Tag Archives: UWP Community Toolkit

Windows Template Studio 1.2 released!

We’re extremely excited to announce the Windows Template Studio 1.2. What makes this release even more special is we’ve been accepted into the .NET Foundation! We are thrilled to be accepted in.

In this release, our major new feature is adding content into an existing application with Right-click add. We’ve grown up past only File->New 🙂

What’s new:

Full list of adjustments in the 1.2 release, head over to WTS’s Github.

Improvements to the Wizard:

  • Add new content to existing WTS generated projects in your solution window via right-click
    • We will be working toward seeing how we can enable this for non-WTS generated projects
  • Adjusted ordering of templates based on popularity and logical groupings
  • Under the hood, we’ve done a lot of work toward localization and started some accessibility improvements
  • Simplified descriptions
  • Logo adjustment to help at smaller icon sizes

Feature updates:

  • First-time load prompt
  • What’s New prompt

Template improvements:

Process improvements:

  • Added in pull request template
  • Added in Issue template

How to get the update:

There are two paths to update to the newest build:

  • Already installed: Visual Studio should auto update the extension. To force an update, Go to Tools->Extensions and Updates. Then go to Update expander on the left and you should see Windows Template Studio in there and click “Update”
  • Not installed: Head to https://aka.ms/wtsinstall, click “download” and double click the VSIX installer.

What else is cooking for next versions?

We love all the community support and participation. In addition, here are just a few of the things we are currently building out that will in future builds:

  • Fluent design in the templates
  • Project Rome features as options for your project
  • Ink templates
  • Improved Right-click->add support for existing projects
  • Localization in the wizard
  • Full accessibility supported in both wizard and in the templates
  • Visual Basic support

With partnership with the community, we’ve will continue cranking out and iterating new features and functionality.  We’re always looking for additional people to help out and if you’re interested, please head to our GitHub at https://aka.ms/wts. If you have an idea or feature request, please make the request!

.NET Foundation:

We are happy to say that we’ve been accepted into the .NET Foundation. Such great open source projects like .NET Core, Roslyn and UWP Community Toolkit are just a few of the projects there, and now Windows Template Studio will be there as well!

Windows Template Studio 1.2 released!

We’re extremely excited to announce the Windows Template Studio 1.2. What makes this release even more special is we’ve been accepted into the .NET Foundation! We are thrilled to be accepted in.

What’s new:

For the full list of adjustments in the 1.2 release, head over to WTS’s Github.

Improvements to the Wizard:

  • Add new content to existing WTS generated projects in your solution window via right-click
    • We will be working toward seeing how we can enable this for non-WTS generated projects
  • Adjusted ordering of templates based on popularity and logical groupings
  • Under the hood, we’ve done a lot of work toward localization and started some accessibility improvements
  • Simplified descriptions
  • Logo adjustment to help at smaller icon sizes

Feature updates:

  • First-time load prompt
  • What’s New prompt

Template improvements:

Process improvements:

  • Added in pull request template
  • Added in Issue template

How to get the update:

There are two paths to update to the newest build.

  • Already installed: Visual Studio should auto update the extension. To force an update, Go to Tools->Extensions and Updates. Then go to Update expander on the left and you should see Windows Template Studio in there and click “Update.”
  • Not installed: Head to https://aka.ms/wtsinstall, click “download” and double click the VSIX installer.

What else is cooking for next versions?

We love all the community support and participation. In addition, here are just a few of the things we are currently building out that will in future builds:

  • Fluent design in the templates
  • Project Rome features as options for your project
  • Ink templates
  • Improved Right-click->add support for existing projects
  • Localization in the wizard
  • Full accessibility supported in both Wizard and in the templates
  • Visual Basic support

In partnership with the community, we will continue cranking out and iterating new features and functionality.  We’re always looking for additional people to help out and if you’re interested, please head to our GitHub at https://aka.ms/wts. If you have an idea or feature request, please make the request!

In this release, our major new feature is adding content into an existing application with Right-click add. We’ve grown up past only File->New 🙂

.NET Foundation:

We are also happy to say that we’ve been accepted into the .NET Foundation. Great open source projects like .NET Core, Roslyn, UWP Community Toolkit–and now Windows Template Studio–will be as well!

Toolkits, Toolkits, Toolkits!

As a UWP developer, you have many options to help build your application quickly and reliably. In fact, there are so many options that you may feel like you can choose only one. Luckily, that’s not the case, and many toolkits complement each other in various ways.

Today, we’ll talk about two open source toolkits:

Both are open source, but each has different strengths. These two particular toolkits can bring tools and controls for a variety of application scenarios. Let’s start by introducing the toolkits and how they can help.

UWP Community Toolkit

The UWP Community Toolkit is the ultimate collaboration between Microsoft and the UWP developer community. With dozens of features such as helper functions, custom UI components, animations and app services, the UWP Community toolkit is a great time saver and can bring your application to the next level.

The toolkit has had 12 releases so far and is currently on v 1.4 (released on April 3, 2017). It has more than 80 contributors, with thousands of commits, and the community is constantly working on improvements. Conveniently, it’s broken up into several nuget packages so you can pick and choose exactly what you need.

Examples of this toolkit’s power can be found in the Services namespace, where you can easily interact with social media services with as little as two lines of code.

Here’s an example of getting a Twitter user’s timeline:

TwitterService.Instance.Initialize("consumer-key", "consumer-secret", "callback-uri");
ListView.ItemsSource = await TwitterService.Instance.GetUserTimeLineAsync("user-screenname", 50);

You can find a full demo application here in the source code or here in the Windows Store. Go here to see a full list of the available features (controls, helpers, etc.) and go here to find the documentation.

Telerik UI for UWP

Telerik UI for UWP, from Progress Software, is a recently open sourced toolkit that contains an amazing set of Line of Business (LOB) controls with which you can create native, business-focused, UWP applications. With controls such as DataGrid and RadListView, the Telerik UI provides the powerful sorting, grouping and editing experiences you might expect from a desktop application, as well as rich data visualization experiences with controls such as Charts, Gauges and BulletGraphs.

We recommend you check out the Customer Database Example application here on GitHub to see the DataGrid in action, as well as the SDK Examples app here. You can see a full list of available controls here and find the documentation here (if you’re looking for a little extra help, Progress Software also offers professional support in the premium package).

An example of this toolkit’s power is the RadDataGrid. With one line of code you get a bunch of out-of-the-box features like grouping, sorting and filtering.

You can install UI for UWP in your application using the nuget package or build from the source directly. If you would like to read more about why Progress Software open sourced Telerik UI for UWP, we recommend you check out this great article.

Contributing

If you’re a developer who likes contributing to GitHub repos and giving back to the community, or if you have ideas to make things better for other developers, both toolkits accept pull requests and each has its own contribution guidelines (here for UWP community toolkit and here for Telerik UI for UWP).

Wrapping up

Both toolkits complement each other. You can use them side by side in your application to bring the user a delightful, yet powerful, experience in your UWP application. With dozens of UI controls, helpers, services and more, you can get your UWP app to market faster and with more confidence than ever. We look forward to seeing your UWP Community Toolkit and UI for UWP powered applications in the Windows Store!

Resources

Master the Master-Detail Pattern

In the world of information consumption in applications, it’s crucial to have a clear and easy way to navigate and inspect that information. The master-detail design pattern has become one of the most popular approaches in applications today. In this post, we’ll discuss what this is, determine if it’s appropriate for your application and show how you can use it!

What is a master-detail?

The answer to this will depend on what kind of information your application is trying to show, but at a high level, the “master” is an area in the UI where you have a list of something and the “detail” is the area that shows the relevant information of a selection in the master.

You can find a great example of the master-detail pattern in the Windows 10 email app, “Mail.”  The master is the list of emails and the details is the selected email.

The master-detail pattern is easy to understand and doesn’t need a lot of explanation to the user. When the user selects something in the master, they see the information and any actions relevant to that detail item. For example, selecting an email shows the body of the email as well as the buttons for: reply, reply-all and delete.

The pattern works well for these types of application scenarios:

  • You have a list where it makes sense to show details (e.g. list of contacts, products, etc.)
  • You have a large list that has items that need to be prioritized (e.g. RSS readers)
  • You need to switch between items frequently but want to stay in the same context (e.g. email)

Let’s use the Microsoft RSS Reader UWP example app to illustrate the master-detail pattern’s features.

If you want to follow along or see the code first-hand, find the RSS Sample’s source code here on GitHub.

Master-detail modes

The master-detail pattern works well on a wide range of device types and display sizes. However, you should consider how you want to use the pattern on different display sizes.

There are two popular modes that will help with this:

  • Side-by-side
  • Stacked

The determination between which approach to take comes down to how much horizontal room your app has. Here’s a table of typical effective pixels available per “size class” (if you’re not familiar with Effect Pixels (epx) see this one minute video).

Size class small medium large
Typical screen size (diagonal) 4″ to 6″ 7″ to 12″, or TVs 13″ and larger
Typical devices Phones Phablets, tablets, TVs PCs, laptops, Surface Hubs
Common window sizes in effective pixels 320×569, 360×640, 480×854 960×540, 1024×640 1366×768, 1920×1080
Window width breakpoints in effective pixels 640px or less 641px to 1007px 1008px or greater

Side by side

There many scenarios in which your application will have plenty of horizontal space to stretch.  The recommended guidelines for this mode is when your application has 720 epx or more available; this puts us in to the “Medium” and “Large” size classes seen above.

A few of these are:

  • Devices that let you size the app window larger (PC, HoloLens, Surface Hub)
  • Windows 10 Mobile running Continuum
  • Windows 10 Mobile (landscape orientation)

In the side-by-side approach, you can have both the master view and the detail view showing simultaneously. Using our RSS example, here’s the side-by-side approach:

Stacked

If your application is running in between 320 to 719 epx, you can’t comfortably fit the master and details next to each other, so we’ll need another way to display the master and detail.

A few examples of this scenario are:

  • Any device that lets you resize the app window (e.g. PC, HoloLens)
  • Windows 10 Mobile (portrait orientation)

For this case, you can use the stacked approach. In stacked, the master view gets the full screen space, then, when a selection is made, the detail view gets the full screen space.

With this approach, we’re “stacking” the pages in a single area and navigating between them. For example, the user selects an item in the master, the app will navigate to the Details View. When they want to see another item, they’ll navigate back to the master and select another item.

The stacked approach can be implemented with page navigation within a Frame element. In the diagram below, the “page control” you see is where the navigation occurs between the master view and the detail view.

Using our RSS sample app, here are a couple screenshots of the master and detail in stacked mode. Note that the app is running on a desktop PC, but with the window sized small, you’ll see the same appearance as it were on a mobile device. What matters is not the device, but the available screen space!

The “Breaking Point”

You’ll notice that we have this point where we need to change between the two different modes, depending on the current app width. For our master-detail, we’ve decided to do this at 720 epx. This means that once the application window gets resized to above or below 720 epx, we should be switching between side-by-side or stacked mode.

The Universal Windows Platform has a great feature to help with changing modes: the AdaptiveTrigger. Using an AdaptiveTrigger in your view’s VisualStates, you can adapt the UI when the application’s window size reaches that “breaking point.”  In the RSS sample, you can see how this is done on the MasterDetailPage.xaml.

First, let’s look at the master-detail layout; there’s a Frame element for the master content (ListView of feeds and articles) and a WebView for the detail content (the selected article). Notice the default width of the MasterColumn is set to 360.

    <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
        <ColumnDefinition x:Name="MasterColumn"
                          Width="360" />
        <ColumnDefinition x:Name="DetailColumn"
                          Width="*" />
    </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>

    <Frame x:Name="MasterFrame" />

    <WebView x:Name="ArticleWebView"
             Grid.Column="1"
             Visibility="Collapsed" />
</Grid>

Now, let’s look at line 49 in the VisualStateGroups. You’ll see the VisualState named “NarrowState.” In this visual state, the MasterColumn.Width changes to * (star, which means “take all the available space”) and the DetailColumn.Width changes to 0.

Because the AdaptiveTrigger is set to 720, anything between 0 and 719 will use the NarrowState and anything 720 or larger will use the DefaultState.

<VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>
    <VisualStateGroup>
        <VisualState x:Name="DefaultState">
            <VisualState.StateTriggers>
                <AdaptiveTrigger MinWindowWidth="720" />
            </VisualState.StateTriggers>
        </VisualState>
        <VisualState x:Name="NarrowState">
            <VisualState.StateTriggers>
                <AdaptiveTrigger MinWindowWidth="0" />
            </VisualState.StateTriggers>
            <VisualState.Setters>
                <Setter Target="MasterColumn.Width" Value="*" />
                <Setter Target="DetailColumn.Width" Value="0" />
            </VisualState.Setters>
        </VisualState>
    </VisualStateGroup>
</VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>

To see this in action, run the RSS reader example and resize the window from big to small and back. You’ll see the visual states change and switch between the side-by-side and stacked modes.

Additional Detail Functionality

In the beginning of this article, we briefly touched on how you can have context-aware functionality when using a master-detail. The example was having a “reply” button for an email app. However, you can go much further with it. Here are some more examples of functionality you can put into the detail view:

  • Product list: Order, track, add to wish list
  • Contact list detail options: Call, email, drive to
  • Inventory list detail: Reorder, mark damaged, ship

Another takeaway is that you can share the same controls (e.g. Buttons) for frequently used functionality and that functionality would intuitively be for that selected item in the detail view.

UWP Community Toolkit

If you’re building an application that could benefit from a master-detail implementation, you can skip a lot of the work by using the MasterDetailView control in the UWP Community Toolkit. With as little as a few lines of code and a couple DataTemplates (one for the master’s items and the one for the detail view), you can be up and running quickly.

Here’s the example from the UWP Community Toolkit demo app:

<controls:MasterDetailsView
          ItemsSource="{Binding Items}"
          ItemTemplate="{StaticResource ListTemplate}"
          DetailsTemplate="{StaticResource DetailsTemplate}">
</controls:MasterDetailsView>

Resources

ICYMI – Your weekly TL;DR

Busy weekend of coding ahead? Get the latest from this week in Windows Developer before you go heads down.

Standard C++ and the Windows Runtime (C++/WinRT)

The Windows Runtime (WinRT) is the technology that powers the Universal Windows Platform, letting developers write applications that are common to all Windows devices, from Xbox to PCs to HoloLens to phones. Check out how most of UWP can also be used by developers targeting traditional desktop applications.

New Year, New Dev – Windows IoT Core

Learn how easy it is to start developing applications to deploy on IoT devices such as the Raspberry Pi 3.

Project Rome for Android Update: Now with App Services Support

Project Rome developers have had a month to play with Project Rome for Android SDK, and we hope you are as excited about its capabilities as we are! In this month’s release, see what support we bring for app services.

How the UWP Community Toolkit helps Windows developers easily create well-designed and user-friendly apps

In August 2016, we introduced the open-source UWP Community Toolkit and we recently caught up with two developers who have used the toolkit to help create their apps. Check out what they had to say.

Download Visual Studio to get started.

The Windows team would love to hear your feedback. Please keep the feedback coming using our Windows Developer UserVoice site. If you have a direct bug, please use the Windows Feedback tool built directly into Windows 10.

How the UWP Community Toolkit helps Windows developers easily create well-designed and user-friendly apps

In August 2016, we introduced the open-source UWP Community Toolkit. It simplifies app development and enables developers to collaborate and contribute new capabilities on top of the Windows SDK for Windows 10. Developers can leverage the UWP Community Toolkit to build UWP apps for any Windows 10 device, including PC, mobile, Xbox, the Internet of Things and Hololens.

We recently caught up with two developers who have used the toolkit to help create their apps. Hermit Dave developed the Daily Mail Online app for Windows. It’s the official Windows app for the Daily Mail, a British newspaper. David Bottiau is a member of the Github organization, UWP Squad. He developed a Windows 10 app for TVShow Time, a site that helps you track your favorite TV shows.

We asked them how the UWP Community Toolkit helped them. Here’s what they had to say:

Tell us about the app you built with the help of the UWP toolkit.

Hermit Dave: I joined MailOnline in November 2015 to expand their mobile offering to Windows. After initial talks on Phone + Xbox offering, I suggested the UWP as a means to target all the platforms. After the initial release, Windows was deemed a suitable platform to try out UI + UX tweaks and the current version of the app kicked off in April 2016.

David Bottiau: I really needed a service that offers me a way to track my favorite TV series and animated shows, and I recently discovered the TVShow Time service. I use the beautiful TVShow Time web app really often and I wanted access to the information even faster and closer. So, I decided to bring the service to Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile using the existing API provided by TVShow Time team.

Why did you use the UWP Toolkit to help you create your app?

HD: Offline reading and availability is a major requirement for news apps and MailOnline strives to be among the best in news applications. News content often contains images and the toolkit’s ImageEx control proved itself very handy. In addition to offline images, the ability to control cache size is important. I previously created an offline image control and a cache mechanism and the toolkit provided a simple yet very elegant solution for both.

In addition to ImageEx and ImageCache, I have used the toolkit’s CacheBase to create VideoCache (offline animated previews) and ConfigurationCache to ensure they are kept up to date. The toolkit also contains helpers like HttpHelper which makes it easy to talk to Http data sources. I use this to make API calls as needed.

 DB: I started to use it to have access to a larger list of UI controls. Moreover, by simplifying/removing code for repetitive tasks, it helps me focus on the main part of app development. Either it is C# or XAML, I can work quickly and add new features faster.

Was the UWP Toolkit simple to use?

HD: Yes — image control can be replaced by ImageEx and can provide offline capability in one line of XAML code. Others, like creating custom cache helpers, reduces the effort to create similar functionality by a very huge margin.

DB: The UWP Toolkit is really simple to use because the different items (Controls, Helpers) are really well written. Moreover, the documentation goes straight to the point: You can read the markdown files (in GitHub) or as a website (http://docs.uwpcommunitytoolkit.com/).

And if it isn’t clear enough, you can try the sample app that gives a visual of what you can achieve with the code, a simple example that you can copy/paste in your app and a view of the documentation in case you want more explanation and you do not want to switch between the app and the website.

How was the UWP Toolkit helpful to you?

HD: The toolkit helped me to create offline images, custom cache, images, videos, configuration and trending data. Also, HttpHelper to make API calls. In one instance, I needed a card layout with drop shadow, and there’s a control for that, too.

DB: The UWP Toolkit gives me the ability to create beautiful apps in a short period of time and with the minimum effort (minimum code). The HamburgerMenu control allowed me to create the entry point of my application where users can navigate easily between the different pages. The AdaptativeGridView control is perfect for displaying a collection of items, like the collection of TV shows I am currently watching. The control is also useful because the item’s size will be adapted to the screen size; it has never been easier to create an app that looks great on a mobile, a tablet, a PC or even a TV.

The DropShadowPanel control can add some effects to the page/items of the page. I used it to highlight important elements like my TV show collection. Another effect is Blur; to make the app even more beautiful, I added a Blur background image for each show episode so users can get visuals along with the description of the episode. And the Helpers can reduce the amount of code needed to read/save data in the application, to register background tasks or even to push notifications.

To simplify, it is the combination of the current Windows 10 SDK and the added elements in UWP Community Toolkit that helped me to achieved a really beautiful app with the least effort.

Did you run into any glitches or issues in creating your app? If so, what were they?

HD: There are always glitches in code. I often refer to them as features. I contributed to the toolkit in places I thought it could do better.

Hermit Dave 

DB: I remember that there was a bug with the HamburgerMenu in v1.1. The property SelectedIndex could not be changed in code-behind. I really wanted to the ability to change the value and I did not understand why it wasn’t possible. So, I checked in the GitHub repository to see if they can fix that. The fact is that it was already fixed, and the update HamburgerMenu was then published in v1.2.

Did the UWP Toolkit make it easier for you to develop your apps and push them onto the app store? Why or why not?

HD: If I was hand-crafting the functionality in the toolkit — the bits I use — my effort would have increased significantly. The toolkit helps by offering building blocks that help you go from 0 to 60 in seconds.

DB: Whatever Windows 10 application you are doing, you’ll find at least one great thing in the toolkit. It could be a UI control, an animation/effect behavior, a simple method to access the LocalStorage, or a rich structure to create notifications.

Dave Bottiau

Do you have any suggestions on how the Toolkit could be improved?

HD: It’s a community toolkit. If there are things you think it can do better, do not hesitate to say so. Raise an issue, push a PR to make it better. Raise user voice for items you think the toolkit should add.

DB: I think developers still have go through a lot of effort to understand and create great animations. The Composition API is a really nice improvement to the Windows SDK and it will continue to grow and offer more features — but it should be also simple to make animations. The Toolkit added some great stuff like the Blur effect and the reorder grid animation. These are good enhancement but at the same time can be better. I heard that the Windows/XAML team is working on the simplification of the animation system and I am happy to hear it. I hope the Toolkit will be improved as well with this future evolution.

What advice would you give to other developers who want to develop UWP apps?

HD: The UWP SDK, the toolkit and Visual Studio make app development a joy. The toolkit allows you to re-use helpers, converters, extension methods, and components not in the SDK.

DB: If you want to develop a great UWP app and need some inspiration for User Interface, you can download the sample app of the UWP Community Toolkit and check UI Controls and Animations. Let the magic happen!

Are there any tips about the UWP toolkit that you can share with other devs? If so, what are they?

HD: The toolkit is much more than controls. There are tons of services, helpers, converters, extensions. There’s a library just for animations, which simplifies the use of Composition API.

DB: I’ll give only one tip: Please visit the GitHub repository and share with the other contributors.

ICYMI – Microsoft Connect, Linux, WIP and a new Insider Preview Build

Just when you thought you’d seen it all at the MVP Summit, we come back with a few exciting announcements from Connect. We want to thank you again for joining us, and if you couldn’t make it this time, continue reading to see what you might’ve missed.

Connect(); 2016

Connect, the annual Visual Studio-centered developer conference, announced the latest version of our favorite IDE, a preview for the new Visual Studio Mac edition, Team Foundation Server 2017 and a preview for Visual Studio Mobile Center. On top of that, we announced our platinum-level partnership with the Linux foundation. We’re thrilled to finally share all of these updates with you – follow the links below to learn more.

UWP Community Toolkit Update 1.2

Our goal with this update was to stabilize current features while adding the most wanted ones that were missing. Check out the blog to see the full list of updates, additions and assorted bells and whistles.

Windows Insider Preview Build 14971

Coming to you in this week’s build: improved reading experience in Microsoft Edge, new opportunities in 3D, PowerShell updates and a whole bunch of PC fixes.

And that’s all! Make sure to tweet us if you have any questions or comments and, as always, see you next week.

Download Visual Studio to get started.

The Windows team would love to hear your feedback.  Please keep the feedback coming using our Windows Developer UserVoice site. If you have a direct bug, please use the Windows Feedback tool built directly into Windows 10.

Announcing UWP Community Toolkit 1.2

Following our commitment to ship new versions at a fast pace, I’m thrilled to announce the availability of UWP Community Toolkit 1.2. If you want to get a first glance, you can install the UWP Community Toolkit Sample App directly from the Windows Store.

  • The focus of this version was to stabilize current features while adding the most wanted ones that were missing. A full list of features and changes is available in the release notes. Here’s a quick preview:
  • New Helpers. we worked on providing 7 new helpers to help with everyday tasks:
    • BackgroundTaskHelper to help you work with background tasks
    • HttpHelper to help you deal with HTTP requests in a secure and reliable way
    • PrintHelper to help you print XAML controls
    • DispacherHelper to help you work with tasks that need to run on UI thread
    • DeepLinkHelper to simplify the management of your deep links
    • WebViewExtensions to allow you to bind HTML content to your Webview
    • SystemInformation to gather all system information into a single and unique class
  • New Controls
    • We introduced a new control named MasterDetailView that helps developers create master/detail user experiences

controls-masterdetailsview

  • Updates. We updated the following features:
    • ImageCache was improved to provide a more robust cache
    • HeaderedTextBlock and PullToRefreshListView now accept ContentTemplate customization
    • Facebook service now supports paging when requesting data
    • Renamed BladeControl to BladeView. BladeView now also derives from ItemsControl. This will allow for more common convention like data binding and will make the control aligned with SDK naming. To guarantee backward compatibility, we kept the previous control and flagged it as obsolete. This way, developers can still reference the new version and everything will work just fine. A compiler warning will just encourage you to use the new version. The current plan is to keep obsolete classes until next major version and then remove them.

We saw an increasing number of contributions from the community of 48 developers that led to several new features and improvements. We also observed some healthy dialogue about what should be include or not in the toolkit, architecture best practices, and feature prioritization that is going drive even higher quality of the toolkit.

For example, I would like to share the story behind the MasterDetailView. The story began with an issue created on the GitHub repo: “We need a MasterDetailView.” Immediately, the community reacted with  tremendous energy, discussing the implementation details, features wanted and the philosophy behind the control. We even ended up with two different implementations at some point (the community then voted and discussed to define which best fit with the toolkit principles). If you want to understand how a united community can create wonderful code, I encourage you to read this thread.

You can find the roadmap of the next release here.

If you have any feedback or if you’re interested in contributing, see you on GitHub!

Download Visual Studio to get started!

In Case You Missed It – this week in Windows Developer

Did you have a busy week this week? That’s ok, so did we.

In case you missed some of our updates, here is our weekly #ICYMI wrap up, featuring all of the blogs in a TL;DR format for your reading pleasure.

The UWP Community Toolkit Update Version 1.1

This week we released the first update to the UWP Community Toolkit based on your feedback. The update includes joining the .NET foundation, several new features, a sample app and even some documentation to get you started. Click the tweet below to read more!

Introducing the Windows Device Portal Wrapper

“Device Portal is a small web server baked into every Windows device that you can enable once you’ve turned on Developer Mode. We built Device Portal as the starting point for a new generation of diagnostic tooling for Windows – tools that work on all your devices, not just your desktop.”

Pretty cool, right? We can’t wait to see how developers start using the wrapper project and we’re eager to hear your feedback. Click the tweet below to learn more.

And that’s it! Stay tuned for more updates next week, and as always, please feel free to reach out to us on Twitter with questions and comments.

Have a great weekend!

Download Visual Studio to get started!

The Windows team would love to hear your feedback.  Please keep the feedback coming using our Windows Developer UserVoice site. If you have a direct bug, please use the Windows Feedback tool built directly into Windows 10.

Announcing UWP Community Toolkit 1.1

Today we are releasing the first update to the UWP Community Toolkit. To see the updates, first:

In under a month since the first release, we are humbled by the positive feedback we have received so far and are excited to see all the contributions the community has made, including:

  • 39 community contributors
  • 188 accepted pull requests
  • 173 issues closed
  • 678 stars
  • 159 forks

Thanks to all the contributors that were involved with this release!

Here’s a summary of what’s new in V1.1:

  1. .NET Foundation. We are excited to announce that the UWP Community Toolkit has joined the .NET Foundation, a vibrant community of open-sourced projects focused on the future of the .NET ecosystem.
  2. Updates and new features. The focus of this release is to improve the quality of the toolkit by addressing feedback we received through GitHub and the Store Sample App. Full list available in the Release Notes, including:
    1. Services: added LinkedIn service (i.e. read user profile and share activity), Microsoft Graph service (i.e. send and read emails from UWP via Office 365 or explore Azure Active Directory graph) and updates to the Facebook and Bing services
    2. Controls: added Blade, GridSplitter and DropShadowPanel controls
    3. Animations: new FadeHeaderBehavior
  3. Sample app. The UWP Community Toolkit Sample App has been updated to include the new features of this release. The Sample App is the best way to preview the features of the toolkit.
  4. Documentation. As the project joins the .NET Foundation, we moved the documentation to a new location, directly connected to GitHub.

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If you want to use it in your projects, visit the Getting Started page. If you are already using the toolkit, we recommend updating to the latest release.

You can find the roadmap of next release here.

If you have any feedback or are interested in contributing, see you on GitHub!

Download Visual Studio to get started!