Tag Archives: Shift

Wanted – 2x 8gb DDR3 1600

If anyone has 2 8gb sticks of DDR3 1600mhz they are looking to shift please let me know.
I’ve currently got 2x 4gb in my old Asus P8 Z77 motherboard and want to see what difference doubling it up will make, so don’t need anything fancy, nor do I care what it looks like !
Many thanks.

Location: St Austell England

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Kronos Workforce Dimensions stirs HR tech world

The Kronos Workforce Dimensions mobile-first SaaS system represents a major course shift for the long-dominant, but sometimes stodgy, workforce management and time and attendance software vendor.

The company, based in Lowell, Mass., unveiled the new AI-based suite of social media UI-style workforce management (WFM) apps at its KronosWorks user conference in Las Vegas.

Kronos sunk about $150 million and three years of R&D into building Kronos Workforce Dimensions, and it hopes to smoothly migrate many of its existing on-premises software and hosted cloud customers to the subscription-based service housed in the Google public cloud, executives told SearchHRSoftware.

Kronos tries to evolve

If that strategy succeeds, the $1.2 billion firm, which has historically been wedded to older-generation software, could, indeed, transform itself into a more agile, cloud-first vendor in a next-generation HR tech world.

Bill Bartow, Kronos vice president of product managementBill Bartow

Two leading older-generation, large HR tech vendors, Oracle and SAP, are attempting similar, though perhaps less dramatic, transitions with their human capital management (HCM) offerings, while smaller Kronos competitors, such as Ceridian and Ultimate Software, already are cloud-only.

“We see a lot of potential opportunities to change the direction of and disrupt markets,” said Bill Bartow, vice president of global product management at Kronos. “We want to challenge ourselves … Put ourselves out of business.”

Bartow was not speaking literally, but rather reflecting a strategic outlook articulated by Kronos CEO Aron Ain when Kronos formed an off-site working group of about 20 people in August 2014 to conceptualize an entirely new product — what became Kronos Workforce Dimensions.

Soon, that team swelled to several hundred dedicated to the project.

Building new WFM software

An analyst who previewed the system, Mark Smith, CEO of Ventana Research in Bend, Ore., said the Kronos Workforce Dimensions product is a significant departure for Kronos, and one that looks poised to meet the company’s goal of reinventing itself and pushing the WFM market toward thorough digitization.

“For a company to move toward the next evolution, they had to basically take their existing product and say, ‘We’ve taken this as far as it’s going to go, and we’ll still maintain it, but we’re going to need a new digital platform for the broader needs of the workforce,'” Smith said. “This is a smart move. There are not many companies that can put people, resources and time to build something that’s new and takes you to the next level.”

Inspired by Workday

For his part, Bartow cited the cloud-only HR tech paradigm pioneered, in particular, by Workday — one of Kronos’ big HCM vendor partners for Workforce Dimensions — as one inspiration.

“Our vision became to transform the workforce management market,” Bartow said.

The other HCM partners, so far, are Oracle and SAP SuccessFactors. Notably absent from this list are Ceridian, which Kronos views as a direct competitor in the WFM space, and Ultimate.

Analysts noted that both Ceridian and Ultimate, though offering robust WFM technology, mainly go after midsize customers, while Kronos’ target market for Workforce Dimensions is large enterprises.

In an interview, Bartow and Jim Kizielewicz, senior vice president and chief marketing officer at Kronos, emphasized the artificial intelligence and deep learning technology they said underlies Kronos Workforce Dimensions.

Kronos Workforce Dimensions app manager view
Kronos Workforce Dimensions tablet screenshot showing manager time-off approvals

Kronos puts AI in HR tech

This is a smart move. There are not many companies that can put people, resources and time to build something that’s new and takes you to the next level.
Mark SmithCEO, Ventana Research

A key theme of the new system — intended to be used primarily on smartphones and tablets, but which also runs on laptop and desktop computers — is automating many routine tasks corporate managers feel swamped by and give the executives more time for strategic work. Those tasks could be approving timecards, vacation requests or shift swaps.

The software’s machine-learning-based assistant, Workforce Advisor, delivers recommendations, which can become more automatic as the system learns about the manager’s intent regarding approvals and the manager starts to trust the advice.

WFM tech for managers and workers

Meanwhile, Kronos found in its product development research that many line employees are now influenced by gig economy culture and want more say over their own schedules, better balance between work and home life, and more feedback from managers.

Workforce Dimensions, which also has a module for salaried employees, enables hourly employees to find and choose their own shifts while informing managers in a “collaborative self-scheduling” mode, according to Kronos.

For HR tech and IT professionals, Kronos is providing the new Kronos D5 platform that supports all the functions in Workforce Dimensions. The platform as a service is built with what Kronos calls “foundational AI,” and it includes open APIs, a new domain model and unified information architecture.

The D5 platform also enables high-volume, real-time processing, embedded analytics and forecasting, and the predictive artificial intelligence of the system, including proactive compliance, Kronos said.

In its development of the Workforce Dimensions suite, Kronos also relied on feedback from 10 large employers it calls “early adopters,” which piloted the system and plan to stick with it when it goes live in the commercial release expected in March.

Early adopters

Those early users are BorgWarner, Brookstone, GATE Petroleum Co., Google, London Energy, Snyder’s-Lance, Things Remembered, Tru Blu Beverages and University of Colorado, Boulder.

Still, the Kronos executives said the company will still support its Kronos Central hosted cloud WFM system, and the new product will have “feature parity” with the older platform.

However, they said Kronos built transition tools into the new system to help streamline the process of migrating customers that want to move to the mobile-oriented SaaS software. Pricing is per employee, per month, depending on the module.

Migration a key challenge

As for that migration issue, Ron Hanscome, another analyst, said converting many of Kronos’ 7,200 Workforce Central customers to the cloud, just as Oracle and SAP are doing, will be a critical and likely challenging task for Kronos. Kronos has 13,200 customers using other products.

“This does present a target to start bringing in these customers to. How do you migrate your legacy base and keep them in the mainstream of your product support?” Hanscome said. “This introduction triggers 10 years of migration and transition of the customer base.”

Even so, Hanscome came away from his preview especially impressed with the new system’s AI and machine learning technology and broad WFM applications.

“Clearly, they’ve put a lot of thought into the new architecture. What they’ve done around user experience and how to help the employee, the manager and the IT function, they’ve addressed those issues,” he said.

Kronos’ new offices sport fun features

SearchHRSoftware interviewed the Kronos executives at the company’s newly renovated world headquarters in the former Wang Laboratories complex it moved into in the fall of 2017.

For Kronos, the ultra-modern offices — complete with remote employee temporary docking stations, “scrum-rooms” for impromptu brainstorming and employee lounges with expansive new picture windows and foosball tables — embody its attempt to remake the 40-year-old company.

Cisco cloud VP calls out trends in multicloud strategy

Large enterprises have quickly embraced multicloud strategy as a common practice — a shift that introduces opportunities, as well as challenges.

Cisco has witnessed this firsthand, as the company seeks a niche in a shifting IT landscape. Earlier this year, Cisco shuttered Intercloud Services, its failed attempt to create a public cloud competitor to Amazon Web Services (AWS). Now, Cisco’s bets are on a multicloud strategy to draw from its networking and security pedigree and sell itself as a facilitator for corporate IT’s navigation across disparate cloud environments.

In an interview with SearchCloudComputing, Kip Compton, vice president of Cisco’s cloud platforms and solutions group, discussed the latest trends with multicloud strategy and where Cisco plans to fit in the market.

How are your customers shifting their view on multicloud strategy?

Kip Compton: It started with the idea that each application is going to be on separate clouds. It’s still limited to more advanced customers, but we’re seeing use cases where they’re spanning clouds with different parts of an application or subsystems, either for historical reasons or across multiple applications, or taking advantage of the specific capabilities in a cloud.

Hybrid cloud was initially billed as a way for applications to span private and public environments, but that was always more hype than reality. What are enterprises doing now to couple their various environments?

Compton: The way we approach hybrid cloud is as a use case where you have an on-prem data center and a public data center and the two work together. Multicloud, the definition we’ve used, is at least two clouds, one of which is a public cloud. In that way, hybrid is essentially a subset of multicloud for us.

Azure Stack is a bit of an outlier, but hybrid has changed a bit for most of our customers in terms of it not being tightly coupled. Now it is deployments where they have certain codes that run in both places, and the two things work together to deliver an application. They’re calling that hybrid, whereas in the early days, it was more about seamless environments and moving workloads between on prem and the public cloud based on load and time of day, and that seems to have faded.

What are the biggest impediments to a successful multicloud strategy?

Compton: Part of it is what types of problems do people talk about to Cisco, as opposed to other companies, so I acknowledge there may be some bias there. But there are four areas that are pretty reliable for us in customer conversations.

First is networking, not surprisingly, and they talk about how to connect from on prem to the cloud. How do they connect between clouds? How do they figure out how that integrates to their on-prem connectivity frameworks?

Then, there’s security. We see a lot of companies carry forward their security posture as they move workloads; so virtual versions of our firewalls and things like that, and wanting to align with how security works in the rest of their enterprise.

The third is analytics, particularly application performance analytics. If you move an app to a completely different environment, it’s not just about getting the functionality, it’s about being performant. And then, obviously, how do you monitor and manage it [on] an ongoing basis?

The trend we see is [customers] want to take advantage of the unique capabilities of each cloud, but they need some common framework, some capability that actually spans across these cloud providers, which includes their on-prem deployment.

Where do you draw the line on that commonality between environments?

Compton: In terms of abstraction, there was a time where a popular approach was — I’ll call it the Cloud Foundry or bring-your-own-PaaS [platform as a service] approach — to say, ‘OK, the way I’m going to have portability is I’m not going to write my application to use any of the cloud providers’ APIs. I’m not going to take advantage of anything special from AWS or Azure or anyone.’

That’s less popular because the cloud providers have been fairly successful at launching new features developers want to use. We think of it more like a microservices style or highly modular pattern, where, for my application to run, there’s a whole bunch of things I need: messaging queues, server load, database, networking, security plans. It’s less to abstract Amazon’s networking, and it’s more to provide a common networking capability that will run on Amazon.

You mentioned customers with workloads spanning multiple clouds. How are those being built?

Compton: What I referred to are customers that have an application, maybe with a number of different subsystems. They might have an on-prem database that’s a business-critical system. They might do machine learning in Google Cloud Platform with TensorFlow, and they might look to deliver an experience to their customers through Alexa, which means they need to run some portion of the application in Amazon. They’re not taking their database and sharding it across multiple clouds, but those three subsystems have to work together to deliver that experience that the customer perceives as a single application.

What newer public cloud services do you see getting traction with your customers?

Compton: A few months ago, people were reticent to use [cloud-native] services because portability was the most important thing — but now, ROI and speed matter, so they use those services across the board.

A few months ago, people were reticent to use [cloud-native] services because portability was the most important thing — but now, ROI and speed matter, so they use those services across the board.
Kip Comptonvice president, Cisco’s cloud platforms and solutions group

We see an explosion of interest in serverless. It seems to mirror the container phenomenon where everybody agrees containers will become central to cloud computing architectures. We’re reaching the same point on serverless, or function as a service, where people see that as a better way to create code for more efficient [use of] resources.

The other trend we see: a lot of times people use, for example, Salesforce’s PaaS because their data is there, so the consumption of services is driven by practical considerations. Or they’re in a given cloud using services because of how they interface with one of their business partners. So, as much as there are some cool new services, there are some fairly practical points that drive people’s selection, too.

Have you seen companies shift their in-house architectures to accommodate what they’re doing in the public cloud?

Compton: I see companies starting new applications in the cloud and not on prem. And what’s interesting is a lot of our customers continue to see on-prem growth. They have said, ‘We’re going to go cloud-first on our new applications,’ but the application they already have on prem continues to grow in resource needs.

We also see interest in applying the cloud techniques to the on-prem data center or private cloud. They’re moving away from some of the traditional technologies to make their data center work more like a cloud, partially so it’s easier to work between the two environments, but also because the cloud approach is more efficient and agile than some of the traditional approaches.

And there are companies that want to get out of running data centers. They don’t want to deal with the real estate, the power, the cooling, and they want to move everything they can into Amazon.

What lessons did Cisco learn from the now-shuttered Intercloud?

Compton: The idea was to build a global federated IaaS [infrastructure as a service] that, in theory, would compete with AWS. At that time, most in the industry thought that OpenStack would take over the world. It was viewed as a big threat to AWS.

Today, it’s hard to relate to that point of view — obviously, that didn’t happen. In many ways, cloud is about driving this brutal consistency, and by having global fabrics that are identical and consistent around the world, you can roll out new features and capabilities and scale better than if you have a federated model.

Where we are now in terms of multicloud and strategy going forward — to keep customers and partners and large web scale cloud providers wanting to either buy from us or partner with us — it’s solving some of these complex networking and security problems. Cisco has value in our ability to solve these problems [and] link to the enterprise infrastructures that are in place around the world … that’s the pivot we’ve gone through.

Trevor Jones is a senior news writer with SearchCloudComputing and SearchAWS. Contact him at tjones@techtarget.com.

Benefits of public cloud: Unilog’s Google adoption

Unilog Content Solutions Pvt. Ltd.’s shift to the public cloud involves considerably more than obtaining a new place to park its IT infrastructure.

The e-commerce company, based in Bangalore, India, with North American headquarters in Wayne, Pa., traditionally offered its core B2B software platform through a private cloud hosted in a colocation facility. Unilog, however, wanted to speed up customer deployments, improve its ability to scale and lower its operating costs. The company decided the anticipated benefits of public cloud could deliver on those requirements. 

Swamy Mahesh, CTO and vice president of U.S. operations at Unilog, said Unilog selected Google’s public cloud from a short list of providers that included Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Rackspace. The company also hired Agosto Inc., a Google cloud partner based in Minneapolis, Minn., to provide support and consulting services.

Unilog worked with Agosto to establish a strategic roadmap for public cloud adoption, which kicked off with a lift-and-shift migration from Unilog’s private hosted setting to Google. The task involved moving Unilog’s virtual machines to the new environment and optimizing them for Google Cloud.

The initial migration soon led to other opportunities for improvement.

“It became apparent that strategic challenges were on the end of that” lift-and-shift phase, said Rick Erickson, executive vice president at Agosto. He said his company conducted a cloud modernization analysis to uncover ways Unilog could operate more efficiently.

Benefits of public cloud

Among the business benefits of Unilog’s public cloud migration is the ability to speed up the task of bringing new customers on board its e-commerce platform. In its private cloud environment, the process of getting a newly acquired client onto the system could take several days.

Customer onboarding is much faster.
Swamy MaheshCTO and vice president of U.S. operations, Unilog

“We had to constantly add hardware to the racks and set it up,” Mahesh said, noting the manual labor involved. “It was not a scalable model.”

“Unilog was going through significant growth with their customer base and had a backlog of customers and one of the [factors] causing the backlog was the time it took to procure infrastructure and launch new customers,” Erickson said.

But with the cloud and an improved customer onboarding process, Unilog can now bring a new customer onto its system in about a day, according to Unilog.

“Customer onboarding is much faster,” Mahesh said.

The cloud move also helps with disaster recovery. Unilog had previously needed to consider multiple colocation spaces for redundancy purposes, a pursuit that Mahesh said amounts to “reinventing what a good cloud has already done.”

Multi-tenant shift

The benefits of public cloud also surfaced on the application software side. In Unilog’s case, the company used the occasion of the cloud refit to take a look at its application stack. The company’s e-commerce platform was based on providing each client a single-customer instance of its software under a perpetual license. Unilog, however, wanted to transition to a software-as-a-service subscription model and multi-tenancy.

The multi-tenant version of its Unilog’s e-commerce software also contributes to improved efficiency and faster customer deployments, since it allows the company to maintain and update a single image of its application. But the approach also introduces challenges, which Unilog continues to work through.

Mahesh cited differences among clients with regard to data growth rates and the resulting traffic on each client’s network pipes as one example. Another design and development challenge of multi-tenancy: accommodating different use cases across multiple customers.

Unilog is now looking to further optimize its processes as it supports a mixed customer base — some use the multi-tenant version of its platform and others continue to use the legacy system.

For Sale – Apple MacBook Air 2009 13 inch model Offers??

Need to shift this now. So open to sensible offers!!

Apple MacBook Air mid 2009 model purchased the end of 2010
Please read fully as no refund is given.
Internal 128GB Official Apple HD included (needs fitting!)
External 500GB HD which contains OS and Install OS *10.6.8*

Not included : Power Supply & Box

I have had it on charge with my daughters MacBook Pro charger, although, that is not included and you will have to source your own charger.

Ask for more detail if needed, I will be completely upfront as once sold it is your responsibility.

See image pictures posted.

There is the odd bop and bump her and there and a few cosmetic issues. But to be honest, it doesn’t look too bad and when you open it up, it looks pretty damn good!

Battery info.

Battery Information:
Model Information:
Serial Number: 6N923027X6EW
Manufacturer: SMP
Device name: bq20z951
Pack Lot Code: 0000
PCB Lot Code: 0000
Firmware Version: 002a
Hardware Revision: 0001
Cell Revision: 0100
Charge Information:
Charge remaining (mAh): 466
Fully charged: No
Charging: Yes
Full charge capacity (mAh): 5003
Health Information:
Cycle count: 399
Condition: Normal
Battery Installed: Yes
Amperage (mA): 2655
Voltage (mV): 7756

Collection is welcome.

Price and currency: Offers £160
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BACS PPG
Location: Bolton
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Apple MacBook Air 2009 13 inch model Offers??

Need to shift this now. So open to sensible offers!!

Apple MacBook Air mid 2009 model purchased the end of 2010
Please read fully as no refund is given.
Internal HD included (needs fitting!)

However, I have got the Laptop to boot via a USB 500GB hard drive.
It works just fine!

I have had it on charge with my daughters MacBook Pro charger, although, that is not included and you will have to source your own charger.

There is no PSU
There is no box

Ask for more detail if needed, I will be completely upfront as once sold it is your responsibility.

See image pictures posted.

There is the odd bop and bump her and there and a few cosmetic issues. But to be honest, it doesn’t look too bad and when you open it up, it looks pretty damn good!

Collection is welcome.

Price and currency: Offers?? £160
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BACS PPG
Location: Bolton
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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