Tag Archives: Sharing

For Sale – Mac Mini (Late 2012), Magic Keyboard and Trackpad, Monitor

Hi ModestN….

1. Model info…. (I’ve previously been advised against sharing serial numbers publicly so hope this is sufficient)
Model Name: Mac mini
Model Identifier: Macmini6,2
Processor Name: Intel Core i7
Processor Speed: 2.6 GHz

2. Yes, that’s fine. Without the monitor, I’d like £440 delivered or £420 collected from London.

3. SSD is ‘Crucial MX500 CT500MX500SSD1(Z) 500 GB (3D NAND, SATA, 2.5 Inch, Internal SSD)’ – taken from the amazon page where I bought it (I installed it myself)

4. I’m not massively keen on doing this, but aware that I have limited feedback on this forum. You can check out my eBay feedback – my username is mrcjbush – or let me know where you are as collection could be possible.

Let me know if you have any more questions.

Thanks,

Chris.

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Microsoft Open Data Project adopts new data use agreement for datasets

Datasets compilation for Open Data

Last summer we announced Microsoft Research Open Data—an Azure-based repository-as-a-service for sharing datasets—to encourage the reproducibility of research and make research data assets readily available in the cloud. Among other things, the project started a conversation between the community and Microsoft’s legal team about dataset licensing. Inspired by these conversations, our legal team developed a set of brand new data use agreements and released them for public comment on Github earlier this year.

Today we’re excited to announce that Microsoft Research Open Data will be adopting these data use agreements for several datasets that we offer.

Diving a bit deeper on the new data use agreements

The Open Use of Data Agreement (O-UDA) is intended for use by an individual or organization that is able to distribute data for unrestricted uses, and for which there is no privacy or confidentiality concern. It is not appropriate for datasets that include any data that might include materials subject to privacy laws (such as the GDPR or HIPAA) or other unlicensed third-party materials. The O-UDA meets the open definition: it does not impose any restriction with respect to the use or modification of data other than ensuring that attribution and limitation of liability information is passed downstream. In the research context, this implies that users of the data need to cite the corresponding publication with which the data is associated. This aids in findability and reusability of data, an important tenet in the FAIR guiding principles for scientific data management and stewardship.

We also recognize that in certain cases, datasets useful for AI and research analysis may not be able to be fully “open” under the O-UDA. For example, they may contain third-party copyrighted materials, such as text snippets or images, from publicly available sources. The law permits their use for research, so following the principle that research data should be “as open as possible, as closed as necessary,” we developed the Computational Use of Data Agreement (C-UDA) to make data available for research while respecting other interests. We will prefer the O-UDA where possible, but we see the C-UDA as a useful tool for ensuring that researchers continue to have access to important and relevant datasets.

Datasets that reflect the goals of our project

The following examples reference datasets that have adopted the Open Use of Data Agreement (O-UDA).

Location data for geo-privacy research

Microsoft researcher John Krumm and collaborators collected GPS data from 21 people who carried a GPS receiver in the Seattle area. Users who provided their data agreed to it being shared as long as certain geographic regions were deleted. This work covers key research on privacy preservation of GPS data as evidenced in the corresponding paper, “Exploring End User Preferences for Location Obfuscation, Location-Based Services, and the Value of Location,” which was accepted at the Twelfth ACM International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing (UbiComp 2010). The paper has been cited 147 times, including for research that builds upon this work to further the field of preservation of geo-privacy for location-based services providers.

Hand gestures data for computer vision

Another example dataset is that of labeled hand images and video clips collected by researchers Eyal Krupka, Kfir Karmon, and others. The research addresses an important computer vision and machine learning problem that deals with developing a hand-gesture-based interface language. The data was recorded using depth cameras and has labels that cover joints and fingertips. The two datasets included are FingersData, which contains 3,500 labeled depth frames of various hand poses, and GestureClips, which contains 140 gesture clips (100 of these contain labeled hand gestures and 40 contain non-gesture activity). The research associated with this dataset is available in the paper “Toward Realistic Hands Gesture Interface: Keeping it Simple for Developers and Machines,” which was published in Proceedings of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems.

Question-Answer data for machine reading comprehension

Finally, the FigureQA dataset generated by researchers Samira Ebrahimi Kahou, Adam Atkinson, Adam Trischler, Yoshua Bengio and collaborators, introduces a visual reasoning task for research that is specific to graphical plots and figures. The dataset has 180,000 figures with 1.3 million question-answer pairs in the training set. More details about the dataset are available in the paper “FigureQA: An Annotated Figure Dataset for Visual Reasoning” and corresponding Microsoft Research Blog post. The dataset is pivotal to developing more powerful visual question answering and reasoning models, which potentially improve accuracy of AI systems that are involved in decision making based on charts and graphs.

The data agreements are a part of our larger goals

Microsoft Research Open Data project was conceived from the start to reflect Microsoft Research’s commitment to fostering open science and research and to achieve this without compromising the ethics of collecting and sharing data. Our goal is to make it easier for researchers to maintain provenance of data while having the ability to reference and build upon it.

The addition of the new data agreements to Microsoft Research Open Data’s feature set is an exciting step in furthering our mission.

Acknowledgements: This work would not have been possible without the substantial team effort by — Dave Green, Justin Colannino, Gretchen Deo, Sarah Kim, Emily McReynolds, Mario Madden, Emily Schlesinger, Elaine Peterson, Leila Stevenson, Dave Baskin, and Sergio Loscialo.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Google-Ascension deal reveals murky side of sharing health data

One of the largest nonprofit health systems in the U.S. created headlines when it was revealed that it was sharing patient data with Google — under codename Project Nightingale.

Ascension, a Catholic health system based in St. Louis, partnered with Google to transition the health system’s infrastructure to the Google Cloud Platform, to use the Google G Suite productivity and collaboration tools, and to explore the tech giant’s artificial intelligence and machine learning applications. By doing so, it is giving Google access to patient data, which the search giant can use to inform its own products.

The partnership appears to be technically and legally sound, according to experts. After news broke, Ascension released a statement saying the partnership is HIPAA-compliant and a business associate agreement, a contract required by the federal government that spells out each party’s responsibility for protected health information, is in place. Yet reports from The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian about the possible improper transfer of 50 million patients’ data has resulted in an Office for Civil Rights inquiry into the Google-Ascension partnership.

Legality aside, the resounding reaction to the partnership speaks to a lack of transparency in healthcare. Organizations should see the response as both an example of what not to do, as well as a call to make patients more aware of how they’re using health data, especially as consumer companies known for collecting and using data for profit become their partners.

Partnership breeds legal, ethical concerns

Forrester Research senior analyst Jeff Becker said Google entered into a similar strategic partnership with Mayo Clinic in September, and the coverage was largely positive.

Forrester Research senior analyst Jeff Becker Jeff Becker

According to a Mayo Clinic news release, the nonprofit academic medical center based in Rochester, Minn., selected Google Cloud to be “the cornerstone of its digital transformation,” and the clinic would use “advanced cloud computing, data analytics, machine learning and artificial intelligence” to improve healthcare delivery.

But Ascension wasn’t as forthcoming with its Google partnership. It was Google that announced its work with Ascension during a quarterly earnings call in July, and Ascension didn’t issue a news release about the partnership until after the news broke.

“There should have been a public-facing announcement of the partnership,” Becker said. “This was a PR failure. Secrecy creates distrust.”

Matthew Fisher, partner at Mirick O’Connell Attorneys at Law and chairman of its health law group, said the outcry over the Google-Ascension partnership was surprising. For years, tech companies have been trying to get access to patient data to help healthcare organizations and, at the same time, develop or refine their existing products, he said.

“I get the sense that just because it was Google that was announced to have been a partner, that’s what drove a lot of the attention,” he said. “Everyone knows Google mostly for purposes outside of healthcare, which leads to the concern of does Google understand the regulatory obligations and restrictions that come to bear by entering the healthcare space?”

Ascension’s statement in response to the situation said the partnership with Google is covered by a business associate agreement — a distinction Fisher said is “absolutely required” before any protected health information can be shared with Google. Parties in a business associate agreement are obligated by federal regulation to comply with the applicable portions of HIPAA, such as its security and privacy rules.

A business associate relationship allows identifiable patient information to be shared and used by Google only under specified circumstances. It is the legal basis for keeping patient data segregated and restricting Google from freely using that data. According to Ascension, the health system’s clinical data is housed within an Ascension-owned virtual private space in Google Cloud, and Google isn’t allowed to use the data for marketing or research.

“Our data will always be separate from Google’s consumer data, and it will never be used by Google for purposes such as targeting consumers for advertising,” the statement said.

Health IT and information security expert Kate Borten Kate Borten

But health IT and information security expert Kate Borten believes business associate agreements and the HIPAA privacy rule they adhere to don’t go far enough to ensure patient privacy rights, especially when companies like Google get involved. The HIPAA privacy rule doesn’t require healthcare organizations to disclose to patients who they’re sharing patient data with.

“The privacy rule says as long as you have this business associate contract — and business associates are defined by HIPAA very broadly — then the healthcare provider organization or insurer doesn’t have to tell the plan members or the patients about all these business associates who now have access to your data,” she said.

Chilmark Research senior analyst Jody Ranck said much of the alarm over the Google-Ascension partnership may be misplaced, but it speaks to a growing concern about companies like Google entering healthcare.

Since the Office for Civil Rights is looking into the partnership, Ranck said there is still a question of whether the partnership fully complies with the law. But the bigger question has to do with privacy and security concerns around collecting and using patient data, as well as companies like Google using patient data to train AI algorithms and the potential biases it could create.

All of this starts to feel like a bit of an algorithmic iron cage.
Jody RanckSenior analyst, Chilmark Research

Ranck believes consumer trust in tech companies is declining, especially as data privacy concerns get more play.

“Now that they know everything you purchase and they can listen in to that Alexa sitting beside your bed at night, and now they’re going to get access to health data … what’s a consumer to do? Where’s their power to control their destiny when algorithms are being used to assign you as a high-, medium-, or low-risk individual, as creditworthy?” Ranck said. “All of this starts to feel like a bit of an algorithmic iron cage.”

A call for more transparency

Healthcare organizations and big tech partnerships with the likes of Google, Amazon, Apple and Microsoft are growing. Like other industries, healthcare organizations are looking to modernize their infrastructure and take advantage of state of the art storage, security, data analytics tools and emerging tech like artificial intelligence.

But for healthcare organizations, partnerships like these have an added complexity — truly sensitive data. Forrester’s Becker said the mistake in the Google-Ascension partnership was the lack of transparency. There was no press release early on announcing the partnership, laying out what information is being shared, how the information will be used, and what outcome improvements the healthcare organization hopes to achieve.

“There should also be assurance that the partnership falls within HIPAA and that data will not be used for advertising or other commercial activities unrelated to the healthcare ambitions stated,” he said.

Fisher believes the Google-Ascension partnership raises questions about what the legal, moral and ethical aspects of these relationships are. While Ascension and Google may have been legally in the right, Fisher believes it’s important to recognize that privacy expectations are shifting, which calls for better consumer education, as well as more transparency around where and how data is being used.

Although he believes it would be “unduly burdensome” to require a healthcare organization to name every organization it shares data with, Fisher said better education on how HIPAA operates and what it allows when it comes to data sharing, as well as explaining how patient data will be protected when shared with a company like Google, could go a long way in helping patients understand what’s happening with their data.

“If you’re going to be contracting with one of these big-name companies that everyone has generalized concerns about with how they utilize data, you need to be ahead of the game,” Fisher said. “Even if you’re doing everything right from a legal standpoint, there’s still going to be a PR side to it. That’s really the practical reality of doing business. You want to be taking as many measures as you can to avoid the public backlash and having to be on the defensive by having the relationship found out and reported upon or discussed without trying to drive that discussion.”

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Crazy about chocolate, serious about people: meet the Dutch chocolate company that dared to be different – Microsoft News Centre Europe

Now, staff can build annual reports with Teams, easily sharing multiple source documents while knowing that team members are always working with the most current versions. As with every other aspect of work life for Tony’s employees, that strategy is carefully aligned with company values. “We use the chat feature in Teams to build the personal relationships we want to encourage,” says Ursem. “Email is more formal, more time-consuming. Chat lends itself to the shared humor and quick check-ins that naturally fit our culture and make us more efficient.”

With Teams, Tony’s team members have an informal, easy way to collaborate on projects with each other and with suppliers by using Teams Rooms. For IT Manager Rick van Doorn, otherwise known as Chocomatic Fanatic, nurturing spirit drives key decisions made by company leadership. “We say that our team comes first,” he explains. “Without the team, there is no company. And keeping that team collaborating optimally is vitally important to everything we do.”

Since implementing Teams, the company has averaged a 10 to 15 percent decrease in its total email volume. Ursem and van Doorn point out that this is happening despite steady company growth. “We’re pushing communication to the channels where it can happen most effectively,” says van Doorn.

A new world of work
The company focuses intently on messaging, both internally and externally. Even the design of its chocolate bars has a message – each bar is divided into unequal pieces, to mirror the inequalities in traditional profit sharing.

Internally, employees mix up workspaces every six months, sharing space with colleagues from different departments to build stronger team relations. That dedication to cultivating teamwork led the company to experiment with various apps purported to propel teamwork forward.

One of the biggest successes to come out of this experimentation was consolidating telephony with Office 365 in April 2019. As a result, employees can now access the company landline through Teams with the Vodafone Calling in Office 365 solution. For customer contact, Teams is extended with the Anywhere365 Contact Center. Because the solution interoperates with Salesforce, incoming calls can be logged in the company’s customer relationship management system for inclusion in the customer database.

“Using Teams with Vodafone Calling in Microsoft Office 365 amplifies the personal and transparent approach we’re known for,” says van Doorn. “We can talk to our chocofans with full knowledge of their prior backgrounds, orders, and feedback.” Incoming calls automatically route to the best person to handle the call, no matter where that person is, and contact information is included for the convenience of the person receiving the call.

A future in the cloud
Ten years ago, the company migrated to the cloud. “We were growing rapidly and needed to be scalable,” recalls van Doorn. “And we also looked at the growing number of relationships we were managing—both customers and suppliers, plus our rapidly expanding staff. We felt that committing to a complicated IT landscape in terms of connections, interfaces, and equipment would have been a risk.”

Cross-functional collaboration also underpins daily and strategic operations at Tony’s Chocolonely. Teamwork fans out from internal teams to a swath of partners that support different aspects of operations, including web developers, product wrapper suppliers, retail stores, and many more.

The company is so committed in fact, that its suppliers also now collaborate in Teams. “We’ve implemented the entire Microsoft 365 suite,” van Doorn. “All of our data is on SharePoint. With this modern working platform, we can easily collaborate with our partners, suppliers, and with each other.” The company also hopes to reduce business travel expenses by 10 percent now that so much collaboration takes place in the cloud.

For the people behind the Tony’s Chocolonely brand, it comes down to relationships. “By growing long-term relationships and paying a higher price—above the market price plus the Fairtrade Premium—to West African farmers, we’re trying to create an equal partnership,” says Ursem. “And if we’re performing well, other companies will be inspired to shoulder this responsibility, too.”

For more information, please visit the Microsoft Customer Stories blog.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

My views on U.S. immigration policy

Below is an e-mail I sent to all Microsoft employees today sharing my views on U.S. immigration policy.  This is an incredibly important topic and one I care deeply about.

Team,

Like many of you, I am appalled at the abhorrent policy of separating immigrant children from their families at the southern border of the U.S. As both a parent and an immigrant, this issue touches me personally.

I consider myself a product of two amazing and uniquely American things — American technology reaching me where I was growing up that allowed me to dream the dream and an enlightened immigration policy that then allowed me to live that dream. My story would not have been possible anywhere else.

This new policy implemented on the border is simply cruel and abusive, and we are standing for change. Today Brad detailed our company’s position on this issue, as well as the immigration legislation currently being considered in Congress, and I encourage you to read his blog post.

I want to be clear: Microsoft is not working with the U.S. government on any projects related to separating children from their families at the border. Our current cloud engagement with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is supporting legacy mail, calendar, messaging and document management workloads.

Microsoft has a long history of taking a principled approach to how we live up to our mission of empowering every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more with technology platforms and tools, while also standing up for our enduring values and ethics. Any engagement with any government has been and will be guided by our ethics and principles. We will continue to have this dialogue both within our company and with our stakeholders outside.

The immigration policy of this country is one of our greatest competitive advantages, and this is something we must preserve and promote. America is a nation of immigrants, and we’re able to attract people from around the world to contribute to our economy, our communities and our companies. We are also a beacon of hope for those who need it the most. This is what makes America stronger. We will always stand for immigration policies that preserve every person’s dignity and human rights. That means standing with every immigrant who works at Microsoft and standing for change in the inhumane treatment of children at the U.S. border today. 

Satya  

My views on U.S. immigration policy

Below is an e-mail I sent to all Microsoft employees today sharing my views on U.S. immigration policy.  This is an incredibly important topic and one I care deeply about.

Team,

Like many of you, I am appalled at the abhorrent policy of separating immigrant children from their families at the southern border of the U.S. As both a parent and an immigrant, this issue touches me personally.

I consider myself a product of two amazing and uniquely American things — American technology reaching me where I was growing up that allowed me to dream the dream and an enlightened immigration policy that then allowed me to live that dream. My story would not have been possible anywhere else.

This new policy implemented on the border is simply cruel and abusive, and we are standing for change. Today Brad detailed our company’s position on this issue, as well as the immigration legislation currently being considered in Congress, and I encourage you to read his blog post.

I want to be clear: Microsoft is not working with the U.S. government on any projects related to separating children from their families at the border. Our current cloud engagement with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is supporting legacy mail, calendar, messaging and document management workloads.

Microsoft has a long history of taking a principled approach to how we live up to our mission of empowering every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more with technology platforms and tools, while also standing up for our enduring values and ethics. Any engagement with any government has been and will be guided by our ethics and principles. We will continue to have this dialogue both within our company and with our stakeholders outside.

The immigration policy of this country is one of our greatest competitive advantages, and this is something we must preserve and promote. America is a nation of immigrants, and we’re able to attract people from around the world to contribute to our economy, our communities and our companies. We are also a beacon of hope for those who need it the most. This is what makes America stronger. We will always stand for immigration policies that preserve every person’s dignity and human rights. That means standing with every immigrant who works at Microsoft and standing for change in the inhumane treatment of children at the U.S. border today. 

Satya  

Lifesize looks to make outfitting huddle rooms cheaper

Lifesize this week released a device for wireless screen sharing and previewed a software-based video conferencing room kit. The products should appeal to businesses looking for relatively cheap ways to add collaboration technology to huddle rooms.

Companies can plug Lifesize Share into any monitor with an HDMI port, including the video conferencing systems of third-party providers. The device lets users wirelessly share files, individual browser tabs or their computer screens. It also syncs with cellphones.

Users can manage all of the Lifesize Share displays through an online portal, which is accessible via a customizable URL. Lifesize, meanwhile, keeps the software of the Share devices updated via the cloud. The devices could be particularly useful in huddle rooms, which often lack the more expensive equipment found in large conference rooms.

“Really, it’s about keeping it simple for users when they bring their own device into the room,” said Rob Arnold, an analyst at Frost & Sullivan. “This alleviates that physical connection problem.”

Cisco released a similar product last month, Cisco Webex Share, which is expected to become available this fall. Dozens of other products for sharing content wirelessly from PCs and mobile devices are already on the market — perhaps the best-selling among them being Barco ClickShare, Arnold said. Despite the number of available products, demand for more options is growing.

Businesses often cite “content” as the second most important aspect of a meeting, behind audio and above video, Arnold said. “Some rooms don’t really need video, but you need content, and you need audio.”

The ability to manage Lifesize Share devices from an online portal could help the product stand out, said Ira Weinstein, managing partner of Recon Research Inc., based in Coral Springs, Fla.

“It’s a lower-cost device with some of the features of some of the more expensive platforms,” Weinstein said. Lifesize Share costs $499, which includes a two-year subscription and warranty.

Lifesize meeting room kit targets huddle rooms

The Lifesize meeting room kit, called Dash, lets businesses turn meeting rooms into resources people can reserve through calendaring software and manage using an Android or iOS tablet left in the room. The software application that facilitates the connection runs on a Chromebox.

The vendor plans to demo its meeting room kit at the InfoComm conference in Las Vegas next week. The platform competes against similar products available from web conferencing vendors, including Zoom and BlueJeans.

Lifesize is known for its Icon series video conferencing cameras and conference phones. However, many businesses can’t afford to purchase those endpoints for all of their huddle rooms. Therefore, Lifesize hopes Dash appeals to existing customers as a lower-cost alternative.

Lifesize released a cloud-based web conferencing platform four years ago to replace its on-premises video conferencing servers. The announcements of Dash and Share this week are the vendor’s latest attempts to pivot toward a business model based on the sale of software and services that complement its hardware.

“This is a way for taking an existing Lifesize customer and making it more cost-effective for them to scale,” Weinstein said of Dash. “And I think it’s a great way to drop the overall cost of people who are considering getting further into video, but have found it cost-prohibitive.”

Share from File Explorer in the Windows 10 Technical Preview

In the Windows 10 Technical Preview, we’ve added a new “Share” button in File Explorer to make it easy to share one or more selected files. Most file management happens through File Explorer, and now sharing is streamlined right where you need it.

share

 

Installed apps that enable sharing will work with this button; it will open the share experience just like in Windows 8.1 when the Share charm is used. For example – you can select a few photos directly in File Explorer, press the share button, and share directly to Facebook or Twitter if you have these apps installed. This implementation is of course in the very early stages with more work to be done in the coming months! If you have developed a Windows app, you can learn how to utilize the share contract in your app and benefit from this platform capability by clicking here.

Have feedback on this for us? Make sure you are signed up for the Windows Insider Program and use the Windows Feedback app to send feedback directly to us.

(I originally planned to publish this post this week but Brad Sams beat me to it – figure I would go ahead and post anyway.)

5 tips for sharing on your Windows Phone

So, my kids gave me a Cthulhu bobblehead for Mother’s Day (other love offerings have included a Gandalf lunch box, a Frodo action figure, and a talking Yoda doll—proving that nerdiness is indeed inherited). Every day when they get out of school, I pose the Great Old One in some kind of action scene, take a photo on my Lumia 925, and text it to them.

sharing-photo-text-screen

Now you know my shame. It’s dorky, but it’s a way to stay connected while I’m at the office. Of course, texting a photo is Sharing 101, and Windows Phone has lots of other ways to stay in touch, plus an ever-expanding list of social apps to help out. Here are my top tips for some less familiar routes to togetherness.*

1. Connect the dots

In the People Hub, go to your contacts list, tap someone, and then swipe over to Connect, a new addition to contact cards in Windows Phone 8.1. You’ll see apps you can use to connect with that person, like Facebook and Skype. Tap one, and you’ll go straight to the person’s page in the app—for example, if you tap Facebook, you’ll see their timeline.

people-contacts-connect-screen

2. Project yourself

Looking to torment a captive audience with glamour shots of your cat or a photo essay about your kitchen remodel? Then why limit yourself to a tiny phone screen? Use Project My Screen to display those beauties on a nice, big Windows PC via a USB cable or even wirelessly. Learn how.

project-my-screen

3. Share a place (with Cortana’s help)

Then:

Me: “Let’s meet at 6. Where should we eat?”

Friend: “I don’t know. We’ll need a reservation so we can be sure to make the show on time.”

Me: “How about that new Tibetan-Cuban fusion place?”

Friend: “Do they have gluten-free?”

Me: “I have no idea. What restaurants around there do?”

Friend: “No idea. I don’t go downtown a lot.”

Now:

Me: “Find gluten-free restaurants in downtown Seattle.”

Cortana: “Here are 8 restaurants matching ‘gluten-free’ around downtown Seattle. The closest one’s about 7 miles away.”

Me: “Which ones take reservations?”

Cortana: “Here are the ones that take reservations.”

I tap a restaurant to see reviews, menus, and so on, then I tap Share to text the info to my friend. Done and done.

cortana-restaurant-search-screen

You can also go straight to Cortana’s Notebook to share favorite places or spots you’ve been to recently.

(Note: Cortana is currently available in select markets. If it’s not available on your phone or you don’t use it, you can find and share places using Local Scout in the Maps app.)

4. Look who’s sharing (about you)

Curious to see who shared a link on your Facebook timeline or tagged you on Instagram? Action center is your go-to spot for social notifications. To control what you see there, go to Settings > Notifications + actions, tap an app, and tweak notification settings for it. If you’re still not seeing all the adulation you expect, you might need to go into the app itself and turn on some notification options. For instance, in the Facebook app, go to Settings > Notifications, and then select the notifications you want to get.

social-notifications-screen

5. Developers, developers, developers

Our trusty app developers are stepping up to make sharing on Windows Phone 8.1 even better. MultiShare allows you to share to more than one social network at once, via your Me Card or the Photos app. If you’re a Foursquare fan, check out Social extension for 4th & Mayor, which lets you check in with Foursquare using your Me Card (you’ll also need to install 4th Mayor, a Foursquare client). And Messenger gets you to your Facebook messages lickety-split. Keep an eye on the Social section of the Store for new sharing apps as developers get busy.

* This post refers to features in Windows Phone 8.1. If your phone is running Windows Phone 8, some of them won’t be available. Check to see which software version you have and find out if an update is available.