Tag Archives: space

For Sale – Parts Clear Out (Motherboards, Memory, CPUs, GPUs and Case) ***PRICE DROPS***

Due to a recent upgrade, and the need to clear some space in the garage, I’ve got the following up for sale.

Motherboards:
MSI Z87 GD65 Used £65.00
MSI Z170I ITX Used £95.00

DDR3:
8GB Corsair Vengeance Pro – 2133Mhz (2x4GB) Used £35.00
16GB HyperX Savage Red – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £50.00 SOLD to scott178

DDR4:
16GB Corsair Low Profile Black – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £45.00

Intel Processors:
LGA 1150 – Intel Core i5-4670K Used £65.00
LGA 1151 – Intel Core i5-6600 Used £105.00

AMD Graphics Cards:
XFX AMD R9 390 – 8GB Used £75.00

Nvidia Graphics Cards:
MSI – GTX 660Ti 2GB Used £45.00
MSI – GTX 570 2GB Used £35.00

Mice:
Razer Mamba 2016 Wireless Used £35.00

Cases:
Phanteks Evolve ITX Used £40.00

Coolers:
Corsair H50 Used £40.00
Corsair H80i Used £50.00

Most items will be boxed in their original retail or OEM packaging.

I will updating this thread as I discover anything else that I no longer require.

Open to offers.

Price and currency: £845
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG
Location: Oxford
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Oracle Cloud Infrastructure SVP shares competitive strategy

SAN FRANCISCO — Oracle’s late entry to the public cloud space has been met with skepticism, but the company has a few strategies, particularly around autonomous cloud, unexpected partnerships and shared responsibility, that executives expect to make up for its tardiness.

Oracle Cloud Infrastructure (OCI), the company’s second attempt at a public IaaS, was built with the help of former AWS technical employees like Clay Magouyrk, who joined Oracle in 2014.

Now senior vice president of engineering for OCI, Magouyrk spoke with TechTarget during Oracle’s OpenWorld conference about the company’s market position, its efforts to attract customers and what the future may hold.

A common refrain is that Oracle is very late — maybe too late — to arrive at a viable IaaS strategy. What’s your response to this?

Clay Magouyrk: I think you have to understand where we’re at in our evolution of the cloud. I remember when everybody had a kind of, you know, a dumb phone. And I remember it took two years to get to a place where everyone had a smartphone. The switching speed was amazing.

So then the question is, [the industry has] been doing cloud infrastructure for 15 years. Why isn’t it all [migrated over from on-premises] yet? It’s still 90% greenfield. One of the things I worked on at Amazon before I left was the Fire Phone, and the Fire Phone was too late, in the same way that the Windows Phone reboot was too late. Once Apple and Android had 90%-plus market share it was impossible [to catch up].

The reason I spend my day here every day working really hard is because we’re still at the 10% penetration [level]. People act like we’re 90% of the way into the cloud infrastructure transition, but we’re not anywhere close to it.

One of the biggest OCI announcements at OpenWorld was Maximum Security Zones, which you positioned as a response to data breaches at IaaS providers caused by misconfigured systems. But it doesn’t fully reject the shared responsibility stance around security forwarded by AWS and others.

Magouyrk: I think, fundamentally, in the long term, you always end up with some shared responsibility. What we’re trying to say here at Oracle is that we are going to push that boundary.

If you look at cloud in general, cloud providers have the responsibility of patching the hypervisor. And then, okay, your job is to patch your OS. Cool, well, with Autonomous Linux, now it’s our job to patch the OS. So we’re bringing that up the stack.

We’re going to create a construct where you can’t misconfigure it. We’re taking the stance that this is not just your responsibility, we are going to work with you on it.
Clay MagouyrkSVP, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

If you look at the vast majority of security incidents these days, they’re not [committed by] massively sophisticated hackers. It’s misconfiguration. When you moved to the cloud, we gave you all these tools. And now you’ve got a million tools. And you have this programmable infrastructure. It’s so easy to do stuff, right?

We’re going to create a construct where you can’t misconfigure it. We’re taking the stance that this is not just your responsibility, we are going to work with you on it.

Think about it from our perspective on SaaS. We take on a ton of responsibility for that. There’s no way for you to mess it up. As we can make infrastructure to where you can’t mess it up, I don’t see any reason why we can’t take on more responsibility the same way we do in SaaS. The problem is that if people still need that control, to be able to mess it up, then it has to be on them.

You plan to dramatically expand OCI’s global footprint, bringing it to 36 regions by the end of 2020. Tell us about Oracle’s process here.

Magouyrk: There are things under the hood that people don’t see. One of those things is that we’ve massively optimized how we build regions, both from an infrastructure perspective, as well as a software perspective.

When I joined Oracle in 2014, we had zero OCI regions. I knew that if we were going to compete, we had to build regions that are way faster than our competitors. I knew how [AWS] built them, because I had worked there. And we hired people that also worked there. What we did is we took a much more aggressive approach.

Clay Magouyrk, SVP of Oracle Cloud Infrastructure
Clay Magouyrk, senior vice president, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

The way most companies build these regions is you have 200 teams, and they all do it by hand. So the physical hardware gets rolled in, and the actual software teams spend all their time installing the stuff.

When you bought a Windows CD back in the day, Microsoft didn’t send an engineer to install it for you, right? They had an installer. Well, you can do that for the cloud; it’s a bunch of work. But we’ve made that investment from a software perspective.

If you look back to when Amazon got into this, they didn’t know where they were going. It was very early days. And they were like, we’re going to build these big honkin’ regions, and they’re going to cost a jillion dollars and there is going to be so much stuff there.

We realized, by the time I came to Oracle, we were going to need to put regions everywhere, but they’re going to start small and be able to grow. We’ve engineered for that. From a technical perspective, that gives us a lot more flexibility than some of our competitors.

It’s my understanding that Oracle is doing this buildout largely through co-location agreements and not actually building its own data centers, in the interest of speed. Can you elaborate?

Magouyrk: I think the term [co-location] has changed. If you go back 10 or 15 years, co-lo meant you get one rack in a small data center, that kind of a thing. But as you actually see these large cloud providers — the way they’re doing these worldwide rollouts — co-lo providers have actually changed their model. They still do that kind of retail stuff. But they also have a wholesale model. And that’s what has enabled a lot of this rapid global expansion.

Every major cloud provider uses a ton of colocation facilities. There’s just no way that it makes sense otherwise. As a co-lo provider, you can do things where you put stuff in a campus. You buy a bunch of land, and then you start small. But then, as that fills up, you build new buildings and you can deeply interconnect that with fiber. As a [co-lo] customer, you have this expansion plan in that same area, but you don’t have to build a giant data center [yourself].

One OCI announcement this week at OpenWorld concerned a new “always free” tier, which seemed clearly aimed at attracting developers to the platform. Tell us more about your efforts in this area.

Magouyrk: A lot of it is social proof. While we would like to think that everyone’s making a fully informed, highly educated decision, the reality is that most humans do close approximations based on what everyone else does. The key is to create a flywheel that gets enough going, and then it becomes oh, well, they all chose Oracle, why can’t we?

We have dedicated startup investments where we go to startups and give them a bunch of free credits and incentives. Around developers in general, we put a lot of energy into attracting people out of college. We work with universities to give them access to cloud computing resources. They use that in their classrooms to get people familiar with it.

I view [the free tier] as the start of something … Because it’s not just making it free, it’s making the signup easy, the support experience easy. Do you have the collateral and the ecosystem around it? Do you have the right forums for people to ask questions? You do all of those things in a row, and it builds.

The initial use case you put forward with your interoperability partnership between Microsoft Azure and OCI was to split an application up, with the logic and presentation tiers on Azure tied back to an Oracle database running on Exadata inside OCI. Why would a customer want to do that?

Magouyrk: When [Oracle CTO and chairman] Larry [Ellison] gets up there, and he’s like, look, let me show you the performance difference between what you can get from this versus an Exadata, I don’t think people actually believe it, but it’s true. There are all these amazing workloads that need giant relational databases that just can’t move anywhere.

My job is to get you in OCI and then just keep pulling more. Maybe you add some Analytics Cloud on top of it to analyze that data. You just get people hooked that way.

What about going further and bringing Exadata boxes right into Azure data centers? That would eliminate the need for the high-speed interconnect between OCI sites and Microsoft’s.

Magouyrk: As you can imagine, those types of conversations do happen in the abstract. I’m sure Microsoft would love that. The thing you have to understand is that we did a lot of work in Oracle Cloud infrastructure to make Exadata run well. We offer bare-metal; we offer off-the-box virtualized networking. There’s a whole bunch of features.

Let’s say that we were to make a deal and I gave Microsoft a bunch of Exadatas. It would be off in a little tiny part of the network. It’s not actually integrated into their experience. They wouldn’t have a database service wrapped around it. The experience would be terrible. For them, it’s not important [to host Exadatas].

For us, it’s so valuable that we make it really, really good. What we’re not going to do is take the thing that we think is incredibly valuable and then have other people do it badly.

What is next for this deal? Will we see others like it, say with Google? Going even further, is a détente between Oracle and AWS possible?

Magouyrk: Right now, we have great ideas, and we have good buzz, and we have very interesting customers. What we have to do over the next six months is convert those into a bunch of very happy, very public reference customers. That’s the next level of uptick in the process. Until we have that play out, I don’t think anyone’s going to know.

In terms of where we’re taking this with Microsoft, I think it’s about us working much better together. We’re making Oracle Linux work better in [Microsoft’s] cloud. A big part of the reason we chose them is because we have such customer overlap. It might be interesting, technically, for us to do it with Google. But it’s not like Google is already in every single one of our customer accounts. We’re doing this from a customer-driven perspective.

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Author:

For Sale – Parts Clear Out (Motherboards, Memory, CPUs, GPUs and Case) ***PRICE DROPS***

Due to a recent upgrade, and the need to clear some space in the garage, I’ve got the following up for sale.

Motherboards:
MSI Z87 GD65 Used £65.00
MSI Z170I ITX Used £95.00

DDR3:
8GB Corsair Vengeance Pro – 2133Mhz (2x4GB) Used £35.00
16GB HyperX Savage Red – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £50.00 SOLD to scott178

DDR4:
16GB Corsair Low Profile Black – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £45.00

Intel Processors:
LGA 1150 – Intel Core i5-4670K Used £65.00
LGA 1151 – Intel Core i5-6600 Used £105.00

AMD Graphics Cards:
XFX AMD R9 390 – 8GB Used £75.00

Nvidia Graphics Cards:
MSI – GTX 660Ti 2GB Used £45.00
MSI – GTX 570 2GB Used £35.00

Mice:
Razer Mamba 2016 Wireless Used £35.00

Cases:
Phanteks Evolve ITX Used £40.00

Coolers:
Corsair H50 Used £40.00
Corsair H80i Used £50.00

Most items will be boxed in their original retail or OEM packaging.

I will updating this thread as I discover anything else that I no longer require.

Open to offers.

Price and currency: £845
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG
Location: Oxford
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – Parts Clear Out (Motherboards, Memory, CPUs, GPUs and Case) ***PRICE DROPS***

Due to a recent upgrade, and the need to clear some space in the garage, I’ve got the following up for sale.

Motherboards:
MSI Z87 GD65 Used £65.00
MSI Z170I ITX Used £95.00

DDR3:
8GB Corsair Vengeance Pro – 2133Mhz (2x4GB) Used £35.00
16GB HyperX Savage Red – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £50.00 SOLD to scott178

DDR4:
16GB Corsair Low Profile Black – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £45.00

Intel Processors:
LGA 1150 – Intel Core i5-4670K Used £65.00
LGA 1151 – Intel Core i5-6600 Used £105.00

AMD Graphics Cards:
XFX AMD R9 390 – 8GB Used £75.00

Nvidia Graphics Cards:
MSI – GTX 660Ti 2GB Used £45.00
MSI – GTX 570 2GB Used £35.00

Mice:
Razer Mamba 2016 Wireless Used £35.00

Cases:
Phanteks Evolve ITX Used £40.00

Coolers:
Corsair H50 Used £40.00
Corsair H80i Used £50.00

Most items will be boxed in their original retail or OEM packaging.

I will updating this thread as I discover anything else that I no longer require.

Open to offers.

Price and currency: £845
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG
Location: Oxford
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Author:

Analyzing data from space – the ultimate intelligent edge scenario – The Official Microsoft Blog

Space represents the next frontier for cloud computing, and Microsoft’s unique approach to partnerships with pioneering companies in the space industry means together we can build platforms and tools that foster significant leaps forward, helping us gain deeper insights from the data gleaned from space.

One of the primary challenges for this industry is the sheer amount of data available from satellites and the infrastructure required to bring this data to ground, analyze the data and then transport it to where it’s needed. With almost 3,000 new satellites forecast to launch by 20261 and a threefold increase in the number of small satellite launches per year, the magnitude of this challenge is growing rapidly.

Essentially, this is the ultimate intelligent edge scenario – where massive amounts of data must be processed at the edge – whether that edge is in space or on the ground. Then the data can be directed to where it’s needed for further analytics or combined with other data sources to make connections that simply weren’t possible before.

DIU chooses Microsoft and Ball Aerospace for space analytics

To help with these challenges, the Defense Innovation Unit (DIU) just selected Microsoft and Ball Aerospace to build a solution demonstrating agile cloud processing capabilities in support of the U.S. Air Force’s Commercially Augmented Space Inter Networked Operations (CASINO) project.

With the aim of making satellite data more actionable more quickly, Ball Aerospace and Microsoft teamed up to answer the question: “what would it take to completely transform what a ground station looks like, and downlink that data directly to the cloud?”

The solution involves placing electronically steered flat panel antennas on the roof of a Microsoft datacenter. These phased array antennas don’t require much power and need only a couple of square meters of roof space. This innovation can connect multiple low earth orbit (LEO) satellites with a single antenna aperture, significantly accelerating the delivery rate of data from satellite to end user with data piped directly into Microsoft Azure from the rooftop array.

Analytics for a massive confluence of data

Azure provides the foundational engine for Ball Aerospace algorithms in this project, processing worldwide data streams from up to 20 satellites. With the data now in Azure, customers can direct that data to where it best serves the mission need, whether that’s moving it to Azure Government to meet compliance requirements such as ITAR or combining it with data from other sources, such as weather and radar maps, to gain more meaningful insights.

In working with Microsoft, Steve Smith, Vice President and General Manager, Systems Engineering Solutions at Ball Aerospace called this type of data processing system, which leverages Ball phased array technology and imagery exploitation algorithms in Azure, “flexible and scalable – designed to support additional satellites and processing capabilities. This type of data processing in the cloud provides actionable, relevant information quickly and more cost-effectively to the end user.”

With Azure, customers gain its advanced analytics capabilities such as Azure Machine Learning and Azure AI. This enables end users to build models and make predictions based on a confluence of data coming from multiple sources, including multiple concurrent satellite feeds. Customers can also harness Microsoft’s global fiber network to rapidly deliver the data to where it’s needed using services such as ExpressRoute and ExpressRoute Global Reach. In addition, ExpressRoute now enables customers to ingest satellite data from several new connectivity partners to address the challenges of operating in remote locations.

For tactical units in the field, this technology can be replicated to bring information to where it’s needed, even in disconnected scenarios. As an example, phased array antennas mounted to a mobile unit can pipe data directly into a tactical datacenter or Data Box Edge appliance, delivering unprecedented situational awareness in remote locations.

A similar approach can be used for commercial applications, including geological exploration and environmental monitoring in disconnected or intermittently connected scenarios. Ball Aerospace specializes in weather satellites, and now customers can more quickly get that data down and combine it with locally sourced data in Azure, whether for agricultural, ecological, or disaster response scenarios.

This partnership with Ball Aerospace enables us to bring satellite data to ground and cloud faster than ever, leapfrogging other solutions on the market. Our joint innovation in direct satellite-to-cloud communication and accelerated data processing provides the Department of Defense, including the Air Force, with entirely new capabilities to explore as they continue to advance their mission.

  1. https://www.satellitetoday.com/innovation/2017/10/12/satellite-launches-increase-threefold-next-decade/

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Author: Microsoft News Center

For Sale – Parts Clear Out (Motherboards, Memory, CPUs, GPUs and Case) ***PRICE DROPS***

Due to a recent upgrade, and the need to clear some space in the garage, I’ve got the following up for sale.

Motherboards:
MSI Z87 GD65 Used £65.00
MSI Z170I ITX Used £95.00

DDR3:
8GB Corsair Vengeance Pro – 2133Mhz (2x4GB) Used £35.00
16GB HyperX Savage Red – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £50.00 SOLD to scott178

DDR4:
16GB Corsair Low Profile Black – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £45.00

Intel Processors:
LGA 1150 – Intel Core i5-4670K Used £65.00
LGA 1151 – Intel Core i5-6600 Used £105.00

AMD Graphics Cards:
XFX AMD R9 390 – 8GB Used £75.00

Nvidia Graphics Cards:
MSI – GTX 660Ti 2GB Used £45.00
MSI – GTX 570 2GB Used £35.00

Mice:
Razer Mamba 2016 Wireless Used £35.00

Cases:
Phanteks Evolve ITX Used £40.00

Coolers:
Corsair H50 Used £40.00
Corsair H80i Used £50.00

Most items will be boxed in their original retail or OEM packaging.

I will updating this thread as I discover anything else that I no longer require.

Open to offers.

Price and currency: £845
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG
Location: Oxford
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – Parts Clear Out (Motherboards, Memory, CPUs, GPUs and Case) ***PRICE DROPS***

Due to a recent upgrade, and the need to clear some space in the garage, I’ve got the following up for sale.

Motherboards:
MSI Z87 GD65 Used £65.00
MSI Z170I ITX Used £95.00

DDR3:
8GB Corsair Vengeance Pro – 2133Mhz (2x4GB) Used £35.00
16GB HyperX Savage Red – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £50.00 SOLD to scott178

DDR4:
16GB Corsair Low Profile Black – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £45.00

Intel Processors:
LGA 1150 – Intel Core i5-4670K Used £65.00
LGA 1151 – Intel Core i5-6600 Used £105.00

AMD Graphics Cards:
XFX AMD R9 390 – 8GB Used £75.00

Nvidia Graphics Cards:
MSI – GTX 660Ti 2GB Used £45.00
MSI – GTX 570 2GB Used £35.00

Mice:
Razer Mamba 2016 Wireless Used £35.00

Cases:
Phanteks Evolve ITX Used £40.00

Coolers:
Corsair H50 Used £40.00
Corsair H80i Used £50.00

Most items will be boxed in their original retail or OEM packaging.

I will updating this thread as I discover anything else that I no longer require.

Open to offers.

Price and currency: £845
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG
Location: Oxford
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – Parts Clear Out (Motherboards, Memory, CPUs, GPUs and Case) ***PRICE DROPS***

Due to a recent upgrade, and the need to clear some space in the garage, I’ve got the following up for sale.

Motherboards:
MSI Z87 GD65 Used £65.00
MSI Z170I ITX Used £95.00

DDR3:
8GB Corsair Vengeance Pro – 2133Mhz (2x4GB) Used £35.00
16GB HyperX Savage Red – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £50.00 SOLD to scott178

DDR4:
16GB Corsair Low Profile Black – 2400Mhz (2x8GB) Used £45.00 SOLD to beefybarn

Intel Processors:
LGA 1150 – Intel Core i5-4670K Used £65.00
LGA 1151 – Intel Core i5-6600 Used £105.00 SOLD to beefybarn

AMD Graphics Cards:
XFX AMD R9 390 – 8GB Used £75.00

Nvidia Graphics Cards:
MSI – GTX 660Ti 2GB Used £45.00
MSI – GTX 570 2GB Used £35.00

Mice:
Razer Mamba 2016 Wireless Used £35.00

Cases:
Phanteks Evolve ITX Used £40.00

Coolers:
Corsair H50 Used £40.00
Corsair H80i Used £50.00

Most items will be boxed in their original retail or OEM packaging.

I will updating this thread as I discover anything else that I no longer require.

Open to offers.

Price and currency: £845
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT/PPG
Location: Oxford
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be collected

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

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Author:

VMware vSAN HCI: Complete stack or ‘vaporware’?

Days after VMware’s CEO proclaimed his vSAN product the winner in the hyper-converged infrastructure space, the CEO of VMWare rival Nutanix countered that VMware “sells a lot of vaporware.”

“We’re crushing Nu … I mean we’re winning in the marketplace,” VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger said during his opening VMworld keynote last week. “We’re separating from No. 2. We’re winning in the space.”

Two days later on Nutanix’s earnings call, CEO Dheeraj Pandey took a shot at VMware without mentioning the company by name. “We don’t sell vaporware,” he said, when referring to why Nutanix wins in competitive deals.

In an exclusive interview after the call, Pandey admitted the vaporware charge was aimed mostly at VMware’s vSAN HCI software.

Pat Gelsinger, VMware CEOPat Gelsinger

“VMware sells a lot of vaporware,” Pandey said. “A lot of that vaporware becomes evident to customers who buy that stuff. When bundled products don’t deliver on their promise, they call us. What we sell is not shelfware.”

Whatever VMware is selling with its vSAN HCI software, it is working. VMware reported license bookings of its vSAN HCI software grew 45% year-over-year last quarter, while Nutanix revenue and bookings slipped from last year. VMware’s parent Dell also claimed a 77% increase in orders of its Dell EMC VxRail HCI appliances that run vSAN software. Those numbers suggest Dell increased market share against Nutanix, even if Nutanix did better than expected last quarter following a disappointing period. IDC listed VMware as the HCI software market leader and Dell as the hardware HCI leader in the first quarter of 2019, with Nutanix second in both categories. Gartner lists Nutanix as the HCI software leader, but No. 2 VMware made up ground in Gartner’s first-quarter numbers.

Nutanix’s Pandey attributed at least some of VMware’s HCI success to bundling its vSAN software with its overall virtualization stack. Like VMware, Nutanix has its own hypervisor (AHV) and its share of hardware partners — including Dell — but VMware has a huge vSphere installed base to sell vSAN into.

Dheeraj Pandey, Nutanix CEODheeraj Pandey

Pandey said he was unimpressed by VMware’s Kubernetes and open source plans laid out at VMworld, which included Tanzu and Project Pacific. Both are still roadmap items but reflect a commitment from VMware to containers and open source software.

“That’s worse than vaporware, that’s slideware,” Pandey said of VMware’s announcements. “Everything works in slides. We’re based on Linux; we get a lot of leverage out of open source. AHV was based on Linux, and we’ve made it enterprise grade.”

Making vSAN part of its vSphere virtualization platform has paid off for VMware. Customers at VMworld pointed to their familiarity with VMware and vSAN’s integration with vSphere, and its NSX software-defined networking as reasons for going with vSAN HCI.

 “What really end up selling it for us was, we were already using VMware for our base product and the vast majority of the deliverables that our customers request is in vSphere,” said Lester Shisler, senior IT systems engineer at Harmony Healthcare IT, based in South Bend, Ind. “So whatever pain points we learned along the way with vSAN, we were going to have to learn [with a competing HCI product] as well, along with new software and new management and everything else.”

Matthew Douglas, chief enterprise architect at Sentara Healthcare in Norfolk, Va., said Nutanix was among the HCI options he looked at before picking vSAN.

“VMware was ultimately the choice,” he said. “All the others were missing some components. VMWare was a consistent platform for hyper-converged infrastructure. Plus, there was NSX and all these things that fit together in a nice, uniform fashion. And as an enterprise, I couldn’t make a choice of all these independent different tools. Having one consistent tool was the differentiator.”

Despite losing share, Nutanix’s last-quarter results were mixed. Its revenue of $300 million and billings of $372 million were both down from last year but better than expected following the disappointing previous quarter. Nutanix’s software and support revenue of $287 million increased 7%, a good sign for the HCI pioneer’s move to a software-centric business model. Nutanix also reported a 16% growth in deals over $1 million from the previous quarter.

However, operating expenses also increased. Sales and marketing spend jumped to $254 million from $183 million the previous year. Nutanix, which has never recorded a profit, lost $194 million in the quarter — more than double its losses from a year ago. It finished the quarter with $909 million in cash, down from $943 million last year.

Pandey said he is more concerned about growth and customer acquisition than profitability.

“Profitability is a nuanced word,” Pandey said. “We defer so much in our balance sheet. Right now we care about doing right by the customer when we sell them subscriptions.”

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Domain-specific BI vendors gain foothold with expertise

They’re tiny compared with the giants of the business intelligence space, and some have only been in existence a few years as organizations have widely adopted analytics, but domain-specific BI vendors touting a specialized area of expertise are popping up across the BI and analytics landscape.

Soundcharts, for example, sells an analytics suite for the music business. The Tessitura Network provides business intelligence, among other services, for arts and culture organizations. Flowhub targets the cannabis industry. Sports Alliance, as its names suggests, is geared toward the sports world.

And there are others.

The challenge for domain-specific BI enterprises as they compete for customers against established BI vendors is differentiation, providing a more adapted analytics platform for a narrow audience based on specialization and expertise than those built for general audiences like Microsoft Power BI or Tableau can.

“Bringing analytics back to the reason they exist — it’s about doing business better,” said Dave Menninger, research director of data and analytics research at Ventana Research. “The whole purpose of analytics is to do your job better. The easier we can make it for line-of-business people to do their jobs better, the better we’re servicing industries.”

If domain-specific vendors are able to overcome the hurdle of establishing differentiation, it becomes their advantage.

An analysis of musician Billie Eilish's worldwide popularity is displayed on a Soundcharts dashboard.
A Soundcharts dashboard shows the geographic breakdown of where artist Billie Eilish is getting the most airplay.

Specialization

Dashboards are all essentially similar.

As a user sits at their desk and views charts and graphs and other data visualizations, whether it’s a Tableau or Domo dashboard or one from a domain-specific BI vendor, the look is largely the same.

The difference between what’s on the screen of a ThoughtSpot user — or Power BI, Qlik, MicroStrategy, etc. — and what’s displayed to a Tessitura or Soundcharts user is how the data got to that dashboard.

“The power is in the data model,” said John Jakovich, Tessitura’s vice president of business intelligence.

Tessitura, which beyond offering BI capabilities is at its core a customer relationship management (CRM) provider, stands out in that it’s a nonprofit organization. It began as a result of the New York Metropolitan Opera House’s frustration with ticketing and fundraising inefficiencies, and in 2001 the “Met,” along with six other cultural organizations, launched the Tessitura Network. Since then, more than 650 arts and culture organizations have joined.

“We’ve built reporting into an optimized data model,” Jakovich said.

With a general audience tool, finding the right data is often difficult. Data is everywhere, and the specific information relevant to a museum or art gallery — or marijuana dispensary or high school athletics department — isn’t necessarily easy to locate.

If you’re not using [a domain-specific] tool you’re spending time munging data. We’ve premunged the data and put a data model on top of it. We’re making it easy for them to do analytics by doing the data preparation.
John JakovichVice president of business intelligence, Tessitura Network

Tessitura, because of its narrow audience, can do much of the searching and transforming of data — data munging — in advance before embedding the relevant data into the BI application it provides to its members.

“If you’re not using [a domain-specific] tool you’re spending time munging data,” Jakovich said. “We’ve premunged the data and put a data model on top of it. We’re doing the hard work for them. We’re making it easy for them to do analytics by doing the data preparation.”

Similarly, Soundcharts uses its specialized knowledge of the music business to make analytics easier for industry insiders than can a general-audience BI vendor.

The data used by the music industry is highly specific: it’s how frequently a song is played on the radio, how many times a song is streamed, what region an artist is selling more albums than another, where tickets for an artist sell out in just a few hours compared with where they don’t sell out at all, and more.

It’s not simply sales figures, or operating costs.

“The data we have is not available to grab and put on Tableau,” said David Weiszfeld, CEO of Soundcharts. “If you need to see the number of radio plays for an artist, you need to find a company that has that data. Our platform is not showing data that’s centralized elsewhere.”

Weiszfeld added that while Soundcharts counts many of the music business’ largest companies among its clients, many of its customers are small and medium-sized businesses.

Their employees are not, and don’t necessarily have the financial resources to hire people with those skills.

“Those people just want to see insights,” Weiszfeld said. “They don’t want to create an [application programming interface]. We still do a lot of education on how to use data in music. If you use [a general-audience platform], you already know.”

Competition

While specialization provides vendors an entry into analytics, it’s no guarantee of staying power.

There’s a reason Microsoft Power BI, Qlik and Tableau and others have been around as long as they have and have attracted large numbers of customers. They’re good at what they do. And they evolve to meet the needs of potential customers.

The next wave of innovation will likely center around augmented intelligence and machine learning, tools that will help BI vendors better understand the habits of users in order to better get them the data they need.

Domain-specific BI vendors, just as they’re doing now by using their expertise, will have to find a way to remain apart — just as they have to separate themselves from competition within their specialized domain.

“We’re looking into ways AI can augment our CRM,” Jakovich said. “It’s already happening in our industry. Our licensees are engaging with consultants to do predictive models — so how can we premunge data to push those products forward? We’re looking at how to make it easier to facilitate AI projects on behalf of our members.”

Meanwhile, just as Tessitura is embedding relevant data for its users, general-audience BI platforms are embedding data to streamline the user experience.

“All aspects of BI will have to start being more embedded in applications,” Menninger said. “We predict that by 2021 more than half will be. There’s no reason to have analysts for analysis — it should be part of the application.”

Still another challenge domain-specific BI vendors will face is that general-audience BI vendors are starting to offer products aimed at specific domains.

SAP, for example, has a whole suite of analytics tools for the sports world. And the multinational software giant is not alone.

“Coming out of the Salesforce-Tableau merger I think you can expect to see more Salesforce [analytics products] that could be domain-specific,” Menninger said, adding that Qlik has some domain-specific templates.

But just as some general-audience BI vendors are creating tools aimed at niche audiences, it’s possible that domain-specific BI vendors will push back by expanding their areas of expertise.

Soundcharts is still perfecting its data mining of the music business, and according to Weiszfeld there are still types of music data Soundcharts isn’t yet tracking. But perhaps in the future, once it’s done all it can for music industry insiders, it will look at something new.

“Maybe they would transition into supporting the online video industry, and from there digital media and communication,” Menninger said. “They can create a proven business model, and that’s their specialty more than the platform.”

Next phase

Specialization, just like AI and machine learning from a technological perspective, might be part of the future of analytics.

Maybe, just as some general-audience vendors are starting to offer tools aimed at specific domains, more and more domain-specific BI vendors are going to begin their own operations and target audiences and industries now in their infancy. For example, it might have been hard to imagine a legal cannabis industry in need of analytics 10 to 15 years ago.

Through hyperspecialized expertise, domain-specific BI vendors are showing that they’re able to provide their audiences somewhat better data than general-audience BI vendors — at least for now. So maybe many other vendors will follow them, using specialization as their entryway into a mature market.

“The question is where are the metrics, and are they clean?” Weiszfeld said. “In music, clean data never existed. You want the platform with the cleanest data, things that are relevant only to your industry. If someone is doing the data for all industries — diaper sales, for example — they’re going to get music wrong.”

Then again, maybe, domain-specific BI vendors and general-audience BI vendors will eventually combine forces.

Many of the major BI platforms popular today — IBM’s Cognos, Tibco’s Spotfire and SAP’s BusinessObjects, for example, were once stand-alone companies. Tableau was just acquired by Salesforce, and Looker by Google.

“It has to do with the business model,” Jakovich said. “It’s about getting the zeitgeist of what’s going on.”

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