Tag Archives: tool

Easily integrate Skype calls into your content with the new content creators feature | Skype Blogs

Skype is used worldwide as a tool for bringing callers into a variety of different podcasts, live streams, and TV shows. Today, we made it even simpler to bring your incoming audio and video calls to life with the Skype for content creators feature.

Building off the Skype TX appliance for professional studios, we built the feature directly into the desktop app, so podcasters, vloggers, and live streamers can bring Skype calls directly into their content without the need for expensive equipment, studio setup, or multiple crew members.

From a one-on-one audio call up to a four-person group video—incoming calls are available for you to build your own content by integrating Skype calls.

The feature uses NewTek NDI®. You need an NDI-enabled application or device to use Skype for content creators.

There are a number of NDI-enabled software and appliances to choose from,* including:

  • NewTek TriCaster®
  • Xsplit
  • OBS with NDI plugin
  • Pro presenter
  • Wirecast
  • vMIX
  • Ecamm Live for Mac
  • Ovrstream

You will be able to edit, brand, and distribute your Skype content, which can then be sent to a group of friends, uploaded as a podcast or vlog, or live streamed to an audience of millions using platforms such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitch, and LinkedIn.

Skype for content creators is now available on the latest version of Skype for Windows and Mac. Visit Skype for content creators to learn more. We would love to hear from and see what you have created using this feature; email us at sfcc@microsoft.com.

*Third-party applications have not been checked, verified, certified, or otherwise approved or endorsed by Skype. Applications may be subject to the third-party provider’s own terms and privacy policy. Skype does not control and is not responsible for the download, installation, pricing, quality, performance, availability, support, or terms and conditions of purchase of third-party applications.

News roundup: Manage employee resource groups and more

This week’s news roundup features a tool to manage employee resource groups, a roadmap for a wellness coaching technology program and an AI-powered platform to match employees with the right insurance options.

Ready, set, engage

Espresa, which makes a platform for automating employee programs, has added new features that can track and manage employee resource groups.

Employee resource groups, which are organically formed clubs of people with shared enthusiasms, are increasingly popular in U.S. corporations. A 2016 study by Bentley University indicated 90% of Fortune 500 companies have employee resource groups, and 8.5% of American employees participate in at least one.

At a time when employee retention has become more critical, thanks to a very tight labor market, employee resource groups can help employee engagement. But the grassroots nature of the efforts makes it hard for both employees and HR departments to track and manage them.

In many companies today, employee resource groups are managed with a cobbled-together collection of wiki pages, Google Docs and Evite invitations, said Raghavan Menon, CTO of Espresa, based in Palo Alto, Calif. And HR departments often have no idea what’s going on, when it’s happening or who is in charge.

“Today, nothing allows the employer or company to actually promote [employee resource groups] and then decentralize them to allow employees to manage and run the groups with light oversight from HR,” Menon explained.

Espresa’s new features give HR departments a web-based way to keep track of the employee resource groups, while giving the employees a matching mobile app to help them run the efforts.

“When employees are running things, they’re not going to use it if it’s an old-style enterprise app,” he said. “They want consumer-grade user experience on a mobile app.”

With Espresa, HR staff can also measure employee resource groups’ success factors, including participation and volunteer activity levels. That information can then be used to make decisions about company funding or a rewards program, Menon said.

An alternate health coach

Is it possible to help an employee with a chronic condition feel supported and empowered to make lifestyle changes using high-tech health coaching and wearable health technology? According to John Moore, M.D., medical director at San Francisco-based Fitbit, the answer is yes.

During World Congress’ 10th annual Virtual Health Care Summit in Boston, Moore outlined a health coaching roadmap designed to help HR departments and employers meet workers where they are.

“Hey, we know the healthcare experience can be really tough, and it’s hard to manage with other priorities,” he said. “We know you have a life.”

Using a health coach, wearables or a mobile phone — and possibly even looping in family and friends — an employee with a health condition is walked through the steps of setting micro-goals over a two-week period. Reminders, support and encouragement are delivered via a wearable or a phone and can include a real or virtual coach, or even a family intervention, if necessary.

The idea, Moore stressed, is to enable an HR wellness benefits program to give ownership of lifestyle changes back to the employee, while at the same time making the goals sufficiently small to be doable.

“This is different than [typical] health coaching in the workplace,” he said. “This is going to be a much richer interaction on a daily basis. And because it’s facilitated by technology, it’s more scalable and more cost-effective. We’ll be able to collect information that spans from blood pressure, to weight, to steps, to glucose activity and sleep data to get the whole picture of the individual so they can understand themselves better.”

This is an in-the-works offering from Fitbit, and it will not be limited to just the Fitbit-brand device. This platform will be based on technology Fitbit acquired from Twine in February 2018. Moore outlined a vision of interoperability that could include everything, from the pharmacy to a glucose meter to, eventually, an electronic health record system. This could work in tandem with a company’s on-site or near-site health clinic and expand from there, he said.

“Technology can help break down barriers that have existed in traditional healthcare. Right now, interactions are so widely spaced, you can’t put coaches in the office every day or every week. There needs to be a way to leverage technology,” he said. “We can’t just give people an app with an AI chatbot and expect it to magically help them. The human element is still a very important piece, and we can use technology to make that human superhuman.”

HR on the go

StaffConnect has released version 2.2 of its mobile engagement platform, which includes new options for customers to create portals for easier access to payroll, training and other HR information and forms. The StaffConnect service can be used by workers in the office and by what the company calls “nondesk employees,” or NDEs.

The company’s 2018 Employee Engagement Survey showed more than one-third of companies have at least 50% of their workforce as NDEs and highlighted the challenges of keeping all employees equally informed and engaged. The survey indicated the vast majority of companies continue to use either email (almost 80%) or an intranet (almost 49%) to communicate with employees, while just 2% of companies reach out via mobile devices.

The company is also now offering a REST API to make it easier to integrate its platform into existing HR services, and it added custom branding and increased quiz feature options to boost customization.

StaffConnect’s new version also offers additional security options and features, including GDPR compliance and protection for data at rest.

Netflix launches tool for monitoring AWS credentials

LAS VEGAS — A new open source tool looks to make monitoring AWS credentials easier and more effective for large organizations.

The tool, dubbed Trailblazer, was introduced during a session at Black Hat USA 2018 on Wednesday by William Bengtson, senior security engineer at Netflix, based in Los Gatos, Calif. During his session, Bengtson discussed how his security team took a different approach to reviewing AWS data in order to find signs of potentially compromised credentials.

Bengtson said Netflix’s methodology for monitoring AWS credentials was fairly simple and relied heavily on AWS’ own CloudTrail log monitoring tool. However, Netflix couldn’t rely solely on CloudTrail to effectively monitor credential activity; Bengtson said a different approach was required because of the sheer size of Netflix’s cloud environment, which is 100% AWS.

“At Netflix, we have hundreds of thousands of servers. They change constantly, and there are 4,000 or so deployments every day,” Bengtson told the audience. “I really wanted to know when a credential was being used outside of Netflix, not just AWS.”

That was crucial, Bengtson explained, because an unauthorized user could set up infrastructure within AWS, obtain a user’s AWS credentials and then log in using those credentials in order to “fly under the radar.”

However, monitoring credentials for usage outside of a specific corporate environment is difficult, he explained, because of the sheer volume of data regarding API calls. An organization with a cloud environment the size of Netflix’s could run into challenges with pagination for the data, as well as rate limiting for API calls — which AWS has put in place to prevent denial-of-service attacks.

“It can take up to an hour to describe a production environment due to our size,” he said.

To get around those obstacles, Bengtson and his team crafted a new methodology that didn’t require machine learning or any complex technology, but rather a “strong but reasonable assumption” about a crucial piece of data.

“The first call wins,” he explained, referring to when a temporary AWS credential makes an API call and grabs the first IP address that’s used. “As we see the first use of that temporary [session] credential, we’re going to grab that IP address and log it.”

The methodology, which is built into the Trailblazer tool, collects the first API call IP address and other related AWS data, such as the instance ID and assumed role records. The tool, which doesn’t require prior knowledge of an organization’s IP allocation in AWS, can quickly determine whether the calls for those AWS credentials are coming from outside the organization’s environment.

“[Trailblazer] will enumerate all of your API calls in your environment and associate that log with what is actually logged in CloudTrail,” Bengtson said. “Not only are you seeing that it’s logged, you’re seeing what it’s logged as.”

Bengtson said the only requirement for using Trailblazer is a high level of familiarity with AWS — specifically how AssumeRole calls are logged. The tool is currently available on GitHub.

SolarWinds: MSP Pulse can shed light on business transformation

SolarWinds MSP has launched a benchmarking tool that it said is designed to help managed service providers better understand the health of their businesses. The new offering from SolarWinds, MSP Pulse aims to improve channel partners’ business strategies while also providing insight into how they stack up against their competitors.

The move comes as MSPs look for better ways to measure their progress as they grapple with business transformation at their companies. As channel companies transition from hardware reselling to an as-a-service subscription model, many are finding that shifting gears has placed new responsibilities on their business. As a result MSPs are looking for more analysis and insights as they move to the managed services model.

To help them understand how their competitors are handling new market trends, SolarWinds MSP in collaboration with research firm The 2112 Group developed MSP Pulse, a free online survey that asks participants specific questions about their business. 

SolarWinds: MSP Pulse attracts nearly 500 survey takers

So far nearly 500 companies located in North America and Europe have taken the survey, answering a range of questions on such topics as 2017 revenue, 2018 projected revenue, location, types of managed services offered, and the number of dedicated salespeople on staff.

According to executives at SolarWinds MSP, answers to these questions are stored in a database and used to generate comparative analysis in a variety of areas, including sales, profitability and customer engagement.

Comparisons are also made between companies that are the same size, offer the same managed service offerings and operate in the same region.

“Many companies are in the dark on their own,” said Mike Cullen, vice president of customer experience and business strategy at SolarWinds MSP. “This tool gives them good information to balance themselves off of what other companies are doing in the market.”

Chart showing steps for achieving predictable revenue streams
The quest for predicable, as-a-service revenue is just one dimension of the MSP transition the SolarWinds MSP Pulse tool aims to address.

How it works

Many companies are in the dark on their own.
Mike Cullenvice president of customer experience and business strategy, SolarWinds MSP

At the end of the SolarWinds MSP Pulse survey, participants receive a customized report about how their companies’ performance compares with companies of similar size and type. The benchmarking process provides information on whether an MSP is on par, below average or above average with regard to its competitors across a number of categories, including monthly account attrition rate — also known as churn rate — and managed service revenue targets.

Channel partners may use their results to plan their managed services model transformation and are encouraged to take the survey on a quarterly basis to update their data and track their progress.

Cullen said many MSPs are wondering what their benchmark should look like. He said these companies need information on how many new customers should they acquire per month and how much of their companies’ business should be managed services as opposed to hardware.

He added executives at MSPs also want to know if MSPs in their region of the same size and the same revenue structure have the same number of employees.

For Sale – Dr. Delid tool for Skylake and Kaby Lake processors

Selling: –

Dr. Delid tool for Skylake and Kaby Lake processors

Used once to delid my i7700k – does a perfect job.

I also have a tube of liquid pro that just a small blip has been used from for £6.00

Will upload photos later today…

Price and currency: 30.00
Delivery: Delivery cost is included within my country
Payment method: PPG or BT
Location: Malvern
Advertised elsewhere?: Advertised elsewhere
Prefer goods collected?: I have no preference

______________________________________________________
This message is automatically inserted in all classifieds forum threads.
By replying to this thread you agree to abide by the trading rules detailed here.
Please be advised, all buyers and sellers should satisfy themselves that the other party is genuine by providing the following via private conversation to each other after negotiations are complete and prior to dispatching goods and making payment:

  • Landline telephone number. Make a call to check out the area code and number are correct, too
  • Name and address including postcode
  • Valid e-mail address

DO NOT proceed with a deal until you are completely satisfied with all details being correct. It’s in your best interest to check out these details yourself.

How to build a Packer image for Azure

Get started
Bring yourself up to speed with our introductory content.

Packer is an open source tool that automates the Windows Server image building process to give administrators a consistent approach to create new VMs.


For admins who prefer to roll their own Windows Server image, despite the best of intentions, issues can arise…

“;
}
});

/**
* remove unnecessary class from ul
*/
$(“#inlineregform”).find( “ul” ).removeClass(“default-list”);

/**
* Replace “errorMessageInput” class with “sign-up-error-msg” class
*/
function renameErrorMsgClass() {
$(“.errorMessageInput”).each(function() {
if ($(this).hasClass(“hidden”)) {
$(this).removeClass(“errorMessageInput hidden”).addClass(“sign-up-error-msg hidden”);
} else {
$(this).removeClass(“errorMessageInput”).addClass(“sign-up-error-msg”);
}
});
}

/**
* when validation function is called, replace “errorMessageInput” with “sign-up-error-msg”
* before return
*/
function validateThis(v, form) {
var validateReturn = urValidation.validate(v, form);
renameErrorMsgClass();
return validateReturn;
}

/**
* DoC pop-up window js – included in moScripts.js which is not included in responsive page
*/
$(“#inlineRegistration”).on(“click”,”a.consentWindow”, function(e) {
window.open(this.href, “Consent”, “width=500,height=600,scrollbars=1”);
e.preventDefault();
});

from these handcrafted builds.

To maintain some consistency — and avoid unnecessary help desk tickets — image management tools such as Packer can help construct golden images tailored for different needs. The Packer image tool automates the building process and helps admins manage Windows Server images. Packer offers a way to script the image construction process to produce builds through automation for multiple platforms at the same time. Admins can use code repositories to store validated Packer image configurations that admins across different locations can share to ensure stability across builds.

Build a Packer image for Azure

To demonstrate how Packer works, we’ll use it to build a Windows Server image. To start, download and install Packer for the operating system of choice. Packer offers an installation guide on its website.

Next, we need to figure out where to create the image. A Packer feature called builders creates images for various services, such as Azure, AWS, Docker, VMware and more. This tutorial will explain how to build a Windows Server image to run in Azure.

To construct an image for Azure, we have to meet a few prerequisites. You need:

  • a service principal for Packer to authenticate to Azure;
  • a storage account to hold the image;
  • the resource group name for the storage account;
  • the Azure subscription ID;
  • the tenant ID for your Azure Active Directory; and
  • a storage container to place the VHD image.

Validate the Windows Server build instructions

A Packer feature called builders creates images for various services, such as Azure, AWS, Docker, VMware and more.

Next, it’s time to set up the image template. Every Packer image requires a JSON file called a template that tells Packer how to build the image and where to put it. An example of a template that builds an Azure image is in the code below. Save it with the filename WindowsServer.Azure.json.

{
  “variables”: {
      “client_id”: “”,
      “client_secret”: “”,
      “object_id”: “”
  },
  “builders”: [{
    “type”: “azure-arm”,

    “client_id”: “{{user `client_id`}}”,
    “object_id”: “{{user `object_id`}}”,
    “client_secret”: “{{user `client_secret`}}”,
    “resource_group_name”: “labtesting”,
    “storage_account”: “adblabtesting”,
    “subscription_id”: “d660a51f-031d-4b8f-827d-3f811feda5fc”,
    “tenant_id”: “bb504844-07db-4019-b1c4-7243dfc97121”,

    “capture_container_name”: “vhds”,
    “capture_name_prefix”: “packer”,

    “os_type”: “Windows”,
    “image_publisher”: “MicrosoftWindowsServer”,
    “image_offer”: “WindowsServer”,
    “image_sku”: “2016-Datacenter”,
    “location”: “East US”,
    “vm_size”: “Standard_D2S_v3”
  }]
}

You should validate the schema before you start with the packer validate command. We don’t want sensitive information in the template, so we create the client_id and client_secret variables and pass those at runtime.

packer validate -var ‘client_id=value’ -var ‘client_secret=value’ WindowsServer.Azure.json

How to correct Packer build issues

After the command confirms the template is good, we build the image with nearly the same syntax as the validation command. For the purposes of this article, we will use placeholders for the client_id, client_secret and object_id references.

> packer build -var ‘client_id=XXXX’ -var ‘client_secret=XXXX’ -var ‘object_id=XXXX’ WindowsServer.Azure.json

When you run the build the first time, you may run into a few errors if the setup is not complete. Here are the errors that came up when I ran my build:

    • “Build ‘azure-arm’ errored: The storage account is located in eastus, but the build will take place in West US. The locations must be identical”
    • Build ‘azure-arm’ errored: storage.AccountsClient#ListKeys: Failure responding to request: StatusCode=404 – Original Error: autorest/azure: Service returned an error. Status=404 Code=”ResourceGroupNotFound” Message=”Resource group ‘adblabtesting’ could not be found.”

[embedded content]

Using Packer to build an image from another VM.

  • “==> azure-arm: ERROR: -> VMSizeDoesntSupportPremiumStorage : Requested operation cannot be performed because storage account type ‘Premium_LRS’ is not supported for VM size ‘Standard_A2’.”

The error messages are straightforward and not difficult to fix.

However, the following error message is more serious:

==> azure-arm: ERROR: -> Forbidden : Access denied
==> azure-arm:
==> azure-arm:  …failed to get certificate URL, retry(0)

This indicates the use of the wrong object_id. Find the correct one in the Azure subscription role.

After adding the right object_id, you will find a VHD image in Azure.

Dig Deeper on Windows Server deployment

Reflect adds color to Puppet DevOps tools

Data visualization specialist Reflect enlivens the growing Puppet DevOps tool portfolio, but it’s unclear if Puppet’s wares will catch enterprise customers’ attention in a busy marketplace.

The purchase of Reflect, a startup company based in Portland, Ore., shows that Puppet has little choice but to reinvent itself as containers pull users’ attention away from traditional configuration management, analysts said. Data visualization, a way to portray data so that it’s easily understood by people, will also be increasingly important as microservices architectures expand and IT management complexity skyrockets.

“The ability to paint pretty pictures [of data] is not just a ‘nice to have’ feature,” said Charles Betz, analyst at Forrester Research. “It’s important as microservices become more difficult to visualize and manage.”

Puppet didn’t specify  its plans to integrate Reflect’s software with its Puppet Enterprise, Puppet Discovery and continuous delivery tools, but competitors in DevOps pipeline tools, such as Electric Cloud and XebiaLabs, recently added monitoring and visualization features to illustrate the health of pipelines. It’s a safe bet Puppet DevOps tools must also move in that direction, Betz said.

“Puppet has non-trivial data stores already, a lot of it systems configuration data that’s very close to the metal in Puppet Enterprise’s core data repository,” he said.

Puppet CEO Sanjay MirchandaniSanjay Mirchandani

Puppet lacks a data warehouse or data analytics offering to feed into Reflect’s visual tools, but company CEO Sanjay Mirchandani declined to say whether another acquisition or internal IP will fill in that layer of the architecture.

Containers, infrastructure as code invade configuration management’s turf

Enterprise IT shops are overwhelmed by a wall of marketing noise from vendors that want to be their one-stop shop for DevOps. But one vendor or one tool won’t necessarily solve technical problems in infrastructure automation, said Ernest Mueller, director of engineering operations at AlienVault, an IT security firm based in San Mateo, Calif., which plans to reduce its use of Puppet’s configuration management tools.

“As we move to Docker and immutable infrastructure deployments, our goal is to cut the lines of Puppet code we use in half,” Mueller said. “We’re trying to shift configuration management left — adding it at the end just creates problems, because if you try to do the same configuration operation on a thousand different servers, it’s bound to fail on one of them.”

Mueller monitors upgraded capabilities from vendors such as Chef and Puppet, and is interested in a CI/CD process for infrastructure as code. Puppet’s reusable manifests appeal to Mueller more than Chef’s community-maintained cookbooks, but competitor Chef InSpec’s continuous integration-style security and compliance testing intrigues him for infrastructure code.

Overall, though, infrastructure as code testing and deployment still needs a lot of development, and tools are still emerging to help, Mueller said.

“You can’t just apply an application CI/CD tool to infrastructure code,” he said. “In our application unit tests, for example, the best practice is never to call a public API, but what if the code is creating an Amazon Machine Image? The nature of infrastructure as code means there’s no one answer for CI/CD today, and figuring out how to stitch together multiple tools takes a lot of work, without a good reference architecture.”

We’re more interested in [CI/CD tools] like Netflix’s Spinnaker, which plugs in well to Kubernetes. … Distelli is good for heavy Puppet users, [but] there’s just a proliferation of tools to consider.
Andy Domeierdirector of technology operations, SPS Commerce

Presumably, the Puppet DevOps portfolio means it will expand its CI/CD tools’ integrations and coverage beyond Puppet Enterprise code, but right now Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise doesn’t cover other infrastructure as code tools such as HashiCorp’s Terraform, which Mueller’s shop also uses.

A former Puppet user that switched to Red Hat’s Ansible infrastructure automation tool said despite Puppet’s acquisitions he likely won’t re-evaluate its CI/CD tools.

“We’re more interested in things like Netflix’s Spinnaker, which plugs in well to Kubernetes [for container orchestration],” said Andy Domeier, director of technology operations at SPS Commerce, a communications network for supply chain and logistics businesses based in Minneapolis. Spinnaker is a multi-cloud continuous delivery platform open sourced by the same company that made Chaos Monkey.

“Distelli is good for heavy Puppet users, but I wish it had been around earlier. Now there’s just a proliferation of tools to consider.”

Puppet and Chef face game of DevOps musical chairs

As containers and container orchestration tools begin to replace the need for server-level automation in enterprise data centers, configuration management tool vendors such as Puppet and Chef have refocused on higher-ordered IT infrastructure and application automation. Chef has attacked the space with its homegrown Chef Automate, Chef Habitat and Chef InSpec tools, which add application-focused IT automation to complement the company’s configuration management products. Puppet has expanded its product portfolio through acquisition under Mirchandani, who took over as CEO in 2016. Puppet bought CI/CD and container orchestration vendor Distelli in 2017 and rereleased some of Distelli’s software as Continuous Delivery for Puppet Enterprise, which performs continuous integration testing and continuous deployment tasks for Puppet’s infrastructure as code, in early 2018.

“Puppet hasn’t had much choice but to develop a strategy that moves into some adjacencies — otherwise Kubernetes is an existential threat,” Betz said.

In addition to Chef, Electric Cloud and XebiaLabs, a Puppet DevOps bid must fend off a horde of competitors from Red Hat to Docker to AWS and Microsoft Azure, and all seek revenues in a relatively small market, Betz said. Forrester estimates the total DevOps tools market size at $1 billion, compared to $2 to $3 billion for application performance monitoring, another relatively niche space. Both those markets are dwarfed by the market for IT service management tools, which Forrester estimates to be an order of magnitude bigger.

“It’s a game of musical chairs, and many of those chairs will be suddenly pulled out, especially if the economy even hiccups,” Betz said. “There’s no question this market will further consolidate.”

corsair carbide 400c case and dr delid tool for intel

dr delid tool used once to delid my 8600k,very easy to use £20 posted or £15 collected

corsair carbide 400c,its missing the psu plastic shroud cover and the ssd mount for the back(I use double sided tape anyways),apart from that in good condition. £35 collected from wakefield
really nice case.

Price and currency: corsair carbide 400c case and dr delid tool for intel
Delivery: Delivery cost is not included
Payment method: paypal or cash
Location: wakefield…

corsair carbide 400c case and dr delid tool for intel