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Nuage Networks, Talari SD-WAN tack on multi-cloud connectivity

Software-defined WAN vendors are rushing to enhance their SD-WAN platforms with multi-cloud support, as more enterprises and service providers migrate their workloads to the cloud. This week, both Nuage Networks and Talari made multi-cloud connectivity announcements of their own.

Nuage Networks, a Nokia company, updated its SD-WAN platform — Virtualized Network Services — to better support SaaS and multi-cloud connectivity.

The platform enhancement moves to address three specific pain points among customers, according to Hussein Khazaal, Nuage’s vice president of marketing and partnerships. The three points, multi-cloud connectivity, value-added services and end-to-end security, are already available to customers.

“It’s a single platform that you can deploy today and get connectivity to software as a service,” Khazaal said. “We support customers as they send traffic directly from the branch to the SaaS application.”

In addition to multi-cloud connectivity, Nuage VNS offers customers the option to add value-added services — or virtual network functions (VNFs) — that can be embedded within the SD-WAN platform, hosted in x86 customer premises equipment (CPE) or through service chaining (a set of network services interconnected through the network to support an application). These VNFs are available from more than 40 third-party partners and can include services like next-generation firewalls, voice over IP and WAN optimization, Khazaal said.

While many service providers are leaning toward the VNF and virtual CPE approach, the process isn’t simple, according to Lee Doyle, principal analyst at Doyle Research.

“Many service providers are finding the vCPE and VNF approach side to be challenging,” Doyle said. “Those with the resources can, and will, pursue it, and that’s where Nuage could be a piece of the puzzle.”

When it comes to enterprise customers, however, the VNF approach is less attainable, both Doyle and Khazaal noted.

“Nuage is one piece of the puzzle that a customer might add if they’re able to do it themselves,” Doyle said. “But most customers don’t want to piece together different elements.”

For smaller enterprise customers, Khazaal recommended using the option with embedded features, like stateful firewall and URL filtering, built into the SD-WAN platform.

Although Nuage has more than 400 enterprise customers, according to a company statement, its primary market is among service providers. Nuage counts more than 50 service providers as partners that offer managed SD-WAN services — including BT, Cogeco Peer 1, Telefónica and Vertel — and has been a proven partner for service providers over the years, Doyle said.

“Nuage is a popular element of service providers’ managed services strategies, including SD-WAN,” he said. “These enhancements will be attractive mainly to the service providers.”

Nuage VNS is available now with perpetual and subscription-based licenses, and varies based on desired features and capabilities.

Talari launches Cloud Connect for SaaS, multi-cloud connectivity

In an additional multi-cloud move, Talari updated its own SD-WAN offering with Talari Cloud Connect, a platform that supports access to cloud-based and SaaS applications.

Talari also named five accompanying Cloud Connect partners: RingCentral, Pure IP, Evolve IP, Meta Networks and Mode. These partners will run Talari’s Cloud Connect point of presence (POP) technology in their own infrastructure, creating a tunnel from the customer’s Talari software into the cloud or SaaS service, according to Andy Gottlieb, Talari’s co-founder and chief marketing officer.

“The technology at the service provider is multi-tenant, so they only have to stand up one instance to support multiple customers,” Gottlieb said. Meantime, enterprises can use the Cloud Connect tunnel without having to worry about building infrastructure in the cloud, which reduces costs and complexity, he added.

Talari’s partner list reflects the demands of both customers and service providers, he said. Unified communications vendors like RingCentral, for example, require reliable connectivity and low latency for their applications. Meta Networks, on the other hand, offers cloud-based security capabilities, which enterprises are increasingly adding to their networks. Talari SD-WAN already supports multi-cloud connectivity to Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure.

Talari Cloud Connect will be available at the end of October. The software comes at no additional charge for Talari customers with maintenance contracts or with subscriptions, Gottlieb said. Also, Cloud Connect partners can use the Cloud Connect POP software free of charge to connect to Talari SD-WAN customers, he added.

Data guru living with ALS modernizes industries by typing with his eyes – Stories

The couple remodeled their two-story townhouse near Guatemala City so he had everything he needed on the first floor and didn’t have to navigate stairs. Otto learned to use a trackball mouse with his foot to type with an on-screen keyboard. But it was cumbersome, and he needed Pamela nearby to move the cursor from one corner of his two 32-inch screens to another as he navigated Excel spreadsheets and Power BI dashboards.

A tracheotomy was put in his throat to help him breathe, taking away his limited speech and increasing his isolation. But when Knoke, who spends two hours a day reading blogs and researching, saw his friend Juan Alvarado’s post about the new Eye Control feature in Windows 10, he let loose with his version of a shout and immediately ordered the Tobii Eye Tracker hardware to use with the software.

A man sits in a wheelchair while four women and two men crouch around him, touching his shoulders and arms and smiling.
Otto Knoke with his wife, daughters and sons-in-law. Photo provided by Pamela Knoke.

Alvarado, who met Knoke as a database consultant working on the ATM system Knoke had implemented, hadn’t known about Knoke’s condition until he suddenly saw him in a wheelchair one day. And fittingly, Eye Control itself began with a wheelchair.

Microsoft employees, inspired by former pro football player Steve Gleason, who had lost the use of his limbs to ALS, outfitted a wheelchair with  electronic gadgets to help him drive with his eyes during the company’s first Hackathon, in 2014. The project was so popular that a new Microsoft Research team was formed to explore the potential of eye-tracking technology to help people with disabilities, leading to last year’s release of Eye Control for Windows 10.

Knoke said it was “a joy” to learn how to type with his eyes, getting the feel of having sensors track his eye movements as he navigated around the screen and rested his gaze on the elements he wanted to click. Using Eye Control and the on-screen keyboard, he now can type 12 words a minute and creates spreadsheets, Power BI dashboards and even PowerPoint presentations. Combined with his foot-operated mouse, his productivity has doubled. He plans to expand his services to the U.S., where he spent six years studying and working in the 1970s. He no longer relies on his wife’s voice, because Eye Control offers a text-to-speech function as well.

“It was frustrating trying to be understood,” Knoke said in the email interview. “After a few days of using Eye Control I became so independent that I did not need someone to interact with clients when there were questions or I needed to explain something. We have a remote session to the client’s computer, and we open Notepad and interact with each other that way.”

His wife and his nurse had learned to understand the sounds he was able to make, even with the tracheotomy restricting his vocal chords. But now he can communicate with his three grown daughters, his friends and all his customers.

A man lies in a reclining chair, while a younger woman sits in a chair next to him. Both are smiling and looking at a computer screen with a Spanish phrase typed on it.
Using a foot-operated mouse, Eye Control for Windows 10 and the text-to-speech function, Otto Knoke is able to communicate with his family — including his daughter, seen here — as well as with clients.

“Now when our children visit, he can be not just nodding at what they say, but he can be inside the conversation, too,” Pamela Knoke said. “He always has a big smile on his face, because he’s got his independence back.”

He’s also started texting jokes to friends again.

“It’s kind of like it brought my friend back, and it’s amazing,” Alvarado said. “Otto told me that for him, it was like eye tracking meant his arms can move again.”

Being able to text message with Eye Control has helped his business as well.

Grupo Tir, a real-estate development and telecommunications business in Guatemala, hired Knoke for several projects, including streamlining its sales team’s tracking of travel expenses with Power BI.

“Working with Otto has been amazing,” said Grupo Tir Chief Financial Officer Cristina Martinez. “We can’t really meet with him, so we usually work with texts, and it’s like a normal conversation.

“He really has no limitations, and he always is looking for new ways to improve and to help companies.”

HR chatbots from Google, IBM to be in the spotlight at HR Tech 2018

The role of big vendors, such as Google and IBM, in HR technology is expanding as their expertise in conversational robotic intelligence powers some of the chatbots used in HR applications. That observation will be evident this week at the HR Technology Conference & Expo in Las Vegas where HR chatbots will be in the spotlight.

The tech giants’ relationship to HR chatbots is analogous to Intel’s role with PC makers that slap “Intel Inside” stickers on their laptops. The machine learning and natural language processing (NLP) technologies developed by large technology sellers give chatbots conversational capabilities.

“A chatbot stands and falls with the quality of the dialogue,” said Holger Mueller, principal analyst at Constellation Research. “Users will drop and not use [a chatbot] if the answers don’t make sense,” he said.

Conference attendees assessing HR chatbots, in effect, make two bets on any one application. They not only evaluate the HR application but also the capabilities of the vendor that built the underlying, AI-related chatbot technology, whether it’s from Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, Google or some other provider. This technology is key “for the whole solution to work,” Mueller said.

Google’s new Dialogflow powers conversational recruiting

A chatbot stands and falls with the quality of the dialogue.
Holger MuellerPrincipal analyst, Constellation Research

Earlier this year, Google, for instance, announced general availability of its Dialogflow Enterprise Edition. This is Google’s platform for creating voice and text conversation and is based on its machine learning and NLP development.

Google’s technology was adopted by Brazen Technologies, which provides online hiring chat events and a recruiting platform. In late August, Brazen announced a “conversational recruiting” capability based on Google’s system, which provides the underlying chatbot intelligence.

The chatbot conversational capability is assisted by human recruiters who prewrite answers to expected questions that a candidate might ask. The system also conducts an initial screening to try to find qualified people, said Joe Matar, director of marketing at Brazen. He expects the capabilities of conversational HR chatbots to improve rapidly, but it will be a long time before they replace a recruiter’s core skills, such as relationship building, he said.

IBM Watson powers management coaching

LEADx, which is announcing its learning platform at the start of the HR Technology Conference, is using IBM Watson in its product, Coach Amanda.

Coach Amanda aims to improve managerial skills with the help of a virtual trainer. The system uses the Watson Personality Insights module, as well as its natural language conversational capabilities. The Insights program diagnoses personality to help shape the chatbot response, as well the answers and learning materials it delivers to the manager, said Kevin Kruse, founder and CEO of the firm.

Kruse said it works like this: A user can type or speak to the chatbot and ask, for instance, “What is the definition of employee engagement?” The manager may follow with a question about seeking tips on employee engagement. The chatbot answers these questions with material from a resource library based on what it knows about the manager.

The underlying IBM NLP technology has to figure out what the manager is asking about. Is the question about an employee problem? Is the manager seeking advice? Or, said Kruse, is the manager seeking a resource?

But not all firms use big vendor chatbot platforms to power HR chatbots.

HR chatbots at 2018 HR Technology Conference & Expo
HR chatbots will be in the spotlight at this year’s HR Technology Conference & Expo.

In-house and open source seen as superior by some

Jane.ai is designed to make all of a company’s information available, whether it is in a PDF or spreadsheet or resides in applications such as ServiceNow, Workday, Salesforce or among team members. HR is one of the major uses of the application, and that’s why this firm will be at the 2018 HR Technology Conference. SearchHRSoftware is the media partner for the conference.

David Karandish, founder and CEO of Jane.ai, said the system was developed in-house but also used some open source tools, such as software in Stanford CoreNLP, which provides a suite of language tools. Jane.ai developed proprietary algorithms to make matches and mine documents, he said.

An employee can use the chat system, for instance, to check vacation time or ask a question about HR policies. It can put in an IT ticket or schedule a meeting with staff.

The firm is up against the large IT vendors in AI-related development, but Karandish said the big vendor HR chatbots weren’t necessarily designed to solve a business problem. That’s why Jane.ai went with the in-house approach, he said.

“A lot of companies are coming out with cool tech, but they haven’t figured out how to actually go solve real problems with it,” Karandish said.

Wanted – 2017 MacBook Pro 15″ / 13″ (Swap/Trade with 2017 27″ 5K iMac)

Would anyone be interested in swapping their 15″ or maybe their 13″ 2017 MacBook Pro for a mint 2017 27″ 5K iMac?

The iMac i5 3.4GHz quad-core / 512GB SSD / 8GB RAM (additional available) / 4GB Radeon Pro 570.

The MacBook Pro must have 16GB.

Happy to explore swap options depending on what is presented.

Thanks.

Location: London

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

Wanted – 2017 MacBook Pro 15″ / 13″ (Swap/Trade with 2017 27″ 5K iMac)

Would anyone be interested in swapping their 15″ or maybe their 13″ 2017 MacBook Pro for a mint 2017 27″ 5K iMac?

The iMac i5 3.4GHz quad-core / 512GB SSD / 8GB RAM (additional available) / 4GB Radeon Pro 570.

The MacBook Pro must have 16GB.

Happy to explore swap options depending on what is presented.

Thanks.

Location: London

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

A Microsoft apprenticeship helped a former gang member escape the streets

“Our main users were women and they said the guys at their gym were pervs or muscly and intimidating; or it was a scary concept – what should be like going to a doctor is more like trying to work out in front of the strongest guy in class,” Uwadiae says.

Three people turned up to WeGym’s first group session, which was led by a friend of Uwadiae, and two went to the next one. His new business was up and running.

In the months that followed, Uwadiae taught himself to code so he could improve the website during the day. At night he would sneak around London in a hoodie to put up posters advertising WeGym, which would get ripped down again the next morning.

“I would put up posters for three or four hours until 2am or 3am, go home, sleep, get up at 8am and take bookings. We got five or six customers the first time I did it, then 10 after the next one.

“We have the opportunity to change the narrative around who can access a personal trainer and what the product of a personal trainer is. We’ve democratised it in a small way, for a small subset of people.

Two seconds to take a bite out of mobile bank fraud with Artificial Intelligence

The future of mobile banking is clear. People love their mobile devices and banks are making big investments to enhance their apps with digital features and capabilities. As mobile banking grows, so does the one aspect about it that can be wrenching for customers and banks, mobile device fraud. 

image

Problem: To implement near real-time fraud detection

Most mobile fraud occurs through a compromise called a SIM swap attack in which a mobile number is hacked. The phone number is cloned and the criminal receives all the text messages and calls sent to the victim’s mobile device. Then login credentials are obtained through social engineering, phishing, vishing, or an infected downloaded app. With this information, the criminal can impersonate a bank customer, register for mobile access, and immediately start to request fund transfers and withdrawals.

Artificial Intelligence (AI) models have the potential to dramatically improve fraud detection rates and detection times. One approach is described in the Mobile bank fraud solution guide.  It’s a behavioral-based AI approach and can be much more responsive to changing fraud patterns than rules-based or other approaches.

The solution: A pipeline that detects fraud in less than two seconds

Latency and response times are critical in a fraud detection solution. The time it takes a bank to react to a fraudulent transaction translates directly to how much financial loss can be prevented. The sooner the detection takes place, the less the financial loss.

To be effective, detection needs to occur in less than two seconds. This means less than two seconds to process an incoming mobile activity, build a behavioral profile, evaluate the transaction for fraud, and determine if an action needs to be taken. The approach described in this solution is based on:

  • Feature engineering to create customer and account profiles.
  • Azure Machine Learning to create a fraud classification model.
  • Azure PaaS services for real-time event processing and end-to-end workflow.

The architecture: Azure Functions, Azure SQL, and Azure Machine Learning

Most steps in the event processing pipeline start with a call to Azure Functions because functions are serverless, easily scaled out, and can be scheduled.

The power of data in this solution comes from mobile messages that are standardized, joined, and aggregated with historical data to create behavior profiles. This is done using the in-memory technologies in Azure SQL.  

Training of a fraud classifier is done with Azure Machine Learning Studio (AML Studio) and custom R code to create account level metrics.

Recommended next steps

Read the Mobile bank fraud solution guide to learn details on the architecture of the solution. The guide explains the logic and concepts and gets you to the next stage in implementing a mobile bank fraud detection solution. We hope you find this helpful and we welcome your feedback.

Transforming IT infrastructure and operations to drive digital business

It’s time for organizations to modernize their IT infrastructure and operations to not just support, but to drive digital business, according to Gregory Murray, research director at Gartner.

But to complete that transformation, organizations need to first understand their desired future state, he added.

“The future state for the vast majority of organizations is going to be a blend of cloud, on prem and off prem,” Murray told the audience at the recent Gartner Catalyst conference. “What’s driving this is the opposing forces of speed and control.”

From 2016 to 2024, the percentage of new workloads that will be deployed through on-premises data centers is going to plummet from about 80% to less than 20%, Gartner predicts. During the same period, cloud adoption will explode — going from less than 10% to as much as 45% — with off-premises, colocation and managed hosting facilities also picking up more workloads.

IT infrastructure needs to provide capabilities across these platforms, and operations must tackle the management challenges that come with it, Murray said.

How to transform IT infrastructure and operations

Once organizations have defined their future state — and Murray urged organizations to start with developing a public cloud strategy to determine which applications will be in the cloud — they should begin modernizing their infrastructure, he told the audience at the Gartner Catalyst conference. 

“Programmatic control is the key to enabling automation and automation is, of course, critical to addressing the disparity between the speed that we can deliver and execute in cloud, and improving our speed of execution on prem,” he said. 

Organizations will also need developers with the skills to take advantage of it, he said. Another piece of the automation equation when modernizing the infrastructure to gain speed is standardization, he said.

The future state for the vast majority of organizations is going to be a blend of cloud, on prem and off prem.
Gregory Murrayresearch director, Gartner

“We need to standardize around those programmatic building blocks, either by using individual components of software-defined networking, software-defined compute and software-defined storage, or by using a hyper-converged system.”

Hyper-converged simplifies the complexity associated with establishing programmatic control and helps create a unified API for infrastructure, he said.

Organizations also need to consider how to uplevel their standardization, according to Murray. This is where containers come into play. The atomic unit of deployment is specific to an application and it abstracts much of the dependencies and complications that come with moving an application independent of its operating system, he explained.

“And if we can do that, now I have a construct that I can standardize around and deploy into cloud, into on prem, into off prem and give it straight to my developers and give them the ability to move quickly and deploy their applications,” he said.

Hybrid is the new normal

To embrace this hybrid environment, Murray said organizations should establish a fundamental substrate to unify these environments.

“The two pieces that are so fundamental that they precede any sort of hybrid integration is the concept of networks — specifically your WAN and WAN strategy across your providers — and identity,” Murray said. “If I don’t have fundamental identity constructs, governance will be impossible.”

Organizations looking to modernize their network for hybrid capabilities should resort to SD-WAN, Murray said. This provides software-defined control that extends outside of the data center and allows a programmatic approach and automation around their WAN connectivity to help keep that hybrid environment working together, he explained.

But to get that framework of governance in place across this hybrid environment requires a layered approach, Murray said. “It’s a combination of establishing principles, publishing the policies and using programmatic controls to bring as much cloud governance as we can.”

Murray also hinted that embracing DevOps is the first step in “a series of cultural changes” that organizations are going to need to truly modernize IT infrastructure and operations. For those who aren’t operating at agile speed, operations still needs to get out of the business of managing tickets and delivering resources and get to a self-service environment where operations and IT are involved in brokering the services, he added.

There is also need to have a monitoring framework in place to gain visibility across the environment. Embracing AIOps — which uses big data, data analytics and machine learning — can help organizations become more predictive and more proactive with their operations, he added.

New survey: What parents think about technology in the classroom |

As a former educator, I’ve always been conscious of the parent’s role – essentially as their child’s first teacher – and their unique, valuable perspective on learning. Parents remember the ways they were taught in school and often have valid questions and thoughts on the new ways children learn, and about the curriculum being taught.

With summer coming to an end and parents sending their children back to school, Microsoft wanted to understand how parents felt about technology in the classroom. What did they really think of the importance of learning digital skills? Microsoft Education partnered with YouGov and surveyed parents in the U.S. with children aged 18 and under and found most parents are hopeful about what technology will do for their kids. [Download the accompanying infographic here.]

Parents optimistic about technology

The survey asked parents how they felt about the role of technology in their child’s life as that child grows up. In reply, 60 percent said they felt “optimistic” or “hopeful.”

Understandably, parents felt differently about tech depending on where it’s being used. When asked about tech use between home and school, 63 percent of parents cited concerns about their kids spending too much time on devices at home, while 86 percent of parents believed tech in school – including computers and educational software – would be helpful to their child’s education.

When I was teaching I would often talk to parents about screen-content, not just screen-time, and whether the engagement with digital content was active (like creating an animation) or passive (viewing a movie). It’s encouraging seeing parents understand that, when used in the right way, technology can help prepare their children for the jobs of the future and help them succeed.

 

The importance of Computer Science and learning digital skills

Using technology to learn isn’t the only way to prepare children for the future, however. According to The Bureau of Labor Statistics, 52 percent of job growth by the year 2020 will be in the fields of computing and mathematics, which shows a great importance in teaching Computer Science and digital skills in classrooms today.

According to the survey, half (50 percent) of parents believed coding and computer programming to be the most beneficial subject to their child’s future employability.

Another promising result: Parents felt strongly about the positive role federal and state governments can play in ensuring their children are learning these subjects. The survey sample indicated strongly that parents would like to see increased government support to help schools build kids’ digital skills.

When asked about the technology industry’s involvement, 75 percent of parents said they believe big tech companies should be involved in helping schools build kids’ digital skills. Many companies, including Microsoft and organizations like Code.org, are working to do just that. Programs like TEALS, which is supported by Microsoft Philanthropies, pairs trained Computer Science professionals from across the technology industry with classroom teachers to team-teach the subject.

Tech tips for teachers this school year

With parents seeing the importance of their children learning with technology and being taught Computer Science, coding and digital skills, the survey points to good news for teachers who work every day to ensure the children in their classrooms are prepared for the future.

Teachers work incredibly hard to bring the best and most inspiring learning opportunities to their classrooms. We celebrate and thank them.

For those teachers just starting to explore the potential of Computer Science in their classroom, I’d recommend these three simple approaches:

  1. Open up the conversation with your students. What do they understand CS to mean? What jobs are unlocked with CS?
  2. Take a short course and get started in Computer Science.
  3. Get involved with the Hour of Code.

Happy teaching!

Survey methodology

All figures, unless otherwise stated, are from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 3927 adults, of which 1011 were parents of children under 19. Fieldwork was undertaken between 2nd – 6th August 2018.  The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all US adults.

Talari SD-WAN targets mobile with Meta Networks integration

Talari Networks’ customers can now combine their software-defined WAN service with a network-as-a-service platform from Meta Networks.

The platform offered by Meta Networks, an Israel-based NaaS startup, targets remote and mobile users who need to access data center and cloud applications. While SD-WAN technology offers remote connectivity to an extent, it is limited in its flexibility to connect individual remote and mobile BYOD users, as most can’t deploy a physical or virtual SD-WAN appliance. With Talari’s support for Meta Networks’ NaaS software, Talari customers located outside the software-defined WAN perimeter can connect using one of Meta’s multiple points of presence (POP) worldwide.

With the platform, user devices connect to the closest Meta POP to access corporate resources. Instead of applying policies based on site location, Meta Networks takes a user-centric approach by specifying policies and application authentication based on individual user permissions. Network administrators, for example, can create policies that deny mobile users access to certain websites or cloud applications.

The integrated offering is now available for Talari SD-WAN customers.

Versa Networks adds managed SD-WAN partner

Versa Networks added another service provider to its managed SD-WAN partner list. California Telecom, headquartered in Chino, Calif., joins existing Versa Networks partners CenturyLink, China Telecom Global, Comcast Business and Verizon in adding managed SD-WAN services to its portfolio.

California Telecom customers can choose from three available purchasing options: SD-WAN standard, SD-WAN advanced and SD-WAN secured. Load balancing, automated failover, error correction and circuit monitoring, among other features, are included in all three options. Customers can add additional features, such as firewalls, antivirus and content filtering and advanced routing.

“We spent over a year looking for an SD-WAN platform we could integrate into our existing MPLS infrastructure that could offer all the features that were being promoted in the industry,” said Jim Gurol, California Telecom’s CEO, in a statement. Versa’s Cloud IP Platform paired well with California Telecom’s infrastructure, he added, allowing the service provider to go to market immediately.

Customers can deploy California Telecom’s managed SD-WAN service to create various WAN designs, including hybrid MPLS, cloud-based SD-WAN and security-focused models, Gurol said.

SD-WAN adoption impeded by available options

Enterprises are investigating SD-WAN, but the technology is still being adopted relatively slowly, according to a report conducted by Sapio Research at the request of Teneo, a consulting firm and technology integrator.

While almost half of the 200 senior IT and networking managers surveyed said they were investigating SD-WAN in some form, only 20% said they’ve deployed the technology. A third of the respondents hadn’t yet evaluated SD-WAN technology. Part of the reason for SD-WAN’s slow adoption is the large number of available SD-WAN options and variants, according to Marc Sollars, CTO of Teneo, based in Dulles, Va.

“Many firms are clearly putting a toe in the water on SD-WAN or doing a proof of concept, but it’s still very hard to say when this test phase will start to translate into enterprise-level implementations,” Sollars said in a statement. “In many ways, the broad range of choice that SD-WAN brings is what’s causing companies to hesitate over their decisions.”

Respondents indicated the primary driver to consider SD-WAN deployment is to help address the growing complexity of network infrastructure and performance tasks. Cutting network costs and better infrastructure management followed behind.