Tag Archives: teams

A new vision for intelligent communications in Office 365 – Office Blogs

Today’s post was written by Lori Wright, general manager for Microsoft Teams and Skype product marketing.

Today at Microsoft Ignite in Orlando, Florida, we introduced a new vision for intelligent communications, transforming calling and meeting experiences for people and organizations around the world. Intelligent communications go beyond traditional unified communications, enabling you to complete tasks more efficiently with minimal context switching, participate in more productive meetings that cover the entire meeting lifecycle, and better manage your everyday communications overload.

Microsoft Teams is core to our vision for intelligent communications—bringing together conversations, meetings, files, Office apps, and third-party integrations—to provide a single hub for teamwork in Office 365. Teams is now being used by over 125,000 organizations across the world in just six months since its launch. Its strong momentum has proven that teamwork is essential to the way work gets done today.

To achieve our vision for intelligent communications, we are bringing comprehensive calling and meetings capabilities into Teams, along with data and insights from the Microsoft Graph, and a strong roadmap of innovation to empower teams to achieve more.

All of this is being built on a new, modern Skype infrastructure for enterprise-grade voice and video communications. Our next generation, cloud-born architecture is already powering communication experiences in Teams, and is evolving rapidly. We are excited about this new infrastructure because it will provide both speed of innovation as well as higher quality communication experiences.​

As we build out these capabilities, Teams will evolve as the primary client for intelligent communications in Office 365, replacing the current Skype for Business client over time.

The future of business meetings

Combining communications, collaboration, and intelligence in this way will make new things possible across the lifecycle of a call or meeting:

  • Before a meeting, Teams will surface relevant documents and rich information about the participants to help you prepare.
  • During the meeting, the conversation can be captured, transcribed, and time-coded, with closed captioning and voice recognition for attributing remarks to specific individuals.
  • After the meeting, the cloud recording and transcript can be automatically added to the relevant channel, so conversations, documents, notes, and action items can be reviewed, indexed, and searched by the entire team.

Image of a Teams meeting with four participants.

Introducing calling features and meeting enhancements in Teams

Over the past six months, we’ve continued to enhance the communications capabilities in Teams, with new features like scheduled meetings, Outlook calendar integration, and meetings on mobile. Also, earlier this month, we began rolling out guest access—so you can use Teams to collaborate with people outside your company. In the coming months, we will begin adding calling features in Teams—including inbound and outbound calls to PSTN numbers, hold, call transfer, and voicemail.

We are also introducing new enhancements to Teams meetings, including audio conferencing (available in preview today)—enabling participants to join a Teams meeting by dialing a telephone number—and interoperability between Teams and Skype for Business, including universal presence, and messaging and calling interoperability.

This is just the beginning of a big wave of feature releases that will bring the core set of meetings and phone system capabilities into Teams.

We remain committed to bringing the familiar Skype experience into any and every meeting room. We have seen strong customer momentum with Skype Rooms Systems. Today, Lenovo announced they will bring to market a new Skype Room Systems device, Smart Hub 500, expanding on the current portfolio of Skype Room Systems with Logitech, Crestron, and Polycom. In addition, Polycom, Pexip, and Blue Jeans Networks will deliver cloud video interop capabilities within Teams. This adds to the existing video interop capabilities for Skype for Business delivered by Polycom’s RealConnect for Office 365 and Pexip’s Infinity Fusion product.

What’s next

Office 365 customers can take advantage of the capabilities in Microsoft Teams starting today. We are committed to providing visibility into the Teams product roadmap, so our customers can assess when Teams is right for them. We intend to make an updated roadmap for Teams available in October.

We plan to continue to offer and support Skype for Business in Office 365 and Skype for Business Server on-premises. For customers who are not yet ready to move their PBX and advanced calling capabilities to the cloud, we will release a new version of Skype for Business Server targeted for the second half of calendar year 2018.

Microsoft Teams and Skype for Business clients can be run side by side to evaluate and explore what’s best for your organization.

We encourage every Office 365 customer to begin using Teams today. Office 365 customers currently using Skype for Business can find guidance and resources on the intelligent communications page in the FastTrack portal.

—Lori Wright

Microsoft Teams to replace Skype for Business Online

Microsoft plans to replace Skype for Business Online with the Teams collaboration service, a move likely to have the greatest effect on companies using the video conferencing software for on-premises or cloud-based telephony.

Microsoft will replace the Skype for Business user interface with the Teams UI, while continuing with the Skype communications infrastructure, which already powers audio and video communications in Teams. Microsoft announced the transition Monday at its Ignite developer conference in Orlando, Fla.

Microsoft did not provide a timetable for the change, saying it would occur “over time.” Analysts, however, expect Skype for Business Online to disappear by 2020.

The switch is significant because Teams will become the core communications client for Office 365, the company’s cloud-based business productivity suite with 60 million commercial customers.

What happens to Skype for Business Server?

The transition adds uncertainty to the long-term prospects of Skype for Business Server, the on-premises version of the cloud-based PBX that connects Skype for Business to the public telephone network. Analysts wonder how that product will be affected as Microsoft directs more of its resources to online communications.

“One doesn’t know the pace at which they will be making enhancements, since it’s no longer a part of their strategic product direction,” said Bern Elliot, an analyst at Gartner.

For now, Microsoft plans to conduct business as usual. In the second half of next year, the company will release an upgrade of Skype for Business Server, which provides voice and video conferencing along with PBX services unavailable in Skype for Business Online.

The switch to Teams also brings uncertainty to companies that have swapped their telephone system for the cloud-based version of Skype for Business. That’s because there is no commitment on the part of Microsoft to move all functionality over to Teams.

Companies that had a plan to do [Skype for Business] telephony online should review their plans in light of the uncertainty.
Bern Elliotanalyst at Gartner

“It’s not certain what will be available when — especially when it comes to some of the functions like telephony,” Elliot said. “Companies that had a plan to do [Skype for Business] telephony online should review their plans in light of the uncertainty.”

Meanwhile, Microsoft is beefing up telephony in Teams. At Ignite, the company is announcing the ability to make and receive calls on the public telephone network. Also, Teams users will have the option of placing calls on hold, transferring them to another party or sending them to voicemail.

Despite the telephony enhancements, swapping out Skype for Business Online could be painful for many enterprises that have to train employees to use Teams, analysts warned. However, AFR Furniture Rental, based in Pennsauken, N.J., believes the additional features in Teams will be worth the move for the company’s 500 Skype for Business users.

“I think it’s going to be a pretty easy integration for Microsoft to do,” said Steven Singer, manager of information systems for AFR. “I don’t see a real downside, outside of training, and training is temporary.”

The market trend that killed Skype for Business Online

Microsoft’s decision to fade out Skype for Business Online is a response to companies demanding more communication functionality in group messaging applications, which are growing in popularity among employees, analysts said. Microsoft’s biggest rival, Cisco, is similarly focused on its competing Spark product.

A survey of 700 companies found that nearly half had rolled out team chat apps enterprise-wide or were planning to do so, according to Nemertes Research, based in Mokena, Ill.

The trend toward group messaging services means software-based phones like Skype for Business, which also provide messaging and limited document sharing, are “dead,” said Art Schoeller, an analyst at Forrester Research. “All these separate client experiences are collapsing into a team messaging interface.”

Discontinuing Skype for Business Online will reduce Microsoft’s bloated portfolio of collaboration apps to three — Teams, Yammer and Office 365 Groups.

“The Teams interface is much better suited to group, persistent collaboration, and it provides clarity around what so far has been a confusing array of Microsoft collaboration tools,” said Irwin Lazar, an analyst at Nemertes Research.

Also at Ignite, Microsoft will announce that Teams will get tighter integration with SharePoint, which is the company’s document management and collaboration tool. Pages and communication sites people create in SharePoint will be accessible through Teams.

Yammer is also on tap to get tighter integration with SharePoint, as well as changes to data handling to meet the compliance requirements of many enterprises.

Adobe and Microsoft expand strategic partnership to drive e-signatures and collaboration among teams in the cloud – News Center

Adobe Sign now Microsoft’s preferred e-signature solution; Microsoft Teams now preferred chat-based workspace across Adobe Cloud Services

SAN JOSE, Calif., and REDMOND, Wash. — Sept, 7, 2017 Adobe (NASD “ADBE”) and Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq “MSFT”)  recently delivered their first set of joint solutions to help enterprises transform their customer experience with Adobe Experience Cloud, Microsoft Azure and Microsoft Dynamics. The companies are now expanding their strategic alliance to increase workforce productivity and drive more efficient business processes. Beginning today, Adobe Sign, the market-leading e-signature service in Adobe Document Cloud, is now Microsoft’s preferred e-signature solution across the company’s portfolio, including the 100 million monthly commercial active users of Microsoft Office 365. In addition, Microsoft Teams, the new chat-based workspace in Microsoft Office 365, is now the preferred collaboration service for Adobe Creative Cloud, Document Cloud and Experience Cloud. In addition to product integrations, Adobe will make Microsoft Azure its preferred cloud platform for Adobe Sign. Together, Adobe and Microsoft will ensure individuals and teams can efficiently collaborate, communicate and drive decision-making across devices.

Adobe and Microsoft are the leaders in document and productivity software, with a rich heritage of innovating to deliver ubiquitous solutions that touch hundreds of millions of customers through integrated desktop tools, innovative mobile apps and cloud-based services. In addition to the partnership announced today, the companies will explore opportunities to continue collaborating on artificial intelligence, analytics and intelligent document automation, taking productivity in the cloud to the next level.

“Adobe and Microsoft are working together to redefine what the modern enterprise experience looks like with collaboration, identity, data and intelligence at the core,” said Abhay Parasnis, chief technology officer, Adobe. “Together we will develop integrated cloud services with best-in-class solutions like Adobe Sign and Office 365 that help businesses digitally transform while delivering great experiences to their customers.”

“Together with Adobe, we’re committed to fostering creativity and a culture of teamwork for our shared customers, so they can unlock the opportunities of today’s rapidly evolving workplace,” said Peggy Johnson, executive vice president, business development, Microsoft. We’re thrilled that our partnership with Adobe has now grown to span our three clouds — Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and Dynamics 365 — providing customers with the powerful integrations they need to navigate digital transformation.”

The first integrations resulting from this partnership are expected to be available to customers in the coming weeks:

  • Integration between Microsoft Office 365 and Adobe Sign will deliver fast, secure electronic signing across Office 365, including Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Outlook, so that signing documents electronically, on any device, can become an everyday experience.
  • Adobe Creative Cloud and Adobe Stock integration with Microsoft Teams will give Adobe’s creative customers access to a world-class collaboration workspace that speeds up creative feedback, iteration and decision-making. Microsoft Teams integration will expand to Adobe Experience Cloud in the future.
  • Adobe Sign integration with Microsoft Teams will accelerate electronic agreement creation, approval and signature processes across teams. The Adobe Sign app in Microsoft Teams includes a tab to send documents for signature and a bot that allows team members to manage and track documents.
  • Adobe Sign integration with Microsoft Flow will allow users to build end-to-end digital workflows by adding Adobe Sign to any Microsoft Flow process. In the coming months, organizations will benefit from Flow integration with other Microsoft applications such as SharePoint, Dynamics and OneDrive.

“When Adobe and Microsoft team up to innovate, their customers win,” said Jamie McLellan, chief technology officer, J. Walter Thompson Worldwide. “As power users of Microsoft Teams, Adobe Sign and Adobe Creative Cloud, we’re excited to realize the immediate impact delivered by these integrations that will enhance creativity, teamwork and overall productivity across our agency.”

“The most successful companies today are relentlessly focused on helping employees be more effective. Productivity suffers when work requires multiple applications that don’t interact,” said Alan Lepofsky, VP and principal analyst at Constellation Research. “The integration of team collaboration, electronic signatures and creative content provides customers with huge efficiency gains, and paves the way for how people will get work done in the future.”

Availability

Adobe Sign for Microsoft Dynamics and Microsoft SharePoint is already available. New Adobe Sign integrations for Microsoft Teams, Microsoft Flow, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Outlook are expected to be available in the coming weeks. Adobe Creative Cloud integration with Microsoft Teams is also expected to be available in the coming weeks with Experience Cloud integrations to follow.

Helpful links

 About Adobe

Adobe is changing the world through digital experiences. For more information, visit www.adobe.com.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) is the leading platform and productivity company for the mobile-first, cloud-first world, and its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, rrt@we-worldwide.com

Steve Ballerini, Adobe, (415) 832-2234, sballeri@adobe.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

Adobe and Microsoft expand strategic partnership to drive e-signatures and collaboration among teams in the cloud – News Center

Adobe Sign now Microsoft’s preferred e-signature solution; Microsoft Teams now preferred chat-based workspace across Adobe Cloud Services

SAN JOSE, Calif., and REDMOND, Wash. — Sept, 7, 2017 Adobe (NASD “ADBE”) and Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq “MSFT”)  recently delivered their first set of joint solutions to help enterprises transform their customer experience with Adobe Experience Cloud, Microsoft Azure and Microsoft Dynamics. The companies are now expanding their strategic alliance to increase workforce productivity and drive more efficient business processes. Beginning today, Adobe Sign, the market-leading e-signature service in Adobe Document Cloud, is now Microsoft’s preferred e-signature solution across the company’s portfolio, including the 100 million monthly commercial active users of Microsoft Office 365. In addition, Microsoft Teams, the new chat-based workspace in Microsoft Office 365, is now the preferred collaboration service for Adobe Creative Cloud, Document Cloud and Experience Cloud. In addition to product integrations, Adobe will make Microsoft Azure its preferred cloud platform for Adobe Sign. Together, Adobe and Microsoft will ensure individuals and teams can efficiently collaborate, communicate and drive decision-making across devices.

Adobe and Microsoft are the leaders in document and productivity software, with a rich heritage of innovating to deliver ubiquitous solutions that touch hundreds of millions of customers through integrated desktop tools, innovative mobile apps and cloud-based services. In addition to the partnership announced today, the companies will explore opportunities to continue collaborating on artificial intelligence, analytics and intelligent document automation, taking productivity in the cloud to the next level.

“Adobe and Microsoft are working together to redefine what the modern enterprise experience looks like with collaboration, identity, data and intelligence at the core,” said Abhay Parasnis, chief technology officer, Adobe. “Together we will develop integrated cloud services with best-in-class solutions like Adobe Sign and Office 365 that help businesses digitally transform while delivering great experiences to their customers.”

“Together with Adobe, we’re committed to fostering creativity and a culture of teamwork for our shared customers, so they can unlock the opportunities of today’s rapidly evolving workplace,” said Peggy Johnson, executive vice president, business development, Microsoft. We’re thrilled that our partnership with Adobe has now grown to span our three clouds — Microsoft Azure, Office 365 and Dynamics 365 — providing customers with the powerful integrations they need to navigate digital transformation.”

The first integrations resulting from this partnership are expected to be available to customers in the coming weeks:

  • Integration between Microsoft Office 365 and Adobe Sign will deliver fast, secure electronic signing across Office 365, including Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Outlook, so that signing documents electronically, on any device, can become an everyday experience.
  • Adobe Creative Cloud and Adobe Stock integration with Microsoft Teams will give Adobe’s creative customers access to a world-class collaboration workspace that speeds up creative feedback, iteration and decision-making. Microsoft Teams integration will expand to Adobe Experience Cloud in the future.
  • Adobe Sign integration with Microsoft Teams will accelerate electronic agreement creation, approval and signature processes across teams. The Adobe Sign app in Microsoft Teams includes a tab to send documents for signature and a bot that allows team members to manage and track documents.
  • Adobe Sign integration with Microsoft Flow will allow users to build end-to-end digital workflows by adding Adobe Sign to any Microsoft Flow process. In the coming months, organizations will benefit from Flow integration with other Microsoft applications such as SharePoint, Dynamics and OneDrive.

“When Adobe and Microsoft team up to innovate, their customers win,” said Jamie McLellan, chief technology officer, J. Walter Thompson Worldwide. “As power users of Microsoft Teams, Adobe Sign and Adobe Creative Cloud, we’re excited to realize the immediate impact delivered by these integrations that will enhance creativity, teamwork and overall productivity across our agency.”

“The most successful companies today are relentlessly focused on helping employees be more effective. Productivity suffers when work requires multiple applications that don’t interact,” said Alan Lepofsky, VP and principal analyst at Constellation Research. “The integration of team collaboration, electronic signatures and creative content provides customers with huge efficiency gains, and paves the way for how people will get work done in the future.”

Availability

Adobe Sign for Microsoft Dynamics and Microsoft SharePoint is already available. New Adobe Sign integrations for Microsoft Teams, Microsoft Flow, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and Microsoft Outlook are expected to be available in the coming weeks. Adobe Creative Cloud integration with Microsoft Teams is also expected to be available in the coming weeks with Experience Cloud integrations to follow.

Helpful links

 About Adobe

Adobe is changing the world through digital experiences. For more information, visit www.adobe.com.

About Microsoft

Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT” @microsoft) is the leading platform and productivity company for the mobile-first, cloud-first world, and its mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

For more information, press only:

Microsoft Media Relations, WE Communications for Microsoft, (425) 638-7777, rrt@we-worldwide.com

Steve Ballerini, Adobe, (415) 832-2234, sballeri@adobe.com

Note to editors: For more information, news and perspectives from Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft News Center at http://news.microsoft.com. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://news.microsoft.com/microsoft-public-relations-contacts.

Stand up infrastructure on a budget with Azure DevTest Labs

Many businesses expect IT teams to do more without giving them more money — and, sometimes, cutting an already…

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small budget. But new projects mean test and development — an expensive endeavor in the data center. One way to alleviate this financial strain is to move those test and development workloads into the cloud.

Running a test environment in the data center is expensive, with high costs connected to hardware, software, power and cooling — not to mention all the time and effort IT spends keeping everything running and properly updated. Instead, administrators can turn to the cloud to develop and test applications in Microsoft’s Azure DevTest Labs. This enables companies to trade in hardware expenses and switch to a pay-per-use model. Other features in the service, such as the auto shutdown for VMs, can further control costs.

In this first part of a two-part series, we explain the merits of using a test bed in Azure and configuring a VM for lab use. In part two, we explore ways to manage the VM in DevTest Labs, as well as benefits gained when a workload moves out of the data center.

What is Azure DevTest Labs?

Many businesses maintain an on-premises test environment that emulates the production environment, which lets development teams test code before it is pushed into production. This also enables other teams within the app dev team to perform usability and integration testing.

But a test environment can have slight variations from the production side. It might not have key updates or patches, or it could run on different hardware or software. These disparities cause the application to fail when it hits the production environment. Azure DevTest Labs address these issues, enabling admins to build an infrastructure that is disposable and adaptable. If the test environment requires drastic changes, the team can remove it and build a new one with minimal effort. In contrast, a typical on-premises production setting generally cannot be offline for very long; the investment in hardware, software and other infrastructure requires lengthy deliberation before IT makes any changes.

The team can turn off DevTest Labs when the test period ends so that resources go away, and there are no costs until the service is needed again.

Creating another lab scenario to test a new feature removes the effort to twist and tweak an existing test environment to bring necessary components online, which can cause problems with other testing scenarios. An on-premises test environment requires sizable expense and effort to maintain and keep in sync with production. In contrast, admins can quickly configure a test setting in Azure DevTest Labs.

What are the benefits of Azure DevTest Labs?

The most noticeable benefits to DevTest Labs include:

  • Pay as you go pricing: The lab only incurs cost when a VM runs. If the VM is deallocated, there are no charges.
  • Specified shutdown: IT staff can configure DevTest Labs to shut down at a certain time and automatically disconnect users. Turning the service off — for example, shutting it down between 5 p.m. and 8 a.m. — saves money.
  • Role-based access: IT assigns certain access rights within the lab to ensure specific users only have access to the items they need.

How do I get started with Azure DevTest Labs?

To set up Azure DevTest Labs, you’ll need an Azure subscription. Sign up for a 30-day trial from the Microsoft Azure site. Go to the Azure Resource Management portal, and add the DevTest Labs configuration from the Azure Marketplace with these steps:

  • Select the New button at the top of the left column in the Azure portal. This will change the navigation pane to list available categories of services and the main blade to a blank screen. As you make selections, this will populate with related information.
  • In the search box, enter DevTest Labs, and press Enter.
  • In the blade that displays the search results, click on DevTest Labs. This will display more information about DevTest Labs and a Create button.
Install Azure DevTest Labs
Figure 1. Find the option to add the Azure DevTest Labs to your subscription from the Azure Marketplace.

Click the Create button. Azure will prompt you to enter configuration settings for the instance, such as:

  • The name of the lab: The text box shows a green checkmark if the value is acceptable.
  • The Azure subscription to use
  • The region where the DevTest Lab will reside: Pick a region closest to user(s) for better performance.
  • If auto shutdown should be enabled: This is enabled by default; all VMs in the lab will shut down at a specified time.

Enter values for these options; items marked with a star are required. Click Create, and Azure will provision the DevTest Labs instance. This typically takes a few minutes to gather the background services and objects needed to build the lab. Click the bell icon in the header area of the Azure portal screen to see the progress for this deployment.

DevTest Labs provisioning
Figure 2. Click the bell-shaped icon in the Azure portal to check the provisioning progress of the DevTest Labs instance.

Once Azure provisions the lab, you can add objects and resources to it. Each lab gets a resource group within Azure to keep all the items packaged. The resource group takes the name of the lab with some random characters at the end. This ensures the resource group name for the lab is unique and ensures the admin manages its resources through DevTest Labs.

To find the lab, select the option for DevTest Labs from the left navigation pane. For new users, it might be listed under More Services at the bottom. When the lab is located, scroll down to the Developer Tools section, and click the star icon next to the service name to pin DevTest Labs to the main navigation list.

Click DevTest Labs in the navigation list to open the DevTest Labs blade and list all the labs. Click on the name of the new lab: techTarget — for the purposes of this article.

Azure DevTest Labs environment
Figure 3. After Azure provisions the lab, the administrator can add compute and other resources.

This opens the blade for that lab. The administrator can populate the lab with compute and other resources. New users should check the Getting Started section to familiarize themselves with the service.

What components can we put in the lab?

DevTest Labs creates sandbox environments to test applications in development or to see how a feature in Windows Server performs before moving it to a production environment.

Administrators can add components to each lab, including:

  • VMs: Azure uses VMs from the Marketplace or uploaded images.
  • Claimable VMs: The IT department provides a pool of VMs for lab users to select.
  • Data disks: You can attach these disks to VMs to store data within a lab.
  • Formulas: Reusable code and automation objects are available to objects within the lab.
  • Secrets: These are values, such as passwords or keys, the lab needs. These reside in a secure key vault within the Azure subscription.

Administrators can modify configuration values and policies related to the lab, change the auto startup and auto shutdown times and specify machine sizes that users can create. To find more information on these items, select My virtual machines under MY LAB in the navigation list. Click Add at the top of the blade to insert a VM.

Add a new VM
Figure 4. Create a new VM with the Add button in the lab.

For the purposes of this article, select Windows Server 2016 Datacenter as the VM base image. The next blade shows the following items that are required to build the VM:

  • VM name: A unique name for the VM.
  • Username: The admin username for this VM — it cannot be administrator.
  • Disk type: Options include solid-state drive or hard disk drive — SSD provides better performance, but will raise the cost of operations slightly.
  • VM size: The number of CPU cores and amount of RAM — after selecting the one you want, click Select.
Configure the lab VM
Figure 5. Make selections to build the VM for the lab. The blades show the options and prices based on the size of the VM.

You can also select artifacts to install when the VM is created, and configure advanced options for the resource. Find more information about artifacts at Microsoft’s Azure documentation site.

For labs with more complex needs, advanced settings let administrators adjust the VM’s networking settings and set the VM as claimable.

When you finish the lab VM configuration, click Create. Azure will do its work, which will take some time to complete.

In the next installment of this article, we will look at VM management in Azure DevTest Labs and different testing scenarios within the service.

Next Steps

A Hyper-V lab can help with certification studies

Explore OpenStack’s capabilities with a virtual home lab

Keep a test VM from affecting the production environment

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