Tag Archives: search

Algolia partners with integrators, digital agencies

Algolia, which offers search technology for websites and mobile apps, has launched a partner program targeting systems integrators, consultants, digital agencies and e-commerce platforms. Algolia partners include Accenture Interactive’s Altima business unit, digital agency Wunderman and e-commerce platforms Magento and Shopify.

At launch, the Algolia Partner Program has 20 certified partners. The program aims to create an ecosystem of Algolia partners that can help enterprises customize Algolia search technology, according to the company.

The program’s launch follows rising interest among customers in working with partners, said Alexandre Popp, director of channels and alliances at Algolia.

“Over the past year, we saw increasing demand from enterprises to leverage the support of partners like systems integrators, consultants and agencies,” Popp said. “So we made the decision to dedicate resources to building out partner engineering, account management, and marketing teams to support our partners in the field and meet customer demand.”

The partner program is part of the company’s enterprise customer initiative.

Alexandre Popp, director of channels and alliances at AlgoliaAlexandre Popp

“Our motion to move upmarket comes with partners and multinational brands purchasing our product in tandem with partner solutions, and deployed with consulting firms’ team[s],” Popp said. He noted the program’s objective is to support partners as they “build or sell digital products” that embed Algolia.

Algolia’s partner program offers technical enablement and certification; go-to-market and sales enablement; and marketing support, including co-marketing events, webinars and campaigns. The company, founded in 2012, said it has more than 5,700 customers.

Cloud service providers launch offerings

Cloud service providers Faction and 2nd Watch rolled out new services this week.

Over the past year, we saw increasing demand from enterprises to leverage the support of partners like systems integrators, consultants and agencies.
Alexandre Poppdirector of channels and alliances, Algolia

Faction, a Denver company that focuses on multi-cloud services, said it is working with VMware to provide cloud-attached storage for VMware Cloud on AWS deployments. Faction said its Cloud Control Volumes offering provides a scalable storage platform for VMware Cloud on AWS customers who need more storage capacity.

Meanwhile, 2nd Watch, a managed service provider based in Seattle, said its Cloud Migration Cost Assessment service aims to help large and midmarket firms get a handle on the cost benefits of moving on-premises IT infrastructure to the cloud. The cloud migration assessment involves a six-week engagement in which 2nd Watch cloud personnel evaluate a customer’s IT estate and “map current resources to the most cost-effective cloud solution,” according to the company.

Other news

  • Silver Peak launched its Authorized Deployment Partner (ADP) Program, which will train, certify and authorize a group of services partners. Partners receiving authorization are deemed capable of managing the design, deployment and management of the Silver Peak Unity EdgeConnect SD-WAN offering. Program participants include Cavell Group, FireOwls Corp., Geode Networks, Traversa Solutions and Velociti.
  • Arcserve, a data backup and availability vendor based in Minneapolis, unveiled a new channel program dubbed Arcserve Accelerate. The program targets North American MSPs, value-added resellers, large-account resellers and original equipment manufacturers. Program features include re-developed e-learning courses, partner certification, individual and corporate SPIFs, marketing development funds and access to cloud-native products with support for private and public clouds such as AWS and Microsoft Azure, according to Arcserve.
  • Matrix Integration, an IT infrastructure company in Kentucky and Indiana, has opened its new Louisville regional office. The company said the expansion provides a hub for modernizing the IT infrastructure of public and private sector entities in the Louisville area.

Market Share is a news roundup published every Friday.

Lucidworks Fusion platform to scale via channel partnerships

Lucidworks, a vendor of search and discovery applications, has revealed a channel program designed to make partners central to its business growth.

The program, launched this week, offers channel staples such as deal registration, a partner portal, and training and certification. The program also features engagement models to support various channel partner types, including technology vendors, systems integrators, value-added resellers, managed services providers (MSPs) and SaaS providers, Lucidworks said.

“The design philosophy around this was to formalize the way that partners engage with us,” said Simon Taylor, vice president of worldwide channels and alliances at Lucidworks, based in San Francisco. The vendor, which developed the Lucidworks Fusion platform, currently has about 60 to 80 core partners, he noted.

The company launched the program on the heels of a $50 million funding round and an alliance struck with storage vendor Commvault in June. Looking to expand, Lucidworks identified the channel as the means for transforming “our scale and growth as a company,” Taylor said.

“What we decided to do … is to really change the way the organization operates and make it as much as possible 100% channel-centric,” he added.

The tracks for different channel partner types within the Lucidworks program are intended to develop the vendor’s relationships “so that we could focus on partners that were meaningful to our business,” he said.

What we decided to do … is to really change the way the organization operates and make it as much as possible 100% channel-centric.
Simon Taylorvice president of worldwide channels and alliances, Lucidworks

The reseller program is structured with three partner tiers — Authorized, Gold and Platinum — with incremental requirements and benefits. Benefits include market development funds, qualified sales leads and technical assistance.

Other partner tracks within the program include the following:

  • an OEM and SaaS partner program, providing tools for embedding Lucidworks Fusion technology into solutions or using the Fusion software development kit and App Studio platforms to build apps and connectors.
  • a Certified Partner Consultant program for partners qualified to design and deploy offerings using the Lucidworks Fusion platform and applications, according to the vendor.

Taylor noted the company has invested significantly — and will continue to invest — in hiring channel management staff.

“It is a core part of our overall business plan: to embrace partners and grow this way,” he said.

Informatica ramps up partner training

Informatica, an enterprise cloud data management vendor, plans to train thousands of partner employees over the next year, as it seeks digital transformation resources.

Richard Ganley, senior vice president of digital transformation solutions and global partners at Informatica, based in Redwood City, Calif., said the company aims to cultivate partners that can help its customers navigate digital transformation projects.

“As good as we think our technology is … we really need partners to help us,” he added, noting the complexity of transformative IT initiatives.

Informatica’s training push includes a series of Elevate enablement events, which will conclude next week in Denver. The Denver event, scheduled for Aug. 20 to 23, follows training events held earlier this year in Copenhagen, Denmark, and Bangkok. The events include presales, sales and implementation tracks.

Over the course of the three events, Informatica will have trained some 750 people, Ganley estimated.

In another training effort, Informatica plans to send a training team to visit the campuses of eight of the largest systems integrators in India. Ganley said the company aims to train several thousand people over the course of the next year. Not all of the integrator personnel will be trained to the deepest level, but some will, he added.

Informatica’s goal is to provide a “much bigger pool of trained resources in the market,” he said.

“We are trying to train our partners on our technology on an industrial scale,” Ganley said.

Accenture focuses on digital twin tech

Accenture’s Industry X.0 practice, which focuses on the smart connected products market, is concentrating on digital twin technology.

Craig McNeil, managing director at Accenture and North American lead for Industry X.0, said digital twin is “one of the bigger areas of focus in our current fiscal year and definitely will be in the next fiscal year.” Accenture’s fiscal year begins Sept. 1.

A digital twin is a virtual representation of a product that can be used in design and simulation.

In other news, Accenture has entered an alliance with Malong Technologies, an AI startup based in Shenzhen, China. Accenture also made a minority investment in the company. Malong and Accenture’s Applied Intelligence practice will provide “computer vision and product recognition capabilities” to customers.

Other news

  • Cloudreach, a cloud services provider based in London, has inked a letter of intent to purchase Relus Cloud, an Amazon Web Services partner in Peachtree Corners, Ga. Relus Cloud, founded in 2013, is a Premier Consulting Partner in the AWS Partner Network, focusing on the North American market.
  • Qualys, a cloud-based security and compliance vendor, revealed it will release a version of its cloud platform for consultants, consulting firms and MSPs. Qualys Consulting Edition provides vulnerability assessments capabilities, as well as features such as customizable reporting and trending reports and dashboards, Qualys said. The vendor said Qualys Consulting Edition will be available by the end of this month.
  • Beachhead Solutions reported 72% year-over-year revenue growth for the first half of 2018 on the strength of managed service provider partnerships. The company said about 250 MSPs now work with the company, which provides cloud-managed PC and mobile device encryption, security and data access control offerings.
  • OPAQ, a network security cloud vendor, is teaming with Palo Alto Networks’ MSSP Partner Program in an alliance that lets MSPs and managed security services providers deliver Palo Alto’s security-as-a-service offering to midsize companies.
  • Cask LLC has joined Unified Compliance’s partner network as a value-added reseller.
  • ERGOS, an MSP based in Houston, has tapped Liongard’s Roar platform, which automates system discovery and documentation.

Market Share is a news roundup published every Friday.

LinkedIn Sales Navigator refresh adds deals pipeline

A LinkedIn Sales Navigator refresh adds a deals management feature, smoother search experience and mobile deal pages to the social media giant’s social sales platform.

The revamp injects an array of new ways to search, manipulate and process LinkedIn’s vast troves of personal and consumer data and data from CRM systems and puts LinkedIn in a better position to monetize the information — coming off a hot quarter for LinkedIn, which reported June quarter earnings of $1.46 billion, up 37% from Q2 2017.

These upgraded features represent the next step in AI-assisted sales and marketing campaigns in which B2B companies mash up their own customer data with information on LinkedIn.

Microsoft banking on LinkedIn revenue

Microsoft bought LinkedIn in June 2016 for $26.2 billion. While Microsoft doesn’t always announce how AI is assisting automation of sales-centric search tools in Sales Navigator, a premium LinkedIn feature that also integrates LinkedIn data to CRM platforms such as Salesforce and Dynamics CRM, some experts have noted how AI subtly manifests itself in the search. 

The LinkedIn Sales Navigator refresh was unveiled in a blog post by Doug Camplejohn, vice president of products for LinkedIn Sales Solutions.

The new “Deals” web interface extracts and imports sales pipeline data from the user’s CRM system and enables users to update pipelines considerably faster, Camplejohn said in the post about the LinkedIn Sales Navigator refresh.

“Reps can now update their entire pipeline in minutes, not hours,” he wrote.

Adobe Sign connector added

Meanwhile, a new feature in Deals, “Buyer’s Circle,” pulls in and displays opportunity role information to streamline the B2B buying process. Users can see if any “key players” such as decision-maker, influencer or evaluator, are missing from deals, according to LinkedIn.

We all live in email.
Doug Camplejohnvice president of products, LinkedIn

The vendor called another new function in the LinkedIn Sales Navigator refresh — Office 365 integration — “Sales Navigator in your inbox.”

“We all live in email,” the blog post said. “Now you can take Sales Navigator actions and see key insights without ever leaving your Outlook for Web Inbox. “

LinkedIn also touted what it called a “new search experience” in the Sales Navigator update, saying it redesigned the search function to surface search results pages faster and easier.

Also as part of the LinkedIn Sales Navigator refresh, LinkedIn added mobile-optimized lead pages for sales people working on mobile devices. LinkedIn also named Adobe Sign the fourth partner to its Sales Navigator Application Platform (SNAP). Other SNAP partners include Salesforce, Microsoft Dynamics and SalesLoft.

Bing adds new intelligent visual search features

As the saying goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. Microsoft’s new intelligent visual search technology allows users to discover information about objects captured in images without having to pick and choose a handful of keywords to fit into a search box.

The AI-powered visual search feature is available on Bing mobile apps.

“Sometimes, it is almost impossible to describe what you want to search for using words,” explained Vince Leung, product lead for Bing Images at Microsoft.

For example, imagine hiking through a meadow and seeing a flower that you’ve never seen before. You want to know what it is and whether you can get it at your local garden store to plant at home. Bing’s Visual Search can help you identify and find more information from your snapshot of the flower.

Or, perhaps you’re in the market for a new couch and spot one you like in a high-end home furnishing store, but the price tag is beyond your budget. By taking a picture of the couch, Bing’s Visual Search can help you find couches that match the style with prices that may meet your budget.

The visual search feature uses Microsoft’s computer vision algorithms, which are trained with datasets containing vast amounts of labeled images, as well as images from around the web. From the training images, the algorithms learn to recognize dogs from cats, for example, and roses from daisies.

What’s more, the learning process is never done; the performance of the algorithms improves as they get more data.

“While there have been strides for many years to get to this point,” noted Leung, “with the advent of cloud computing we are able to accelerate our ability to make sense out of pixels.”

Related:

John Roach writes about Microsoft research and innovation. Follow him on Twitter.

Visual Search from Bing now lets you search what you see

Today we’re launching new intelligent Visual Search capabilities that build upon the visual technology already in Bing so you can search the web using your camera. Now you can search, shop, and learn more about your world through the photos you take.
These new Visual Search capabilities are available today in the US on the Bing app for iOS and Android, and for Microsoft Launcher (Android only). They’ll also begin rolling out today for Microsoft Edge for Android, and will be coming soon to Microsoft Edge for iOS and Bing.com. Just click the camera button to get started:

                         
For example, imagine you see a landmark or flower and want to learn more. Simply take a photo using one of the apps, or upload a picture from your camera roll. Bing will identify the object in question and give you more information by providing additional links to explore.


                        

You can even shop from your photos for fashion and home furnishings. Let’s say you see a friend’s jacket you like, but don’t know its brand or where to purchase. Upload a pic into the app’s search box and Bing will return visually-similar jackets, prices, and details for where to purchase.

We’ll be working hard over the coming months to add more capabilities to Visual Search, so your input on these features is greatly appreciated, as always. We hope you’re as excited by Visual Search as we are!

– The Bing Team

Welcoming Flipgrid to the Microsoft family |

If you want to see what a movement looks like, search #FlipgridFever on Twitter, or walk into any classroom that’s using Flipgrid. The enthusiasm radiating from Flipgrid’s community is a reflection of how the product began – in the classroom.

Back in 2015, Dr. Charlie Miller, Jim Leslie and Phil Soran came together to envision a world where educators could recast the role of video in the classroom, from a passive experience to a tool that empowers and amplifies every student’s voice. Flipgrid does just that, now supporting more than 20 million Pre-K to PhD educators, students and families across 180 countries. But the success isn’t simply in the numbers, it’s in how students tap into Flipgrid to define their voices, share their voices and respect the diverse voices of others.

This is just the beginning of Flipgrid’s inspiring story. Today, I’m thrilled to announce the Flipgrid team will be joining Microsoft and embarking on its next exciting chapter. To bring the power of video-based social learning to everyone, we’ll be making Flipgrid free for all educators and offering prorated refunds to everyone who has purchased a subscription from Flipgrid in the last year.

Plus: I’m not the only one who is excited.

Just as we’ve seen with products like Teams, social interaction in learning can help deepen students’ understanding of curricula and help build their collaborative, social and emotional skills. The recent Class of 2030 research illustrates how social and emotional skills will be required in 30 to 40 percent of the fastest-growing occupations. With social learning, students are not only more employable, but they are more likely to become responsible, confident digital citizens.

Teachers, like Lucretia Anton (@lantonha) from the Arcadia Unified School District in California, are saying Flipgrid helps their students develop their communication skills, increase self-awareness and grow from failure, setting them up to contribute positively to the world.

Fans of Flipgrid can rest assured the Flipgrid they know and love, in joining Microsoft, will continue to grow and thrive across the Microsoft, Google and partner ecosystems, all while retaining its distinct brand, culture and team. Furthermore, Flipgrid will continue to be a safe, secure place for students and teachers to communicate in alignment with Microsoft’s GDPR, FERPA and COPPA compliant privacy architecture.

‘Fans of Flipgrid can rest assured the Flipgrid they know and love, in joining Microsoft, will continue to grow and thrive across the Microsoft, Google and partner ecosystems, all while retaining its distinct brand, culture and team.’ #FlipgridFever Click To Tweet

If you’re eager to learn more, new Flipgrid updates will be livestreamed from Minneapolis on August 1 at Flipgrid’s annual educator conference, #FlipgridLIVE. You can learn more about refunds for Flipgrid classroom by visiting blog.Flipgrid.com/refund.

So, yeah – we caught #FlipgridFever!

‘Aha, now I get it!’ Microsoft is building technology to put numbers in perspective – The AI Blog

When people in the United States ask Microsoft’s search engine Bing how big Syria is, they learn the country is 71,498 square miles and about equal to the size of Florida. When they ask Bing how many calories are in a serving of ice cream, they learn that a scoop contains 137 calories, which is equal to about 11 minutes of running.

These two-part answers supplied by Bing are early, real-world examples of a technology being developed inside Microsoft’s research labs to help us make sense of the jumble of numbers we increasingly encounter in the digital world.

“We want to reduce the number of times that people read a number and can’t make sense of it. And we want to do that by providing some context, or an analogy, or perspective, that puts it in more familiar terms usually related to their everyday experience,” said Jake Hofman, a senior researcher in Microsoft’s New York research lab.

The need for a new way to understand numbers stems from the overwhelming abundance of data now available to help us make decisions about everything from federal budgets to personal health and environmental conservation, noted Dan Goldstein, a principal researcher in Microsoft’s New York research lab.

“The solution is a relatively low-tech one. Using perspective sentences is very simple and they help a lot,” he said. “What we’re finding is creating them is a difficult challenge because it requires not only understanding the proper numbers to compare the numbers to, but also understanding what people are familiar with, what kinds of comparisons people like, what kinds of things people can easily imagine.”

On the road to AI

The examples on Bing today are only available for a few specific subjects and required human input to develop. Ultimately, the Microsoft researchers aim to build a service that automatically generates perspectives for any number and communicates them with the ease of a skilled storyteller or teacher. This service would be able to pass a test for general artificial intelligence posed in 1950 by the British computer theorist Alan Turing.

“You would be very sure you were talking to a machine if it says 248,572 square miles as opposed to roughly the size of Texas when you asked it how big France was,” said Goldstein. “To pass the Turing test, you have to talk like a human; someone who can explain something in a way that is personalized to the audience.”

The road to this generalized, automated technology that takes raw numbers from sources such as email, social media feeds and search results and puts them in a personalized context is filled with hurdles. To clear them requires a deep understanding of the nuance and complexity of what makes humans human.

Microsoft’s New York research lab, where Hofman and Goldstein are based, is well suited to clear this hurdle, noted David Pennock, a principal researcher and the lab’s assistant managing director. The lab brings together social scientists and computer scientists to study not just computers, but people and how people behave with computers.

“There’s an extra piece that is important for AI, which is taking the result of the complex algorithm that does all its magic and then actually putting it in a presentable form for people,” said Pennock. “If you want to run a data-driven company, yes you want all the great data; yes, you want to run all the right experiments; and yes, you want to make decisions based on your data. But ultimately, you need it in a form that is presentable to a person who in the end makes the decision.”

Numbers in the news

Hofman and Goldstein started down this road on October 30, 2012. The researchers remember the day because it fell the day after Superstorm Sandy slammed the East Coast. They fought snarled traffic to reach an off-site meeting where they had a brainstorming session on new research directions.

“We proposed the idea of trying to make numbers in the news make sense to the average person,” said Hofman. “Everyone nodded and said, ‘Yeah, that sounds like a good idea.’ We had no idea how good of an idea it was, or wasn’t, or how hard of a problem it was to solve.”

To begin, the researchers recruited people to participate in an online experiment designed to quantify the value of perspectives for the comprehension of unfamiliar numbers. Some participants generated perspective sentences for numbers taken from news articles and others took a series of randomized tests to determine if the perspectives improved recall, estimation and error detection.

For example, a news article noted that “Americans own almost 300 million firearms.” That fact alone might be difficult to estimate or believe if never seen before, and recall even if seen in the past. The researchers found comprehension of U.S. gun ownership improved with the perspective that “300 million firearms is about one firearm for every person in the United States.”

The finding that perspective sentences help people understand numbers in the news prompted the researchers to begin teasing apart why perspectives work. Does merely the repetition of numbers increase memory? Do perspectives add fodder for our brains to noodle over and associate with, leading to more stuff to pull on when it comes time for recall? Do perspectives stake mental flags?

What’s more, are some perspectives better than others? Take the area of Pakistan, for example, which is 307,373 square miles. What comparative rank or measure best helps people understand how big – how much land – 307,373 square miles is? Perhaps, how long it would take to drive across? Or how big it is compared to U.S. states? If comparing to states, which state? Is twice the size of California more helpful than five times larger than Georgia?

“How do you figure out which of those is better? How do you do that in a principled way?” said Chris Riederer, who interned with Hofman and Goldstein while pursuing his Ph.D. at Columbia University and co-authored a paper that describes this phase of the research. “Essentially, what we did is we ran a big survey.”

Study participants compared country sizes and populations to the sizes and populations of various U.S. states. The results show that familiar states combined with simple multipliers, even if less precise, are best. For example, people in the U.S. grasp the area of Pakistan more easily when expressed as roughly twice the size of California than the technically more accurate five times larger than Georgia.

These findings were used to generate the country-area perspectives live on Bing today. Ask the search engine, “How big is Pakistan?” and you’ll learn the square-mile fact along with the pre-computed comparison to California.

Bing and beyond

Bing’s question and answer team is working on additional perspectives to increase comprehension of everything from gas mileage to planet sizes. Bing’s food and drink team deployed perspectives that express calories in terms of minutes of running, protein and sodium in percent of the daily recommendation, grams of sugar in teaspoons of sugar and milligrams of caffeine in cups of coffee.

The decision on how to express each perspective – calories in minutes running versus walking, for example – involves brainstorming over email between the Bing and research teams as well as analysis of data from search logs and surveys, explained Christina Ntouniaoglou, a program manager for Bing’s food and drink team.

“I was thinking it is walking. Why would it be running? There are people who cannot really run. But the survey proved that people actually like the running part, so we went with that,” she said.

The next challenge, said Hofman, is to build a system that automatically creates perspectives so that people can more easily use all the data we have access to today to make informed decisions.

“Computers have lots of facts in lots of databases, but they don’t really know how to rank those facts as more or less useful, or comprehensible, to humans,” he said. “That is the last remaining hurdle – big hurdle – that we need to clear in this project.”

Hofman and Goldstein are applying the latest advances in machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, and data analysis to clear this hurdle. Their eyes are fixed on the goal of a generalized service that operates as a plug-in to browsers, email programs and text editors that automatically generates relevant, personalized perspectives for any numbers the users encounter or write.

“If we were infinitely wise and infinitely good at calculating, it wouldn’t really matter how numbers are expressed, it would all be the same to us. But the fact is, some things really cause people to go ‘Aha, now I get it,’” said Goldstein. “This is new territory; looking at how to communicate numbers in a way that gives people insight and memory and comprehension.”

The half decade Hofman has spent on the research project, he said, has already planted perspectives in his brain.

“I am always in the background thinking, ‘Am I presenting this in the most comprehensible way?’”

Related:

John Roach writes about Microsoft research and innovation. Follow him on Twitter.

Introducing the SEM Insider Insights podcast series – Bing Ads

To make Bing Ads an effective endeavor for search engine marketing (SEM) pros, we spend a lot of time talking to the people who use it. When we meet someone who is truly mastering the art and science of SEM, we do our best to convince them to share their knowledge with you.
 
Give yourself a shortcut to staying informed and up to speed with our SEM Insider Insights podcast series, featuring interviews with some of the sharpest SEM leaders in the industry.
 
In addition to discussions with independent experts and consultants, we’re getting down into the SEM trenches and meeting with the professionals who are staying ahead of the competition by innovating strategies every day. They’re sharing with us – and you – their opinionated, first-person spin on the challenges SEM pros face trying to surf the cutting edge.
 
We invite you to listen in on the conversation and take advantage of the great opportunity to learn something new or maybe help you to confirm a path forward.
 
Here’s what we’re talking about:

Podcast: Ad testing tips and tricks

SEM pro: Brad Geddes, Adalysis

Podcast host Frances Donegan-Ryan thanked her lucky stars when Brad Geddes, author and co-founder of Adalysis, dropped by to share his ad testing tips and tricks. At the top of his list was this gem, “If you’re not testing, you’re not understanding.” Geddes explained that testing is the only way to understand how you’re influencing customers and discovering what they care about.
Projects start with Bing Ads research, gleaning new ideas discovered by the Bings Ads team. With the help of Bing Ads’ heat maps, Geddes discovers the most commonly used words in different ad types. He can also determine which words people would use for the targeted product or service.

Listen now

Podcast: For rising SEM pros, on-the-job practice makes perfect

SEM pro: Maddie Cary, Point It Digital Marketing
 
If you’re a new SEM professional – or want to help motivate the younger set on your team – listen to or share this interview with Maddie Cary.
 
When Cary joined Point It Digital Marketing as an intern, her college education hadn’t prepared her well for the job ahead. But just six years in her role, Cary has captured the attention of not only her employer but industry watchers as well, winning multiple awards, including Young Search Professional of the Year by US Search Awards. How’d she do it? In this podcast, Cary said the key to starting a successful career in SEM and PPC is to take it upon yourself to continually polish the skills this dynamic profession requires.

Listen now

Podcast: Paid-search success in a mobile-first world

SEM pro: Aaron Levy, Elite SEM

Developing SEM strategies for mobile devices is no longer an option for marketers, it has become a necessity. Considering that, on average, more than half of all searches are done on mobile devices annually (that figure jumps to 75 percent on Thanksgiving and Black Friday) having an effective mobile strategy is the key to survival. When Frances Donegan-Ryan talked to Aaron Levy from the digital agency, Elite SEM, he emphasized that going mobile isn’t a simple matter of scaling an image to fit a handheld device screen.
 
Why’s that? Consumers’ mindsets can change depending on when and where they’re using devices. As a result, marketers shouldn’t take a “device-first approach,” said Levy. Instead, marketers need to create mobile experiences that allow consumers “to do what they want to.”
 
Listen now
 
Click here to check out the SEM Insider Insights podcast series. Reach out to us on Twitter @BingAds and let us know what you think. We’d love to hear your speaker and topic recommendations!