Tag Archives: surprise

Remote access is just one of many COVID-19 IT challenges

The coronavirus pandemic caught quite a few organizations by surprise and the effects may linger long after the quarantine has ended.

IT workers scrambled to stand up technical service and hunt down enough laptops to give to workers, many of whom were working remotely for the first time. In addition to dealing with technical issues, administrators had to execute time-sensitive deployment projects while trying to explain the basics: connecting to a VPN, using multifactor authentication and muting the mic during a Zoom meeting.

Few organizations had the finances or the technical ability to quickly stand up a virtual desktop infrastructure environment to provide access to business applications that were only available to office users. As a temporary solution, some companies made do with their existing hardware and Windows Server licenses to spin up several Remote Desktop Session hosts and paid for the client access licenses to provide this remote access. Microsoft offered advice to help IT shops free up bandwidth for critical VPN systems for organizations that needed to accommodate a sudden influx of users.

Our advisory board members shared their thoughts about the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, how it affected their operations and what lessons they’ve learned during this transition period.

Tips to help IT weather this pandemic storm

Reda Chouffani: For many people working remotely for the first time, it might be overwhelming when they experience computer problems without an IT person nearby to assist. There are several keys to help IT leaders prepare their teams to expedite support and minimize some common pitfalls of working from home.

Reda ChouffaniReda Chouffani

Here are a few things IT can consider to ease this transition:

  • Get the right internet speed. While many households have access to broadband, connecting to video conferences or remoting into the office computer is not always guaranteed to go smoothly. Employees who work from home need to make sure they have a solid wireless device. The quality of working remotely will suffer with a relatively slow connection by disrupting the use of video conferencing or some other cloud service. One way to ease network traffic at home is to put limits on the internet during work hours, such as restricting streaming video services by other household members.
  • Invest in the right hardware. Because being physically by the computer to troubleshoot hardware issues for IT might be out of the question, those in IT circles quickly recognized it’s important to send employees home with reliable laptops and other equipment. This is even more critical today because a broken laptop may leave an employee out of work for several days while they await a replacement.
  • Train users on communication tools. Since many companies moved to a remote work setup, the use of real-time chat applications, intranets to post announcements, conferencing products like WebEx or Microsoft Teams and file-sharing services have increased in importance. Companies that had little use for these tools before the coronavirus pandemic have had to quickly readjust and invest in training so users have a fuller understanding of the tools they are now expected to use.
  • Other ways IT can help ease the transition. The silver lining of this pandemic is it is a great opportunity for IT workers to deliver meaningful tools and education during these challenging times. There are creative ways some IT departments have engaged with their users rather than through the typical troubleshooting exchanges. IT workers have been sending updates through newsletters and sharing daily tips and fun ways to use the new technology, such as jazzing up the Zoom or Microsoft Teams backgrounds or using Snapchat plugins on a video conference.
Adam FowlerAdam Fowler

Some shops had to scramble to set up security measures

Adam Fowler: Coronavirus changed a lot of priorities. Having the resources — both physical devices and support-wise to rapidly send everyone home — was the biggest struggle for many companies. Many people hadn’t worked from home beyond the occasional email from their phone, so staffers were thrown into the deep end to understand what they had and what they needed.

A lot of effort went to the real basics: What sort of internet do I have, where can I plug in my laptop, how do I get this screen working? It’s much harder to talk someone through these issues over the phone when the end user is not familiar with the equipment or the technology.

It was a high-pressure changeover. Everyone needed to keep working, so having to deal with plugging in your own cables or understanding why the wireless connection isn’t working can be frustrating for an end user. Setting up a video conference and choosing which device to use for the speaker and microphone was enough to frustrate people who were already stressed by the great unknown of the coronavirus pandemic.

Security, of course, was another big focus. I expect a lot of companies got caught by their “we just won’t give people remote access” setup because it was cheaper and easier to manage. There’s a lot of setup work involved in configuring multifactor authentication and poking holes in firewalls in a short period of time. Microsoft’s Azure Active Directory and multifactor authentication/conditional access is in a pretty good state right now, including user onboarding, so the timing of availability for those services was one positive outcome.

If this pandemic had occurred five years ago, then the IT world would have been in a much worse place. We would have been able to set up remote access, but it would have been less secure. There were products available but at a much higher premium than they are now, along with limited vendor support.

Brian KirschBrian Kirsch

Lack of hardware hampered some efforts

Brian Kirsch: For quite some time, IT has been on a path to reduce hardware, add more cloud services and optimize wherever possible. This helped trim budgets and was a necessary evolution for IT, but then COVID-19 hit. Few of us could have predicted how crucial that hardware was until we needed it to provide services for remote workers.

At my school, we needed to put together a remote lab environment for IT students. We were able to forklift everything the 600 students needed in a few days instead of a yearlong rollout. It wasn’t perfect, but it does the job.

That seems to be the state of things in IT today: It’s not ideal, but it works. We finished the lab quickly because we had the necessary hardware. The project was on our agenda, but COVID-19 expedited the process. We heard anecdotal stories of other schools that struggled to set up similar environments, but they didn’t have enough physical servers, so the remote access system broke down when it could not support all the users.

This server shortage isn’t just something that hit higher education. Many IT shops that worked hard to reduce their data center footprint are now laboring to get those systems back so they can provide the services their users need. In addition to servers and other data center hardware, laptops and mobile technology are in short supply, causing prices to shoot through the roof. IT teams continue to struggle to get the technology they need to help employees that need a way to remotely access their organization’s resources.

It’s safe to say few disaster recovery plans had this kind of scope in mind when they were created. Both people and technology are advancing at speeds that were nonexistent before this pandemic, because a once-in-a-lifetime event was not on anyone’s radar.

I am seeing people who have never used remote technology not only just getting by, but flourishing as they fully embrace the tools and gain confidence by using them. The technology to support them won’t go away when this pandemic is over, so we might just see a reduction in the physical offices we once thought were so necessary to do our jobs.

Nathan O'BryanNathan O’Bryan

Will working from home be the new normal after COVID-19?

Nathan O’Bryan: It’s time for corporate America to embrace remote work on a large scale. While the recent social distancing order to help curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus is the most recent and probably most attention-grabbing reason, it’s not the only one. Organizations just starting down the road of supporting remote workers have many challenges to address. The place to start is to define what your employees working from home need, then determine how your organization can secure those resources.

Multiple studies have shown that people are more productive working from home. I know many mangers find that difficult to believe, but that’s the case if the remote worker has the proper setup. There are many other compelling reasons to let employees work from home, such as higher morale, less turnover and fewer sick days. Embracing a remote work arrangement can save businesses a significant amount in office expenses.

We have the IT infrastructure, laptops and phone systems to support a remote workforce for many jobs, but that’s just one piece of the puzzle. Organizations need to build the internal culture, security practices and teamwork norms to support remote work that complies with corporate standards and industry best practices. While this can be a significant undertaking, there is no doubt that it is a necessary one to survive in this time of social distancing.

Protecting your organization’s data is always a primary concern in these situations. Many security policies have been built around the assumption that users will access data from the organization’s physical location, which is not compatible with this new world of remote workers. The IT team will need to rethink how authorized users can access that data from remote locations.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Microsoft wins $10 billion JEDI contract over AWS

Microsoft has been awarded the U.S. Department of Defense’s controversial JEDI contract over AWS in a surprise development that could be remembered as a watershed moment in the battle for market share among hyperscale cloud computing providers.

AWS had widely been expected to win the Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure contract, which was first announced in September 2017 and vigorously pursued by IBM, Oracle, Google and Microsoft. The DoD narrowed the field of candidates to AWS and Microsoft in April, and in July a judge tossed out a federal lawsuit brought by Oracle in protest of the process.

AWS had a perceived leg up on competitors for the JEDI contract, thanks not only to the breadth and depth of its cloud platform, but due to precedent. Several years ago, AWS landed a $600 million contract with the CIA centered on further development of the intelligence agency’s big data analytics capabilities.

Still, in May 2018, Microsoft said it had won a contract worth hundreds of millions of dollars that would see a panoply of U.S. intelligence agencies use its Azure Government service.

The DoD’s JEDI proposal, as laid out in a November 2017 memo, calls for a 10-year contract with a single provider to create a “highly available, exponentially elastic, secure, resilient cloud computing environment that seamlessly extends from the homefront to the tactical edge.”

The JEDI contract is worth up to $10 billion over the life of the agreement, but the base contract period is for just two years with $1 million guaranteed, according to the DoD.  About $210 million is expected to be spent during the initial two years, but the remainder of the contract is subject to rigorous ongoing reviews, the DoD said.

AWS could not immediately be reached for comment, but in published reports, a company spokesperson expressed surprise at the result.

“AWS is the clear leader in cloud computing, and a detailed assessment purely on the comparative offerings clearly lead to a different conclusion,” the company said.

The specter of presidential politics has loomed over the JEDI contract saga, with President Donald Trump – a harsh critic of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos – saying in July that his administration planned to scrutinize Amazon’s JEDI bid in the wake of complaints about the award process from AWS competitors.

It isn’t immediately clear whether Amazon can or will pursue additional recourse following the JEDI contract award to Microsoft.

“All offerors were treated fairly and evaluated consistently with the solicitation’s stated evaluation criteria,” the DOD said in a statement. “Prior to the award, the department conferred with the DOD Inspector General, which informed the decision to proceed.”

While the Pentagon plans to eventually move 80% of its internal systems to the platform created by JEDI, it maintains many other cloud services. It also “continues to assess and pursue various cloud contracting opportunities,” according to a statement.

The cloud infrastructure market is worth about $100 billion at present, according to new numbers from Synergy Research. AWS has about 33.5% share of that market, with Microsoft at about 16.5%, Synergy reported.

AWS may still have a healthy lead over Microsoft, but the JEDI award gives the latter not only bragging rights but also a high-profile testimony to Azure’s readiness for the world’s most critical and sensitive workloads, which could prove quite valuable in negotiating other large-scale deals.

More details of the DoD’s decision-making process could be learned in coming days. In recent months, there had been some speculation the DoD would add an additional vendor to the JEDI contract after an initial award, both to hedge its strategic bets and mollify critics.

This is a breaking news story. More details to follow.

Go to Original Article
Author:

How Windows Admin Center stacks up to other management tools

Microsoft took a lot of administrators by surprise when it released Windows Admin Center, a new GUI-based management tool, last year. But is it mature enough to replace third-party offerings that handle some of the same tasks?

Windows Admin Center is a web-based management environment for Windows Server 2012 and up that exposes roughly 50% of the capabilities of the traditional Microsoft Management Console-based GUI environment. Most common services — DNS, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol, Event Viewer, file sharing and even Hyper-V — are available within the Windows Admin Center, which can be installed on a workstation with a self-hosted web server built in, or on a traditional Windows Server machine using IIS.

It also covers several Azure management scenarios, as well, including managing Azure virtual machines when you link your cloud subscription to the Windows Admin Center instance you use.

Windows Admin Center dashboard
Among its many features, the Windows Admin Center dashboard provides an overview of the selected Windows machine, including the current state of the CPU and memory.

There are a number of draws for Windows Admin Center. It’s free and designed to be developed out of band, or shipped as a web download, rather than included in the Windows Server product. So, Microsoft can update it more frequently than the core OS.

Microsoft said, over time, most of the Windows administrative GUI tools will move to Windows Admin Center. It makes sense to spin up an instance of it on a management workstation, an old server or even a lightweight VM on your virtualization infrastructure. Windows Admin Center is a tool you will need to get familiar with even if you have a larger, third-party OS management tool.

How does Windows Admin Center compare with similar products on the market? Here’s a look at the pros and cons of each.

Goverlan Reach

Goverlan Reach is a remote systems management and administration suite for remote administration of virtually any aspect of a Windows system that is configurable via Windows Management Instrumentation. Goverlan is a fat client, normal Windows application, not a web app, so it runs on a regular workstation. Goverlan provides one-stop shopping for Windows administration in a reasonably well-laid-out interface. There is no Azure support.

For the extra money, you get a decent engine that allows you to automate certain IT processes and create a runbook of typical actions you would take on a system. You also get built-in session capturing and control without needing to connect to each desktop separately, as well as more visibility into software updates and patch management for not only Windows, but also major third-party software such as Chrome, Firefox and Adobe Reader.

Goverlan Reach has three editions. The Standard version is $29 per month and offers remote control functions. The Professional version costs $69 per month and includes Active Directory management and software deployment. The Enterprise version with all the advanced features costs $129 per month and includes compliance and more advanced automation abilities.

Editor’s note: Goverlan paid the writer to develop content marketing materials for its product in 2012 and 2013, but there is no ongoing relationship.

PRTG Network Monitor

Paessler’s PRTG Network Monitor tracks the uptime, health, disk space, and performance of servers and devices on your network, so you proactively respond to issues and prevent downtime.

[embedded content]
Managing Windows Server 2019 with Windows Admin Center.

PRTG monitors mail servers, web servers, database servers, file servers and others. It has sensors built in for the attendant protocols of each kind of server. You can build your own sensors to monitor key aspects of homegrown applications. PRTG logs all this monitoring information for analysis to build a baseline performance profile to develop ways to improve stability and performance on your network.

When looking at how PRTG stacks up against Windows Admin Center, it’s only really comparable from a monitoring perspective. The Network Monitor product offers little from a configuration standpoint. While you could install the alerting software and associated agents on Azure virtual machines in the cloud, there’s no real native cloud support; it treats the cloud virtual machines simply as another endpoint. 

It’s also a paid-for product, starting at $1,600 for 500 sensors and going all the way up to $60,000 for unlimited sensors. It does offer value and is perhaps the best monitoring suite out there from an ease-of-use standpoint, but most shops would most likely choose it in addition to Windows Admin Center, not in lieu of it.

SolarWinds

Windows Admin Center is a tool you will need to get familiar with even if you have a larger, third-party OS management tool.

SolarWinds has quite a few products under its systems management umbrella, including server and application monitoring; virtualization administration; storage resource monitoring; configuration and performance monitoring; log analysis; access right auditing; and up/down monitoring for networks, servers and applications. While there is some ability to administer various portions of Windows, with the Access Rights Manager or Virtualization Manager, these SolarWinds products are very heavily tilted toward monitoring, not administration.

The SolarWinds modules all start with list prices anywhere from $1,500 to $3,500, so you quickly start incurring a substantial expense to purchase the modules needed to administer all the different detailed areas of your Windows infrastructure. While these products are surely more full-featured than Windows Admin Center, the delta might not be worth $3,000 to your organization. For my money, PRTG becomes a better value for the money if monitoring is your goal.

Nagios

Nagios has a suite of tools to monitor infrastructure, from individual systems to protocols and applications, along with database monitoring, log monitoring and, perhaps important in today’s cloud world, bandwidth monitoring.

Nagios has long been available as an open source tool that’s very powerful, and the free version, Nagios Core, certainly has a place in any moderately complex infrastructure. The commercial versions of Nagios XI — $1,995 for standard and $3,495 for enterprise — have lots of shine and polish, but lack any sort of interface to administer systems.

The price is right, but its features still lag behind

There is clearly a place for Windows Admin Center in every Windows installation, given it is free, very functional although there are some bugs that will get worked out over time — and gives you a vendor-supported way of both monitoring and administering Windows.

However, Windows Admin Center lacks quite a bit of monitoring prowess and also doesn’t address all potential areas of Windows administration. There is no clear-cut winner out of all the profiled tools in this article. If anything, Windows Admin Center should be thought of as an additional tool to use in conjunction with some of these other products.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Ex-Cisco exec Rowan Trollope promises to be different CEO at Five9

Rowan Trollope’s departure from Cisco in May took many in the industry by surprise. In his five years as a top executive, Trollope was widely credited with reinvigorating Cisco’s collaboration portfolio. At the end of his tenure, he made the bold move of merging Cisco’s core meeting software, Webex and Spark.

Trollope is now the CEO of cloud contact center vendor Five9, a startup in San Ramon, Calif., with revenue one-twenty-fifth the size of the collaboration division at Cisco. Trollope described his new company as smaller than his old one, but also nimbler.

In an interview this week, Trollope spoke about why he left Cisco and the use cases of the contact center AI he’s likely to bring to Five9.

Editor’s note: The following was edited for style, clarity and brevity.

How will your leadership change Five9?

Rowan Trollope, CEO, Five9Rowan Trollope

Rowan Trollope: I wasn’t hired because the company needed a new strategy. The way the search happened was ultimately because the former CEO, unfortunately, had a health issue and couldn’t continue. So, it’s kind of a different CEO transition in that sense; it’s not like the company needed a transformation or a new direction.

I am a different CEO, I think, than the former CEO just in terms of my background. I’m a much more product-focused executive, whereas Mike [Burkland] was more focused on sales and go-to-market. And so, you know, my focus will probably be more on product. I think the innovation side of this story that’s unfolding needs a lot of attention.

Cisco is also a big contact center vendor. Why didn’t you want to stay there?

Trollope: Timing in business is so important. And the time for a cloud contact center is now. And, you know, I had been at Cisco for five years, very successful with transforming the portfolio and having a good run. But this was an opportunity to join a very special company, a much smaller company, more nimble, and something that I just, personally, was very interested in.

It’s not anything negative about Cisco. I enjoyed working there, I learned a lot, it’s a great company, and I think their collaboration business has great prospects. But I couldn’t say no to this opportunity.

What applications of contact center AI do you think will have the biggest impact on the industry?

Trollope: One, data analytics. All the voice traffic coming through your contact center today is only used for the purposes of quality-assurance checks and compliance. So, the first real big opportunity is to unlock the value of that data.

Speech-to-text, and then natural language understanding to provide analytics on top of that data, can really [help a company] understand at the business level what’s going on with my customers [and] what are they asking about. If you look at how call centers work today, at the very end of the call, they will enter a reason code, like install problem or password reset. And that’s just so limiting, and the industry has struggled to make sense of this data. That’s why I call it ‘dark data.’

Two, virtual agents. The technology has just gotten to the point where it could be feasible that when you call into your typical call center, instead of getting, ‘Welcome to ABC company. Push one for sales; push two for product,’ that you will be greeted by, ‘Hi, ABC company, can I help you?’ And you say, ‘Yeah, I’ve been having a problem with your product. I’m wondering if I can speak to Joe in support.’ ‘Oh, sure, yeah, let me get Joe on the line.’

That’s not a human; that conversation was with a robot. That’s feasible now. It wasn’t feasible a year ago. And it will become more and more feasible. So, the death of the IVR [interactive voice response] couldn’t come soon enough for most. If you’re a consumer, that’s like the worst experience ever, right?

Three, agent guidance. If the computer can listen to all of the context of the conversation in real time and present me with advanced search results from my knowledge bases and my company information and my workflows, I become a smarter agent.

Today, the agents will be listening to your call. And they will be sitting with a whole bunch of windows open, and they will be Googling for this, or searching their internal knowledge base for that, or typing a text message to a peer to say, ‘Do you know what this problem could be?’ And all that can be made much easier through AI. So, that’s about assisting agents to get better answers faster.

asus 1070/1060 waterblock

hi all
well I made a booboo..bought the wrong waterblock for my asus 1070 dual and surprise surprise it doesn’t fit lol.

was told by seller it fitted the 1070 OG dual but its actually for the:

ASUS GTX1070-O8G-GAMING
ASUS GTX1060-O6G-SI
ASUS GTX1070-O8G-SI

I think they are the ones with the dark shroud not white like mine.

paid nearly £80 in total for it so hoping to recover half of what I paid,its brand new just taken out of box then put back in when I realised it wouldn’t fit (no…

asus 1070/1060 waterblock

For Sale – MacBook Pro 13″ 2015. i5 2.9GHz, 8GB RAM, 500GB SSD, 1 year’s JL warranty remaining

Somewhat to my surprise, I’m upgrading to a new MacBook so my “old” one is now looking for a new home.

It was bought new by me from John Lewis in February 2016 so has 13 months of the transferable JL warranty remaining. It’s in excellent condition – I take very good care of all my tech – and has been protected by a shell case since day one. If the buyer wishes, I’ll include the case at no extra cost.

Battery count is currently at 348 because my practice is to charge the MacBook, then use it on a tray on my lap until it needs recharging, etc etc. Nothing has been unduly strained by hard usage: mostly, I visit various forums online, browse a number of other sites, and check emails.

This will come with all original packaging and accessories, all in the same excellent condition as the MacBook itself. I’m not sure whether there’s an Apple brown outer box because the unit was collected from JL, but if there isn’t the MacBook will be securely packaged inside another outer box before being posted. Amazon to the rescue again :).

The asking price is inclusive of RMSD. Collection is also possible, should a local buyer want to save a few £££. I’ll get some pics up tomorrow but in the meantime, if you’ve got any questions just ask.

Price and currency: £825
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Bournemouth
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – MacBook Pro 13″ 2015. i5 2.9, 8GB RAM, 500GB HD, 1 year’s JL warranty remaining

Somewhat to my surprise, I’m upgrading to a new MacBook so my “old” one will be available by the beginning of next week.

It was bought new by me from John Lewis in February 2016 so has 13 months of the JL warranty remaining. It’s in excellent condition – I take very good care of all my tech – and has been protected by a shell case since day one. If the buyer wishes, I’ll include the case at no extra cost.

Battery count is currently at 348 because my practice is to charge the MacBook, then use it on a tray on my lap until it needs recharging, etc etc. Nothing has been unduly strained by hard usage: mostly, I visit various forums online, browse a number of other sites, and check emails.

This will come with all original packaging and accessories, all in the same excellent condition as the MacBook itself. I’m not sure whether there’s an Apple brown outer box because the unit was collected from JL, but if there isn’t the MacBook will be securely packaged inside another outer box before being posted. Amazon to the rescue again :).

The asking price is inclusive of RMSD. Collection is also possible, should a local buyer want to save a few £££. I’ll get some pics up tomorrow but in the meantime, if you’ve got any questions just ask.

Price and currency: £825
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Bournemouth
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – MacBook Pro 13″ 2015. i5 2.9, 8GB RAM, 500GB HD, 1 year’s JL warranty remaining

Somewhat to my surprise, I’m upgrading to a new MacBook so my “old” one will be available by the beginning of next week.

It was bought new by me from John Lewis in February 2016 so has 13 months of the JL warranty remaining. It’s in excellent condition – I take very good care of all my tech – and has been protected by a shell case since day one. If the buyer wishes, I’ll include the case at no extra cost.

Battery count is currently at 348 because my practice is to charge the MacBook, then use it on a tray on my lap until it needs recharging, etc etc. Nothing has been unduly strained by hard usage: mostly, I visit various forums online, browse a number of other sites, and check emails.

This will come with all original packaging and accessories, all in the same excellent condition as the MacBook itself. I’m not sure whether there’s an Apple brown outer box because the unit was collected from JL, but if there isn’t the MacBook will be securely packaged inside another outer box before being posted. Amazon to the rescue again :).

The asking price is inclusive of RMSD. Collection is also possible, should a local buyer want to save a few £££. I’ll get some pics up tomorrow but in the meantime, if you’ve got any questions just ask.

Price and currency: £825
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Bournemouth
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – MacBook Pro 13″ 2015. i5 2.9, 8GB RAM, 500GB HD, 1 year’s JL warranty remaining

I’m testing the waters here ……

Somewhat to my surprise, I’m upgrading to a new MacBook so my “old” one will be available by the beginning of next week.

It was bought new by me from John Lewis in February 2016 so has 13 months of the JL warranty remaining. It’s in excellent condition – I take very good care of all my tech – and has been protected by a shell case since day one. If the buyer wishes, I’ll include the case at no extra cost.

Battery count is currently at 348 because my practice is to charge the MacBook, then use it on a tray on my lap until it needs recharging, etc etc. Nothing has been unduly strained by hard usage: mostly, I visit various forums online, browse a number of other sites, and check emails.

This will come with all original packaging and accessories, all in the same excellent condition as the MacBook itself. I’m not sure whether there’s an Apple brown outer box because the unit was collected from JL, but if there isn’t the MacBook will be securely packaged inside another outer box before being posted. Amazon to the rescue again :).

The asking price is inclusive of RMSD. Collection is also possible, should a local buyer want to save a few £££. I’ll get some pics up tomorrow but in the meantime, if you’ve got any questions just ask.

Price and currency: £825
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Bournemouth
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – MacBook Pro 13″ 2015. i5 2.9, 8GB RAM, 500GB HD, 1 year’s JL warranty remaining

I’m testing the waters here ……

Somewhat to my surprise, I’m upgrading to a new MacBook so my “old” one will be available by the beginning of next week.

It was bought new by me from John Lewis in February 2016 so has 13 months of the JL warranty remaining. It’s in excellent condition – I take very good care of all my tech – and has been protected by a shell case since day one. If the buyer wishes, I’ll include the case at no extra cost.

Battery count is currently at 348 because my practice is to charge the MacBook, then use it on a tray on my lap until it needs recharging, etc etc. Nothing has been unduly strained by hard usage: mostly, I visit various forums online, browse a number of other sites, and check emails.

This will come with all original packaging and accessories, all in the same excellent condition as the MacBook itself. I’m not sure whether there’s an Apple brown outer box because the unit was collected from JL, but if there isn’t the MacBook will be securely packaged inside another outer box before being posted. Amazon to the rescue again :).

The asking price is inclusive of RMSD. Collection is also possible, should a local buyer want to save a few £££. I’ll get some pics up tomorrow but in the meantime, if you’ve got any questions just ask.

Price and currency: £825
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT
Location: Bournemouth
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.