Tag Archives: tech

AI, data analytics, recruiting tech among HR priorities, leaders say

LAS VEGAS — HR leaders at top national companies want tech that delivers insights and improves talent management. The top HR priorities included boosting candidate and employee experience through stellar technology. That was the message to vendors and attendees at the 2018 HR Technology Conference & Expo from a panel on what it takes to create top-notch HR. Improved recruiting platforms, AI, data analytics and user-driven learning platforms were all listed as important.

The HR chiefs from Accenture, BlackRock, Delta Air Lines, Johnson & Johnson and The Walt Disney Co., who appeared on a panel, discussed their technology priorities and interests. They weren’t picking and choosing vendors, and they made a point of avoiding mentioning any of the vendors at the conference.

But this group of global HR leaders had a clear idea of what they thought was important to conference attendees and vendors. It was a strategic, but pointed, overview of how they are using technology and what their firms want from it.

Stellar HR requires a candidate-focused recruiting system

Johnson & Johnson interviews a million people a year to hire 28,000 individuals. “So, how do you make sure that they [the candidates] have visibility [into] how they’re tracking through the process, like you would track a Domino’s pizza or a UPS or a FedEx package?” asked Peter Fasolo, executive vice president and chief human resources officer (CHRO) at Johnson & Johnson, based in New Brunswick, N.J.

At BlackRock, talent is an ongoing executive board-level discussion, said Matt Breitfelder, managing director and chief talent officer. The New York-based company is using technology to help improve the diversity of its hiring.

The firm wants diversity on its teams, so its employees are “challenging each other to think more clearly about what they’re seeing in markets,” Breitfelder said.

BlackRock is using tools in its hiring process to make sure it is “not just replicating an industry that has tended to have one way of thinking,” Breitfelder said. “We know it’s about teams, not about individual stars.”

Data analytics makes us more human

We democratized all of our learning.
Ellyn Shookchief leadership and human resource officer at Accenture

“Data analytics makes us more human, because our own data analytics shows there’s a lot of liberal arts majors who make great investors, which is very counterintuitive,” Breitfelder said. 

Delta Air Lines has begun using machine learning and AI technologies to help discover “good predictors of success” in its hiring, said Joanne Smith, the company’s executive vice president and CHRO. “That’s going to help us get smarter and smarter and smarter about hiring,” she said.

Learning and a focus on employee experience

Learning technology was also mentioned as a priority, and Accenture explained why that is. In response to the competition in the labor market, the firm decided to go big on training employees on entirely new skills.

“We democratized all of our learning,” said Ellyn Shook, chief leadership and human resource officer at Accenture, based in Dublin. Learning “is now in real time, on demand and available to our people anytime, anywhere, any device,” she said.

Some 300,000 of Accenture’s 450,000 employees have taken advantage of it in the last two years, which includes some “leading-edge technical areas that there would be no way we could have hired at that scale,” Shook said.

A common theme for the conference panel was the need for consumer-like HR technologies.

“Help me do what I’m doing. Help my employees be better at what we’re doing. But have a consumer mindset to it,” said Jayne Parker, senior executive vice president and CHRO of Disney.

Federal privacy regulations usher in the age of tech lawmakers

Tech companies that have successfully lobbied against stricter privacy regulations are facing pushback from consumers on their latest campaign to curtail data privacy rights.

Big tech’s call for federal regulation comes amid a reactionary call for privacy rights, as data breach media coverage has exposed companies’ poor management of personal information and piqued consumers’ data protection concerns.  

“Consumers are seeing data breaches and privacy mistakes in the news every single day, and the breaches are getting larger in scope. And the number of individuals impacted seems to be larger for every single one,” said Nicholas Merker, partner and co-chair of the data security and privacy practice at Ice Miller, based in Indianapolis. “People understand that some companies are misusing their data or not protecting their data appropriately, and it’s creating a risk for these individuals.”

Shortly after GDPR — the European law that unified data privacy protection and specified consumer rights to their personal data — went into effect last spring, California passed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) of 2018. The new state law gives users the right to request details about individual data collected by the companies they do business with and to delete personal data without penalty to service.

Now, tech giants like Facebook, IBM and Microsoft are playing offense and proposing federal privacy regulations that override the California rules.

As the fight between state and federal laws plays out, CIOs and their data privacy experts may well find themselves advising their companies on where to come down on data privacy rights.

A company‘s best course will likely depend, in large part, on where it does business, how it makes money and how much its customers value data privacy.

Why the push for federal law?

Tech companies with multistate operations are gunning for the federal law in order to avoid having to comply with up to 50 competing jurisdictions. Experts expect other states to begin following in California’s footsteps by amending or creating state privacy laws.

The CCPA has certainly set the bar for other like-minded states, said Erin Illman, co-chair of Bradley’s cybersecurity and privacy practice group and member of the North Carolina Bar Association’s Privacy and Data Security Committee.

“You’re going to see the states that have taken a forward stance in privacy start to really look at California and say, ‘Maybe we need to amend our laws that are already on the books, but maybe we also need to put forward a similar law or something that even goes farther than California,'” Illman said.

But big tech’s effort to get a federal law passed is not just to save themselves the headache of state-specific compliance, experts said, but also to preserve profits amid growing concern over business preservation.

And if we look to the GDPR as a model for U.S. legislation, we must also examine the immediate aftermath, Merker said.

“The GDPR is a great example of what [strict federal privacy legislation] would do to the behavioral advertising firm, targeted advertising firm, company index firm industry — it would destroy it,”  Merker said.

“When GDPR was implemented for publicly traded companies, you saw massive drops in stock prices; you saw some companies that just no longer existed, because their practices are no longer legitimate under the GDPR.”

Data: The new dollar

Data privacy experts advise CIOs keep a close eye on the proposed legislation and its framework, including exactly whom it seeks to regulate.

For example, one of the proposals for the federal privacy regulations defines consumers as users who have purchased something from the company. Under this definition, social media businesses like Facebook and email businesses like Gmail that do not charge for their services or sell products would have far fewer reportable consumers than sites that sell a product or charge a nominal fee for service. Even a $1 yearly fee makes each individual a consumer whose privacy is protected instead of a user who remains exempt from privacy regulations.

Experts noted that this distinction shows the defining characteristic of online business: Data is money.

Personal information is the currency of the internet — more so than bitcoin, more so than the dollar. [Data] is what is being bartered for services and then sold for revenue,” said Nader Henein, research director of data protection and privacy at Gartner.

“Like any other currency, it needs to be regulated. Otherwise, it loses its value, and it’s inconsistent.”

Love affair gone sour

In the face of big tech’s all-out lobbying effort for the federal law, data privacy interest groups have not hung back. Instead, they are taking advantage of growing consumer sentiment that the titans of Silicon Valley can delight customers and still not have their best interest at heart.

The inability of business to prevent massive data breaches that expose sensitive information has also fueled consumer interest in wanting more control over personal data. 

Internationally, America seems like we are now behind the times when it comes to privacy law.
Nicholas Merkerpartner and co-chair of Ice Miller’s data security and privacy practice

A major point on the tech companies’ list of wishes is self-regulation and the creation of industry guidelines with no legal or financial penalty for noncompliance. Trade groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the Internet Association and the Information Technology Industry Council are all pushing for voluntary standards.

Tech companies’ C-suites claim they know exactly what data is being collected, how it’s used and, ultimately, how to protect it. They argue self-regulation allows for flexible compliance that protects privacy and the ability to remain profitable.

Privacy advocates, on the other hand, cite years of improper data management, privacy violations and data breaches as examples of the whittling of trust that’s occurred between the general public and tech businesses.

“There’s a lot of trust that’s been lost between the general public and between privacy advocates and business,” Illman said. “Because of that loss of trust, the concept of self-regulation is something that privacy advocates are pushing back against and saying, ‘You know, we don’t really trust you to regulate yourselves.'”

So, what’s the next battle move? The proposal and establishment of federal privacy regulations could be a positive change if companies develop strategies that are fair, transparent and create a more equal benefit for company and user.

“Internationally, America seems like we are now behind the times when it comes to privacy law,” Merker said. “All privacy advocates want America to catch up and be standing with the rest of the world.”

New tech trends in HR: Josh Bersin predicts employee experience ‘war’

LAS VEGAS — Among fresh tech trends in HR, one that may garner the most interest is a new layer of software — which superstar analyst Josh Bersin called an employee experience platform — that will fit between core HR and talent management tools.

Bersin said he expects employee experience to become the next-generation employee portal — in other words, the go-to application for modern workers who need HR-based information. Vendors are lining up to address the need, he added.

“There is going to be a holy war for [what] system your employees use first,” said Bersin, an independent analyst who founded Bersin by Deloitte. Although his quote served as hyperbole, it nonetheless stuck with attendees here at the 2018 HR Technology Conference & Exposition.

“He hit home,” said Rita Reslow, senior director of global benefits at HR software vendor Kronos, based in Lowell, Mass. “We have all these systems, and we keep buying more.” But she wondered aloud when one product would tie her systems together for employees.

No vendor has achieved a true employee experience platform, Bersin told a room packed with 900 or so attendees at the conference on Tuesday. However, ServiceNow, PeopleDoc — which Ultimate Software acquired in July — and possibly IBM appear to have a head start, he added.

Tech trends in HR point to team successes

There is going to be a holy war for [what] system your employees use first.
Josh Bersinindependent analyst

Bersin, who plans to release an extensive report about 2019 tech trends in HR, said software development within the industry reflects a shift in management that steers away from employee engagement and company culture in favor of increased team performance.

Unless a recession hits, “I think the focus of the tech market for the next couple of years … is on performance, productivity and agility,” he said.

The shift to productivity will require future technology to simplify work life, said Cliff Howe, manager of enterprise applications at Cox Enterprises, a communications and media company in Atlanta. “Our employees are being inundated,” Howe said. “We don’t want to hit our employees with too much [technology].”

Bersin suggested that HR software buyers consider the following tips when evaluating new human capital management products:

  • Shop around for vendors that focus on your company’s particular market. For example, if your organization exhibits a compliance-based culture, find a vendor that mirrors that approach.
  • Evaluate the “personality of the vendor,” he said. As an example, determine if the vendor’s reps listen to your decision-makers and help them. If the answer is no, it may be time to drop that vendor from consideration.

AI auditing, real-time payrolls needed in future

In other upcoming tech trends in HR, Bersin pegged AI as a quickly growing field that smart HR departments will learn how to monitor and audit in the future. That notion was on the minds of many at the HR Technology Conference, for which TechTarget — the publisher of SearchHRSoftware — is a media partner.

AI innovation has increased rapidly in the last two years. Today, even small HR software vendors with three to five engineers can use technology from Google or IBM, combine it with open source options and scale a new product on the cloud quickly, Bersin said. HR professionals will need to adjust their skills in order to better understand why AI software makes its decisions, which is an area not fully grasped yet, he added.

Howe agreed AI has grown beyond wish-list status. “AI will be a requirement, rather than a shiny object,” he said.

Bersin also noted that software will need to reflect a possible switch to a continuous payroll model — perhaps as often as daily. Younger workers, some of whom might not have bank accounts, have increased their demands to be compensated in real time, and this request is not just for the gig economy, he said.

Amazon Chime app adds dial-out, single sign-on features

Amazon Web Services has been gradually building out the features of Amazon Chime, as the tech giant struggles to attract corporate interest in the online messaging and meetings platform.

AWS added a dial-out function to the Amazon Chime app this week so that users can program the app to call a phone number at the start of a meeting. The feature will simplify the process of connecting to meeting audio for attendees who are away from their desks. 

AWS also recently announced it would integrate the Amazon Chime app with the software of Okta, a leading single sign-on vendor. Okta’s platform consolidates the username and password information of an organization’s apps so that users only have to remember one set of sign-on credentials.

Last month, AWS made it possible to conduct a Chime video meeting in Google Chrome. While all major browsers support messaging and most non-video meeting features, Chrome is the only internet client that supports Chime video conferencing. (Users can also install a desktop app.)

“I see these largely as incremental improvements that allow Amazon to better compete with the likes of Zoom, BlueJeans, GoToMeeting, Cisco Webex, etc.,” said Irwin Lazar, analyst at Nemertes Research, based in Mokena, Ill.

Businesses expect all online meetings platforms to support in-browser video conferencing at this point, while single sign-on is a must-have feature for many large organizations, Lazar said.

Amazon Chime app trails rivals as AWS seeks greater share of collaboration market

Launched in February 2017, Amazon Chime is still playing catch-up with more established online meetings platforms. Amazon has stepped up efforts to penetrate the enterprise market in recent years, including with the release of the contact center platform Amazon Connect.

Alexa for Business, an enterprise version of the vendor’s popular AI voice assistant, has the potential to gain traction in the enterprise market, said Wayne Kurtzman, analyst at IDC. The Amazon Chime app, however, is not yet on the radar of many companies, he said.

“While Alexa for Business will gain traction over time, mostly integrated with other products, Amazon has to prove that Chime will be here for the long haul, be better than competitors and be a trusted part of a custom, cloud-based IT stack,” Kurtzman said.

Amazon is not the only consumer tech giant making a play at the enterprise collaboration market. Google also recently released a team collaboration app, Hangouts Chat, and an online meetings platform, Hangouts Meet.

AWS, a $17.5 billion division of Amazon, has sought to use low and flexible pricing to attract businesses to Amazon Chime.

When Chime first launched, AWS gave customers the ability to prorate the subscription fees of individual users by activating and deactivating their licenses on demand. Later, the vendor implemented a usage-based pricing system that costs $3 every time a user hosts a meeting, for a maximum of $15 per user, per month.

In announcing usage-based pricing in March, AWS said it expected the new scheme would reduce the bills of virtually all premium customers of Amazon Chime. Nevertheless, aggressive pricing hasn’t been enough to draw attention from tech buyers.

“I rarely hear about Chime,” said Alan Lepofsky, analyst at Constellation Research, based in Cupertino, Calif. “I think Chime could have an interesting differentiation if Amazon made it very easy for developers to add voice and video features to custom applications. That would make Chime more of a competitor to Twilio than to Webex.”

Laura Noren advocates data science ethics for employee info

The trend in tech has been to gather more and more data on everyone — customers and employees alike — even if there is no direct reason to collect so much data. This has led to a pushback by users and experts about data privacy and more conversations about standards of data science ethics.

At Black Hat USA 2018, Laura Norén, director of research at Obsidian Security, spoke about data science ethics, how companies can avoid “being creepy,” and why privacy policies often leave out protections for employees.

Editor’s note: This interview was edited for length and clarity.

How did you become interested in data science ethics? 
 
Laura Norén: Data science isn’t really a discipline, it’s a set of methods being used across disciplines. One of the things that I realized fairly early on was people were doing the same thing with data science that we’ve done with so many technologies. We get so excited about the promise. People get so excited about being the first to do some new thing. But they’re really using technologies before they fully understand what the consequences and the social impact would be. So that’s when I got started on data science ethics and I talked fairly consistently to get a course that was just about ethics for data science.
 
But I ended up spending several years just working on, ‘What is it that’s unique about data science ethics?’ We’ve had ethics forever. Most engineers take an ethics class. Do we really need to reinvent the wheel here? What’s actually new about this?
 
I realized it is actually very difficult to ask those kinds of questions sitting solely from within academia because we don’t have business pressure and we don’t have the data to really understand what’s happening. I knew that I wanted to leave for a while so that I could be a better data chief science ethicist, but that it would be very difficult to find a company that would want to have such a person around. Frankly, no tech company wants to know what they can’t do, they want to know what they can do. They want to build, they want to innovate, they want to do things differently. 
 
Obsidian is a new company, but it’s founded by three guys who have been around for a while. They have seen some things that I would say they would find creepy and they didn’t ever want to be that kind of company. They were happy to have me around. [They said], ‘If you see that we’re being creepy, I want you to push back and to stop us. But also, how we can avoid that? Not just that we should stop, but what we should do differently so that we can continue to move forward and continue to build products. Because, frankly, if we don’t put X, Y, Z product out in the world someone else will. And unless we have a product that’s actually better than that, you’re still going to have employee data, for instance, being treated in bizarre and troubling ways.’

Why was it important to study data science ethics from within a company?

Norén: I got lucky. I picked them because they care about ethics, and because I knew that I needed to see a little bit more about how data are actually being used, deployed, or deleted or not, combined in a real setting. These are all dangerous issues, but unless you actually see how they’re being done, it’s way too easy to be hypercritical all the time. And that’s kind of where that field is going.
 
It’s also very interesting that employee data is not yet in the spotlight. Right now, the spotlight in tech ethics is on how tech companies are treating their workers. Are they inclusive or not? Do they care if their workers don’t want to develop weapons? Do they still have to do that anyways? And then it’s also on user data. But it’s not on employee data.

I feel like — I don’t know exactly how fast these cycles go — in three to five years, the whole conversation will be about employee data. We will have somehow put some stop-gaps in place to deal with user data, but we will not have paid much attention to employee data. In three to five years, when regulation starts to come down the chain, we’ve actually already built systems that are at least ethical. It’s hard to comply with a regulation that doesn’t exist, but at least you can imagine where those regulations are going to go and try to be in compliance with at least the principle of the effort.
 
What makes employee data different from a data science ethics perspective? 
 
Norén: One of the major differences between user data and employee data, at least from a legal perspective, is that when someone starts to work for a company, that company usually has them consent to a bunch of procedures, one of those procedures being, ‘And you consent to us surveilling what you are doing under the auspices of this company, using our physical equipment when you’re out in the world representing us. Therefore we need to be able to monitor what you’re up to, see that you’re in line with what we think you’re supposed to be doing for us.’ This means that employees actually have far fewer privacy assumptions and rights than users do in a practical sense. They have those rights, but then they consent to give them up. And that’s what most employees do. 
 
That’s why there’s not a lot of attention here because they’ve signed an employment agreement that they’ve established. Legally it’s not a gray area. Employers can potentially do what they wish. 
 
Is there a way to push back on those types of policies, or is it more just a matter of trying to get companies to change those policies? 
 
Norén: California has the California Consumer Privacy Act; it’s very similar to the GDPR. They’ve changed a few things, and — almost as a throwaway — they stuck employees in there as potential users. It’s moving to be tried in the court of law — someone’s going to have to test exactly how this is written — but it doesn’t go into effect for a while. It is possible that regulators may explicitly — or in a bumbling kind of almost accidental fashion — write employees into some of the policies that are like GDPR copycats.

It’s probably my imagination of how this is going to work [but it’s] the same thing that happened with Facebook. What Facebook was doing was considered by everyone to be kind of fine for a long time. Because just like employees/employers do, Facebook had a privacy policy and they had terms of service and everyone checked the box and legally — supposedly — that covered them for all the things that they were doing. 
 
But not really, because in the court of public opinion, eventually people started to say, ‘Hey, this isn’t right, that’s not right. I don’t think that I really consented to have my elections meddled with. That’s not in my imagination.’ If you look at the letter of the law, I’m sure Facebook is probably in compliance, but ethically their business practice extended beyond what people turned out to be comfortable with. I have a feeling that that same kind of thing is going to happen with employees.

Probably we’ll see this kind of objection happening among fairly sophisticated workers first, just like the Google Maven project was objected to by Google employees first. They’re very sophisticated, intelligent, well-educated people who are used to being listened to.

The law will have to react to those kinds of things, which is typical, right? Laws always react. 
 
What are good data science ethics policies that enterprises should adopt when handling both user data and employee data? 
 
Norén: Well, one of the more creative things that we’re trying to do is, instead of asking people at one point in time to confront a very dense legal document that says, “OK, now I’ve signed — I’m not even sure what — but I’m going to sign here and then I’ll just move on with my life,’ is to kind of do transparency all throughout the process. 
 
Let’s say you’re a typical employee and you emailed your wife, girlfriend, boyfriend, kid, whoever, some personal connection from your work account. Now you’ve consented to let your employer look at that email traffic. They may or may not be reading the contents of the email, but they can see subject lines and who you’re contacting and that may be personal for you. Instead of just letting that happen, you could say, ‘Hey, it looks like you’re emailing someone who we think is a personal connection. Just wanted to remind you that we are able to see …’ and then whatever your agreement is. 
 
Remind them of what you’re able to see and then you say something like, ‘You know, if you were to contact this person after hours or on another device or outside of this account then we wouldn’t be able to see that.’ To encourage them to take their own privacy a little bit more seriously on a daily basis right at the moment where it matters rather than assuming they’re going to remember something that they signed three years ago. Even three minutes ago. Make it really accessible and then do that transparent kind of thing throughout. 
 
Maybe they’re still OK with it because it’s just email. But maybe then you also use some of the information that you have about those emails. Like, ‘OK, I can see that Jane is totally comfortable emailing her mom all the time.’ But then if Jane leaves the company, maybe that’s some of the first steps you investigate and then delete. So not only do you make transparency kind of an ongoing process where you’re obtaining consent all the way along for doing what you’re doing, or at least providing your employees some strategy for not being surveilled, but then once they leave, you probably — as an employer — want to maintain some of the data that they have.

Certainly from the cybersecurity perspective, if you’re trying to develop predictive algorithms about, ‘What does a typical employee working in accounting do?’ you don’t just want to delete all their data the second they leave because it’s still valuable to you in terms of creating a baseline model of a typical employee, or in this case maybe if you require creating a baseline model of that employee, it’s still really valuable. But you probably don’t need to know all the times that they were emailing their personal connections. Maybe that’s something that you decide to decay by design. You decay out some of the most privacy-sensitive stuff so that you can keep what is valuable to you without exposing this person’s private communications any more than they would need to be. 

What are the ethical issues with storing so much data?

Norén: One of the things about these contracts is the indefinite status of holding onto data. We’re very skeptical about hoarding data. We’re very picky about what we keep. And we try to find ways to take the stuff that might be not all that valuable to us but very sensitive to the individual because it’s personal or who knows might make it sensitive, and deleting that kind of thing first.

The right to be forgotten is that someone’s going to come to you and say, ‘Hey, would you please forget this?’ Just as a good social scientist, we know that only a very select group of people ever feel so empowered and so informed of the right to go do such a thing. So it’s already kind of an unfair policy because most people won’t know how to do that, won’t know that they can do that. We feel like some of these broader policies are actually more fair because they will be applied to everyone, not just the privileged people who are entitled to their rights, and they’re going to demand these things and figure out how to do it. So those are the kinds of policies that we’re looking at. 
 
We have decided never to store the contents of people’s emails in the first place. That also falls in line with our “do not hoard” policy. We don’t need to know contents of emails. It doesn’t give us anything additional for what we need to do, so we’re just not going to store it. And we’re not going to get transfixed by what lots of data scientists get transfixed by which is the idea that in the future if we have all the data now, we’ll do this magical thing in the future that we haven’t figured out yet. No, that fairy tale’s dead here.

For Sale – CLEAROUT: Synology NAS, Hazro 27″ 1440P Monitor, Chuwi Surbook (Surface pro copy).

Evening all, Doing a yearly clearout of IT Tech that i need to get rid of so first point of call would be on here.

Synologys 212j NAS drive – £50
Currently Diskless as the drives are in use but has been running flawlessly since new. Handy little NAS drive to backup key files.

Hazro HZ27WB Graphics Monitor – £90
Brilliant monitor used in my old IT job, advertised as a 10 bit panel with hefty specs, review and more information can be found here
https://www.trustedreviews.com/reviews/hazro-hz27wc

Chuwi Surbook 128GB SSD – £225
Purchased last year. Intel Apollo Lake CPU, 6GB RAM with 128GB SSD with the surface pro form factor its a very capable little workbook. Bought for the mother in law but now moved on to a Ipad Pro. Backlit keyboard and Stylus pen also included.
Full review here Chuwi SurBook | TechRadar

Welcome to collect or can be posted out once i obtain a quote. Sensible offers welcome

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[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]

Price and currency: 1
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Cash, PayPal
Location: Hornchurch
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

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DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – CLEAROUT: Synology NAS, Hazro 27″ 1440P Monitor, Chuwi Surbook (Surface pro copy).

Evening all, Doing a yearly clearout of IT Tech that i need to get rid of so first point of call would be on here.

Synologys 212j NAS drive – £50
Currently Diskless as the drives are in use but has been running flawlessly since new. Handy little NAS drive to backup key files.

Hazro HZ27WB Graphics Monitor – £90
Brilliant monitor used in my old IT job, advertised as a 10 bit panel with hefty specs, review and more information can be found here
https://www.trustedreviews.com/reviews/hazro-hz27wc

Chuwi Surbook 128GB SSD – £225
Purchased last year. Intel Apollo Lake CPU, 6GB RAM with 128GB SSD with the surface pro form factor its a very capable little workbook. Bought for the mother in law but now moved on to a Ipad Pro. Backlit keyboard and Stylus pen also included.
Full review here Chuwi SurBook | TechRadar

Welcome to collect or can be posted out once i obtain a quote. Sensible offers welcome

[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]

Price and currency: 1
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Cash, PayPal
Location: Hornchurch
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – CLEAROUT: Synology NAS, Hazro 27″ 1440P Monitor, Chuwi Surbook (Surface pro copy).

Evening all, Doing a yearly clearout of IT Tech that i need to get rid of so first point of call would be on here.

Synologys 212j NAS drive – £50
Currently Diskless as the drives are in use but has been running flawlessly since new. Handy little NAS drive to backup key files.

Hazro HZ27WB Graphics Monitor – £90
Brilliant monitor used in my old IT job, advertised as a 10 bit panel with hefty specs, review and more information can be found here
https://www.trustedreviews.com/reviews/hazro-hz27wc

Chuwi Surbook 128GB SSD – £225
Purchased last year. Intel Apollo Lake CPU, 6GB RAM with 128GB SSD with the surface pro form factor its a very capable little workbook. Bought for the mother in law but now moved on to a Ipad Pro. Backlit keyboard and Stylus pen also included.
Full review here Chuwi SurBook | TechRadar

Welcome to collect or can be posted out once i obtain a quote. Sensible offers welcome

[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]
[​IMG]

Price and currency: 1
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Cash, PayPal
Location: Hornchurch
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – CLEAROUT: Synology NAS, Hazro 27″ 1440P Monitor, Chuwi Surbook (Surface pro copy).

Evening all, Doing a yearly clearout of IT Tech that i need to get rid of so first point of call would be on here.

Synologys 212j NAS drive – £50
Currently Diskless as the drives are in use but has been running flawlessly since new. Handy little NAS drive to backup key files.

Hazro HZ27WB Graphics Monitor – £90
Brilliant monitor used in my old IT job, advertised as a 10 bit panel with hefty specs, review and more information can be found here
https://www.trustedreviews.com/reviews/hazro-hz27wc

Chuwi Surbook 128GB SSD – £225
Purchased last year. Intel Apollo Lake CPU, 6GB RAM with 128GB SSD with the surface pro form factor its a very capable little workbook. Bought for the mother in law but now moved on to a Ipad Pro. Backlit keyboard and Stylus pen also included.
Full review here Chuwi SurBook | TechRadar

Welcome to collect or can be posted out once i obtain a quote. Sensible offers welcome

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Price and currency: 1
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: Cash, PayPal
Location: Hornchurch
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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