Tag Archives: study

Wanted – WANTED All In one Desktop PC

As per title, I’m looking for a all in one desktop pc as part of a study room I’m making for my son.

If anyone has an all in one pc that they would consider selling please let me know.

Ideally within the West Yorkshire area but if your far I would cover postage costs.

Please it must be a good working order with zero faults.

Thanks in advance

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Wanted – WANTED All In one Desktop PC

As per title, I’m looking for a all in one desktop pc as part of a study room I’m making for my son.

If anyone has an all in one pc that they would consider selling please let me know.

Ideally within the West Yorkshire area but if your far I would cover postage costs.

Please it must be a good working order with zero faults.

Thanks in advance

Go to Original Article
Author:

Microsoft study: Teens looking to parents for help with online issues – Microsoft on the Issues

Preliminary results of a new Microsoft study show teenagers around the world are increasingly turning to their parents and other trusted adults for help with online problems — an encouraging development as the new school year begins.

More than four in 10 teens (42 percent) from 22 countries who encountered online issues said they asked their parents for help, while 28 percent said they sought advice from another adult such as a teacher, coach or counselor. Those figures are up an impressive 32 and 19 percentage points, respectively, compared to last year’s findings which showed only 10 percent of young people turned to their parents for advice and just 9 percent asked for help from other adults. In addition, adults and teens across the globe say parents are by far the best placed of any group to keep young people and families safe online. Results show parents have both the greatest potential — and were deemed the most effective — at promoting online safety among young people, teens and families.

The findings are from the latest research associated with Microsoft’s work in digital civility — encouraging safer and healthier online interactions among all individuals and communities. The study, “Civility, Safety and Interaction Online — 2018,” polled teens ages 13-17 and adults ages 18-74 in 22 countries[i] about more than 20 online risks. This latest research builds on similar studies conducted over the previous two years, which polled the same age groups in 23 and 14 countries, respectively. A total of 11,157 individuals participated in the latest research.

Online risk exposure, consequences and pain higher for teen girls 

Digital Civility Research: Risk impact on girls vs. boysTeenage girls were more likely to ask for help from their parents (44 percent of girls vs. 37 percent of boys) and from other trusted adults (29 percent of girls vs. 26 percent of boys), the study shows, likely because life online in general is harder on girls than boys. Indeed, the data demonstrate that girls have a higher level of online risk exposure than boys; they suffer more consequences and “pain” from online ills, and the online risks and abuse that they experience are more emotionally charged. Moreover, as online risks have grown in severity — think “sextortion” and “swatting”[ii] — young people are perhaps more inclined to seek advice from the older generation.

“Civility in cyberspace has become a ‘must’ as we understand so much more about how harmful simple type and images can be,” said Dr. Sharon Cooper, a U.S.-based pediatrician, who works with survivors of cybervictimization. “The immediate, seemingly universal, distribution of unwanted materials can wound both youth and adults.”

Based on her experience, Dr. Cooper spoke of chronic anxiety, depression and a rational paranoia as just some of the resulting harms from negative online experiences. “Sadly, research has shown that some link to cybervictimization has become the issue in nearly 50 percent of cases of suicidal thoughts resulting in seeking care in emergency rooms,” she added.

And, some of these consequences were borne out in our research. Two-thirds (66 percent) of female teenage respondents reported being exposed to online risks vs. 60 percent of male teenage respondents. Nearly three-quarters (73 percent) of girls reported negative consequences following an online issue compared to 67 percent of boys, and the level of pain associated with online risks and the intensity of the attendant emotions — namely fear, anger and sadness — were higher for girls.

New mix of countries in latest study

In 2018, Microsoft added Canada and Singapore to the survey, while three previously polled countries (Australia, China and Japan) were removed. Complete and final results will be made available on Feb. 5, 2019, to mark international Safer Internet Day along with a year-over-year comparison of the Microsoft Digital Civility Index. The Digital Civility Index measures the perceived level of online civility in a given country based on the reported level of risk exposure of individuals in that country. Between 2016 and 2017, the Digital Civility Index did not change—both years read 65 percent, despite the addition in the second year of nine countries and three risks. In the latest survey, the 21 polled-about risks break down as follows:

  • Reputational – “Doxing” and damage to personal or professional reputations
  • Behavioral – Being treated meanly; experiencing trolling, online harassment or bullying; encountering hate speech and microaggressions
  • Sexual – Sending or receiving unwanted sext messages and making sexual solicitations; receiving unwanted sexual attention – a new risk added in this latest research, and being a victim of sextortion or non-consensual pornography (aka “revenge porn”), and
  • Personal / Intrusive – Being the target of unwanted contact, experiencing discrimination, swatting, misogyny, exposure to extremist content/recruiting, or falling victim to hoaxes, scams or fraud.

Back to school with Microsoft’s Digital Civility Challenge

We’re making this preliminary research available in the back-to-school timeframe to encourage parents, teachers, teens and young people to commit to Microsoft’s Digital Civility Challenge – four basic tenets for life online, namely:

  • Live the “Golden Rule” and treat others as you would like to be treated by leading with empathy, compassion and kindness, and affording everyone respect and dignity both online and off.
  • Respect differences by honoring diverse perspectives and, when disagreements surface, engage thoughtfully and avoid name-calling and abusive language.
  • Pause before replying to comments or posts you disagree with and refrain from posting or sending anything that could hurt someone, damage a reputation or threaten someone’s safety.
  • Stand up for yourself and others if it’s safe and prudent to do so; also, report illegal and abusive content and behavior and preserve evidence.

We will post at least one other early look at some other key findings in the weeks ahead. In the meantime, to learn more about digital civility and how you can become a champion for these common-sense online practices, visit www.microsoft.com/digitalcivility. For more on online safety generally, visit our website and check out and share our resources; “like” us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

[i] Countries surveyed:  Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Canada*, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Ireland, Italy, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Singapore*, South Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom, the United States and Vietnam. (* Indicates the first time this country has been included in this research.)

[ii] In the study, “swatting” is defined as deceiving emergency services like police, fire or medical into sending an emergency response team, typically to a person’s home, based on a false report of an ongoing critical incident or crime.

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New report shows how teachers use Microsoft Forms to drive improvement in learning outcomes |

Microsoft Education has undertaken a new study with researchers at Digital Promise to investigate how teachers around the world are using Microsoft Forms to drive learning. Providing feedback to students on their learning progress is one of the most powerful pedagogical approaches and education research has repeatedly shown that formative feedback has a tremendous impact on learning outcomes.

In this study, we found that teachers use Microsoft Forms not only for formative assessment, but for many other pedagogical activities. Teachers value the ease of use and clear reporting of Microsoft Forms.

“I actually say to teachers, ‘I think Forms is the most underrated piece of software in the suite because of the time that it saves you in terms of data-driven outcomes and the data collection that goes on with schools now.’”  

– Instructional Technology Coach

We are delighted to share this new report, which highlights the variety of creative ways teachers are using Forms.

Teachers are using Microsoft Forms in pedagogically substantive ways to improve student outcomes:

  • Formative Assessment
  • Differentiating Instruction
  • Peer Collaboration (students creating their own Forms in groups)
  • Social and Emotional Learning (see this teacher’s video on how she leverages Forms for SEL)
  • Increasing Student Engagement

Teachers also used Microsoft Forms for professional learning and to increase their efficiency with administrative and routine teaching tasks, such as:

  • Communicating with Parents
  • Professional Development through Reflective Practice
  • Increasing Teaching Efficiency by incorporating lunch choices, applications, and locker assignments into Forms

We also explored some of the best practices school and education-system leaders are using to grow adoption and use of Microsoft Forms. Some implementation strategies to get teachers to use Forms:

  • The most essential strategy is simply making teachers aware that Microsoft Forms is available and how it can be used. Follow the Quick Start guide to try out Microsoft Forms.
  • Training on how to use Forms is the second step and most coaches believed this training should be undertaken on its own (not as part of training on other apps). Check out Microsoft’s own training course, Microsoft Forms: Creating Authentic Assessments.

Coaches used the following strategies:

  • Using a Form with teachers directly to show its simplicity of use and to get them familiar with the tool
  • Understanding their teacher audiences and designing training for those audiences (e.g. ‘savvy explorer’ or ‘cautious adopter’)
  • Describing the time-saving element of Microsoft Forms use, especially enabling teachers to give students instant feedback; and how Microsoft Forms enables data-driven approaches to pedagogy with the immediate capture of data to Microsoft Excel.

Forms is an ideal tool for helping teachers incorporate more data-driven approaches to understanding what is working in their teaching practices, because it makes the collection (and much of the analysis) of student-learning data automatic. Results from a mood survey, a math quiz, or an exit ticket Form, are instantly available to both students and teachers. Such data helps teachers to build stronger learning relationships with their students, because they know where each student is at in their learning progress.

“There was that magical moment when getting the data happened. Oh my gosh, we’re getting this data in Forms in real time and that was unheard of before. Now within a matter of minutes I know where my students stand on the concepts that we’re going to cover that day.”

– 3rd Grade Teacher

Getting Started with Microsoft Forms

Microsoft Forms is an online quiz and survey application included with Microsoft Office 365. Forms was designed using direct feedback from educators looking for a simple way to formatively assess student learning and monitor learning progress on an ongoing basis.

Forms is part of the Office 365 suite of tools. If your school already has Office 365, you can log in at www.office.com and begin using Forms as one of the many apps included in the suite. Teachers and students can also Download Office 365 for free using a valid school email address. The resources below will help you get started on your journey to using Microsoft Forms.

Ponemon: Mega breaches, data breach costs on the rise

The Ponemon Institute’s latest study on data breach costs highlights the rise of what it calls “mega breaches,” which are the worst types of security incidents in terms of costs and data exposed.

The “2018 Cost of a Data Breach Study: Global Overview,” which was sponsored by IBM Security, details the cost enterprises incur after falling victim to a data breach and found that the average total cost of a data breach rose from $3.62 to $3.86 million — a 6.4% increase — with $148 as the average cost per lost or stolen record. This year’s report also features data on the biggest breaches, which Ponemon and IBM have termed “mega breaches.”

“Mega breaches are where there are more than one million records that have been breached,” Limor Kessem, executive security advisor at IBM, told SearchSecurity. “And then we looked at up to 50 million [records exposed], although it could be up to infinity these days. Just last year there were 2.9 billion records exposed, and in 2016 there were over 4 billion records exposed, so a breach can be millions and hundreds of millions as well.”

Given that this is the first year that Ponemon has included mega breaches in its annual report and that there were only 11 mega breaches that occurred, there was no data from past years to compare these findings to. However, the report found that a mega breach with the minimum of 1 million records exposed lead to an average total cost of $40 million, while a mega breach with 50 million records exposed had an average cost of $350 million.

 After collecting data from more than 2,500 separate interviews that were conducted over a 10-month period with 477 enterprises, the study concluded that mega breaches take 365 days to identify, which is almost 100 days shorter than typical breaches (266 days to detect).

The Ponemon study also discovered that “data breaches are the most costly in the United States and the Middle East and least costly in Brazil and India,” given that the average total in the United States was $7.91 million. “The U.S. topped the chart at almost twice the international average,” Kessem said. “Of course there are currency differences, but the big thing in the U.S. is loss of business.”

Kessem further noted that when consumers were interviewed, 75% of them said they would not want to do business with a company that they didn’t trust to safeguard their data.

“People in the U.S. are very aware of breaches,” she said. “They topped the charts in awareness of how [data breaches] happen and how many happen and so on. In other words, we know breaches are happening and we wouldn’t like to do business with those who can’t protect our data and I think this was a major cost center for the U.S. in terms of data breaches.”

In addition to the cost per record, companies also experience direct and indirect costs after a breach. For example, Canada has the highest direct costs, according to the report, but the U.S. had the highest indirect cost at $152 per capita, which includes “employee’s time, effort and other organizational resources spent notifying victims and investigating the incident.” The study also highlights the idea that breaches in the healthcare industry are the most expensive and have been consistently so for several years, according to Kessem, considering the amount of personal data healthcare companies possess. 

“Typically [healthcare companies] have a lot of personally identifiable information,” she said. “They’re also going to have payment information and contact information — the more information is attached to an identity, the more it is going to cost.”

Post-breach consequences are further addressed in the report, which states, “Organizations that lost less than one percent of their customers due to a data breach resulted in an average total cost of $2.8 million.” However, the Ponemon study also noted that an incident response team has the ability to reduce the cost by as much as $14 per compromised record — a small change that would greatly add up at the end of a breach.

A web-based approach to preauthorization for insurance

Preauthorizations for insurance are akin to a four-letter word for providers. A March 2018 study by the American Medical Association showed 84% of physicians found the burden of having to get insurance prior approvals either high or extremely high, and 86% said the problem is just getting worse.

Enter startup ZappRx with a portable web-based app it hopes will eliminate the tedious back and forth with insurance companies and streamline physician communication and patient consent. Armed with six years of research and product development, as well as $41 million in just-raised B-level funding, ZappRx hopes to tackle this relatively obscure — and often overlooked by mainstream health IT efforts — problem on a broad scale.

And there’s no question it is a problem. Today’s aging population requires more access than ever to specialty medications for conditions ranging from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to cancer, and the vast majority of those drugs require preauthorization for insurance payment due to their high cost. In most practices, prior authorizations are done by staff, by hand, and transmitted via fax machine.

“The way they tracked preauthorizations before involved sticky notes and whiteboards and Excel spreadsheets,” said Libby Webb, senior vice president of product at ZappRx. “There was nothing that existed that kept that information in a centralized location.” The process was labor intensive, but also off-putting to patients. The AMA study showed 78% of doctors believed the delays inherent in preauthorization for insurance could lead to patients abandoning the treatment altogether.

With the ZappRx platform, the provider’s team can use an iPhone or iPad or tablet to fill out forms for preauthorization for insurance, capture patient consent and send the information to the insurance company. A central dashboard allows staff to see at a glance exactly where each request stands and provides access to any needed follow-up requests. For states allowing electronic physician signatures, that feature is built in. “The app saves all the data and it’s essentially ‘one and done’ for each patient,” Webb said.

“From the moment a patient is diagnosed and drugs are selected we process that entire journey through our web-based app today,” Webb said. “Otherwise it is a paper-based process with staff literally filling out forms by hand and faxing them to the payer for prior authorization. There is no way to know what’s happening with the payer or when forms are sent to the specialty pharmacy. It’s a black hole.”

The black hole is why ZappRx was founded in 2012, Webb said. The CEO had a family member who, while waiting on preauthorization for insurance of a specialty medication, grew dramatically more ill. So the idea for ZappRx was born with the hope that medications could get into the hands of the patients more quickly than before.

But providers and payers may also benefit from the streamlined process. Insurance companies devote a lot of staff to handling incoming faxes and they also have to spend time deciphering handwritten and often blurry paperwork, Webb said. Instead payers can print the ZappRx form and move forward. Provider practices may find this also eases the administrative burden for them, Webb said, which can translate to less staff turnover. “People don’t go into medicine to do paperwork.”

To date the ZappRx solution is at work in over 30 practices and large academic medical facilities. Now the platform is focused on three pulmonology diseases, and is in beta for gastroenterology, and with plans to move into rheumatology and orphan diseases/cancer in the near future, Webb said.

And, while ZappRx does not currently integrate preauthorization for insurance with any EHRs, Webb said the company is ready to work with customers on a plug and play API-based integration layer to make that vision a reality.

27″ Mid-2010 iMac, 3.2 GHz i3, 12GB of RAM, 1TB Storage

Selling my mid 2010 iMac as I need to clear the study to make way for a nursery. Would look to trade for Macbook or iPad. Excellent condition for it’s age with no noticeable marks.

Comes with original box, keyboard, and magic mouse.

Thanks,

Nick

Price and currency: £400
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank Transfer, PPG
Location: Burnley
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the…

27″ Mid-2010 iMac, 3.2 GHz i3, 12GB of RAM, 1TB Storage

27″ Mid-2010 iMac, 3.2 GHz i3, 12GB of RAM, 1TB Storage

Selling my mid 2010 iMac as I need to clear the study to make way for a nursery. Would look to trade for Macbook or iPad. Excellent condition for it’s age with no noticeable marks.

Comes with original box, keyboard, and magic mouse.

Thanks,

Nick

Price and currency: £400
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank Transfer, PPG
Location: Burnley
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the…

27″ Mid-2010 iMac, 3.2 GHz i3, 12GB of RAM, 1TB Storage

27″ Mid-2010 iMac, 3.2 GHz i3, 12GB of RAM, 1TB Storage

Selling my mid 2010 iMac as I need to clear the study to make way for a nursery. Would look to trade for Macbook or iPad. Excellent condition for it’s age with no noticeable marks.

Comes with original box, keyboard, and magic mouse.

Thanks,

Nick

Price and currency: £400
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank Transfer, PPG
Location: Burnley
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the…

27″ Mid-2010 iMac, 3.2 GHz i3, 12GB of RAM, 1TB Storage

27″ Mid-2010 iMac, 3.2 GHz i3, 12GB of RAM, 1TB Storage

Selling my mid 2010 iMac as I need to clear the study to make way for a nursery. Would look to trade for Macbook or iPad. Excellent condition for it’s age with no noticeable marks.

Comes with original box, keyboard, and magic mouse.

Thanks,

Nick

Price and currency: £400
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Bank Transfer, PPG
Location: Burnley
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the…

27″ Mid-2010 iMac, 3.2 GHz i3, 12GB of RAM, 1TB Storage