Tag Archives: some

For Sale – REDUCED £440 Intel NUC Bean Canyon NUC8i7BEH i7 8559U 16gb Ram 1TB SSD – Windows 10

Some Technical Info

Intel NUC Bean Canyon NUC8i7BEH i7 8559U

General

Platform Technology Intel vPro Technology
Type PC barebone
Product Form Factor Mini PC
Embedded Security Trusted Platform Module (TPM 2.0) Security Chip
Localisation Region: United Kingdom

Processor / Chipset

CPU Intel Core i7 (8th Gen) 8559U / 2.7 GHz
Max Turbo Speed 4.5 GHz
Number of Cores Quad-Core
CPU Qty 1
Max CPU Qty 1
CPU Upgradability Not upgradable

Cache Memory

Installed Size L3 Cache – 8 MB
Cache Per Processor 8 MB

RAM

Installed Size 0 MB / 32 GB (max)
Technology DDR4 SDRAM
Form Factor SO-DIMM 260-pin
Slots 2 (Total) / 2 (empty)

Hard Drive

Type No HDD

Storage Controller

Type 1 x SATA
Controller Interface Type SATA 6Gb/s

Optical Storage

Type No optical drive

Card Reader

Supported Flash Memory Cards microSDXC

Monitor

Monitor Type None.

Graphics Controller

Graphics Processor Intel Iris Plus Graphics 655
Video Interfaces HDMI
Max Monitors Supported 3

Audio Output

Sound Output Mode 7.1 channel surround
Compliant Standards High Definition Audio

Audio Input

Type 2 microphones

Networking

Wireless LAN Supported Yes
Wireless NIC Intel Wireless-AC 9560
Data Link Protocol Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11n, IEEE 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0
Compliant Standards IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11n, IEEE 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0

Expansion / Connectivity

Bays 1 (total) / 1 (free) x internal 2.5″
Slots 1 (total) / 1 (free) x M.2 Card – 2280/2242
Interfaces 4 x USB 3.1 Gen 1 – Type A (2 front, 2 rear) ¦ 1 x Thunderbolt 3/USB-C 3.1 ¦ 1 x HDMI ¦ 1 x LAN (Gigabit Ethernet) – RJ-45 ¦ 1 x audio line-in/headphones/microphone – mini-jack ¦ 1 x SATA-600

Miscellaneous

Theft/Intrusion Protection Security lock slot (cable lock sold separately)
Security Slot Type Kensington security slot
Compliant Standards ICES-003, EN55024, UL 60950-1, IEC 60950-1, EN 60950-1, AS/NZS 4268, VCCI V-3, VCCI V-2, EN 62311, VCCI V-4, Directive 2012/19/EU, Directive 2011/65/EU, KN24, China RoHS, CNS 13438, ETSI EN 301 489-17, KN32, ETSI EN 300 328, ETSI EN 301 489-1, ETSI EN 301 893, AS/NZS 2772.2, CISPR 32, EN 55032, CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 60950-1

Power

Device Type Power adapter
Nominal Voltage DC 19 V
Power Provided 90 Watt

Manufacturer Warranty

Service & Support Limited warranty – 3 years

Dimensions & Weight

Width 11.7 cm
Depth 11.2 cm
Height 5.1 cm

Environmental Parameters

Min Operating Temperature 0 °C
Max Operating Temperature 40 °C

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Closing the rural broadband gap is an urgent national crisis – Microsoft on the Issues

It’s been clear to us for some time that the digital divide in this country is an urgent national crisis that must be solved. Since 2017, we’ve been working with internet service providers to do just that, through our Airband Initiative, and we’re on track to cover 3 million Americans in unserved rural areas by 2022.

It’s encouraging to see this issue rise in national prominence, through funding from the administration, congressional legislation and most recently new proposals introduced by several candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination. While there’s been some progress already, solving the broadband gap will require active engagement as well as effective policy proposals from all parts of the public sector.

It’s time to recognize that inequal access to broadband translates into inequality of opportunity. People in rural areas that lack broadband face higher unemployment rates, see fewer job and economic opportunities and place children from these communities behind their suburban and peers in school. Of course, this is not just a rural issue – broadband deserts exist within very urban areas as well, where costs can be unaffordable and availability non-existent.

To be sure, there are efforts underway to provide the funding and assistance needed to expand broadband coverage for rural areas, by the administration, Congress, governors and the private sector, including Microsoft and our Airband partners. But much more needs to be done to translate proposals into action.

That’s why we’re at the Iowa State Fair this week as well. Microsoft is hosting a booth, where we’ll learn from Iowans about their digital realities, discuss what we can do through the Airband Initiative to help and what other opportunities can be unlocked with reliable, affordable broadband access. We hope to discuss the issue with political leaders attending the fair as well.

Solving the broadband gap should be a national issue because we are leaving millions of Americans behind. We look forward to working with both sides of the aisle to make meaningful progress on this important national issue.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

For Sale – REDUCED £440 Intel NUC Bean Canyon NUC8i7BEH i7 8559U 16gb Ram 1TB SSD – Windows 10

Some Technical Info

Intel NUC Bean Canyon NUC8i7BEH i7 8559U

General

Platform Technology Intel vPro Technology
Type PC barebone
Product Form Factor Mini PC
Embedded Security Trusted Platform Module (TPM 2.0) Security Chip
Localisation Region: United Kingdom

Processor / Chipset

CPU Intel Core i7 (8th Gen) 8559U / 2.7 GHz
Max Turbo Speed 4.5 GHz
Number of Cores Quad-Core
CPU Qty 1
Max CPU Qty 1
CPU Upgradability Not upgradable

Cache Memory

Installed Size L3 Cache – 8 MB
Cache Per Processor 8 MB

RAM

Installed Size 0 MB / 32 GB (max)
Technology DDR4 SDRAM
Form Factor SO-DIMM 260-pin
Slots 2 (Total) / 2 (empty)

Hard Drive

Type No HDD

Storage Controller

Type 1 x SATA
Controller Interface Type SATA 6Gb/s

Optical Storage

Type No optical drive

Card Reader

Supported Flash Memory Cards microSDXC

Monitor

Monitor Type None.

Graphics Controller

Graphics Processor Intel Iris Plus Graphics 655
Video Interfaces HDMI
Max Monitors Supported 3

Audio Output

Sound Output Mode 7.1 channel surround
Compliant Standards High Definition Audio

Audio Input

Type 2 microphones

Networking

Wireless LAN Supported Yes
Wireless NIC Intel Wireless-AC 9560
Data Link Protocol Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11n, IEEE 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0
Compliant Standards IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11n, IEEE 802.11ac, Bluetooth 5.0

Expansion / Connectivity

Bays 1 (total) / 1 (free) x internal 2.5″
Slots 1 (total) / 1 (free) x M.2 Card – 2280/2242
Interfaces 4 x USB 3.1 Gen 1 – Type A (2 front, 2 rear) ¦ 1 x Thunderbolt 3/USB-C 3.1 ¦ 1 x HDMI ¦ 1 x LAN (Gigabit Ethernet) – RJ-45 ¦ 1 x audio line-in/headphones/microphone – mini-jack ¦ 1 x SATA-600

Miscellaneous

Theft/Intrusion Protection Security lock slot (cable lock sold separately)
Security Slot Type Kensington security slot
Compliant Standards ICES-003, EN55024, UL 60950-1, IEC 60950-1, EN 60950-1, AS/NZS 4268, VCCI V-3, VCCI V-2, EN 62311, VCCI V-4, Directive 2012/19/EU, Directive 2011/65/EU, KN24, China RoHS, CNS 13438, ETSI EN 301 489-17, KN32, ETSI EN 300 328, ETSI EN 301 489-1, ETSI EN 301 893, AS/NZS 2772.2, CISPR 32, EN 55032, CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 60950-1

Power

Device Type Power adapter
Nominal Voltage DC 19 V
Power Provided 90 Watt

Manufacturer Warranty

Service & Support Limited warranty – 3 years

Dimensions & Weight

Width 11.7 cm
Depth 11.2 cm
Height 5.1 cm

Environmental Parameters

Min Operating Temperature 0 °C
Max Operating Temperature 40 °C

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Author:

How to plot out an Office 365 tenant-to-tenant migration

With the number of users and organizations on Office 365, circumstances will inevitably require some of them to move between tenants.

An Office 365 tenant-to-tenant migration can occur for several reasons, such as after a merger or acquisition or part of a company gets sold. These business events come with complicated legal maneuvers with rigid timelines. Most of these situations require completing tenant-to-tenant migrations on a schedule made by lawyers and executives with little to no regard for the time it takes to move the associated data. It’s up to the technical team to work out how to complete the migration and meet their deadline.

Whatever the reason, successfully executing a tenant-to-tenant migration within Office 365 is a complex process with some significant limitations. Let’s walk through the process to clarify what’s involved with this type of data migration process.

What data can migrate?

The biggest challenge with an Office 365 tenant-to-tenant migration is knowing what data you can and cannot move. Microsoft develops new APIs continuously to give access to different types of data stored within Office 365, but as of publication, the accessibility is still somewhat limited.

To further complicate the issue, there is no Microsoft tool to move data between tenants. While there are many third-party applications to help migrate different types of Office 365 data between tenants, they all have different capabilities. Finding the right product for your Office 365 tenant-to-tenant migration requires some research to find the tool — or tools — that move the data your organization needs.

While there are many third-party applications to help migrate different types of Office 365 data between tenants, they all have different capabilities

Out of the entire Office 365 suite, Exchange Online, SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business are the applications most commonly affected by this tenant migration effort. While there are multiple tools available to move these data types, this article can’t pick the right one for you.

The more popular and capable migration tools are BitTitan, Quest, ShareGate and AvePoint, which acquire new features and updated functionality regularly. My recommendation is to look at these tools and other similar ones to decide which one is best for your circumstances.

Different applications come with different complications

Not every application handles data the same, which further muddles the tenant migration process.

Planning a move between Office 365 tenants

For example, Skype for Business is an important communication tool for many organizations, but much of the data it uses is not with the application. The meetings data resides in Exchange and buddy lists live with the Skype for Business client. Most of the time, Skype for Business is not migrated between tenants but reconfigured at the destination tenant.

Teams is another application that presents a migration challenge. As of publication, Microsoft has not finished the APIs that will let third-party tools handle these tenant migrations. At the moment, you can move the SharePoint document libraries attached to Teams or the Exchange mailboxes that hold Teams calendars, but it’s not yet possible to migrate Teams entirely.

Preparing for your migration

As you inventory all the Office 365 applications that hold user data that you want to migrate, the list might overwhelm you. If you need to move mailboxes and data from multiple web applications such as Yammer, Bookings, Planner, Delve, Flow, Forms, Power BI, StaffHub, Stream, Sway and To-Do, then that’s going to take some work to get a handle on what is involved with each service.  

To further complicate this effort, you’ll find most of the Office 365 applications don’t support any migration. If you need data from a particular application, all you can do about it is try to recreate the data in your destination tenant the same way you did in the original tenant. Identifying what data you can, and cannot, move between Office 365 tenants is an important step, but it’s just the beginning of your migration process.

Another issue that can complicate the tenant migration timeline is bandwidth throttling. Microsoft controls the rate of speed when transferring data on Office 365 to ensure the health of the overall platform. This limitation can be very troublesome when you need to move a large amount of data in a short amount of time.

You can try to adjust the throttling on your Office 365 tenant if you open a support case with Microsoft, but there are no clear rules on how much, if at all, the throttling limits can be relaxed. In my experience, Microsoft will do everything possible to help you reach your deadline if you explain your situation.

Tenant names and vanity domains can be another difficult part of an Office 365 tenant-to-tenant migration. All Office 365 tenant names need to be unique. This can make it difficult to find a tenant name that matches the name of your organization. Furthermore, a vanity domain — @company.com — can only be associated with a single Office 365 tenant. Exchange migration tools need to connect to the source mailbox and the destination mailbox by name, so most tools recommend making that connection using the @tenant.onmicrosoft.com address for each mailbox.

The best advice I can give is to make sure you understand the tools you chose to move data between Office 365 tenants. They all have recommended configurations that will make this work go much smoother and bring you much better results.

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Author:

For Sale – PC Parts Clear Out

Due to a recent upgrade, and the need to clear some space in the garage, I’ve got the following up for sale.

Motherboards:
MSI Z87 GD65 Used £70.00
MSI Z170I ITX Used £100.00

DDR3:
8GB Corsair Vengeance Pro – 2133Mhz (2x4GB) Used £35.00
16GB HyperX Savage Red – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £50.00

DDR4:
16GB Corsair Low Profile Black – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £50.00

Intel Processors:
LGA 1150 – Intel Core i5-4670K Used £70.00
LGA 1151 – Intel Core i5-6600 Used £110.00

AMD Graphics Cards:
XFX AMD R9 390 – 8GB Used £80.00

Nvidia Graphics Cards:
MSI – GTX 660Ti 2GB Used £50.00
MSI – GTX 570 2GB Used £40.00

Mice:
Razer Mamba 2016 Wireless Used £60.00

Cases:
Phanteks Evolve ITX Used £40.00

Coolers:
Corsair H50 Used £40.00
Corsair H80i Used £50.00

Most items will be boxed in their original retail or OEM packaging.

Will upload more photographs this evening.

I will updating this thread as I discover anything else that I no longer require.

Open to offers.

Price and currency: £845
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG
Location: Oxford
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Wanted – Computer Screen

Ill need to double check, but I have some 19″ 1440 x 900 monitors with no stand. VGA and DVI inputs.

Only looking for 10 collected. Collection could be NW London (Wembley) or Central WC2X. Though I have no packaging.

Let me know and I’ll check where they are, might be at my parents place, which is in Hayes, Middlesex (UB3) so might be able to meet you there for collection (closer to Woking)

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Author:

As public cloud adoption grows, new drawbacks discovered

Public cloud adoption is proving to be more costly for some companies than they expected.

A recent survey conducted by U.K.-based tech research company Vanson Bourne asked 900 IT leaders if the public cloud has delivered on all of their organizations’ expected benefits. Only 32.2% of respondents said all their expectations were met, while 58.1% said some expected benefits came to fruition and 9.6% said only a few of their expected benefits were achieved. The remaining 0.1% said they saw no benefit to public cloud adoption at all.

The study, which was commissioned by enterprise storage and data management company Cohesity, also found that 88% of respondents said they were given mandates from their company’s leadership to use public cloud more. That number is further broken down into 38.3% who said they are using the public cloud efficiently and fully reaping benefits, 40.7% who said they are struggling to effectively benefit from public cloud adoption and 8.7% who are executing public cloud adoption just to appease leadership.

One of the conclusions of the study is that there is a disconnect between senior management and IT. The expectations of public cloud adoption included lowering costs, simplifying IT operations, increasing business agility and providing insight into the organization’s data.

“The mandates may have come from people who aren’t IT, but on the business management side of things,” said Peter Linkin, senior director of enterprise marketing at Cohesity. “There’s a command to move there without fully understanding the implications.”

George Crump, founder of storage analyst firm Storage Switzerland, has seen this story play out in his consulting experience. He said companies start off by adopting the public cloud for workloads like backup and disaster recovery (DR) and successfully saving money. The problems begin when there is a long-term vision to shrink the data center or remove it entirely. These organizations are often motivated by a belief that removing the physical footprint would lower costs, free IT staff from mundane maintenance tasks or lead to other benefits. Crump said it’s not that simple.

“The cloud at scale becomes expensive and more complicated,” Crump said.

Crump said the public cloud’s No. 1 expense is egress fees, where organizations are charged to pull data back off the cloud. I/O processing fees also make up part of the costs, along with long lists of line items that cloud service providers (CSPs) might charge. Crump said modern day CSP bills are complex and hard to decipher.

Fred Moore, president of storage consultant Horison Information Strategies in Boulder, Colo., said organizations are frequently blindsided by those costs. He said there is little awareness of things like storage fees, access fees and charges for higher response times and geographic redundancy zones.

The cloud providers don’t go out of their way to help you learn these things. They don’t like to talk about their pricing models.
Fred Moore President, Horison Information Strategies

“The cloud providers don’t go out of their way to help you learn these things,” Moore said. “They don’t like to talk about their pricing models.”

Palmaz Vineyards CEO Christian Gastón Palmaz had to pull his proprietary algorithmic fermentation control system off of the cloud due to egress charges and latency issues. He initially thought public cloud adoption was going to save him more money than storing everything on premises until he received his first bill.

“To put a petabyte on the cloud is one thing, but pulling that data off the cloud was expensive,” Palmaz said.

Palmaz Vineyards currently stores most of its data on premises, including backup data. It only uses the cloud for cold storage, with 280 TB of archived data on Amazon Glacier.

“When people come back in from the cloud, that’s a real headache,” Moore said. “It could take a month to download everything back into the data center. That’s when you just want to roll up a truck full of tapes — it’s actually faster.”

Aside from egress charges, public cloud adoption can add complexity to an organization’s IT infrastructure and lead to lower productivity. In the Vanson Bourne study, 75% of respondents said they had to spend considerable time and effort integrating data center and public cloud environments for effective data management. The survey also found that 45% of respondents believe their IT teams are spending between 30% and 70% of their time managing secondary data across public clouds.

Move to the public cloud

The biggest concern with public cloud adoption was compliance risks, with 48.9% of respondents citing that. Egress charges were actually third on the list, with 42.3% of respondents saying they were concerned about them. However, Crump and Moore said they’ve seen organizations scale back their public cloud operations as a direct result of the latter.

Crump did pointed out he’s not seeing companies leaving the public cloud in droves. Even if they aren’t completely happy with their cloud journey, some companies would rather eat the costs than go through the hassle of returning to the data center. This is why it’s important for organizations to assess and truly understand what they should and shouldn’t put on cloud in order to avoid increasing their overall costs rather than lowering them.

Crump said organizations need to be smarter about differentiating which applications and data sets should go to the cloud rather than assuming the cloud is always the right choice. He said legacy applications that weren’t designed to work in cloud environments and workloads that are performance-intensive, either in terms of storage or CPU-usage, usually should likely stay on premises. Backup and DR are ideal workloads for cloud because it is data that isn’t accessed frequently.

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How to deal with the on-premises vs. cloud challenge

For some administrators, the cloud is not a novelty. It’s critical to their organization. Then, there’s you, the lone on-premises holdout.

With all the hype about cloud and Microsoft’s strong push to get IT to use Azure for services and workloads, it might seem like you are the only one in favor of remaining in the data center in the great on-premises vs. cloud debate. The truth is the cloud isn’t meant for everything. While it’s difficult to find a workload not supported by the cloud, that doesn’t mean everything needs to move there.

Few people like change, and a move to the cloud is a big adjustment. You can’t stop your primary vendors from switching their allegiance to the cloud, so you will need to be flexible to face this new reality. Take a look around at your options as more vendors narrow their focus away from the data center and on-premises management.

Is the cloud a good fit for your organization?

The question is: Should it be done? All too often, it’s a matter of money. For example, it’s possible to take a large-capacity file server in the hundreds of terabytes and place it in Azure. Microsoft’s cloud can easily support this workload, but can your wallet?

Once you get over the sticker shock, think about it. If you’re storing frequently used data, it might make business sense to put that file server in Azure. However, if this is a traditional file server with mostly stale data, then is it really worth the price tag as opposed to using on-premises hardware?

Azure file server
When you run the numbers on what it takes to put a file server in Azure, the costs can add up.

Part of the on-premises vs. cloud dilemma is you have to weigh the financial costs, as well as the tangible benefits and drawbacks. Part of the calculation in determining what makes sense in an operational budget structure, as opposed to a capital expense, is the people factor. Too often, admins find themselves in a situation where management sees one side of this formula and wants to make that cloud leap, while the admins must look at the reality and explain both the pros and cons — the latter of which no one wants to hear.

Part of the on-premises vs. cloud dilemma is you have to weigh the financial costs, as well as the tangible benefits and drawbacks.

The cloud question also goes deeper than the Capex vs. Opex argument for the admins. With so much focus on the cloud, what happens to those environments that simply don’t or can’t move? It’s not only a question of what this means today, but also what’s in store for them tomorrow.

As vendors move on, the walls close in

With the focus for most software vendors on cloud and cloud-related technology, the move away from the data center should be a warning sign for admins that can’t move to the cloud. The applications and tools you use will change to focus on the organizations working in the cloud with less development on features that would benefit the on-premises data center.

One of the most critical aspects of this shift will be your monitoring tools. As cloud gains prominence, it will get harder to find tools that will continue to support local Windows Server installations over cloud-based ones. We already see this trend with log aggregation tools that used to be available as on-site installs that are now almost all SaaS-based offerings. This is just the start.

If a tool moves from on premises to the cloud but retains the ability to monitor data center resources, that is an important distinction to remember. That means you might have a workable option to keep production workloads on the ground and work with the cloud as needed or as your tools make that transition.

As time goes on, an evaluation process might be in order. If your familiar tools are moving to the cloud without support for on-premises workloads, the options might be limited. Should you pick up new tools and then invest the time to install and train the staff how to use them? It can be done, but do you really want to?

While not ideal, another viable option is to take no action; the install you have works, and as long as you don’t upgrade, everything will be fine. The problem with remaining static is getting left behind. The base OSes will change, and the applications will get updated. But, if your tools can no longer monitor them, what good are they? You also introduce a significant security risk when you don’t update software. Staying put isn’t a good long-term strategy.

With the cloud migration will come other choices

The same challenges you face with your tools also apply to your traditional on-premises applications. Longtime stalwarts, such as Exchange Server, still offer a local installation, but it’s clear that Microsoft’s focus for messaging and collaboration is its Office 365 suite.

The harsh reality is more software vendors will continue on the cloud path, which they see as the new profit centers. Offerings for on-premises applications will continue to dwindle. However, there is some hope. As the larger vendors move to the cloud, it opens up an opportunity in the market for third-party tools and applications that might not have been on your radar until now. These products might not be as feature-rich as an offering from the larger vendors, but they might tick most of the checkboxes for your requirements.

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How to Provide PaaS Services with Azure Stack

On this post, we’re going to be getting into some talk about PaaS with Azure Stack, but before we get into that, let’s see where we’ve been thus far!

Our Microsoft Azure Stack Series So Far

  1. An Introduction to the Microsoft Hybrid Cloud Concept and Azure Stack
  2. How to Install the Azure Stack Development Toolkit (ASDK)
  3. The Ultimate Azure Stack Post-Installation Checklist
  4. How to Provide IaaS Images with Azure Stack

What is PaaS (Platform as a Service)

Now that we’re diving deeper into cloud technologies, we can easily recognize that Infrastructure as a Service is not the best use-case for getting the most out of Azure Stack. With what we’ve covered so far, Azure Stack can really be seen as just more VM technology behind Virtual Machine Manager (VMM). But Platform as a Service can really bring a more dynamic and elasticity capabilities to services running in your cloud. There is no need to manage the underlying infrastructure and is highly available by default in general.

What is PaaS

Azure Stack PaaS is a special flavor because as of today the currently existing resource providers rely upon linking to an existing environment that could either be part of Azure Stack (if we talk about virtual machines that are responsible for the PaaS service itself) or a physical environment that sits outside of Azure Stack.

If you create a database “as a service” in Azure Stack, it will be deployed on this environment and you should take care to manage and back up the PaaS associated VMs themselves. They are not auto-deployed and self-managed like in Azure Public. So while they ARE providing PaaS services to those people and workloads connecting to them, you still need to manage them.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the PaaS solutions are not part of the default Azure Stack setup that is being deployed from the Hardware vendor (Remember that a true Azure Stack deployment will be handled by the hardware vendor), it is optional and needs to be ordered via separate SKUs.

PaaS Solutions in Azure Stack

Azure Stack as of today comes with the following PaaS solutions:

  1. Microsoft SQL Server
  2. MySQL Server
  3. App Services

If you deploy them using the Script from Matt McSpirit, they are part of the deployment by default. Please have in mind that the MS SQL and the MySQL resource providers have completely different APIs than the Azure ones. This means that your automation scripts behave completely different and consistency may be an issue currently.

Microsoft SQL Server on Azure Stack

Resource provider for Microsoft SQL

As you can see, the underlying SQL Server infrastructure is a set of SQL Servers (up to release 2017) on Windows Server or even on Linux (if you’d like) for placement of you PaaS databases.

The deployment itself is being done using the DeploySqlProvider.ps1 script (from the resource provider link above), that performs the following tasks:

  • Certificate and artifact upload to the Azure Stack storage account
  • Publishing gallery items to be able to deploy SQL using the gallery
  • Deploying the SQL resource provider VM which is a Windows Server 2016 core based one
  • Registers a local DNS record that maps to your resource provider VM.
  • Registers your resource provider with the local Azure Resource Manager for the operator account.

NOTE: Please keep in mind, that the registration of the SQL Server resource provider may take up to 75 min on the Azure Stack environment.

To double check if the deployment finished properly you should check this in the .system..sqladapter resource group in your Azure Stack Amin Portal:

Microsoft SQL Server on Azure Stack

Finally, we will need to connect to the existing SQL Server environment (so-called hosting servers) to define the location for the created databases via this resource provider. Basically, we’ll be telling Azure Stack where to put new Databases when Azure Stack users request a new one!

Microsoft SQL Server on Azure Stack 2

You will find the entry for the SQL Hosting Servers under administrative resources and add new server environments:

Microsoft SQL Server on Azure Stack

Fill out the form as shown above.

After having created the corresponding SKUs, it may take up to 30 min to recognize and be able to use them in a proper manner in the environment.

You should now be able to create a first PaaS database using the wizard in the Azure Stack!

MySQL on Azure Stack

The resource provider for MySQL is available in its most recent version here:

If you have a look into the deployment guide, you will shortly recognize that the deployment steps are quite like what we went through above for the Microsoft SQL Server resource provider. The name of the script meanwhile changed a little bit to DeployMySqlProvider.ps1 and even the deployment steps are the same.

Most of you know MySQL as a database environment sitting on a Linux operating system. This is where the resource provider is somehow different as it relies on Windows Server-based MySQL resources.

After having deployed the resource provider you could simply add the MySQL hosting server, define the SKUs and deploy the first databases on your MySQL server environment just like we showed for Microsoft SQL above.

App Services on Azure Stack

The App Services resource provider is one which should be quite familiar with what you may already know from public Azure.

The options with the App Services resource provider are:

  1. Web Apps
  2. Mobile Apps
  3. Function Apps

Therefore, the use-cases are a bit broader compared to the SQL options mention thus far.

Looking into the deployment guide, the setup is more GUI based and quite simple. You can run the deployment using the appservice.exe installer that collects all requirements and lets you define the required parameters before starting the installation itself.

The requirements besides a few basic parameters are:

  • Microsoft SQL Database (e.g. via the MS SQL resource provider)
  • Windows File Server

After the installation has finished, the appropriate resources will show up in the portal.

App Services on Azure Stack

Having this done, the resource provider for App Services is up and running and can be used in your environment.

PaaS Use Cases on Azure Stack

After having installed all available resource providers for Azure Stack, you will be able to provide these services to your tenants using Plans and Offers. They are now able to deploy e.g. a WebApp as their services frontend with a SQL server-based backend.

Looking into hybrid cloud environments using Azure and Azure Stack, one part of the solution architecture may reside on Azure Stack (e.g. database) and the frontend on public Azure to be nearer to the customer itself or vice versa depending on the solution requirements. The only requirement would be again to have networking connectivity between both environments.

One other thing to note, regarding the Azure Stack Update cycles, you should have in mind that Azure Stack updates do not include updates for PaaS solutions. These need to be done manually and based on their availability. As the last months showed, the updates always included new features. So, I would say it is mandatory to follow the cycle. Regarding the update tasks, see the corresponding resource provider download as mentioned in this article. They should include a description and will show you how the update has to take place.

Wrap-Up

How are you liking Azure Stack so far? Have you found it easy to use? Difficult? Have you run into anything not covered yet in this series? We’d love to know in the comments section below.

Thanks for reading!

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Author: Markus Klein

For Sale – Cheap, quick Samsung NP3530EC

Very decent condition with some slight cosmetic damage here and there, and 2 keys scratched as pictured. Screen is excellent as is the Pad. Comes with i3 (2.20ghz) 6gb RAM, 120 SSD. Legit free upgrade from Windows 8 copy of Windows 10 installed.

Screen 15.6 I think and battery life is great.

Had very light use.

Comes with charger.

Lightning quick for Office. Boots in just a few seconds. Perfect for a back up, Uni, school etc.

Looking for £150.

Price and currency: 150
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PayPal Gift / BT
Location: Manchester
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

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