Tag Archives: that

Wanted – Ultra Portable 13” laptop

I’ve got a Dell Latitude E7240 that I was about to list if it’s of any interest.

12.5″ screen
Intel i5-4210U 1.7 Ghz Processor
4GB RAM
128GB SSD drive
Windows 10 Pro

There are some scratches on the laptop lid and around the casing, happy to post pictures etc, but price wise it’s likely to be about £250 ono.

It’s a nice light portable laptop, don’t use it much now as I’ve fully moved over to the Mac side…

Wanted – i7 4790k

I have one that’s been sat in a PC that I don’t even use for a few months now. I’ll have a check around when I get home for if I have the box or an appropriate method of shipping and get a price to you.

Been run with a Zalman CNPS10X Performa cooler, no de-lidding or other customisations, and never overclocked :)

For Sale – 2GB Gigabyte GTX 670 – £40 inc

Hi all,

My son has upgraded so now has his GTX 670 that I bought from here just over 12 months ago available, £40 inc delivery, payment via PPG or BT.

No original packaging but will be well packed in an anti static bag.

Exact model is Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Windforce 3X review | bit-tech.net

Price and currency: £40
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG / BT
Location: Milford Haven
Advertised elsewhere?: Not advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

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Wanted – Ultra Portable 13” laptop

I’ve got a Dell Latitude E7240 that I was about to list if it’s of any interest.

12.5″ screen
Intel i5-4210U 1.7 Ghz Processor
4GB RAM
128GB SSD drive
Windows 10 Pro

There are some scratches on the laptop lid and around the casing, happy to post pictures etc, but price wise it’s likely to be about £250 ono.

It’s a nice light portable laptop, don’t use it much now as I’ve fully moved over to the Mac side…

Wanted – i7 4790k

I have one that’s been sat in a PC that I don’t even use for a few months now. I’ll have a check around when I get home for if I have the box or an appropriate method of shipping and get a price to you.

Been run with a Zalman CNPS10X Performa cooler, no de-lidding or other customisations, and never overclocked :)

For Trade – Zotac 1080 Ti Mini

Looking to trade my Zotac GTX 1080 Ti Mini for another 1080 Ti that I can watercool.

it’s this – Zotac NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB Mini Graphics Card

Price and currency: 600
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: N/A
Location: Liverpool
Advertised elsewhere?: advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

For Trade – Zotac 1080 Ti Mini

Looking to trade my Zotac GTX 1080 Ti Mini for another 1080 Ti that I can watercool.

it’s this – Zotac NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB Mini Graphics Card

Price and currency: 600
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: N/A
Location: Liverpool
Advertised elsewhere?: advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Want to understand DevOps? Look to open source’s history

The DevOps revolution is only the latest example of a long series of cultural shifts that have redefined the technology world over the past decades.

The free and open source software movement is another example — a kind of parallel that’s worth studying, especially if you want to understand DevOps and want to avoid making some of open source’s mistakes.

A brief history of free and open source software

To be clear, I don’t mean to suggest that free and open source software is a failure. On the contrary, it’s been wildly successful. According to the 2015 Future of Open Source survey by North Bridge and Black Duck Software, 78% of respondent companies were powered by open source software. In 2016, the survey found 90% of companies relied on open source for improved efficiency and innovation. Open source code is also foundational to the infrastructure that hosts the internet — not to mention devices like Android smartphones and even your car.

Yet, it’d be an understatement to say the history of the free and open source software community has been rocky. It has suffered from factionalism, as well as major differences of opinion regarding purpose and direction. Those who want to understand DevOps should take note.

Open source
Free and open source software is more than 30 years old. Like DevOps, it’s a way of thinking and working.

Mistakes to avoid

Just what are those mistakes? Here’s a list of the major ones.

Ambiguous terminology

Shortly after Richard Stallman launched the GNU project in 1984, which marked the start of the free software movement, he wrote a manifesto explaining the project’s goals.

Stallman stated repeatedly that he intended to create “free” software, but did not define what “free” meant. It was easy for readers to assume Stallman was referring simply to price, rather than control over source code, but that is what actually mattered to him. This uncertainty engendered a lasting ambiguity that endures to the present, when some uninformed computer users continue to assume that “open source” simply refers to software that costs no money.

The lesson for those wanting to understand DevOps is that terminology needs to be defined specifically and expressly from the start. When DevOps engineers talk about concepts like Agile and continuous delivery, they shouldn’t assume everyone else knows what they mean.

Thinking too narrowly

When the free software movement was born in the mid-1980s, developers focused on bringing free code to large computers, like those manufactured by DEC. Personal computers with x86 processors were not a priority.

That turned out to be a mistake. The x86 architecture slowly but steadily assumed the lion’s share of the personal computing market, as well as a large part of the server market. DEC hardware, in contrast, is now consigned to museums.

If you want to understand DevOps and avoid this, you need to set your sights broadly. You shouldn’t aim to revolutionize just one part of the software delivery process, even if it’s the most important one at the moment. You should instead reshape all processes, from development to testing to deployment to assessment.

Disagreeing about end goals

Pretty much everyone who supports free and open source software believes that software source code should be shared freely.

Yet, there is a great deal of disagreement about why code should be shared. Some argue it’s primarily about providing functional benefits — open source code makes innovation easier — while others focus on moralist arguments; Stallman mentioned the golden rule to justify his free software movement. This debate will probably never be resolved to everyone’s satisfaction.

Focus on implementing the essential parts of your DevOps processes and tool set first.

The DevOps community faces a similar conundrum. Is the point of DevOps simply to make software delivery faster? Once you achieve continuous delivery, are you done with your DevOps transformation? Or, does DevOps mean more than continuous delivery? Should improving software security or quality, for example, also be part of your goals?

These are important questions to answer to understand DevOps, lest the community fracture into competing factions, as has happened in the free and open source software world, where some developers cling to the “free software” label largely because of philosophical disagreements with those who prefer “open source.”

Don’t overlook the essentials

Arguably, the GNU project fell short of achieving its full potential because GNU developers waited until it was too late to begin developing the most essential part of their operating system: the kernel. They didn’t start work on their kernel, named Hurd, until the late 1980s. In the meantime, they wrote a host of useful but less essential programs, like productivity software.

Hurd never came close to being a usable kernel. It may get there someday. Its development remains ongoing. Ultimately, GNU developers were forced — unhappily at first — to adopt the Linux kernel in order to complete the GNU system. Had GNU started developing a kernel earlier, things may have turned out quite differently. We might be using only GNU software today, and Linux may never have been created. Linus Torvalds wrote that one of his reasons for writing the first version of Linux in 1991 was that Hurd was not close to completion.

To really understand DevOps and future-proof it, engineers will want to avoid making similar mistakes. Focus on implementing the essential parts of your DevOps processes and tool set first, then build out from there. Don’t set up a fancy ChatOps tool before you have perfected your continuous integration server. Wait until you have the core parts of continuous delivery down before starting to add DevSecOps to your routine.

For Sale – Billion Bipac 7800n router – Boxed VGC

This is a massive upgrade on the rubbish routers that broadband providers give.
If you don’t know much about it I would highly recommend doing a quick google search to see how good these actually are!
You can fully customise your broadband speed to get the best out of your line without relying on your provider.

This is fully boxed in very good condition and has no yellowing like many other 7800n’s I’ve seen.

[​IMG]

Price and currency: 30
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: PPG or BT
Location: Warrington, Cheshire
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Moving to a new home…

This is the last blog post that I am going to write as Virtual PC Guy. But do not fear, I am starting a new blog over at american-boffin.com, and all the Virtual PC Guy posts are going to remain intact.

You may wonder why I am making this change?

Well, there are several reasons.

  • It’s been a long time. I have written 1399 blog posts over 14 years – averaging one new post every other working day. When I started this blog, I had more hair and fewer children.
  • The world has changed. When I started writing as Virtual PC Guy, virtualization was a new and unknown technology. Cloud computing was not even invented yet. It is amazing to think about how far we have come!
  • The scope and impact of my work has drastically increased. When I started blogging, there were a very select group of people who cared about virtualization. Now, between cloud computing, the rise of virtualization and containerization as standard development tools – and the progress we have been making on delivering virtualization based security for all environments – more and more people are affected by my work.
  • I am a manager now. When I started on this blog I was a frontline program manager – and most of my time was spent thinking about and designing technology. I have been a program manager lead for almost a decade now – and while I do still spend a lot of time working with technology – I spend more time working with people.
  • Maintaining multiple blogs is hard. I have tried, from time to time, to start up separate blogs for different parts of my life. But maintaining a blog is a lot of work. Maintaining multiple blogs is just too much work for me.
  • Virtual PC Guy has a very distinctive style. Over the years I have toyed with the idea of switching up the style of Virtual PC Guy – but I have never been able to bring myself to do it.

For all these reasons – I have decided that the best thing to do would be to archive Virtual PC Guy (I have posts that are 10 years old and are still helping people out!) and to start a new blog.

On my new blog – I will still talk about technology – but I will also spend time talking about working with customers, working with people in a corporate environment, and about whatever hobbies I happen to be spending my time on.

I hope you come and join me on my new blog!

Cheers,
Ben