Tag Archives: weeks

For Sale – High Spec Gaming PC/Computer

Bought this off a chap 2 weeks ago but just don’t have the time to play it.

Gaming PC – VR READY – 4K – 1440P – HIGH END!

– Proccessor
Ryzen 7 3700x

– Graphics card
ASUS 2060 Super

– RAM
16GB Corsair 3200mhz

– Storage
1tb HDD
1tb HDD
250gb SSD M.2 Drive

– Motherboard
B450 Plus

– Proccessor Cooler
Double fan AIO Cooler

Windows 10 Full activated

This pc is extremely fast and can run any games you throw at it 1080p max settings high FPS! Or you could even play 4k 1440p at really good FPS, also the pc is VR Ready and can play any game with no stutters etc.

If you know anything about pcs you know that this is really high end and hasn’t been cheaped out on.

The pc has plenty of fans so the temperatures are really cool.

This PC is great for, Competitive/Casual gamers, Video/Photo editing or anything else.

I can also throw in my Keyboard and mouse, the Keyboard alone cost £200+!

If you have any questions or enquires then please ask.

Pick up in Nottingham or can post.

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For Sale – EVGA RTX 2060 XC Ultra GPU Graphics Card

Selling the card as I decided to go with RX 5700 instead.

Got it on ebay a few weeks ago.

The card still got just under 2 years of warranty left, card is a year old.

Looking to recoup what I paid for it, which is £300.

Location
Aberdeen
Price and currency
£305
Delivery cost included
Delivery Is Included
Prefer goods collected?
I have no preference
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
PPG or BT

Attachments

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Dell confirms a possible VMware spinoff

After weeks of speculation, Dell Technologies confirmed reports that it is exploring a potential spinoff of VMware next year. Company officials said if it does so, it will continue to have a strategic relationship with VMware.

Hoping to assure VMware users, Dell chairman and CEO Michael Dell said in a prepared statement that “the strategic relationship between Dell Technologies and VMware has never been stronger.” He added that despite the options being explored, the two companies will accelerate their current strategies, including jointly creating a number of integrated products.

Dell gained an 80% stake in VMware when it acquired EMC in 2015. EMC acquired VMware in 2004.

Possible Dell-VMware spinoff at least a year off

Dell also confirmed what analysts have said over the past few weeks: that any spinoff would not happen until September of 2021 so the company can sidestep the heavy federal taxes associated with the deal.

Dell said if it decides to follow through on a spinoff, it will agree to specific terms and conditions under the auspices of a special committee made up of the Board of Directors of VMware and Dell. Dell said it would also negotiate the payment of a special cash dividend by VMware to be paid on a pro rata basis to all VMware shareholders.

With its commanding position in virtualization and concentrated focus on hybrid clouds and containers, most analysts believe a spinoff provides VMware with more competitive advantage than it has with Dell, which is traditionally a hardware-oriented company. But some believe the economic advantages Dell would gain through a spinoff outweigh any strategic technology disadvantages. Wall Street doesn’t like the capitalization structure between Dell and VMware, which investors believe has held down the market value of Dell.

“The crazy thing is, Dell has a market worth of around $30-something billion, but they own 81% of VMware, which should make their value about $50 billion,” said Patrick Moorhead, president and principal analyst at Moor Insights and Strategy. “It almost forces [Dell’s] hand to sell VMware,” he said.

While many IT market analysts favored VMware, investors were encouraged by Dell’s confirmation of a potential spinoff sending the company’s stock up 17% the day of the announcement on Thursday.

Even with the financial upside to a spinoff, Dell would still need to find another software partner, or multiple software partners, to replace VMware, Moorhead said, which could prove difficult.

“They certainly aren’t going to go out and buy another company because the capitalization doesn’t work out there,” Moorhead said. “The other route is to do what HP did and pull together various pieces and build their own stack, but I don’t see them pulling that off.”

Another analyst believes Dell, in part, is exploring a spinoff is to gain more freedom to cozy up to other top-tier cloud providers.

“The only possible reason [Dell] would float this out there is because of two possible suitors; namely Google and Amazon,” said Dana Gardner, principal analyst at Interarbor Solutions, LLC. “Those two would like the chance to take that installed VMware base across, but neither one of them would see Dell as that strategic.”

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For Sale – Brand new Alienware m15 R2 (i7, RTX 2070, 256GB SSD)

I won this beautiful piece of equipment at a conference in NL a couple of weeks back but I use a Macbook Pro for work and don’t game so it’s been sitting around collecting dust and now, trying to fund a start-up it’s a good opportunity for me to sell.

It’s never been used, the lid has been opened once to take the picture for this thread and it’s never been out of the box. Seals still on the screen. Did a bit of research and these are real state of the art machines, not too clunky and the keyboard isn’t obnoxiously small – over-all I think whoever buys it will have a hell of an experience.

I’ve sold phones on here and also a Macbook Pro without issue! Also, i’ll link my ebay profile where I used to sell refurbed phones if anyone wants to check my rep.

I will be posting for FREE using the most competent and reliable logistics companies so either DHL or DPD – tracked a signed for next day delivery. No RoyalMail BS in this thread!

(Also, the box has the plastic on it because DHL stick their labels in a sticky bag)

SPECS:

9th gen Intel Core i7 9750H
8GB DDR4 RAM
RTX 2070 8GB GDDR6
256GB PCIe SSD
15 inch FHD 60hz display
Comes with Win-10 pre installed.

Also comes with European power adapter (as I won it in NL) so a UK wall adapter will work fine.

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For Sale – Brand new Alienware m15 R2 (i7, RTX 2070, 256GB SSD)

I won this beautiful piece of equipment at a conference in NL a couple of weeks back but I use a Macbook Pro for work and don’t game so it’s been sitting around collecting dust and now, trying to fund a start-up it’s a good opportunity for me to sell.

It’s never been used, the lid has been opened once to take the picture for this thread and it’s never been out of the box. Seals still on the screen. Did a bit of research and these are real state of the art machines, not too clunky and the keyboard isn’t obnoxiously small – over-all I think whoever buys it will have a hell of an experience.

I’ve sold phones on here and also a Macbook Pro without issue! Also, i’ll link my ebay profile where I used to sell refurbed phones if anyone wants to check my rep.

I will be posting for FREE using the most competent and reliable logistics companies so either DHL or DPD – tracked a signed for next day delivery. No RoyalMail BS in this thread!

(Also, the box has the plastic on it because DHL stick their labels in a sticky bag)

SPECS:

9th gen Intel Core i7 9750H
8GB DDR4 RAM
RTX 2070 8GB GDDR6
256GB PCIe SSD
15 inch FHD 60hz display
Comes with Win-10 pre installed.

Also comes with European power adapter (as I won it in NL) so a UK wall adapter will work fine.

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When will mobile voting be ready?

Listen to this podcast

This week’s Risk & Repeat podcast examines the rise of mobile voting apps and how security experts have expressed concerns about the risks deploying the technology for elections.

This week’s Risk & Repeat podcast looks at the prospect of mobile voting apps being deployed for U.S. elections in the near future.

The COVID-19 pandemic has raised concerns about in-person voting at potentially crowded polls with long lines. But despite those concerns, various security experts as well as mobile voting advocates say the technology won’t be ready for widespread deployment in elections any time soon. Critics of the technology argue the mobile apps aren’t secure enough to ensure the integrity of votes, while advocates say there isn’t enough funding or infrastructure to support a large rollout of the technology.

In this episode, SearchSecurity editors Rob Wright and Alex Culafi discuss the challenges facing mobile and internet voting options, the friction between voting system vendors and the security research community, and the potential of these systems in future elections.

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For Sale – Brand new Alienware m15 R2 (i7, RTX 2070, 256GB SSD)

I won this beautiful piece of equipment at a conference in NL a couple of weeks back but I use a Macbook Pro for work and don’t game so it’s been sitting around collecting dust and now, trying to fund a start-up it’s a good opportunity for me to sell.

It’s never been used, the lid has been opened once to take the picture for this thread and it’s never been out of the box. Seals still on the screen. Did a bit of research and these are real state of the art machines, not too clunky and the keyboard isn’t obnoxiously small – over-all I think whoever buys it will have a hell of an experience.

I’ve sold phones on here and also a Macbook Pro without issue! Also, i’ll link my ebay profile where I used to sell refurbed phones if anyone wants to check my rep.

I will be posting for FREE using the most competent and reliable logistics companies so either DHL or DPD – tracked a signed for next day delivery. No RoyalMail BS in this thread!

(Also, the box has the plastic on it because DHL stick their labels in a sticky bag)

SPECS:

9th gen Intel Core i7 9750H
8GB DDR4 RAM
RTX 2070 8GB GDDR6
256GB PCIe SSD
15 inch FHD 60hz display
Comes with Win-10 pre installed.

Also comes with European power adapter (as I won it in NL) so a UK wall adapter will work fine.

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How to Recover Deleted Emails in Microsoft 365

When the CEO realizes they deleted a vital email thread three weeks ago, email recovery becomes suddenly becomes an urgent task. Sure, you can look in the Deleted Items folder in Outlook, but beyond that, how can you recover what has undergone “permanent” deletion? In this article, we review how you can save the day by bringing supposedly unrecoverable email back from the great beyond.

Before we continue, we know that for all Microsoft 365 admins security is a priority. And in the current climate of COVID-19, it’s well documented how hackers are working around the clock to exploit vulnerabilities. As such, we assembled two Microsoft experts to discuss the critical security features in Microsoft 365 you should be using right now in a free webinar on May 27. Don’t miss out on this must-attend event – save your seat now!

Now onto saving your emails!

Deleted Email Recovery in Microsoft And Office 365

Email Recovery for Outlook in Exchange Online through Microsoft and Office can be as simple as dragging and dropping the wayward email from the Deleted Items folder to your Inbox. But what do you do when you can’t find the email you want to recover?

First, let’s look at how email recovery is structured in Microsoft 365. There are few more layers here than you might think! In Microsoft 365, deleted email can be in one of three states: Deleted, Soft-Deleted, or Hard-Deleted. The way you recover email and how long you have to do so depends on the email’s delete status and the applicable retention policy.

Email Recovery in Microsoft 365

Let’s walk through the following graphic and talk about how email gets from one state to another, the default policies, how to recover deleted email in each state, and a few tips along the way.

Items vs. Email

Outlook is all about email yet also has tasks, contacts, calendar events, and other types of information. For example, you can delete calendar entries and may be called on to recover them, just like email. For this reason, the folder for deleted content is called “Deleted Items.” Also, when discussing deletions and recovery, it is common to refer to “items” rather than limiting the discussion to just email.

Policy

Various rules control the retention period for items in the different states of deletion. A policy is an automatically applied action that enforces a rule related to services. Microsoft 365 has hundreds of policies you can tweak to suit your requirements. See Overview of Retention policies for more information.

‘Deleted Items’ Email

When you press the Delete key on an email in Outlook, it’s moved to the Deleted Items folder. That email is now in the “Deleted” state, which simply means it moved to the Deleted Items folder. How long does Outlook retain deleted email? By default – forever! You can recover your deleted mail with just a drag and drop to your Inbox. Done!

If you can’t locate the email in the Deleted Items folder, double-check that you have the Deleted Items folder selected, then scroll to the bottom of the email list. Look for the following message:

Outlook Deleted Items Folder

If you see the above message, your cache settings may be keeping only part of the content in Outlook and rest in the cloud. The cache helps to keep mailbox sizes lower on your hard drive, which in turn speeds up search and load times. Click on the link to download the missing messages.

But I Didn’t Delete It!

If you find content in the Deleted Items and are sure you did not delete it, you may be right! Administrators can set Microsoft 365 policy to delete old Inbox content automatically.

Mail can ‘disappear’ another way. Some companies enable a personal archive mailbox for users. When enabled, by default, any mail two years or older will “disappear” from your Inbox and the Deleted Items folder. However, there is no need to worry. While apparently missing, the email has simply moved to the Archives Inbox. A personal Archives Inbox shows up as a stand-alone mailbox in Outlook, as shown below.

Stand-alone mailbox in Outlook

As a result, it’s a good idea to search the Archives Inbox, if it is present when searching for older messages.

Another setting to check is one that deletes email when Outlook is closed. Access this setting in Outlook by clicking “File,” then “Options,” and finally “Advanced” to display this window:

Outlook Advanced Options

If enabled, Outlook empties the Deleted Items when closed. The deleted email then moves to the ‘soft-delete’ state, which is covered next. Keep in mind that with this setting, all emails will be permanently deleted after 28 days

‘Soft-Deleted’ Email

The next stage in the process is Soft-Deleted. Soft-Deleted email is in the Deleted-Items folder but is still easily recovered. At a technical level, the mail is deleted locally from Outlook and placed in the Exchange Online folder named Deletions, which is a sub-folder of Recoverable Items. Any content in Recoverable Items folder in Exchange Online is, by definition, considered soft-deleted.

You have, by default, 14 days to recover soft-deleted mail. The service administrator can change the retention period to a maximum of 30 days. Be aware that this can consume some of the storage capacity assigned to each user account and you could get charged for overages.

How items become soft-deleted

There are three ways to soft-delete mail or other Outlook items.

  1. Delete an item already in the Deleted Items folder. When you manually delete something that is already in the Deleted Items folder, the item is soft-deleted. Any process, manual or otherwise that deletes content from this folder results in a ‘soft-delete’
  1. Pressing Shift + Delete on an email in your Outlook Inbox will bring up a dialog box asking if you wish to “permanently” delete the email. Clicking Yes will remove the email from the Deleted-Items folder but only perform a soft-delete. You can still recover the item if you do so within the 14 day retention period.

Soft Deleting Items in Outlook

  1. The final way items can be soft-deleted is by using Outlook policies or rules. By default, there are no policies that will automatically remove mail from the Deleted-Items folder in Outlook. However, users can create rules that ‘permanently’ (soft-delete) email. If you’re troubleshooting missing email, have the user check for such rules as shown below. You can click Rules on the Home menu and examine any created rules in the Rules Wizard shown below.

Microsoft Outlook Policies and Rules

Note that the caution is a bit misleading as the rule’s action will soft-delete the email, which, as already stated, is not an immediate permanent deletion.

Recovering soft-deleted mail

You can recover soft-deleted mail directly in Outlook. Be sure the Deleted Items folder is selected, then look for “Recover items recently removed from this folder at the top of the mail column, or the “Recover Deleted Items from Server” action on the Home menu bar.

Recovering soft-deleted mail in Outlook

Clicking on the recover items link opens the Recover Deleted Items window.

Recover Deleted Items, Microsoft Outlook

Click on the items you want to recover or Select All, and click OK.

NOTE: The recovered email returns to your Deleted Items folder. Be sure to move it into your Inbox.

If the email you’re looking for is not listed, it could have moved to the next stage: ‘Hard-Deleted.’

While users can recover soft-deleted email, Administrators can also recover soft-deleted email on their behalf using the ‘Hard-Deleted’ email recovery process described next (which works for both hard and soft deletions). Also, Microsoft has created two PowerShell commands very useful in this process for those who would rather script the tasks. You can use the Get-RecoverableItems and Restore-RecoverableItems cmdlets to search and restore soft-deleted email.

Hard-Deleted Email

The next stage for deletion is ‘Hard Delete.’ Technically, items are hard deleted when items moved from the Recoverable folder to the Purges folder in Exchange online. Administrators can still recover items in the folder with the recovery period set by policy which ranges from 14 (the default) to 30 (the maximum). You can extend the retention beyond 30 days by placing legal or litigation hold on the item or mailbox.

How items become Hard-Deleted

There are two ways content becomes hard-deleted.

  1. By policy, soft-deleted email is moved to the hard-deleted stage when the retention period expires.
  2. Users can hard-delete mail manually by selecting the Purge option in the Recover Deleted Items window shown above. (Again, choosing to ‘permanently delete’ mail with Shift + Del, results in a soft-delete, not a hard-delete.)

Recovering Hard-Deleted Mail

Once email enters the hard-delete stage, users can no longer recover the content. Only service administrators with the proper privileges can initiate recovery, and no administrators have those privileges by default, not even the global admin. The global admin does have the right to assign privileges so that they can give themselves (or others) the necessary rights. Privacy is a concern here since administrators with these privileges can search and export a user’s email.

Microsoft’s online documentation Recover deleted items in a user’s mailbox details the step-by-step instructions for recovering hard-deleted content. The process is a bit messy compared to other administrative tasks. As an overview, the administrator will:

  1. Assign the required permissions
  2. Search the Inbox for the missing email
  3. Copy the results to a Discovery mailbox where you can view mail in the Purged folder (optional).
  4. Export the results to a PST file.
  5. Import the PST to Outlook on the user’s system and locate the missing email in the Purged folder

Last Chance Recovery

Once hard-deleted items are purged, they are no longer discoverable by any method by users or administrators. You should consider the recovery of such content as unlikely. That said, if the email you are looking for is not recoverable by any of the above methods, you can open a ticket with Microsoft 365 Support. In some circumstances, they may be able to find the email that has been purged but not yet overwritten. They may or may not be willing to look for the email, but it can’t hurt to ask, and it has happened.

What about using Outlook to backup email?

Outlook does allow a user to export email to a PST file. To do this, click File” in the Outlook main menu, then “Import & Export” as shown below.

Outlook Menu, Import Export

You can specify what you want to export and even protect the file with a password.

While useful from time to time, a backup plan that depends on users manually exporting content to a local file doesn’t scale and isn’t reliable. Consequently, don’t rely on this as a possible backup and recovery solution.

Alternative Strategies

After reading this, you may be thinking, “isn’t there an easier way?” A service like Altaro Office 365 Backup allows you to recover from point-in-time snapshots of an inbox or other Microsoft 365 content. Having a service like this when you get that urgent call to recover a mail from a month ago can be a lifesaver.

Summary

Users can recover most deleted email without administrator intervention. Often, deleted email simply sits in the Deleted folder until manually cleared. When that occurs, email enters the ‘soft-deleted stage,’ and is easily restored by a user within 14-days. After this period, the item enters the ‘hard-deleted’ state. A service administrator can recover hard-deleted items within the recovery window. After the hard-deleted state, email should be considered uncoverable. Policies can be applied to extend the retention times of deleted mail in any state. While administrators can go far with the web-based administration tools, the entire recovery process can be scripted with PowerShell to customize and scale larger projects or provide granular discovery. It is always a great idea to use a backup solution designed for Microsoft 365, such as Altaro Office 365 Backup.

Finally, if you haven’t done so already, remember to save your seat on our upcoming must-attend webinar for all Microsoft 365 admins:

Critical Security Features in Office/Microsoft 365 Admins Simply Can’t Ignore

Is Your Office 365 Data Secure?

Did you know Microsoft does not back up Office 365 data? Most people assume their emails, contacts and calendar events are saved somewhere but they’re not. Secure your Office 365 data today using Altaro Office 365 Backup – the reliable and cost-effective mailbox backup, recovery and backup storage solution for companies and MSPs. 

Start your Free Trial now


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Author: Brett Hill

Community and Connection to Drive Change

Reflections on International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month

In recent weeks, I have had several individuals share with me their admiration for the amount of time I spend listening to, advocating for and simply being there for women. Of course I was humbled by what felt like a compliment, but hearing this gave me pause. Why did these individuals see my actions as deserving of admiration as opposed to a core way of how we show up for each other in the workplace, the industry and our lives in general? What path led me to this way of being, how might I expand my impact and how might I encourage others to take a more active role?

This way of being has been part of who I am for my entire working life. When I joined Microsoft full time in 1998, my first manager was a role model for me. Laurie Litwack spent time getting to know me personally as well as to understand my passion and hopes and what unique perspective I brought. She thoughtfully created my first assignment to both leverage my skills and challenge me. Laurie showed me not only what it meant to bring your authentic self to work but also how it felt to be supported. Under her leadership I not only grew in the technical aspects of my role, she also nurtured my appreciation for people. Looking back, this experience was unique, especially for that era in engineering where there were fewer women and even fewer women managers. It shaped my values as a leader and my view on how you best engage people and support their development. It showed me the importance of being present.

Early into my career the VP of our engineering organization, Bill Vegthe, brought a group of women employees together to better understand our experiences in the organization. He genuinely wanted to learn from us what the organization could be doing better to support our growth and satisfaction. At the time, the number of women in the organization was low and this forum was the first opportunity many of us had to meet and spend time with each other. The most valuable thing we learned from the experience was the personal support and enjoyment that came from simply making time for each other. The isolation we each felt melted away when we got to spend time with others like us: creating connections, sharing experiences, learning from each other. We grew more collectively than we ever would have individually, and I personally benefited from both the friendship and wisdom of many of the women in this community: Terrell Cox, Jimin Li, Anna Hester, Farzana Rahman, Deb MacFadden, Molly Brown, Linda Apsley, Betsy Speare. This was true many years ago when this community was created and holds true today even as this community has scaled from a handful of women to thousands of women across our Cloud + AI Division who make up this Women’s Leadership Community (WLC) under sponsorship from leaders such as Bob Muglia, Bill Laing, Brad Anderson and currently Scott Guthrie.

As I grew in my career, the importance of intentionally building connections with other women only became more clear. In the early 2010s as I joined the technical executive community, I looked around and felt a similar experience to my early career days. There were very few technical executives who were women, and we were spread across the organization, meaning we rarely had the opportunity to interact and in some cases had never met! It was out of desire to bring the WLC experience to this group that our Life Without Lines Community of technical women executives across Microsoft grew, based on the founding work of Michele Freed, Lili Cheng, Roz Ho, Rebecca Norlander. This group represents cross-company leadership and as the connections deepened, so did the impact on each other in terms of peer mentoring, career sponsorship and engineering and product collaboration.

Together we are more powerful than we are individually, amplifying each other’s voices.       

Although the concept of community might seem simple and obvious in the ongoing conversations about inclusion, the key in my experience is how the connections in these communities were built. This isn’t just about networking for the sake of networking; we come together with a focus on being generous with our time and our experiences, challenging each other and our organization to address issues in a new way, and with the space to be authentic within our own community by not feeling like we needed to be a monolith in our perspectives or priorities. We advocate for one another, we leverage our networks, we create space and we amplify voices of others. This community names the challenges these women face, names the hopes they have for themselves and future women in our industry, and names what is most important to our enjoyment of our work. My job, and the job of others leaders, is to then listen to these voices leveraging the insights to advocate for what is needed in the organization, and drive systemic changes that will create the best-lived experience for all women at Microsoft and in the industry. 

I have found that members of the community want to be heard, if you are willing to be present, willing to bring your authentic self and willing to take action on what you learn. I’m reflecting on this, in particular, as I think about International Women’s Day (IWD). From its beginnings in the early 1900s through to present day, IWD strives to recognize the need for active participation, equality and development of women and acknowledge the contribution of women globally.

This year I am reflecting on the need to ensure that our communities of women accurately represent the diverse range of perspectives and experiences of employees and customers. Making sure that even in a community about including others, we are not unintentionally excluding certain groups of women who may not have the same experiences or priorities, or privileges as others. It is a chance to reflect on how I can expand my impact. I challenge all of us to take this time to recognize those who are role models for us and those voices who may not be heard and determine what role each of us can play in achieving this goal for everyone.

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Author: Microsoft News Center

For Sale – 13-inch MacBook Pro 2.5GHz Dual-core Intel i5 (Mid 2012)

Received last week as an insurance replacement for my old MacBook which broke a few weeks ago. My insurance company ordered this direct from the Apple Refurb site (RRP £759) meaning you’ll get 12 months warranty too from Apple. You can find it on their website here. Only opened to take a…

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