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Welcoming and retaining diversity in cybersecurity

I doubt I’d be in the role I am now if leaders at one of my first jobs hadn’t taken an interest in my career. Although I taught myself to code when I was young, I graduated from college with a degree in English Literature and began my post-college career in editorial. I worked my way up to Assistant Editor at a math and science college textbook publisher located in Boston, Massachusetts. I was responsible for acquisitions and training on the software that that the company distributed with its textbooks. The senior editors sent me to a conference in Florida to train the sales team on how to present the software to professors. This is where I met Jennifer. Jennifer headed up the network and IT support for our California parent company, and because we shared a room at the conference hotel, we got to know each other, and she saw me present. This interaction proved pivotal. When the publisher created a new position to support a network of AS/400s, Jennifer talked me into applying—and yes, she did have to talk me into it! Like a lot of young professionals, I was intimidated to take on such a different role. But I’m so glad she was looking out for me. It was the start of my career in technology, which ultimately led me to Microsoft.

My experience is a great example of how individuals and company culture can influence the trajectory of someone’s career. To celebrate Women in Cybersecurity month, Microsoft is exploring tactics to increase diversity in the tech industry. In the first post in the series, Ann Johnson wrote about mentorship. In this post, I share some ideas for cultivating the diverse talent that already work at your company to build a strong and diverse leadership team.

Retention is as important as recruitment

When we talk about the lack of diversity in tech, much of the conversation focuses around hiring. And it’s true that we need to dramatically increase the number of women, non-binary, and people of color that we recruit. But if we want to create more diverse technology teams, we also need to address the talent drain. Too often smart technologists with nontraditional backgrounds drop out of STEM careers. Studies have shown that up to 52 percent of women leave technology fields. This is nearly double the percentage of men who quit tech. And for those who think it’s because women don’t enjoy technology, 80+ percent of women in STEM say they love their work. The problem often comes down to culture. Which means it’s something we can fix! I’ve worked with and managed many neuro-diverse teams and here’s what I’ve seen work.

People aren’t books

One of the most famous pictures of Einstein shows him with his hair in disarray, sticking his tongue out. If you didn’t know he was one of the greatest thinkers in the world, you might assume he wasn’t the fastest electron in the universe. Or what does it say that many of us didn’t discover Katharine Johnson, another brilliant physicist, until 2017 when the movie “Hidden Figures” was released.

Our collective mental model for what an engineer or scientist is supposed to look and act like doesn’t reflect reality. Some people have purple hair, some like to work in yoga pants, some listen to loud music on headphones all day, or have creative face tattoos. And many are women or LGBTQ or people of color or disabled. People’s race, gender, appearance and work styles have no bearing on whether they are a hard worker or a valuable contributor. We know this, but often we don’t realize we’ve made a judgement based on unconscious biases.

How to address: Don’t judge people by their “covers.” This starts by acknowledging that your biases may not be explicit or intentional, but they still exist. Listen to what people say. Evaluate the work they produce. Observe how they collaborate with others. These are the indicators of the value they bring. And keep in mind that people who’ve been conditioned to believe that technology isn’t for them, may not exhibit the level of confidence you expect. It doesn’t mean they can’t do it. They may just need a little more encouragement (thank you, Jennifer!).

Women often leave jobs because they feel stalled in their careers. In one study, 27 percent of U.S. women said they feel stalled and 32 percent were considering quitting in the next year. For a variety of reasons, unconscious bias results in straight white men getting more opportunities on high profile projects, more ideas greenlit, and faster promotions. As a result, women get discouraged, do not feel supported and look for other opportunities. That is why in the previous blog, we focused on mentorship.

How to address: Be a champion for women and other underrepresented groups in your company. My relationship with Jennifer is a great example of this. She took an interest in my career, identified an opportunity and helped me get to the next rung. Our relationship was informal, but you can also create a structured sponsorship program. The goal is to go beyond mentorship and become an advocate for promising women, people of color, and other underrepresented groups. Use your influence to get them the right projects, the right advice, and the right exposure to help them advance their careers.

Nurture unique thinkers

Back when I was a manager at KPMG, we used to try to hire people who “think outside the box.” But the tricky part about hiring out of the box thinkers is that their ideas are, well, outside the box. Organizations often think they want people to shake things up but in practice many are uncomfortable being challenged. This leads them to quickly shut down bold new ideas. When original thinkers don’t feel valued, they take all that innovation and creativity elsewhere.

How to address: Build a culture of inclusion where everyone has a chance to share. Not every idea is great; in my career I’ve had more than my share of bad ones! But you should listen to and consider all opinions—even if they seem a little off the wall. It doesn’t mean you have to move them all forward, but sometimes an idea that sounds outlandish one day starts to make sense after a good night’s sleep. Or take a page from the women in the Obama administration and amplify ideas that have been overlooked.

Respect the hours

Not everyone can commit to a regular eight in the morning to six in the evening work week. Many people care for children, sick spouses, and elderly parents—being a caretaker is a skill in and of itself! In fact, this quality of being a caretaker is something that in most technology roles can be a valued asset. In addition to being a caretaker, others can’t work “regular” weeks because they’re finishing degrees or have other time challenges and commitments.

Varied approaches to time also apply to project milestones. People deal with deadlines differently—some get stressed if the deadline is too close (like me!) and do their work in advance, others need that adrenaline pump and wait until (almost) the last minute to deliver.

How to address: Institute and support flexible work hours, job sharing (two people share the same job, both doing it half-time), or three weeks on/one week off work schedules that enable people to contribute without requiring them to keep the same hours as everyone else. Trust that people can be productive even if they don’t work the same way or at the same time as your typical employee.

To build a diverse, experienced team of leaders, you need an environment that supports and accepts differences of all kinds. Don’t let bias about gender, appearance, or the hours someone can work get in the way of nurturing all those great hires into the next generation of great leaders. Our senior director for our cybersecurity operations team, Kristina, looks for diversity as this helps with managing the diversity of threats. Listen to her thoughts on diversity in our CISO Spotlight Episode 7.

What’s next

For those interested in how to find more diverse talent, next week Theresa Payton will share ideas from her experience recruiting girls, women, and other people with differing backgrounds into technology.

In the meantime, bookmark the Security blog to keep up with our expert coverage on security matters. Also, follow us at @MSFTSecurity for the latest news and updates on cybersecurity. To learn more about our Security solutions visit our website. Or reach out to me on LinkedIn or Twitter.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Chang takes leave from Cisco collaboration unit amid reorganization

Amy Chang, a top Cisco executive who has led the company’s collaboration division for nearly two years, has taken a leave of absence for an unspecified period.

Chang’s time off comes amid a restructuring within Cisco. David Goeckeler, general manager of Cisco’s networking and security group, resigned to become CEO of Western Digital. The company took Goeckeler’s departure apparently as an opportunity to reorganize into five new product groups.

Under the reorganization, the head of Cisco’s collaboration business will no longer report to the CEO. Instead, that person will answer to the leader of the new security and applications group. Cisco said it planned to appoint an executive to oversee the new group in the future.

Sri Srinivasan, general manager of the Webex suite, will run the collaboration division until Chang returns, the company said in a statement. Srinivasan joined Cisco in early 2018 after spending more than 12 years at Microsoft.

“After an impressive 15 years of great achievements at an incredibly fast pace, Amy has decided to take a well-earned breath,” Cisco said. “She is going to recharge her batteries, while also prioritizing time with her 12-year-old son, and [CEO Chuck Robbins] and Cisco as a whole applaud her for this.”

The reorganization comes at a critical time for Cisco’s collaboration division, which generated something close to $5.8 billion in revenue last fiscal year. The vendor has an opportunity to capitalize on a surge in teleconferencing and remote work amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Chang’s leave of absence also follows a disappointing financial quarter for her unit — the first under her leadership. Revenue for the product category that includes collaboration was down 8% year over year in the three months ended Jan. 25.

Cisco is battling for enterprise customers with Microsoft, which has attracted more than 20 million daily active users to the Office 365 collaboration app Microsoft Teams. The vendor’s Webex business is also taking heat from video conferencing upstart Zoom.

Chang replaced Rowan Trollope as the leader of Cisco’s collaboration business in May 2018 after the vendor acquired her startup, Accompany. Chang previously held a seat on Cisco’s board of directors but resigned to become an employee.

Chang spearheaded significant changes to Cisco’s portfolio. She led an effort to align the features and interfaces of premise-based Jabber and cloud-based Webex Teams. Chang also sought to differentiate Cisco’s products based on a set of AI features marketed as “cognitive collaboration.”

“I am surprised by the changes,” said Dave Michels, principal analyst at TalkingPointz. “Cisco just hosted a highly successful and engaging analyst event last month. The Cisco collaboration leadership team seemed well-aligned, and Chang seemed enthused and engaged.”

Srinivasan is a good pick to lead the division in Chang’s absence, Michels said. Srinivasan spearheaded significant improvements to Webex during his tenure. He will now also oversee Cisco’s telephony and contact center businesses.

Srinivasan has been Chang’s “right-hand man,” said Irwin Lazar, analyst at Nemertes Research. His promotion suggests the company’s strategy will not change dramatically, at least for now.

“Should Amy not return, or be replaced by someone outside the organization, then I’d expect there to be change,” Lazar said.

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Why move to PowerShell 7 from Windows PowerShell?

PowerShell’s evolution has taken it from a Windows-only tool to a cross-platform, open source project that runs on Mac and Linux systems with the release of PowerShell Core. Next on tap, Microsoft is unifying PowerShell Core and Windows PowerShell with the long-term supported release called PowerShell 7, due out sometime in February. What are advantages and disadvantages of adopting the next generation of PowerShell in your environment?

New features spring from .NET Core

Nearly rebuilt from the ground up, PowerShell Core is a departure from Windows PowerShell. There are many new features, architectures and improvements that push the language forward even further.

Open source PowerShell runs on a foundation of .NET Core 2.x in PowerShell 6.x and .NET Core 3.1 in PowerShell 7. The .NET Core framework is also cross-platform, which enables PowerShell Core to run on most operating systems. The shift to the .NET Core framework brings several important changes, including:

  • increases in execution speed;
  • Window Desktop Application support using Windows Presentation Foundation and Windows Forms;
  • TLS 1.3 support and other cryptographic enhancements; and
  • API improvements.

PowerShell Core delivers performance improvements

As noted in the .NET Core changes, execution speed has been much improved. With each new release of PowerShell Core, there are further improvements to how core language features and built-in cmdlets alike work.

PowerShell Core speed improvement
A test of the Group-Object cmdlet shows less time is needed to execute the task as you move from Windows PowerShell to the newer PowerShell Core versions.

With a simple Group-Object test, you can see how much quicker each successive release of PowerShell Core has become. With a nearly 73% speed improvement from Windows PowerShell 5.1 to PowerShell Core 6.1, running complex code in gets easier and completes faster.

Sort-Object test results
Another speed test with the Sort-Object cmdlet shows a similar improvement with each successive release of PowerShell.

Similar to the Group-Object test, you can see Sort-Object testing results in nearly a doubling of execution speed between Windows PowerShell 5.1 and PowerShell Core 6.1. With sorting so often used in many applications, using PowerShell Core in your daily workload means that you will be able to get that much more done in far less time.

Gaps in cmdlet compatibility addressed

The PowerShell team began shipping the Windows Compatibility Pack for .NET Core starting in PowerShell Core 6.1. With this added functionality, the biggest reason for holding back from greater adoption of PowerShell Core is no longer valid. The ability to run many cmdlets that previously were only available to Windows PowerShell means that most scripts and functions can now run seamlessly in either environment.

PowerShell 7 will further cinch the gap by incorporating the functionality of the current Windows Compatibility Module directly into the core engine.

New features arrive in PowerShell 7

There are almost too many new features to list in PowerShell 7, but some of the highlights include:

  • SSH-based PowerShell remoting;
  • an & at the end of pipeline automatically creates a PowerShell job in the background;
  • many improvements to web cmdlets such as link header pagination, SSLProtocol support, multipart support and new authentication methods;
  • PowerShell Core can use paths more than 260 characters long;
  • markdown cmdlets;
  • experimental feature flags;
  • SecureString support for non-Windows systems; and
  • many quality-of-life improvements to existing cmdlets with new features and fixes.

Side-by-side installation reduces risk

A great feature of PowerShell Core, and one that makes adopting the new shell that much easier, is the ability to install the application side-by-side with the current built-in Windows PowerShell. Installing PowerShell Core will not remove Windows PowerShell from your system.

Instead of invoking PowerShell using the powershell.exe command, you use pwsh.exe instead — or just pwsh in Linux. In this way, you can test your scripts and functions incrementally before moving everything over en masse.

This feature allows quicker updating to new versions rather than waiting for a Windows update. By decoupling from the Windows release cycle or patch updates, PowerShell Core can now be regularly released and updated easily.

Disadvantages of PowerShell Core

One of the biggest drawbacks to PowerShell Core is losing the ability to run all cmdlets that worked in Windows PowerShell. There is still some functionality that can’t be fully replicated by PowerShell Core, but the number of cmdlets that are unable to run is rapidly shrinking with each release. This may delay some organizations move to PowerShell Core, but in the end, there won’t be a compelling reason to stay on Windows PowerShell with the increasing cmdlet support coming to PowerShell 7 and beyond.

Getting started with the future of PowerShell

PowerShell Core is released for a wide variety of platforms, Linux and Windows alike. Windows offers MSI packages that are easily installable, while Linux packages are available for a variety of different package platforms and repositories.

Simply starting the shell using pwsh will let you run PowerShell Core without disrupting your current environment. Even better is the ability to install a preview version of the next iteration of PowerShell and run pwsh-preview to test it out before it becomes generally available.

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Decision-makers may prefer Wi-Fi over 5G in retail networks

While fifth-generation wireless has taken the technology world by storm, many retailers don’t see a need to heed the hype.

Several use cases may glean immediate 5G benefits, yet 5G in retail is superfluous for now. Although 5G can support retail networks that require advanced capabilities, such as virtual reality, the retail world won’t depend on 5G because other wireless technologies are still efficient, according to a recent Forrester Research report. The report “The CIO’s Guide To 5G In The Retail Sector” explored particular retail use cases, and report author and principal analyst Dan Bieler discussed key differences between retail and other 5G use cases.

“Retailers are quite sophisticated in their existing technology understanding,” Bieler said. “They have achieved some great solutions with existing technologies, and they will not risk upsetting everything in the short term where they don’t see a clear [ROI] for making additional network infrastructure investments in 5G.”

Dan BielerDan Bieler

Retailers are interested in 5G for their networks, Bieler said, yet few have implemented or deployed 5G so far. Some retailers may seek out 5G as a replacement for existing MPLS connectivity, but this choice depends on pricing models and business requirements. Overall, IT decision-makers may prefer Wi-Fi over 5G in retail networks because not all retailers require the advanced capabilities 5G networks offer, he added.

5G in retail lacks transformative qualities largely because cellular technologies weren’t developed for indoor network coverage, and physical objects indoors can impede 5G’s millimeter wave frequencies and its line-of-sight travel capabilities.

The advent of Wi-Fi 6, or 802.11ax, may interest retailers more than 5G, as Wi-Fi historically supports more indoor use cases and networks than cellular technologies. Both Wi-Fi 6 and 5G offer similar capabilities, which makes them competitors in some use cases and complementary in others. For exclusively indoor retail environments, IT decision-makers may not see a need for 5G networks, Bieler said.

“[Retailers] can do a lot with the technologies that we have today,” he said. “5G will be a continuum rather than a completely revolutionary new technology for them.”

5G benefits
Aside from 5G in retail, the new generation of cellular technology has several benefits for all types of organizations.

Another issue retailers could face regarding 5G is customer apprehension. Despite 5G’s various new capabilities, customers don’t necessarily care about technological innovations and won’t alter their shopping habits because of 5G. However, customers in younger age groups may be more willing to adapt to the capabilities 5G enables, so organizations should focus more on how to win over older age groups, the report said.

Benefits of 5G in retail use cases, networks

Despite the efficiency of other wireless technologies, the report noted three main areas where 5G in retail can benefit business operations, including the following:

  1. Back-end operations, where organizations can handle work the customers don’t see, such as tracking and monitoring inventory within warehouses.
  2. Front-end operations, which are customer-facing operations and deal with tracking and monitoring products and people within stores.
  3. Finance operations, where the store can remotely track and monitor a customer’s product or service usage and charge them accordingly.

As 5G rolls out throughout the 2020s, more features and potential benefits for organizations will arise, such as network slicing and mobile edge computing. These capabilities can help organizations create experiences tailored specifically to individual customers.

“5G allows the retailer to track many more items and many more sensors in a store than previous cellular technologies, so they can have a much more granular picture of what retail customers are looking at, where they are going and what they are doing with products in the store,” Bieler said.

Other benefits the report cited include cost-efficient store connectivity, enhanced customer insights and improved transparency within supply chains. Organizations won’t glean these benefits for several years, Bieler said, as carriers will deploy new 5G features in stages.

However, decision-makers can prepare to deploy 5G in retail use cases by focusing closely on network design and determining whether 5G is the right choice for their operations. To evaluate this, organizations can assess their indoor connectivity environments and gauge how a 5G deployment could affect the business sectors in which the store or organization requires 5G access.

Overall, 5G has various benefits for retail use cases, the report said, but these benefits are not universal. Businesses need to look closely at their network infrastructures and business requirements to evaluate 5G’s potential effect on their operations. Regardless, Bieler said he was sure deployments of 5G in retail will eventually become common.

“[Retailers] will still adopt it over time because 5G will provide super-fast broadband connectivity,” Bieler said. “It opens up your business model opportunities in an easier way. So, over time, retailers will definitely embrace it, but not tomorrow.”

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Author:

For Sale – ALL SOLD Clearout – 15 x 2TB HDDs CAN NOW POST!

Hi all,

I have for sale 15 x 2TB HDDs taken from one of my backup Unraid servers. These are a mixture of Hitachi, WD and Toshiba (Hitachi Rebrand) and have varying hours. NO WARRANTY is left on any of the drives. I have had no issues with the drives, 2 of which are recerts. None of the drives have errors.

I have attached all 15 drive’s preclear logs. Please pay attention to the “199-UDMA_CRC_Error_Count” line. These CRC errors were due to what I thought at the time was a dodgy SAS card when in fact was due to faulty cables. If you look at the logs you will see the initial count and cycle count has not increased and that the status count is zero.

For those not aware of “preclear”, it is essentially a stress test before you commit a drive to an array and compares S.M.A.R.T values to determine its health. You cannot complete a preclear with a duff drive, the preclear will just fail to start after checking values.

Reason for sale..I’ve moved my wedding forward and so am selling off a few bits of hardware to fund it!

I’m looking for £20 + delivery per HDD. If purchasing multiples then I can knock a few quid off. If you want to buy all 15 then i’m sure we can knock some more off, although I would insist they are collected. Delivery method would be either Collect+ or Royalmail.

All the drives are currently resting in new anti static bags awaiting a new owner(s).

1 x WD Red & 1 x WD Green brotchaq – paid and posted
2 x HDDs 19329hrs & 17249hrs – Andrips – paid and posted
2 x Tosh/Hitachi & 1 Hitachi – paul99 – paid and posted
8 x Hitachi – moofie – paid and posted

Thanks

IMG_20191022_163420.jpgIMG_20191022_163603.jpgIMG_20191022_163552.jpgIMG_20191022_163557.jpgIMG_20191022_172519.jpg

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For Sale – Clearout – 15 x 2TB HDDs CAN NOW POST!

Hi all,

I have for sale 15 x 2TB HDDs taken from one of my backup Unraid servers. These are a mixture of Hitachi, WD and Toshiba (Hitachi Rebrand) and have varying hours. NO WARRANTY is left on any of the drives. I have had no issues with the drives, 2 of which are recerts. None of the drives have errors.

I have attached all 15 drive’s preclear logs. Please pay attention to the “199-UDMA_CRC_Error_Count” line. These CRC errors were due to what I thought at the time was a dodgy SAS card when in fact was due to faulty cables. If you look at the logs you will see the initial count and cycle count has not increased and that the status count is zero.

For those not aware of “preclear”, it is essentially a stress test before you commit a drive to an array and compares S.M.A.R.T values to determine its health. You cannot complete a preclear with a duff drive, the preclear will just fail to start after checking values.

Reason for sale..I’ve moved my wedding forward and so am selling off a few bits of hardware to fund it!

I’m looking for £20 + delivery per HDD. If purchasing multiples then I can knock a few quid off. If you want to buy all 15 then i’m sure we can knock some more off, although I would insist they are collected. Delivery method would be either Collect+ or Royalmail.

All the drives are currently resting in new anti static bags awaiting a new owner(s).

Thanks

IMG_20191022_163420.jpgIMG_20191022_163603.jpgIMG_20191022_163552.jpgIMG_20191022_163557.jpgIMG_20191022_172519.jpg

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For Sale – Clearout – 15 x 2TB HDDs Hitachi/WD/Toshiba

Hi all,

I have for sale 15 x 2TB HDDs taken from one of my backup Unraid servers. These are a mixture of Hitachi, WD and Toshiba (Hitachi Rebrand) and have varying hours. NO WARRANTY is left on any of the drives. I have had no issues with the drives, 2 of which are recerts. None of the drives have errors.

I have attached all 15 drive’s preclear logs. Please pay attention to the “199-UDMA_CRC_Error_Count” line. These CRC errors were due to what I thought at the time was a dodgy SAS card when in fact was due to faulty cables. If you look at the logs you will see the initial count and cycle count has not increased and that the status count is zero.

For those not aware of “preclear”, it is essentially a stress test before you commit a drive to an array and compares S.M.A.R.T values to determine its health. You cannot complete a preclear with a duff drive, the preclear will just fail to start after checking values.

Reason for sale..I’ve moved my wedding forward and so am selling off a few bits of hardware to fund it!

I’m looking for £22 each collected as I don’t have boxes to post out. If purchasing 3+ i can knock a few quid off. If you want to buy all 15 then i’m sure we can knock some more off.

All the drives are currently resting in new anti static bags awaiting a new owner(s).

Thanks

IMG_20191022_163420.jpgIMG_20191022_163603.jpgIMG_20191022_163552.jpgIMG_20191022_163557.jpgIMG_20191022_172519.jpg

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Icelandair turns to headless CMS to improve CX

Icelandair’s web content repository has taken flight from a traditional, on-premises content management system to a headless CMS in the cloud to improve its online travel booking experience for customers.

The migration started several years ago, and remains ongoing as processes move one at a time into the headless system from Contentstack.

We spoke with Icelandair’s global director of marketing Gísli Brynjólfsson and UX writer Hallur Þór Halldórsson to discuss how they made this IT purchasing decision and what CX improvements the airline stands to gain by going to the cloud.

What was the technology problem that got Icelandair thinking about changing to a headless CMS in the cloud?

Halldórsson: When I came on to the project in 2015 we had a very old-fashioned on-premises CMS with a publishing front-end attached to it, which handled all the content for our booking site. Content managers had to go in and do a lot of cache-flushing and add code here, add code there to the site.

Icelandair jetliner in flight
Icelandair’s headless CMS is making flight reservations more efficient for customers.

Load tests during cloud containerizing experiments on AWS in 2016 made people scared the site would crash a lot; people weren’t sure the CMS could handle what was coming in our digital transformation. We started looking for another CMS, using a different one for a year that wasn’t headless — but had API functionality — but it wasn’t quite doing what we expected. We ended up trying several cloud CMS vendors and Contentstack won the contract.

What about headless CMS made sense in the context of your digital transformation plan?

The ability to adapt quickly and scalability were the primary reasons to go with a headless CMS.
Hallur Þór HalldórssonUX writer, Icelandair

Halldórsson: Headless became a requirement at one point to decouple it from the publishing end of the old CMS. We needed this approach if we wanted to personalize content for customers, which we eventually would like to do. But the ability to adapt quickly and scalability were the primary reasons to go with a headless CMS.

What features or functionality won the bid for Contentstack’s headless CMS?

Halldórsson: The way it handles localized content. We support 11 languages online and 16 locales (four different versions of English, two French), and you have to be able to manage that. Other vendors that impressed us otherwise didn’t have mature localization features. 

What is on your digital transformation roadmap over the next couple years?

Halldórsson: The first thing we did was integrate our translation process into the CMS. Before, we had to paste text into a Microsoft Word document, send it to the translation agency, wait for it to come back and paste it into the CMS. Now it gets sent to the agency via API and is delivered back. Automating that workflow was first. Next is a Salesforce integration to more quickly give salespeople and customer service agents the content we know they’re looking for. Integrating a personalization engine, too, is a dream.

Editor’s note: This Q&A has been edited for clarity and brevity.

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For Sale – Memory: 2 x HyperX HX318C10F/8 FURY Series 8GB DDR3 1866 MHz CL10 DIMM Memory

Memory was taken from a working PC,
Happy to send first so memory can be checked.

BT or Paypal
Advertised Elsewhere.
Thanks,

Memory:
2 x HyperX HX318C10F/8 FURY Series 8 GB DDR3 1866 MHz CL10 DIMM Memory Module, Blue
Price £55 Delivered

Price and currency: £55
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: BT or PPG
Location: Milton Keynes
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.