Tag Archives: running

Kasten backup aims for secure Kubernetes protection

People often talk about Kubernetes “Day 1,” when you get the platform up and running. Now Kasten wants to help with “Day 2.”

Kasten’s K10 is a data management and backup platform for Kubernetes. The latest release, K10 2.0, focuses on security and simplicity.

K10 2.0 includes support for Kubernetes authentication, role-based access control, OpenID Connect, AWS Identity and Access Management roles, customer-managed keys, and integrated encryption of artifacts at rest and in flight.

“Once you put data into storage, the Day 2 operations are critical,” said Krishnan Subramanian, chief research advisor at Rishidot Research. “Day 2 is as critical as Day 1.”

Day 2 — which includes data protection, mobility, backup and restore, and disaster recovery — is becoming a pain point for Kubernetes users, Kasten CEO Niraj Tolia said.

“In 2.0, we are focused on making Kubernetes backup easy and secure,” Tolia said.

Other features the new Kasten backup software offers, which became generally available earlier in November, include a Kubernetes-native API, auto-discovery of the application environment, policy-driven operations, multi-tenancy support, and advanced logging and monitoring. The Kasten backup enables teams to operate their environments, while supporting developers’ ability to use tools of their choice, according to the vendor.

Kasten K10 dashboard screenshot
Kasten K10 provides data management and backup for Kubernetes.

Kasten backup eyes market opportunity

Kasten, which launched its original product in December 2017, generally releases an update to its customers every two weeks. A typical update that’s not as major as 2.0 typically has bug fixes, new features and increased depth in current features. Tolia said there were 55 releases between 1.0 and 2.0.

Day 2 is as critical as Day 1.
Krishnan SubramanianFounder and chief research advisor, Rishidot Research

Backup for container storage has become a hot trend in data protection. Kubernetes specifically is an open source system used to manage containers across private, public and hybrid cloud environments. Kubernetes can be used to manage microservice architectures and is deployable on most cloud providers.

“Everyone’s waking up to the fact that this is going to be the next VMware,” as in, the next infrastructure of choice, Tolia said.

Kubernetes backup products are popping up, but it looks like Kasten is a bit ahead of its time, Rishidot’s Subramanian said. He said he is seeing more enterprises using Kubernetes in production, for example, in moving legacy workloads to the platform, and that makes backup a critical element.

“Kubernetes is just starting to take off,” Subramanian said.

Kubernetes backup “has really taken off in the last two or three quarters,” Tolia said.

Subramanian said he is starting to see legacy vendors such as Dell EMC and NetApp tackling Kubernetes backup, as well as smaller vendors such as Portworx and Robin. He said Kasten had needed stronger security but caught up with K10 2.0. Down the road, he said he will look for Kasten to improve its governance and analytics.

Tolia said Kasten backup stands out because it’s “purpose-built for Kubernetes” and extends into multilayered data management.

In August, Kasten, which is based in Los Altos, Calif., closed a $14 million Series A funding round, led by Insight Partners. Tolia did not give Kasten’s customer count but said it has deployments across multiple continents.

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For Sale – HP Spectre Pro X360 G1 touchscreen mint condition

Hp Spectre Pro X360 G1 i5 4GB RAM 256GB SSD running windows 10.

Condition is used but the laptop is in pristine condition. I must say not having used a windows laptop for many years this came as a pleasant and very impressive surprise. It’s fast, slick and the touchscreen is excellent. The display is pretty awesome and I use an iMac all day.

Can be used as laptop, in tent mode for watching films or as a full tablet.

Selling as it was intended for my daughter who is now using a Chromebook.

i5 processor
4GB RAM
256GB SSD drive
Full HD touchscreen

Comes with HP box and charger.

IMG_20191113_154959.jpgIMG_20191113_155011.jpgIMG_20191113_155019.jpgIMG_20191113_155035.jpgIMG_20191113_155103.jpgIMG_20191113_155125.jpgIMG_20191113_155211.jpgIMG_20191113_155249.jpgIMG_20191113_155256.jpgIMG_20191113_155357.jpg

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For Sale – Dell XPS8900

Hi Andy, I spoke to him yesterday and he is interested.
His old PC is running Windows 7 and needs to be updated to 10 so now would be a good time to look at some more up to date hardware.

Just wanted to check, this is running Win 10 Home (not Pro)? I help him out with remote support via RDP, so Pro would be useful, but not a deal breaker

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For Sale – HP Spectre Pro X360 G1 touchscreen mint condition

Hp Spectre Pro X360 G1 i5 4GB RAM 256GB SSD running windows 10.

Condition is used but the laptop is in pristine condition. I must say not having used a windows laptop for many years this came as a pleasant and very impressive surprise. It’s fast, slick and the touchscreen is excellent. The display is pretty awesome and I use an iMac all day.

Can be used as laptop, in tent mode for watching films or as a full tablet.

Selling as it was intended for my daughter who is now using a Chromebook.

i5 processor
4GB RAM
256GB SSD drive
Full HD touchscreen

Comes with HP box and charger.

IMG_20191113_154959.jpgIMG_20191113_155011.jpgIMG_20191113_155019.jpgIMG_20191113_155035.jpgIMG_20191113_155103.jpgIMG_20191113_155125.jpgIMG_20191113_155211.jpgIMG_20191113_155249.jpgIMG_20191113_155256.jpgIMG_20191113_155357.jpg

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For Sale – Vortexbox 2.4 Intel Atom Server – 64gb SSD, Plex Server, Roon Server, Squeezebox Server

For sale is my old music and movies server (now replaced by an Intel NUC running ROCK for Roon and a Nvidia Shield for Plex).

It started off life as a LIV Concepts (now Innuos) Zen 1tb Vortexbox in 2012.

Spec now is:

Intel Atom 1.66ghz (from memory, lost the eBay page I had saved telling me the exact specs)
2gb RAM (ditto)
64gb SSD for operating system (will need either an additional 3.5″ HDD installing, or a NAS mounting)
Blu Ray disc drive
Vortexbox 2.4 software installed, running Plex server, Squeezebox Server and Roon.
MakeMKV installed for Blu Ray and DVD ripping.

Amazingly for a 2012 machine it ran my 1000 album Roon server perfectly.

You may want to re-install the software as I’ve been into the Linux code and mounted my NAS etc, and do a fresh install of Vortexbox (or whatever else you might want to do).

This probably isn’t a plug and play job, but if you like tinkering, it’s yours for £60 plus postage.

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DerbyCon attendees and co-founder reflect on the end

After nine years running, DerbyCon held its ninth and final show, and attendees and a co-founder looked back on the conference and discussed plans to continue the community with smaller groups around the world.

DerbyCon was one of the more popular small-scale hacker conferences held in the U.S., but organizers surprised the infosec community in January by announcing DerbyCon 9 would be the last one. The news came after multiple attendee allegations of mistreatment by the volunteer security staff and inaction regarding the safety of attendees.

Dave Kennedy, co-founder of DerbyCon, founder of TrustedSec LLC and co-founder of Binary Defense Systems, did not comment on specific allegations at the time and said the reason for the conference coming to an end was that the conference had gotten too big and there was a growing “toxic environment” created by a small group of people “creating negativity, polarization and disruption.”

Kennedy claimed in a recent interview that DerbyCon “never really had any major security incidents where we weren’t able to handle the situation quickly and de-escalate at the conference with our security staff.”

Roxy Dee, a vulnerability management specialist, who has been outspoken about the safety for women at DerbyCon, told SearchSecurity that “it’s highly irresponsible to paint it as a great conference” given the past allegations and what she described as a lack of response from conference organizers.  

Despite these past controversies, attendees praised DerbyCon 9, held in Louisville, Ky from Sept. 6 to 8 this year, there have been no major complaints, and Kennedy told SearchSecurity it was everything the team wanted for the last year and “went better than any other year I can remember.”

“When we started this conference we had no idea what we were doing or how to run a conference. We went from that to one of the most impactful family conferences in the world,” Kennedy said. “It’s been a lot of work, a lot of time and effort, but at the end of the day we accomplished everything we wanted to get out of the conference and then some. Family, community and friendship. It was an incredible experience and one that I’ll miss for sure.”

As a joke, someone handed Kennedy a paper during the conference reading “DerbyCon 10” and the image quickly circled the conference via Twitter. Kennedy admitted he and all of the organizers “struggled with ending DerbyCon this year or not, but we were all really burned out.”

“When we decided, it was from all of us that it was the right direction and the right time to go on a high note. We didn’t have any doubts at all this year that there would ever be another DerbyCon. This is it for us and we ended on a high note that was both memorable and magical to us,” Kennedy said. “The attendees, staff, speakers and everyone were just absolutely incredible. Thank you all to who made DerbyCon possibly and for growing an amazing community.”

The legacy of DerbyCon

Kennedy told SearchSecurity that his inspiration for fostering the DerbyCon community initially was David Logan’s Tribal Leadership, “which talks about growing a tribe based on a specific culture.

“A culture for a conference can be developed if we try hard enough and I think our success was we really focused on that family and community culture with DerbyCon,” Kennedy said. “A conference is a direct representation of the people that put it on, and we luckily were able to establish a culture early on that was sorely needed in the INFOSEC space.”

April C. Wright, security consultant at ArchitectSecurity.org, said in her years attending, DerbyCon provided a “wonderful environment with tons of positivity and personality.”

“I met my best friend there. I can’t describe how much good there was going on, from raising money for charity to knowledge sharing to welcoming first-time attendees,” Wright said. “The quality of content and villages were world class. The volunteers and staff have always been friendly and kind. It was in my top list of cons worldwide.”

Eric Beck, a pen-tester and web app security specialist, said the special part about DerbyCon was a genuine effort to run contrary to the traditional infosec community view that “you can pwn or you can’t.”

“We all start somewhere, we all have different strengths and weaknesses and everyone has a seat at the table. Dave [Kennedy], set a welcoming tone and it meant that people that might otherwise hesitate took that first step. And that first step is always the hardest,” Beck said. “DerbCon was my infosec home base and where I recharged my batteries and I don’t know who or what can fill its shoes. I have a kiddo I thought I’d share this conference with and met people I assumed I’d see annually. I’m personally determined to contribute more in infosec and make the effort to reach out, but I have a difficult time imaging being part of something that brought in the caliber of talent and the sense of welcoming that this conference did.”

Danny Akacki, senior technical account manager with Gigamon Insight, said his first time attending was DerbyCon 6 and the moment he walked in to the venue he “fell in love with the vibe of that place and those people.”

“I still didn’t know too many people but I swear to god it didn’t matter. I made so many friends that weekend and I had the hardest bout of post-con blues I’ve ever experienced, which is a testament to just how profound an effect that year had on me,” Akacki said. “I had to skip 7, but made it to 8 and 9. Every year I went back, it felt like only a day had passed since the last visit because that experience and those people stay with you every day.” 

For Alethe Denis, founder of Dragonfly Security, DerbyCon 9 was her first time attending and she said the experience was everything she expected and more.

“The atmosphere was like a sleepover, compared to the giant summer camp that is DEF CON, and I really enjoyed that aspect of it. It felt like it was a weekend getaway with friends and the lack of casinos was appreciated. But I don’t feel that the quality of the talks and availability of villages was sacrificed in the least,” Denis said. “Even as small as Derby is, it was really tough to do everything I wanted to do because there were so many interesting options available. I feel like it brought only the best elements of the DEF CON type community and DEF CON conference to the Midwest.”

Micah Brown, security engineer at American Modern Insurance Group and vice president of the Greater Cincinnati ISSA chapter, echoed the sentiments of brother/sisterhood at DerbyCon and the cheerfulness of the conference and added another key tenet: Charity.

“One of the key tenets of DerbyCon has always been giving back. During the closing ceremonies, it was revealed that over the past 9 years, DerbyCon and the attendees have given over $700,000 to charity. That does not count the hours of people’s lives that go into making the presentations, the tools, the training that are freely distributed each year. Nor does it factor in the personal relationships and mentorships that are established and progress our community,” Brown said. “It was after my first DerbyCon I volunteered to be the Director of Education for the Greater Cincinnati ISSA Chapter and after my second DerbyCon I volunteered to be the Vice President of the Chapter. DerbyCon has also inspired me to give back by sharing my knowledge through giving my own presentations, including the honor to give back to the DerbyCon community with my own talk this year.”

Beyond DerbyCon

Xena Olsen, cyberthreat intelligence analyst in the financial services industry, attended the last two years of DerbyCon and credited the “community and sense of belonging” there with encouraging her to continue learning and leading her to now being a cybersecurity PhD student at Marymount University.

“The DerbyCon Communities initiative will hopefully serve as a means for people to experience the DerbyCon culture around the world,” Olsen said. “As far as a conference taking the place of DerbyCon, I’m not sure that’s possible. But other conferences can adopt similar values of community and inclusiveness, knowledge sharing and charity.” 

Wright said she has seen other conferences with similar personality and passion, “but none have really captured the heart of DerbyCon.”

“There are a lot of great regional cons in the U.S. that I think more people will start going to. They are affordable and easily accessed, with the small-con feel — as opposed to the mega-con vibe of ‘Hacker Summer camp’,” Wright said, referencing the week in Las Vegas that includes Black Hat, DEF CON, BSides Las Vegas, Diana Con and QueerCon plus other events, meetups and parties. “I don’t think anyone can fill the space left by DerbyCon, but I do think each will continue with its own set of ways and personality.”

Akacki was adamant that “no other con will ever take Derby’s place.”

“It burned fast and it burned bright. It was lighting in a bottle, never to be seen again. However, I’m not sad,” Akacki said. “I can’t even say that its vibe is rising from the ashes, because it would have to have burned down for that to happen. The fire that is the spirit of DerbyCon still burns and, I’d argue, it burns brighter than ever.”

I’m not sure any other con will be able to truly capture that magic and fill the space left by Derby.
Alethe DenisFounder, Dragonfly Security

Denis said it will be difficult for any conference to truly replace DerbyCon.

“I feel like the people who organized and were passionate about DerbyCon are what made Derby unique. I’m not sure any other con will be able to truly capture that magic and fill the space left by Derby,” Denis said. “But I guess that remains to be seen and hope that more cons, such as Blue Team Con in June 2020 in Chicago bring high quality content and engaging talks to the Midwest in the future.”

Wright noted that some of her favorite smaller security conferences included GRRcon, NOLAcon, CircleCityCon, CypherCon, Showmecon, Toorcon and [Wild West Hackin’ Fest], and she expressed hope that the proposed “DerbyCon Communities” project “will help with the void left by the end of the era of the original DerbyCon.”

The DerbyCon Communities initiative

The organizers saw DerbyCon growing fast, but “didn’t want to turn the conference into such a large production like DEF CON,” Kennedy told SearchSecurity.

“We wanted to go back to why DerbyCon was so successful and that was due to three core principles: Posivitiy and Inclusiveness, Knowledge Sharing and Charity. There is a direct need for a community to help new people in the industry and help charity at the same time,” Kennedy said. “The goal for the Communities initiative is to bring people together the same way DerbyCon did for one common goal.”

Kennedy also confirmed that there will be some involvement with the Communities initiative from the “core group” of organizers, including his wife Erin, Martin Bos and others.

Akacki said that with the local Derby Communities initiative, “the spirit of Derby has exploded into stardust, covering our universe.”

“You can’t kill what we’ve built, you can’t contain it and you can’t stop it,” Akacki said. “I’m not crying because it ended, I’m smiling and laughing … because it just became bigger than ever.”

On Sept. 11, Kennedy pitched the full idea of DerbyCon Communities to the team and said there should be four main areas of focus:

  • Chapter Groups
    • Independently run with chapter heads
    • Geographically placed
    • Volunteer network
  • Established Groups
    • Partner with similar groups that meet criteria and approval process to join DerbyCon network.
  • Conferences
    • Established or new. Allow for new conferences to be created.
  • Kids
    • Programs geared towards teaching next-gen children.

Ultimately, Kennedy told SearchSecurity he wants new groups to “be welcoming and accepting of new people and making a difference and impact in their local communities or worldwide.”

“Our hope is that not only do DerbyCon Chapters spawn up, but other conferences and chapter groups will join forces to create a DerbyCon network of sorts to grow this community in a positive way.”

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Oracle CDP coming in CX Unity, along with video cloud

Oracle customers running CX programs, teams and technology stacks have plenty to pay attention to at this year’s Oracle OpenWorld conference, beginning with updates around the yet-to-go-live CX Unity platform, plus a new video cloud and a partnership with Deloitte Digital to incorporate the Oracle CX and Deloitte Hux personalization platforms.

CX Unity contains the Oracle CDP, or customer data platform, a foundational data-handling tool. Competing CX suites from Adobe and many smaller platform vendors also offer CDPs, while SAP and Salesforce are working on their own. All of them aspire to manage a customer’s data and reconcile it across sales, marketing, e-commerce and service clouds into a golden record.

With its flagship database pedigree, Oracle hopes to woo customers on to its CX Unity customer intelligence platform, which previewed last year but is still under wraps.

“Data is, ultimately, the fuel driving customer engagement, and Oracle has put a more-than-average data focus on the marketing products,” said Joe Stanhope, an analyst with Forrester Research. “They’re bullish on the Oracle Data Cloud; they’ve invested an enormous amount of effort in that over the last few years.”

Shashi Seth presenting at ModernCX 2018
Oracle Marketing Cloud SVP Shashi Seth, pictured here at ModernCX 2018, will speak at many OpenWorld sessions unveiling the Oracle CX product strategy at OpenWorld.

Video platform now included

Last week, in advance of OpenWorld, Oracle said it will embed Kaltura video platform features via APIs across its CX, HR, ERP, financial and supply chain clouds. Oracle CX users will be a big beneficiary, as video has many applications from marketing to sales content as well as call centers and field service. The OEM integration includes video analytics tools paired with Oracle’s Eloqua and Responsys marketing automation apps.

Kaltura was an attractive choice for an Oracle video platform because of its easy-to-use, modular features that make it simple to set up “corporate YouTube” sites as well as webcasting and sales-enablement video creation tools, said Nick Barber, a Forrester Research analyst. Some of its competitors, such as Brightcove, aren’t as user-friendly, he added, making Kaltura the likeliest choice among the field.

Oracle doesn’t want to own and manage a video platform when it could use some of the capabilities of Kaltura without getting into the video business itself.
Nick BarberAnalyst, Forrester Research

The New York-based video platform provider, with annual revenues somewhere between $50 million and $60 million and whose customer roster includes Vodafone, Novartis and a number of universities, could have been an acquisition target for Oracle. The OEM partnership, Barber said, signifies that Oracle wasn’t quite ready to run another cloud.

“My assumption is Oracle doesn’t want to own and manage a video platform when it could use some of the capabilities of Kaltura without getting into the video business itself,” Barber said.

Emphasis on partnerships

Like Adobe and other CX platform vendors, Oracle leans on professional service firms such as Deloitte, Accenture and Capgemini to help customers mesh their CX programs. In many cases, this means building a branded mobile app to enable e-commerce or online reservations with its cloud technology stacks and the Oracle CDP.

To that end, Oracle is extending its CX-specific partnerships with those firms. Today Deloitte and Oracle announced integration of Deloitte Hux and Oracle CX Unity for marketing personalization; earlier this year Oracle announced partnerships with Capgemini and Accenture to develop best practices for setting up CDPs for customers. Many OpenWorld sessions delve into how to work with those partners to integrate customer-intelligence technologies, said Des Cahill, Oracle VP and CX Evangelist.

While mobile apps might appear simple to the end user, for large organizations, connecting them to back-end systems to integrate data, software and processes can be complex. Since Oracle’s applications are highly configurable, integrators help companies build the custom tools that fit their IT stacks.

“[Deloitte, Accenture and Capgemini] are growing their practices around customer intelligence and real-time CX,” Cahill said, adding that companies who aren’t engaging those integrators for building apps are working on migrating customer data systems from on-premises to the cloud.

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Beyond overhead: What drives donor support in the digital era – Microsoft on the Issues

One of the greatest challenges to running a successful nonprofit organization has always been that donors look at nonprofits’ stewardship of funds as a primary way to assess impact. While there is no doubt that nonprofits must use donor funds responsibly, tracking to see if a nonprofit maintains the highest possible ratio of spending on programs-to spending on overhead is a poor proxy for understanding how effective a nonprofit truly is. In fact, the imperative to limit overhead has forced many organizations to underinvest in efforts to improve efficiency. Ironically, this has long prevented nonprofits from utilizing innovative digital technologies that could help them be more efficient and effective.

Now more than ever, cloud-based technology can have a transformative effect on how nonprofit organizations increase impact and reduce costs. The same technologies that give for-profit businesses insights about customers and markets, create operational efficiencies and speed up innovation can also help nonprofits target donors and raise funds more strategically, design and deliver programming more efficiently, and connect field teams with headquarters more effectively. This means smart investments in digital tools are essential to every nonprofit’s ability to make progress toward its mission.

The good news is that a major shift is underway. As part of our work at Microsoft Tech for Social Impact to understand how nonprofits can use technology to drive progress and demonstrate impact, we recently surveyed 2,200 donors, volunteers and funding decision-makers to learn how they decide which organizations to support, what their expectations are for efficiency and effectiveness, and how they feel about funding technology infrastructure at the nonprofits they support.

The results, which we published recently in the white paper “Beyond overhead: Donor expectations for driving impact with technology,” make clear that people donate to organizations they trust and that donors are increasingly looking at data beyond the ratio of program spending to overhead spending to measure impact. We also found that those who support nonprofits now overwhelmingly recognize the critical role technology plays in driving impact and delivering value. Nearly four out of five supporters (which includes both donors and volunteers) and more than nine out of 10 funding decision-makers told us they support directing donations to improve technology at a nonprofit. An overwhelming majority — 85 percent of supporters and 95 percent of funding decision-makers — are more likely to contribute to organizations that can show that they are using technology to improve how it runs programs.

At the same time, the survey found that most people expect organizations to use donations more efficiently and to advance the causes they work for more effectively than in the past. Among supporters, for example, 79 percent believe nonprofits should be better at maximizing funding than they were 10 years ago. Just over 80 percent of funding decision-makers believe nonprofits should be more effective at achieving their goals and advancing the causes they work for now than in the past.

To give you a better sense of what potential donors are looking for as they consider where to target their nonprofit contributions and how much they weigh technology into their thinking, we have developed a tool using Power BI so you can look at the data in greater detail. Within the tool, you can see how people responded to questions about overall effectiveness and efficiency, the importance of technology as a driver of success, how likely they are to support organizations that use technology to demonstrate impact, and their willingness to fund technology improvements at the nonprofits they support.

To make the tool as useful as possible for your organization, you can sort the data by supporters and funding decision-makers, and you can explore how responses varied by region. As you move through the data, you will see how these critical groups of supporters and funders think about these important questions in the region where your organization operates:

The ultimate goal of this survey was to get a clearer picture of what motivates people to contribute to an organization and how technology can help nonprofits meet supporters’ expectations. Overall, I believe our research provides some important insights that can help any organization be more successful. Fundamentally, we found that people donate to organizations that are perceived to be trustworthy, and that trust is achieved though operational transparency and effective communications. More than ever before, donors recognize that using data to measure and demonstrate impact is the foundation for trust.

I encourage you to read the full report and learn more about Microsoft’s commitment to support nonprofits.

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Author: Microsoft News Center