Tag Archives: virtual switch

Hyper-V 2016 and the Small Business: Switch Embedded Teaming

Switch Embedded Teaming enables the Hyper-V virtual switch to directly control multiple physical network adapters simultaneously. Compare and contrast this with the method used in 2012 and 2012 R2, in which a single Hyper-V virtual switch can only control a single physical or logical adapter.

Read the post here: Hyper-V 2016 and the Small Business: Switch Embedded Teaming

42 Best Practices for Balanced Hyper-V Systems

Last year, Nirmal Sharma wrote a fantastic article on this blog titled 23 Best Practices to improve Hyper-V and VM Performance. This sparked up a very lively discussion in the comments section; some were very strongly in favor of some items, some very strongly opposed to others. What I think was perhaps missed in some of these comments was that, as Nirmal stated in the title, his list was specifically “to improve Hyper-V and VM performance.” If squeezing every last drop of horsepower out of your Hyper-V host is your goal, then it’s pretty hard to find any serious flaws with his list. Just cause a Group can be brought to consensus, does not make them right. Assess the Risks of being wrong before proceeding on their say so. — guy w wallace (@guywwallace) February 27, 2015 As you probably know, or can at least guess, I’m not the biggest fan… Read More»

Original post link: 42 Best Practices for Balanced Hyper-V Systems

The post 42 Best Practices for Balanced Hyper-V Systems appeared first on Hyper-V Hub – Altaro’s Microsoft Hyper-V blog.

Troubleshooting Adapter Teaming in Hyper-V Server

Native adapter teaming is a hot topic in the world of Hyper-V. It’s certainly nice for Windows Server as well, but the ability to spread out traffic for multiple virtual machines is practically a necessity. Unfortunately, there is a still a lot of misunderstanding out there about the technology and how to get it working correctly. We’ve written a couple of posts on this subject previously, but one in particular should be considered background material. If you haven’t read it, then start with part four of our networking series, which focused on Link Aggregation and Teaming. We’re also going to talk about load-balancing algorithms in this article, so make sure you’re up to date on part 8 of that same series, which dealt with that subject. We’ll revisit some of the highlights of those articles out of necessity, but it’s not my intent to reproduce them here. Please make sure you’ve… Read More»

Original post link: Troubleshooting Adapter Teaming in Hyper-V Server

The post Troubleshooting Adapter Teaming in Hyper-V Server appeared first on Hyper-V Hub – Altaro’s Microsoft Hyper-V blog.

Explored: Using Multiple Hyper-V Virtual Switches

In our article on common Hyper-V deployment mistakes, one item we discussed was the creation of too many Hyper-V virtual switches. This article will expand on that thought and cover various Hyper-V virtual switch deployment scenarios. One Switch will Usually Suffice The first and most important point to make is the same as mentioned in the earlier article: one virtual switch is enough for most Hyper-V hosts. We’ll start by showing how advancements in Windows and Hyper-V technologies address problems that necessitated multiple virtual switches in earlier versions. Native OS Teaming is Now Available In 2008 R2 and earlier, you could only team network adapters by using software provided by the network card manufacturer. This software was often buggy and unstable. Furthermore, Microsoft would not officially support any system that used such teaming. In those situations, Hyper-V administrators would often choose to leave the physical adapters unteamed and create multiple… Read More»

Original post link: Explored: Using Multiple Hyper-V Virtual Switches

The post Explored: Using Multiple Hyper-V Virtual Switches appeared first on Hyper-V Hub – Altaro’s Microsoft Hyper-V blog.

How to Install and Configure TCP/IP Routing in a Hyper-V Guest

One of the great things about the Hyper-V virtual switch is that it can be used to very effectively isolate your virtual machines from the physical network. This grants them a layer of protection that’s nearly unparalleled. Like any security measure, this can be a double-edged sword. Oftentimes, these isolated guests still need some measure of access to the outside world, or they at least need to have access to a system that can perform such access on their behalf. There are a few ways to facilitate this sort of connection. The biggest buzzword-friendly solution today is network virtualization, but that currently requires additional software (usually System Center VMM) and a not-unsubstantial degree of additional know-how. For most small, and even many medium-sized organizations, this is an unwelcome burden not only in terms of financial expense, but also in training/education and maintenance. A simpler solution that’s more suited to smaller… Read More»

Original post link: How to Install and Configure TCP/IP Routing in a Hyper-V Guest

The post How to Install and Configure TCP/IP Routing in a Hyper-V Guest appeared first on Hyper-V Hub – Altaro’s Microsoft Hyper-V blog.