Tag Archives: VMware

VMware Workstation and Hyper-V – Working Together

‎08-27-2019 04:51 PM

Yesterday VMware demonstrated a pre-release version of VMware Workstation with early support for the Windows Hypervisor Platform in the What’s New in VMware Fusion and VMware Workstation session at VMworld.

In Windows 10 we have introduced many security features that utilize the Windows Hypervisor.  Credential Guard, Windows Defender Application Guard, and Virtualization Based Security all utilize the Windows Hypervisor.  At the same time, new Developer features like Windows Server Containers and the WSL 2 both utilize the Windows Hypervisor.

This has made it challenging for our customers who need to use VMware Workstation.  Historically, it has not be possible to run VMware Workstation when Hyper-V was enabled.

In the future – users will be able to run all of these applications together.  This means that users of VMware workstation will be able to take advantage of all the security enhancements and developer features that are available in Windows 10.  Microsoft and VMware have been collaborating on this effort, and I am really excited to be a part of this moment!

Cheers,
Ben

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Author: Ben Armstrong

How PowerCLI automation brings PowerShell capabilities to VMware

VMware admins can use PowerCLI to automate many common tasks and operations in their data centers and perform them at scale. Windows PowerShell executes PowerCLI commands via cmdlets, which are abbreviated lines of code that perform singular, specific functions.

Automation can help admins keep a large, virtualized environment running smoothly. It helps with resource and workload provisioning. It also adds speed and consistency to most operations, since an automated task should behave the same way every time. And because automation can guide daily repetitions of testing, configuration and deployment without introducing the same errors that a tired admin might, it aids in the development of modern software as well.

PowerShell provides easy automation for Windows environments. VMware admins can also use the capabilities of PowerShell, however, with the help of VMware’s PowerCLI, which uses PowerShell as a framework to execute automated tasks on VMware environments.

PowerShell and PowerCLI

In a VMware environment, PowerCLI automation and management is provided at scale in a quicker way than using a GUI via the PowerShell framework. PowerCLI functions as a command-line interface (CLI) tool that “snaps into” PowerShell, which executes its commands through cmdlets. PowerCLI cmdlets can manage infrastructure components, such as High Availability, Distributed Resource Scheduler and vMotion, and can perform tasks such as gathering information, powering on and off VMs, and altering workloads and files.

In a single line of code, admins can enact mass changes to an entire VMware environment.

PowerShell commands consist of a function, which defines an action to take, and a cmdlet, which defines an object on which to perform that action. Parameters provide additional detail and specificity to PowerShell commands. In a single line of code, admins can enact mass changes to an entire VMware environment.

Common PowerCLI cmdlets

You can automate vCenter and vSphere using a handful of simple cmdlets.

With just five cmdlets, you can execute most major vCenter tasks. To obtain information about a VM — such as a VM’s name, power state, guest OS and ESXi host — use the Get-VM cmdlet. To modify an existing vCenter VM, use Set-VM. An admin can use Start-VM to start a single VM or many VMs at once. To stop a VM use Stop-VM, which simply shuts down a VM immediately, or Stop-VMGuest, which performs a more graceful shutdown. You can use these cmdlets to perform any of these tasks at scale across an entire data center.

You can also automate vSphere with PowerCLI. One of the most useful cmdlets for vSphere management is Copy-VMGuestFile, which enables an admin to copy files and folders from a local machine to a vSphere VM. Admins can add a number of parameters to this cmdlet to fine-tune vSphere VM behavior. For example, there is -GuestCredential, which authenticates a VM, and -GuestToLocal, which reverses the flow of information.

Recent updates to PowerCLI and PowerShell

PowerCLI features over 500 separate commands, and the list is only growing. In June 2019, VMware released PowerCLI 11.3, which added 22 new cmdlets for HCX management and support for opaque networks, additional network adapter types and high-level promotion of instant clones.

PowerShell is more than simply PowerCLI, of course. In May 2019, Microsoft released the most recent version of PowerShell: PowerShell 7, which includes several new APIs in the .NET Core 3.0 runtime. At the PowerShell summit in September 2019, Microsoft announced several other developments to PowerShell programming.

PowerShell now works with AWS serverless computing, which enables you to manage a Windows deployment without managing a Windows Server machine. So, you can run PowerShell on an API and use it to run serverless events, such as placing an image in an AWS Simple Storage Service bucket and converting that image to multiple resolutions.

PowerShell also offers a service called Simple Hierarchy in PowerShell (SHiPS). An admin can use SHiPS to build a hierarchical file system provider from scratch and bypass the normal complexity of such a task. SHiPS reduces the amount of code it takes to write a provider module from thousands of lines to around 20.

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Datrium opens cloud DR service to all VMware users

Datrium plans to open its new cloud disaster recovery as a service to any VMware vSphere users in 2020, even if they’re not customers of Datrium’s DVX infrastructure software.

Datrium released disaster recovery as a service with VMware Cloud on AWS in September for DVX customers as an alternative to potentially costly professional services or a secondary physical site. DRaaS enables DVX users to spin up protected virtual machines (VMs) on demand in VMware Cloud on AWS in the event of a disaster. Datrium takes care of all of the ordering, billing and support for the cloud DR.

In the first quarter, Datrium plans to add a new Datrium DRaaS Connect for VMware users who deploy vSphere infrastructure on premises and do not use Datrium storage. Datrium DraaS Connect software would deduplicate, compress and encrypt vSphere snapshots and replicate them to Amazon S3 object storage for cloud DR. Users could set backup policies and categorize VMs into protection groups, setting different service-level agreements for each one, Datrium CTO Sazzala Reddy said.

A second Datrium DRaaS Connect offering will enable VMware Cloud users to automatically fail over workloads from one AWS Availability Zone (AZ) to another if an Amazon AZ goes down. Datrium stores deduplicated vSphere snapshots on Amazon S3, and the snapshots replicated to three AZs by default, Datrium chief product officer Brian Biles said.

Speedy cloud DR

Datrium claims system recovery can happen on VMware Cloud within minutes from the snapshots stored in Amazon S3, because it requires no conversion from a different virtual machine or cloud format. Unlike some backup products, Datrium does not convert VMs from VMware’s format to Amazon’s format and can boot VMs directly from the Amazon data store.

“The challenge with a backup-only product is that it takes days if you want to rehydrate the data and copy the data into a primary storage system,” Reddy said.

Although the “instant RTO” that Datrium claims to provide may not be important to all VMware users, reducing recovery time is generally a high priority, especially to combat ransomware attacks. Datrium commissioned a third party to conduct a survey of 395 IT professionals, and about half said they experienced a DR event in the last 24 months. Ransomware was the leading cause, hitting 36% of those who reported a DR event, followed by power outages (26%).

The Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA) information systems department spent a weekend recovering from a zero-day malware exploit that hit nearly three years ago on a Thursday afternoon. The malware came in through a contractor’s VPN connection and took out more than 85 servers, according to Michael Beerer, a senior section manager for online system and network administration of OCTA’s information systems department.

Beerer said the information systems team restored critical applications by Friday evening and the rest by Sunday afternoon. But OCTA now wants to recover more quickly if a disaster should happen again, he said.

OCTA is now building out a new data center with Datrium DVX storage for its VMware VMs and possibly Red Hat KVM in the future. Beerer said DVX provides an edge in performance and cost over alternatives he considered. Because DVX disaggregates storage and compute nodes, OCTA can increase storage capacity without having to also add compute resources, he said.

Datrium cloud DR advantages

Beerer said the addition of Datrium DRaaS would make sense because OCTA can manage it from the same DVX interface. Datrium’s deduplication, compression and transmission of only changed data blocks would also eliminate the need for a pricy “big, fat pipe” and reduce cloud storage requirements and costs over other options, he said. Plus, Datrium facilitates application consistency by grouping applications into one service and taking backups at similar times before moving data to the cloud, Beerer said.

Datrium’s “Instant RTO” is not critical for OCTA. Beerer said anything that can speed the recovery process is interesting, but users also need to weigh that benefit against any potential additional costs for storage and bandwidth.

“There are customers where a second or two of downtime can mean thousands of dollars. We’re not in that situation. We’re not a financial company,” Beerer said. He noted that OCTA would need to get critical servers up and running in less than 24 hours.

Reddy said Datrium offers two cost models: a low-cost option with a 60-minute window and a “slightly more expensive” option in which at least a few VMware servers are always on standby.

Pricing for Datrium DRaaS starts at $23,000 per year, with support for 100 hours of VMware Cloud on-demand hosts for testing, 5 TB of S3 capacity for deduplicated and encrypted snapshots, and up to 1 TB per year of cloud egress. Pricing was unavailable for the upcoming DRaaS Connect options.

Other cloud DR options

Jeff Kato, a senior storage analyst at Taneja Group, said the new Datrium options would open up to all VMware customers a low-cost DRaaS offering that requires no capital expense. He said most vendors that offer DR from their on-premises systems to the cloud force customers to buy their primary storage.

George Crump, president and founder of Storage Switzerland, said data protection vendors such as Commvault, Druva, Veeam, Veritas and Zerto also can do some form of recovery in the cloud, but it’s “not as seamless as you might want it to be.”

“Datrium has gone so far as to converge primary storage with data protection and backup software,” Crump said. “They have a very good automation engine that allows customers to essentially draw their disaster recovery plan. They use VMware Cloud on Amazon, so the customer doesn’t have to go through any conversion process. And they’ve solved the riddle of: ‘How do you store data in S3 but recover on high-performance storage?’ “

Scott Sinclair, a senior analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group, said using cloud resources for backup and DR often means either expensive, high-performance storage or lower cost S3 storage that requires a time-consuming migration to get data out of it.

“The Datrium architecture is really interesting because of how they’re able to essentially still let you use the lower cost tier but make the storage seem very high performance once you start populating it,” Sinclair said.

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VMware’s Bitnami acquisition grows its development portfolio

The rise of containers and the cloud has changed the face of the IT market, and VMware must evolve with it. The vendor has moved out of its traditional data center niche and — with its purchase of software packager Bitnami — has made a push into the development community, a change that presents new challenges and potential. 

Historically, VMware delivered a suite of system infrastructure management tools. With the advent of cloud and digital disruption, IT departments’ focus expanded from monitoring systems to developing applications. VMware has extended its management suite to accommodate this shift, and its acquisition of Bitnami adds new tools that ease application development.

Building applications presents difficulties for many organizations. Developers spend much of their time on application plumbing, writing software that performs mundane tasks — such as storage allocation — and linking one API to another.

Bitnami sought to simplify that work. The company created prepackaged components called installers that automate the development process. Rather than write the code themselves, developers can now download Bitnami system images and plug them into their programs. As VMware delves further into hybrid cloud market territory, Bitnami brings simplified app development to the table.

Torsten Volk, managing research director at Enterprise Management AssociatesTorsten Volk

“Bitnami’s solutions were ahead of their time,” said Torsten Volk, managing research director at Enterprise Management Associates (EMA), a computer consultant based out of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. “They enable developers to bulletproof application development infrastructure in a self-service manner.”

The value Bitnami adds to VMware

Released under the Apache License, Bitnami’s modules contain commonly coupled software applications instead of just bare-bones images. For example, a Bitnami WordPress stack might contain WordPress, a database management system (e.g., MySQL) and a web server (e.g., Apache).

Bitnami takes care of several mundane programming chores. Its keeps all components up-to-date — so if it finds a security problem, it patches that problem — and updates those components’ associated libraries. Bitnami makes its modules available through its Application Catalogue, which functions like an app store.

The company designed its products to run on a wide variety of systems. Bitnami supports Apple OS X, Microsoft Windows and Linux OSes. Its VM features work with VMware ESX and ESXi, VirtualBox and QEMU. Bitnami stacks also are compatible with software infrastructures such as WAMP, MAMP, LAMP, Node.js, Tomcat and Ruby. It supports cloud tools from AWS, Azure, Google Cloud Platform and Oracle Cloud. The installers, too, feature a wide variety of platforms, including Abante Cart, Magento, MediaWiki, PrestaShop, Redmine and WordPress. 

Bitnami seeks to help companies build applications once and run them on many different configurations.

“For enterprise IT, we intend to solve for challenges related to taking a core set of application packages and making them available consistently across teams and clouds,” said Milin Desai, general manager of cloud services at VMware.

Development teams share project work among individuals, work with code from private or public repositories and deploy applications on private, hybrid and public clouds. As such, Bitnami’s flexibility made it appealing to developers — and VMware.

How Bitnami and VMware fit together

[VMware] did not pay a premium for the products, which were not generating a lot of revenue. Instead, they wanted the executives, who are all rock stars in the development community.
Torsten VolkManaging Research Director, EMA

VMware wants to extend its reach from legacy, back-end data centers and appeal to more front-end and cloud developers.

“In the last few years, VMware has gone all in on trying to build out a portfolio of management solutions for application developers,” Volk said. VMware embraced Kubernetes and has acquired container startups such as Heptio to prove it.

Bitnami adds another piece to this puzzle, one that provides a curated marketplace for VMware customers who hope to emphasize rapid application development.

“Bitnami’s application packaging capabilities will help our customers to simplify the consumption of applications in hybrid cloud environments, from on-premises to VMware Cloud on AWS to VMware Cloud Provider Program partner clouds, once the deal closes,” Desai said.

Facing new challenges in a new market

However, the purchase moves VMware out of its traditional virtualized enterprise data center sweet spot. VMware has little name recognition among developers, so the company must build its brand.

“Buying companies like Bitnami and Heptio is an attempt by VMware to gain instant credibility among developers,” Volk said. “They did not pay a premium for the products, which were not generating a lot of revenue. Instead, they wanted the executives, who are all rock stars in the development community.”  

Supporting a new breed of customer poses its challenges. Although VMware’s Bitnami acquisition adds to its application development suite — an area of increasing importance — it also places new hurdles in front of the vendor. Merging the culture of a startup with that of an established supplier isn’t always a smooth process. In addition, VMware has bought several startups recently, so consolidating its variety of entities in a cohesive manner presents a major undertaking.

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New Workspace One features focus on intelligence, security

VMware unveiled new Workspace One features at its annual user conference. Two standouts include Virtual Assistant, which will help to set up a device and answer frequently asked questions, and Employee Experience Management, which can proactively monitor endpoint security.

Workspace One is VMware’s digital workspace product that enables IT to manage endpoints and provide end users access to their desktops and applications wherever they are. The new features include AI capabilities that are designed to help IT and HR get new employees settled faster, as well as better identify potential security issues before they spread throughout the organization.

In this Q&A from VMworld, Shankar Iyer, SVP of end-user computing at VMware, talks about what the new Workspace One features can provide IT, why a zero-trust model is a security must and what customers can expect in the future from Workspace One.

What do organizations need to do at the start to get the most out of the new Workspace One features?

Shankar Iyer: It’s easy for an organization to latch on to it because it’s running in the cloud. The Virtual Assistant piece, we’ve partnered with IBM Watson and our framework will integrate with any NLP [natural language processing] type of programming that organizations use. We’re also seeing in the market the need for these general purpose questions answered, and Watson is a general purpose machine. We thought it was the best starting point from an NLP perspective.

We wanted to build a standard way for these bot frameworks to be able to integrate into our Virtual Assistant product. … But organizations can still customize a lot within Workspace One. Every organization that implements us is different, but there are patterns within industries or types of organizations that can ease that input.

How has the importance of security affected end-user computing?

Iyer: In the old days, the security model was about building this wall and not letting any activity leave the room. Now it’s an open floor: You can go to a company, and sometimes networks are open. Devices come from anywhere. It behooves customers to build this zero-trust security model.

As a result, you’ll need to put up some barriers and gates and that can benefit a platform like Workspace One. You need identity access; you need to establish device compliance and security hygiene. You need to have data collection through every point, and you need this intelligence ability to decode the data in real time and alert you if someone is coming in on a device we haven’t seen before from a place we haven’t seen before, so I’m going to notch up his risk score. If that risk score reaches a point, you can shut off access.

But how do you balance the desire for improved end-user experience with the need for better security?

Iyer: If you implement a zero-trust model you won’t compromise user experience. Because then say an employee comes into a network on a trusted device and, as IT, we’re going to give them the whole experience with no barriers. But through machine learning, if I detect an anomaly, I can start putting up gates. Say you used a friend’s device; the only inconvenience is probably a second login with a login pin. The end user will be OK with that. But if I try to challenge you with dozens of different password logins, that’s when you, as an end user, can get frustrated. It’s progressive enforcement as a need.

VMware SVP of EUC Shankar Iyer
VMware SVP of end-user computing, Shankar Iyer, addresses hundreds of VMworld attendees during the digital experience keynote.

The other thing security people are accepting is there’s no way to block everything. Even when a security concern slips through the cracks, with new Workspace One features, it tracks every action that the end user did. The moment you cross a threshold, we can shut off access.

That philosophy of security where you do progressive security boundaries, while not compromising experience by using all this data to fix things when things go wrong, is what we’re going for.

What is VMware looking forward to with Workspace One and what can customers expect?

Iyer: We’re starting to see an adoption of Workspace One features to optimize experience and when we break it down to a new employee’s Day Zero, Day One, Day Two and offboarding, there’s a lot we can do. We can optimize each one of those days and better bridge the physical and virtual world. For example, when you walk into your office, we badge in. Why do that when you have a smartphone? There are capabilities of using those devices as identity.

You’ll see this experience get more automated, and bringing the power of intelligence to IT to make them more productive and adding services, things like ticketing will diminish over time. Those are some areas we can still optimize. To do that, other facets of the platform like zero trust will need to be leveraged.

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VMware Cloud on AWS migrations continue to pose challenges

Hybrid cloud solutions provider Unitas Global said it is expecting an uptick in VMware Cloud on AWS migrations ahead, but noted migrations continue to pose problems.

According to the Los Angeles-based company, which provides cloud infrastructure, managed services and connectivity services, VMware Cloud on AWS has gained traction among enterprise clients with extensive VMware-based legacy infrastructure. Those legacy environments in the past have proved difficult to migrate, but VMware Cloud on AWS has smoothed the journey.

“[VMware Cloud on AWS] has given us a path to migrating legacy environments to cloud with less friction,” said Grant Kirkwood, CTO at Unitas Global.

VMware Cloud on AWS has also drummed up customer interest for its disaster recovery capabilities, which can provide significant cost reductions compared with traditional enterprise DR infrastructure.  “We are seeing a lot of interest in this particular use case,” he said.

Despite its benefits, however, Kirkwood has found that VMware Cloud on AWS migrations can be problematic for some customers. The biggest challenge usually stems from enterprises’ often complexly interwoven environments. As enterprise environments evolve, they tend to amass lots of hidden dependencies, which can break during cloud migrations, he said. “So no matter how much planning you seem to do, you pick up a database or middleware application and migrate it to the cloud, and [then] five other downstream [apps] break because they were dependent on that and it wasn’t known,” Kirkwood said.

A report from Faction, a Denver-based multi-cloud managed service provider, cited cost management (51%) as the top VMware Cloud on AWS usage challenge, followed by network complexity (37%) and AWS prerequisites (27%). Faction’s report, published in August, was based on a survey of 1,156 IT and business professionals.

VMware poised for multi-cloud opportunities

While enterprise multi-cloud adoption remains in its early stages, Kirkwood said VMware has been successfully redeveloping its portfolio for when it matures.

Each of the leading public cloud providers are trying to differentiate themselves based on their unique capabilities and services, he said. For the most part, enterprise customers today haven’t even scratched the surface of Google, AWS and Microsoft’s rapidly expanding menus of services. As enterprises gradually embrace more public cloud services, “being able to leverage all of them across a common data set [will be valuable] for companies that are sophisticated enough to take advantage of that,” he said.

VMware Cloud on AWS chart

According to Kirkwood, Google Cloud Platform (GCP) excels in AI and machine learning tooling that can be applied to large data sets. GCP is also “very competitive in large-scale storage,” he noted. Meanwhile, AWS has developed powerful analytics and behavioral tooling. Microsoft, though it “has probably the least sophisticated offerings,” provides “the path of least resistance for Microsoft-centric workloads.”

“What I think is going to be interesting to watch is how VMware adapts what they are doing to provide value across that much broader spectrum of [public cloud] services as they gain popularity,” he said.

Other news

  • Insight Enterprises, a technology solutions and services provider based in Tempe, Ariz., has completed its acquisition of PCM Inc., a provider of IT products and services. The deal expands Insight’s reach into the mid-market, especially in North America, and adds more than 2,700 salespeople, technical architects, engineers, consultants and service delivery personnel, according to the company.
  • Iland, a hosted cloud, backup and disaster recovery services provider, said it is reaching “a broader audience of enterprise customers” through a growing network of resellers and managed services providers. SMBs had been the traditional customer set for the company’s VMware-based offerings. The Houston-based company also said it has expanded its channel program. The program provides a partner portal for training, certification and sales management; a new data center in Canada for regional partners in North America; and an updated Catalyst cloud assessment tool.
  • MSP software vendor ConnectWise launched an organization that aims to boost cybersecurity among channel partners. The Technology Solution Provider Information Sharing and Analysis Organization, or TSP-ISAO, offers its members access to threat intelligence, cybersecurity best practices, and other tools and resources.
  • Accenture disclosed two acquisitions this week. The company acquired Northstream, a consulting firm in Stockholm that works with communications service providers and networking services vendors, and Fairway Technologies, an engineering services provider with offices in San Diego; Irvine, Calif.; and Austin, Texas.
  • Ensono, a hybrid IT services provider, launched a managed services offering for VMware Cloud on AWS and said it has achieved a VMware Cloud on AWS Solution Competency.
  • Sparkhound, a digital solutions firm, said its digital transformation project at paving company Pavecon involved Microsoft Office 365, SharePoint, Azure SQL Database and Active Directory. The project also drew upon Power BI for business analytics and PowerApps for creating mobile apps on Android, iOS and Windows, according to the company.
  • US Signal, a data center services provider based in Grand Rapids, Mich., unveiled its managed Website and Application Security Solution. The offering builds upon the company’s partnership with Cloudflare, an internet security company, according to US Signal. The managed website and application security offering provides protection against DDoS, ransomware, malicious bots and application layer attacks, the company said.
  • Cloud communications vendor CoreDial rolled out its CoreNexa Contact Center Certification Program. The program offers free sales and technical training on the vendor’s contact center platform.
  • Security vendor Kaspersky revealed that more than 2,000 companies have joined its global MSP program. Kaspersky launched its MSP program in 2017.
  • Service Express, a third-party maintenance provider based in Grand Rapids, Mich., has opened an office in the Washington, D.C., area. The company specializes in post-warranty server, storage and network support.

Market Share is a news roundup published every Friday.

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Azure and VMware innovation and momentum

Since announcing Azure VMware Solutions at Dell Technologies World this spring, we’ve been energized by the positive feedback we’ve received from our partners and customers who are beginning to move their VMware workloads to Azure. One of these customers is Lucky Brand, a leading retailer that is embracing digital transformation while staying true to its rich heritage. As part of their broader strategy to leverage the innovation possible in the cloud, Lucky Brand is transitioning several VMware workloads to Azure.

“We’re seeing great initial ROI with Azure VMware Solutions. We chose Microsoft Azure as our strategic cloud platform and decided to dramatically reduce our AWS footprint and 3rd Party co-located data centers. We have a significant VMware environment footprint for many of our on-premises business applications.

The strategy has allowed us to become more data driven and allow our merchants and finance analysts the ability to uncover results quickly and rapidly with all the data in a central cloud platform providing great benefits for us in the competitive retail landscape. Utilizing Microsoft Azure and VMware we leverage a scalable cloud architecture and VMware to virtualize and manage the computing resources and applications in Azure in a dynamic business environment.

Since May, we’ve been successfully leveraging these applications on the Azure VMware Solution by CloudSimple platform. We are impressed with the performance, ease of use and the level of support we have received by Microsoft and its partners.” 

Kevin Nehring, CTO, Lucky Brand

Expanding to more regions worldwide and adding new capabilities

Based on customer demand, we are excited to announce that we will expand Azure VMware Solutions to a total of eight regions across the US, Western Europe, and Asia Pacific by end of year.

In addition to expanding to more regions, we are continuing to add new capabilities to Azure VMware Solutions and deliver seamless integration with native Azure services. One example is how we’re expanding the supported Azure VMware Solutions storage options to include Azure NetApp Files by the end of the year. This new capability will allow IT organizations to more easily run storage intensive workloads on Azure VMware Solutions. We are committed to continuously innovating and delivering capabilities based on customer feedback.

Broadening the ecosystem

It is amazing to see the market interest in Azure VMware Solutions and the partner ecosystem building tools and capabilities that support Azure VMware Solutions customer scenarios.

RiverMeadow now supports capabilities to accelerate the migration of VMware environments on Azure VMware Solutions.

“I am thrilled about our ongoing collaboration with Microsoft. Azure VMware Solutions enable enterprise customers to get the benefit of cloud while still running their infrastructure and applications in a familiar, tried and trusted VMware environment. Add with the performance and cost benefits of VMware on Azure, you have a complete solution. I fully expect to see substantial enterprise adoption over the short term as we work with Microsoft’s customers to help them migrate even the most complex workloads to Azure.”

Jim Jordan, President and CEO, RiverMeadow

Zerto has integrated its IT Resilience Platform with Azure VMware Solutions, delivering replication and failover capabilities between Azure VMware Solution by CloudSimple, Azure and any other Hyper-V or VMware environments, keeping the same on-premises environment configurations, and reducing the impact of disasters, logical corruptions, and ransomware infections.

“Azure VMware Solution by CloudSimple, brings the familiarity and simplicity of VMware into Azure public cloud. Every customer and IT pro using VMware will be instantly productive with minimal or no Azure competency. With Zerto, VMware customers gain immediate access to simple point and click disaster recovery and migration capabilities between Azure VMware Solutions, the rest of Azure, and on-premises VMware private clouds. Enabled by Zerto, one of Microsoft’s top ISVs and an award-winning industry leader in VMware-based disaster recovery and cloud migration, delivers native support for Azure VMware Solutions. “

Peter Kerr, Vice President of Global Alliances, Zerto

Veeam Backup & Replication™ software is specialized in supporting VMware vSphere environments, their solutions will help customers meet the backup demands of organizations deploying Azure VMware Solutions.

“As a leading innovator of Cloud Data Management solutions, Veeam makes it easy for our customers to protect their virtual, physical, and cloud-based workloads regardless of where those reside. Veeam’s support for Microsoft Azure VMware Solutions by CloudSimple further enhances that position by enabling interoperability and portability across multi-cloud environments. With Veeam Backup & Replication, customers can easily migrate and protect their VMware workloads in Azure as part of a cloud-first initiative, create an Azure-based DR strategy, or simply create new Azure IaaS instances – all with the same proven Veeam solutions they already use today.”  

Ken Ringdahl, Vice President of Global Alliances Architecture, Veeam Software

Join us at VMworld

If you plan to attend VMworld this week in San Francisco, stop by our booth and witness Azure VMware Solutions in action; or sit down for a few minutes and listen to one of our mini theater presentations addressing a variety of topics such as Windows Virtual Desktop, Windows Server, and SQL Server on Azure in addition to Azure VMware Solutions!

Learn more about Azure VMware Solutions.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

Carbon Black acquisition bolsters VMware’s security play

VMware is continuing a string of acquisitions with the purchase of Carbon Black, an endpoint security company, with the aim of providing more secure cloud offerings.

The Carbon Black acquisition will be an all-cash transaction for $26 per share, which is a company valuation of $2.1 billion. VMware expects the acquisition to close in the second half of VMware’s fiscal year 2020, ending Jan. 31.

In VMware’s Q2 2020 earnings call, CEO Patrick Gelsinger noted that his company has been working with Carbon Black for the past two years on VMware’s AppDefense product, and said that time has been a way of “de-risking this acquisition” and “building a shared go-to-market with them.”

Gelsinger told reporters during the earnings call that the Carbon Black acquisition will address security challenges “as businesses move applications to the cloud and access it over distributed networks and from a diversity of endpoints.” He added that the acquisition will lead to integration through VMware’s “extensive endpoint footprint” and create a unified workspace solution covering both endpoint management and endpoint security. VMWare also plans to leverage partnerships with Dell and SecureWorks to “accelerate the adoption of Carbon Black in the enterprise.”

Gelsinger acknowledged that part of the impetus for the Carbon Black acquisition is due to VMWare’s plan to build a security cloud platform.

“Together VMware and Carbon Black we think will uniquely provide customers advanced threat detection, in-depth app behaviors, insight to prevent sophisticated attacks and accelerate responses across that platform,” Gelsinger said. “This idea of individual products that are bolted on and patched on is just ineffective for customers.”

The Carbon Black acquisition follows other moves by VMware to strengthen its presence in the security industry. Earlier this week, the company acquired Intrinsic, a startup focused on application runtime security, for an undisclosed amount and also confirmed its $1.45 billion purchase of software development firm Pivotal.

In addition to those deals and other security acquisitions this year, VMware introduced its Service-defined Firewall at RSA Conference 2019; the product is designed to secure traffic within a distributed environment by permitting only “known good” behavior of applications while blocking all other activity. At the conference, Gelsinger hinted at a larger cybersecurity play for VMware while criticizing the “nightmare” state of the market, which he said was overwhelmed with too many products that were chasing specific threats instead of reducing attack surfaces.

Gelsinger echoed those comments during VMware’s earnings call Thursday evening and said his company plans to fundamentally “fix” the security market. “As enterprises increasingly become digital, cyber security and protection of enterprise apps, data network endpoints and identity … is a primary concern across the C-suite and boards,” he said. “Yet, as I have said before, the current cyber security industry is simply broken and ineffective with a plethora of fragmented tools, bloatware agents and no cohesive platform architecture.”

Gelsinger added that current market disruptions, which are affecting “legacy players,” have opened up an opportunity for VMware. “We’re out to change the security industry,” he said.

Analyst response

Josh Zelonis, principal analyst serving security and risk professionals at Forrester, said rather than changing the security industry, VMWare’s Carbon Black acquisition was confirmation of a larger trend already under way.

“EDR is traditionally endpoint detection and response and traditional endpoints are workstations and laptops. This acquisition is part of a growing trend in the industry to make it something much bigger than that,” Zelonis told SearchSecurity. “What VMWare is doing is they’re now allowing you to build EDR products by default in all your virtual machines. So all your workloads that you’re managing through VMWare can now instantly be benefitting from what is essentially the logging and detection of an EDR product.”

J. Craig Lowery, a vice president analyst at Gartner, said the Carbon Black acquisition aligns with the strategy VMware set out on several years ago.

“[VMWare is] moving from a legacy virtualization business to a new business in cloud management software and services, specifically with an eye towards cloud-native solutions built on containers,” Lowery told SearchSecurity. “However, there are serious challenges to this strategy, as even these new additions to VMware’s portfolio will not likely significantly increase VMware’s appeal to developers. It will, however, be meaningful for those VMware customers that are looking for a more conservative path to cloud-native outcomes.”

Zelonis pointed out that both Palo Alto Networks and Trend Micro have recently started using the XDR branding to imply EDR plus integration with all of their other technologies. He also pointed out that Microsoft has the Intelligent Security Graph, which Zelonis described as tying together “all the intelligence that’s coming in from all their EDR products, all their email products and the Office products, [which] all have application level capabilities for detecting misuse.”

“Big picture is everything is moving toward leveraging this type of detection in every environment in your organization,” Zelonis said. “The bigger trend that everybody needs to look at is how we’re going to be moving forward with the security analytics and the SIEM space to be integrating these point solutions in a better fashion. My hope is to see that these SIEM products become so heavily focused on being able to ingest anything that we’re able to treat everything like a portfolio solution and not a bolt-on.”

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VMworld pushes vSAN HCI to cloud, edge

VMware executives predict the vSAN hyper-converged software platform will grow rapidly into a key building block for the vendor’s strategy to conquer the cloud and other areas outside the data center.

VMware spent a lot of time discussing the roadmap for its vSAN hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) software roadmap at VMworld 2018 last month. The vSAN news included short-term specifics with the launch of a private beta program for the next version, along with more general overarching plans for the future.

VMware executives made it clear that vSAN HCI will play a big role in its long-term cloud strategy. They painted HCI as a technology spanning from the data center to the cloud to the edge, as it brings storage, compute and other resources together into a single platform.

The vSAN HCI software is built into VMware’s vSphere hypervisor, and is sold as part of integrated appliances such as Dell EMC VxRail and as Ready Node bundles with servers. VMware claims more than 14,000 vSAN customers, and IDC lists it as the revenue leader among HCI software.

VMware opened its private beta program for vSAN 6.7.1 during VMworld, adding file and native cloud storage and data protection features.

VSAN HCI: From DC to cloud to edge

During his opening day keynote at VMworld, VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger called vSAN “the engine that’s just been moving rapidly to take over the entire integration of compute and storage to expand to other areas.”

Where is HCI moving to? Just about everywhere, according to VMware executives. That includes Project Dimension, a planned hardware as a service designed to bring VMware SDDC infrastructure on premises.

“The definition of HCI has been expanding,” said Yanbing Li, VMware senior vice president and general manager of storage and availability. “We started with a simple mission of converging compute and storage by putting both on a software-defined platform running on standard servers. This is where a lot of our customer adoption has happened. But the definition of HCI is expanding up through the stack, across to the cloud and it’s supporting a wide variety of applications.”

VSAN beta: Snapshots, native cloud storage

The vSAN 6.7.1 beta includes policy-based native snapshots for data protection, NFS file services and support for persistent storage for containers. VMware also added the ability for vSAN to manage Amazon Elastic Block Storage (EBS) in AWS, a capacity reclamation feature and a Quickstart guided cluster creation wizard.

If it pans out as we hope, it will be data center as a service.
Chris GreggCIO, Mercy Ships

Lee Caswell, VMware vice president of products for storage and availability, said vSAN can now take point-in-time snapshots across a cluster. The snapshot capability is managed through VMware’s vCenter. There is no native vSAN replication yet, however. Replication still requires vSphere Replication.

Caswell said the file services include a clustered namespace, allowing users to move files to VMware Cloud on AWS and back without requiring separate mount points for each node.

The ability to manage elastic capacity in AWS allows customers to scale storage and compute independently,

“This is our first foray into storage-only scaling,” Caswell said.

The automatic capacity redemption will reclaim unused capacity on expensive solid-state drive storage.

Caswell said there was no timetable for when the features will make it into a general availability version of vSAN.

Mercy Ships was among the customers at VMworld expanding their vSAN HCI adoption. Mercy Ships uses Dell EMC VxRail appliances running vSAN in its Texas data center and is adding VxRail on two hospital ships that bring volunteer medical teams to underdeveloped areas. They include the current Africa Mercy floating hospital and a second ship under construction.

“The data center for us needs to be simple, straightforward, scalable and supportable,” Mercy Ships CIO Chris Gregg said. “That’s the dream we’re seeing through hyper-converged infrastructure. If it pans out as we hope, it will be data center as a service. Then, as an IT department we can focus on things that are really important to the organization. For us, that means serving more patients.”

VMware Project Dimension to deliver managed HCI, edge networking

VMware is developing a managed edge appliance that has compute and storage for running applications and a software-defined WAN for connecting to the data center and public clouds.

The upcoming offering is in technical preview under the name Project Dimension. The product is a lightweight hyper-converged infrastructure system that includes the vSphere infrastructure compute stack and the vSAN software-defined storage product.

For networking, Project Dimension uses VMware’s NSX SD-WAN by VeloCloud, which VMware acquired last year. The VeloCloud SD-WAN provides connectivity to the corporate data center, SaaS or applications running on IaaS.

Project Dimension is essentially the branch version of VMware’s Cloud Foundation, which merges compute, storage and network provisioning to simplify application deployment in the data center and the Amazon and Microsoft Azure public clouds. Companies could use Project Dimension to run IoT and other software in retail stores, factories and oil rigs, according to VMware. Actual hardware for the system would come from VMware partners.

Companies already using Cloud Foundation could apply their policies and security to applications running on Project Dimension.

“There’s a lot of potential for operational simplicity. There’s the potential for improved multi-cloud management, and there’s the potential for faster time to market [for users’ applications],” said Stephen Elliot, an analyst at IDC.

But Project Dimension’s hybrid cloud approach — which lets companies run some applications at the edge, while also connecting to software running in the cloud — could eventually make it a “niche product,” said Andrew Froehlich, president of computer consultancy West Gate Networks, based in Loveland, Colo.

“While hybrid architectures are extremely common today, most businesses are looking to get to a 100% public cloud model as soon as they can,” he said. “Thus, it’s an interesting concept — and one that some can use — but I don’t see this making a significant impact long term.”

How Project Dimension works as a managed service

VMware plans to offer Project Dimension as a managed service. A company would order the service by logging into the VMware Cloud and going to its Edge Portal, where the business would choose a Project Dimension resource cluster and a service-level agreement.

Businesses would then upload the IP addresses of the edge locations, where VMware would send technicians to install the Project Dimension system. Each system would appear as a separate cluster in the Edge Portal.

VMware plans to use its cloud-based lifecycle management system to fix failures and handle infrastructure firmware and software updates. As a result, companies could focus on developing and deploying business applications without having to worry about infrastructure maintenance.

VMware, which introduced Project Dimension last week at the VMworld conference in Las Vegas, did not say when it would release the product. Also, the company did not disclose pricing.