Tag Archives: tech

PC Components

Hi guys

Some old tech up for sale.

i5 2500k Sandybridge CPU – £40
2x4GB G.Skill Ripjaws RAM – £40
Asus P8P67 Pro Motherboard – £70
Gigabyte Windforce 780GTX 3GB – £125
Corsair H50 AIO water cooler – £20

All with retail packaging except CPU.

Price and currency: £295
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT, PPG
Location: Southampton
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I prefer the goods to be…

PC Components

In 2018, legal tech trends attest to power of data

Refocus technology contracts. Reassess tech provider selection. Ponder possible action against trade secrets theft.

That may seem like a wonky list of New Year’s resolutions. Maybe so, but it’s also a necessary one, said attorneys at international law firm Mayer Brown. Legal tech trends in 2018 to watch for include rewriting tech contracts to account for software that learns — think artificial intelligence; privacy and security taking on new significance in tech transactions; and the effects of an ever-increasing use of big data on litigation.

Lawyers in the Chicago-based firm’s technology transactions group gave a rundown of legal tech trends in a recent teleconference. Here’s what CIOs and business chieftains should be ruminating on this year.

Data becoming a core asset

Treating data as a core asset is not just for organizations in data-driven fields like digital marketing, stock trading and pharmaceutical manufacturing; it’s also for “companies that are not centered on data,” said Mayer Brown partner Brad Peterson. Encouraged by falling prices of storage, data processing and innovations in analytics engines, companies of all stripes are using connected devices that gather reams of data.

Brad Peterson, partner at Mayer BrownBrad Peterson

“Companies face an expanding number of digital connections and an absolute explosion of data. As a result, value has shifted to how companies integrate, orchestrate and curate those connections and how they gather, store and exploit data to achieve their missions,” Peterson said.

Companies are using advanced analytics tools that incorporate machine learning and AI to unlock value in data, he said — and a “critical fact” for tech transactions is these tools aren’t programmed; they learn.

“It is often difficult or even impossible to limit how they use data, or to explain why they deliver the insights that they deliver,” Peterson said. “The insights that these tools produce may not be protected by intellectual property laws at all and thus must be protected in different ways than traditional outputs.”

Such tools need to be “restricted to the rights that the contracting parties have in the input data,” and transactions need to center on what insights might be arrived at, not a promise of meeting requirements.

Data protection and security dominate

Rebecca Eisner, attorney at Mayer BrownRebecca Eisner

It’s likely no surprise that IT security is on a list of legal tech trends for 2018, given the recent rise in cyberattacks. In fact, said Mayer Brown attorney Rebecca Eisner, cybersecurity and also privacy are the “most hotly contested area” in technology contract negotiations, including cloud agreements, outsourcing arrangements and software development licensing. Businesses will have to adjust to new privacy and cybersecurity regulation in 2018, developing “reasonable contract terms and allocations of risk,” Eisner said.

Companies already are complying with state and federal privacy and security laws, including laws in 48 states and Washington, D.C., that mandate reporting of data breaches. Changes in 2018 include state and federal privacy and security laws — for example, financial institutions will have to satisfy new requirements from regulatory agencies such as the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council.

For U.S. companies that do business with EU citizens, and process personal data on those citizens, the recently enacted EU-U.S. Privacy Shield agreement “continues to be an effective means of EU-to-U.S. data transfer,” Eisner said. But any company with ties to European customers will be subject to a new EU data protection directive, the General Data Protection Regulation, which will take effect in May. The directive will require companies to make technical and operational changes, and violations could cost them big — up to 4% of revenue.

Companies should have started preparing for such changes in 2017 — restrictions on profiling, for example, and accommodating the European “right to be forgotten” — with 2018 being the time for making “final touches for compliance.”

Companies with business operations in China will also have to reassess compliance obligations, Eisner said. China’s new cybersecurity law, which went live in June, requires that any data collected or generated in China be stored in China unless it can be proven that cross-border transfer of data is necessary to business. Most companies qualify for a grace period, which ends Dec. 31, to comply with the law.

No matter where in the world companies do business in 2018, Eisner said, “This is a good year to re-evaluate existing technology provider selection and due diligence practices, to check to ensure that security and privacy clauses are up to date and to refine the process for ongoing monitoring of third parties.”

Demand for digital services ushers in big changes

Mark Prinsley, attorney at Mayer BrownMark Prinsley

Companies are turning to avant-garde technologies to craft wholly new types of business, said Mayer Brown attorney Mark Prinsley, who works in the firm’s London office. One area that is rapidly growing in popularity is blockchain, the distributed ledger technology that forms the basis of digital currency bitcoin. The financial services industry has embraced blockchain for areas like trade finance, “where numerous people need to access the same information,” Prinsley said, adding that, “at the moment, this processing is done by quite antiquated methods.”  

But it’s not just finance that’s embracing blockchain, he said. Kodak, for example, announced it would use blockchain technology to track the use of stock photos and help photographers earn income for use of their material. Indeed, the possibilities for the technology seem “limitless,” Prinsley said, and regulators in different industries will be looking to develop international standards for deploying it.

Data interoperability — “the rights and obligations of parties to share digital data effectively between competitors,” Prinsley said — will likely gain prominence in 2018. For example, under a U.K. finance platform regulation, if a bank turns down a small-business applicant for a loan, the bank is required to pass information about the applicant to designated financial platforms, which other lenders can access.

“The aim is to increase competition and availability of finance to small businesses in the U.K.,” Prinsley said. “A takeaway for business is to consider how new digital technologies might be adopted in a way which means data can be available, probably to competitors, in a rapid and open way.”

Prepare for anti-antitrust efforts, trade secrets litigation

Antitrust agencies will show more interest in companies using big data in 2018. Prinsley cited the EU commissioner on competition, Margrethe Vestager, who is looking into whether tech companies that control — and later sell — the data consumers hand over when they search and shop online are shutting out competitors.

“It may be that we will see antitrust authorities around the world taking different views on this issue,” Prinsley said.

The digital era may have made it easier for people to steal trade secrets and turn them over to competitors, as the lawsuit that Waymo, Google’s driverless car company, filed against ride-sharing company Uber in February 2017. The suit alleges that ex-Google employees stole secret information and then launched its own autonomous auto company.

“The fact that the action was launched in the first place shows how vulnerable businesses are in an age of digitization,” Prinsley said, pointing to an EU directive that aims to standardize laws in EU countries against trade secrets theft. The directive will come into force in June and “may well be a straw in the wind for more trade secrets litigation in Europe.”

2017 tech events: The year in photos

It’s been another whirlwind year for SearchCIO. Our 2017 tech events coverage not only spanned multiple IT disciplines and technology trends, but also multiple states. Our team journeyed to California, Nevada, Texas, Florida and a few places in between to report on the year’s most notable IT conferences, summits, symposiums and forums.

At these events, we gathered expert insight on topics like AI, chatbots, wearable technology, drones, cybersecurity, digital transformation, changing C-suite roles and much more.

Throughout the year, our team turned to Instagram to help document our time at these events. This 2017 tech events roundup provides a sampling of the best and most interesting photos from the SearchCIO team’s travels.

RSA Conference

February 2017, San Francisco

How are artificial intelligence and machine learning already being used by companies and consumers? What can we expect from AI in the years to come? Those were some of the questions posed during a keynote discussion with Alphabet Inc. executive chairman Eric Schmidt (right) at the RSA Conference 2017. Schmidt said we will eventually move from a mobile-first world to an AI-centered one, but admitted that AI is still in its early stages.

More from this conference:

Gartner Data & Analytics Summit

March 2017, Grapevine, Texas

In their opening keynote, Gartner’s Debra Logan and Kurt Schlegel said that although there’s an abundance of data, we’re still lacking in areas like budgeting, skill development and establishing the right culture to truly take advantage of analytics opportunities. One way to overcome that scarcity, they explained, is through organizational restructuring — including the addition of a chief data officer.

More from this conference:

Chatbots and Virtual Assistants for the Enterprise

May 2017, San Francisco

Beerud Sheth, founder and CEO of smart messaging platform Gupshup, said the next frontier of bot evolution is interbot communication. He foresees a future in which bots can collaborate, multiply and upgrade themselves.

Also from this conference:

MIT Sloan CIO Symposium

May 2017, Cambridge, Mass.

One of the signature 2017 tech events we covered was the MIT Sloan CIO Symposium, where Andrew McAfee and Erik Brynjolfsson of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy said every job and business process will be disrupted by AI. According to them, we’re in the second stage of the machine age: getting machines to learn.

Keynote panelists at the MIT CIO Symposium discussed lessons they learned from their digital transformation journeys and their predictions for the future of digital organizations. Jim Fowler, group CIO at GE, said future workers will be more of data modelers and will need extensive coding skills.

Also from this symposium:

Argyle CIO Leadership Forum

June 2017, New York

Michael Herman of consulting firm KPMG challenged attendees at the Argyle CIO Leadership Forum to think differently about the clichéd term “digital transformation.” One of Herman’s key pieces of advice was that digital transformation projects should be shaped with a human experience in mind — as well as with a strong tie-in to business needs.

More from this forum:

InterDrone 2017

September 2017, Las Vegas

Michael Huerta of the FAA said the drone industry is still very much in its infancy, but massive progress is being made. Huerta noted that drones were critical in hurricane response efforts this year. The next steps in drone development include remote identification and tracking capabilities, he said.

Also from this conference:

Gartner Symposium/ITxpo

October 2017, Orlando, Fla.

Gartner’s Daryl Plummer shared the research firm’s top predictions, which touched on chatbots, AI, IoT and — most surprisingly — fake news. By 2022, Plummer posits that the majority of individuals in a mature economy will consume more false information than true information. The rise of “counterfeit reality” — driven by AI — will contribute to digital distrust, he said.

Gerri Martin-Flickinger, EVP and CTO at Starbucks, said transforming the coffee giant for the digital world meant embracing digital natives, a cloud-based platform model, Agile methodologies and a variety of other emerging technologies.

More from this symposium:

Enterprise Wearable Technology Summit

October 2017, Boston

Jay Kothari, project lead for Glass at X, the moonshot factory, discussed the lessons learned from Glass’s past struggles in the consumer market and described how Google’s wearable efforts have found new life in the enterprise. “We went from what we thought was a consumer fashion device to something that’s very function-oriented and has a very clear use case,” Kothari said.

More from this summit:

MIT Sloan CFO Summit

November 2017, Newton, Mass.

Expert panelists from different industries discussed the changing CFO role and the importance of experience over certifications or degrees. They emphasized the significance of leadership, a good relationship with IT, cross-functional ability, global experience and cultural awareness as vital to being successfully in the CFO role.

More from this summit:

Forrester New Tech Forum

December 2017, Boston

Forrester’s Julie Ask said that smart conversational tech is the future of consumer experiences, but it will take at least 10 years for it to mature. A key challenge for conversational AI is understanding intent, which requires context. Current chatbots don’t have that understanding, Ask said.

AI World Conference

December 2017, Boston

Security guru Bruce Schneier said he doesn’t worry about an apocalypse spawned by AI. Instead, he worries about near-term — and more realistic — dangers like the weaponization of AI to do things like remotely hack airliners and self-driving cars, or alter medical records. As AI continues to evolve to protect assets and information, so does the likelihood of “bad guys” using AI to attack these systems, Schneier said.

More from this conference:

Now that you’ve looked back at our 2017 tech events coverage, check out our Instagram account and give us a follow! It’s your resource for event photos, videos and session snippets.

For Sale – Dell 7140 Pro Convertible Laptop+Keyboard+Dock

Selling the above machine in my tech clearcut thread. All details there:

For Sale – Tech Clearout! Apple TV 4, Apple KB, Dell Venue Pro 7140+Keyboard+Dock, B&W P7 Wireless

Price and currency: £300
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT
Location: High Wycombe
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Sale – Dell 7140 Pro Convertible Laptop+Keyboard+Dock

Selling the above machine in my tech clearcut thread. All details there:

For Sale – Tech Clearout! Apple TV 4, Apple KB, Dell Venue Pro 7140+Keyboard+Dock, B&W P7 Wireless

Price and currency: £300
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: BT
Location: High Wycombe
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.