensure all employees’ apps that deal with sensitive data are secure, Frietman said.

But EMM tools lack the ability to allow for clear and efficient logging, reporting and auditing of what personal data an organization has. That’s the bigger challenge for IT, said Frietman, whose firm is preparing clients and itself for GDPR.

“This is a huge opportunity for EMM vendors,” he said. “It could solve a lot of questions for customers.”

VMware, for one, has aimed over the past year to improve upon its existing data-reporting capabilities in Workspace One, a company spokesperson said. Workspace One Intelligence, announced at this year’s VMworld, can help IT document information for GDPR requirements by gaining deeper insight into its data and running reports based on historical and future big data. It should be generally available before the regulation goes into effect in May, the spokesperson said.

GDPR concerns
Businesses list their concerns about the upcoming GDPR.

Preparing a paper trail

The biggest change EUC administrators will need to enact to comply with GDPR requirements is around governance and data inventory — an approach to managing information that’s based on clear processes and roles. The regulation requires the entities that collect personal data be able to identify exactly what data they have, whose it is, why they have it, the purpose of keeping it and what they are going to do with it.

Clear documentation of all data will be key, said Chris Marsh, research director at 451 Research.

“You can point to that straight away if anyone came to you, and you can say, ‘This is what the purpose was, and here’s what we’re doing with the data,'” Marsh said.

Organizations should also develop clear, written security and compliance policies that state who has access to what data and how they can use it. Can a human resources manager view employees’ bank account information? Can IT administrators view GPS location from a user’s mobile device? Can a salesperson who deals with customer information share data from a corporate app to a personal one?

“We are living with decentralized data, and companies should have thought about the impact of that data a while ago,” Frietman said.

How the GDPR works

We are living with decentralized data.
Danny Frietmanco-founder, MobileMindz

GDPR differs from its predecessor, the Data Protection Directive, in that it has tighter requirements for documenting and defining what data an organization processes and why. It also has a stricter definition of consent, which says companies must get “freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous” agreement from individuals to process their data. In addition, authorities that regulate GDPR will do so in standard fashion across the EU, rather than enforcing the regulation differently in each member state.

But what makes GDPR so complex is its wide-ranging classification of what constitutes personal data. The European definition of personal data is much wider than the U.S. definition of PII. It can even include biometric data, political opinions, health information, sexual orientation, trade union membership and more.

“Those things, according to the European view, are particularly susceptible to misuse in discrimination against individuals,” said Tatiana Kruse, of counsel at global law firm Dentons.

GDPR includes dozens of requirements and suggested security guidelines for how to comply. For instance, certain companies must appoint a data protection officer and report breaches to authorities. They may also have to take data privacy into account when building IT systems and applications by using technologies such as pseudonymization, which masks data so it can’t be attributed to a specific person — an approach called privacy by design.

But the GDPR requirements do not include many specific security measures that IT must implement; a lot of the law will be figured out in litigation as regulators check into companies’ compliance, said Joseph Jerome, a policy counsel on the Privacy and Data Project at the Center for Democracy and Technology in Washington, D.C.

“Everyone needs to be inventorying their personal data and take a broad characterization of this,” Jerome said. “If you’re putting things in writing, that’s good. GDPR is going to lead to lots and lots of documentation.”

No-code platforms are struggling with new iTunes rules

A recent change to Apple Computer Inc.’s iTunes store rules is making it more difficult for companies to use DIY or no-code platforms to develop software they’d like to have hosted on Apple’s popular online store.

The new rule, 4.2.6, was released during Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference in June as part of a list of “minimum functionality” requirements for the iTunes store. Rule 4.2.6 says “Apps created from a commercialized template or app generation service will be rejected.”

Over the last year, no-code platforms and DIY app services have exploded in popularity, bringing the ability to create mobile apps to nearly anyone, regardless of technical background. Not only are software developers in very short supply worldwide, they’re expensive, and most small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) lack the resources to employ them. No-code platforms, in particular, offered a way for small businesses to be competitive with larger companies, at least in the mobile application space.

This rule is definitely impacting the DIY app space.
Abhinav GirdharCEO, Appy Pie

But now that level playing field is at risk, according to low-code platform provider Appy Pie CEO Abhinav Girdhar. “If this rule is being enforced and these apps start getting rejected, it could be a great loss to the SMBs that are wanting to create an app but don’t have the budget to do it,” Girdhar said. “This rule is definitely impacting the DIY app space.”

Appy Pie has enabled the development of nearly 2 million applications, Girdhar said, with no problems from the iTunes Store. Just recently, though, that changed.

Neo Gourmet, a catering business based in Hazmieh, Lebanon, has had its Appy Pie-developed mobile app rejected several times, according to Neo Gourmet’s owner, Freddy Khoury. He hasn’t been able to get a response from Apple, other than the fact that it was “developed using a commercial platform.”

Officials at Apple did not return phone calls seeking a comment on the rule change.

For Girdhar, the real concern is that the rule is vague and he said he’s not sure which apps will be “safe” going forward. He was also not clear if the rule would cover so-called low-code platforms, which are similar to the no-code options but can require some understanding of coding and often allow for a greater degree of customization.

Forrester Research vice president and principal analyst for application development and delivery professionals Jeffrey Hammond has heard from low-code clients, including platform maker OutSystems, that they’ve had no reported issues or rejections by Apple.

“I don’t see this as a larger attempt to ban low-code tools, as there are many ways to generate apps for iOS and I’ve not heard complaints from vendors or clients that use some of the alternative approaches to app development,” he explained. But he also said Apple has certainly cracked down on different things before. “I would say that it’s not the first time we’ve seen Apple be picky about how apps are built for iOS. There were initial teething pains with Cordova and language runtimes like MIT’s Scratch. I think they want to encourage a consistent look and feel for apps and good performance on the platform.”