Tag Archives: While

For Sale – i7 2600k, R9 295 x2, DDR3 Ram, 8800gts oc, 9800gt, coolermaster PSU, Gigabyte Mobo, HDD’s etc

Hi,
Its been a while & im having a clear out. All of the below parts are for sale to fund a new up to date GPU.

The below parts were in my system untill last week when i upgraded to a i7 9900k package and are all working 100%. The ram modules were ran together to give 12gb of ram at stock settings. The GPU is still in my system but if i get a sale i can run my monitor off the Mobo/ CPU.

  • i7 2600k CPU £45 + Postage SOLD TO URL
  • Gigabyte Z68X-UD3P-B3 Inc, OI shield stickers box manuals etc £40 + Postage SOLD TO KINNSY
  • Corsair 2x 2GB DDR3 Ram £10 + Postage
  • Exceleram 2 x 4GB DDR3 Ram £20 + Postage SOLD TO KINNSY
  • Powercolor Radeon R9 295 x2 Watercooled £260 + Postage
    (Still in my system but available for immediate despatch.) This GPU Is very long and as you can see barely fits in my case. it also requires 2, 8 pin power connections with 28amps each as per warning in the box.
  • Dell optiplex Computer with extra ram 5gb ram and gigabyte R4650 gpu, 250gb WD HDD £25 + Postage

The following parts are sold as untested however i dont have any reason to believe they would not work. Prices have been adjusted accordingly and a bundle deal would be availabe.

  • BFG 8800 GTS OC £5 + Postage
  • Palit 9800GT £7 + Postage
  • Cooler Master RS 460 PCAP A3 460W PSU £10 + Postage
  • Seagate Pipeline HD.2 500GB £7 + Postage
  • WD 320 GB HDD £5 + Postage

Prices are a guestimate based on Ebay and Google. Offers accepted.

Any questions let me know

Thanks

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – i7 2600k, R9 295 x2, DDR3 Ram, 8800gts oc, 9800gt, coolermaster PSU, Gigabyte Mobo, HDD’s etc

Hi,
Its been a while & im having a clear out. All of the below parts are for sale to fund a new up to date GPU.

The below parts were in my system untill last week when i upgraded to a i7 9900k package and are all working 100%. The ram modules were ran together to give 12gb of ram at stock settings. The GPU is still in my system but if i get a sale i can run my monitor off the Mobo/ CPU.

  • i7 2600k CPU £45 + Postage SOLD TO URL
  • Gigabyte Z68X-UD3P-B3 Inc, OI shield stickers box manuals etc £40 + Postage SOLD TO KINNSY
  • Corsair 2x 2GB DDR3 Ram £10 + Postage
  • Exceleram 2 x 4GB DDR3 Ram £20 + Postage SOLD TO KINNSY
  • Powercolor Radeon R9 295 x2 Watercooled £260 + Postage
    (Still in my system but available for immediate despatch.) This GPU Is very long and as you can see barely fits in my case. it also requires 2, 8 pin power connections with 28amps each as per warning in the box.
  • Dell optiplex Computer with extra ram 5gb ram and gigabyte R4650 gpu, 250gb WD HDD £25 + Postage

The following parts are sold as untested however i dont have any reason to believe they would not work. Prices have been adjusted accordingly and a bundle deal would be availabe.

  • BFG 8800 GTS OC £5 + Postage
  • Palit 9800GT £7 + Postage
  • Cooler Master RS 460 PCAP A3 460W PSU £10 + Postage
  • Seagate Pipeline HD.2 500GB £7 + Postage
  • WD 320 GB HDD £5 + Postage

Prices are a guestimate based on Ebay and Google. Offers accepted.

Any questions let me know

Thanks

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – i7 2600k, R9 295 x2, DDR3 Ram, 8800gts oc, 9800gt, coolermaster PSU, Gigabyte Mobo, HDD’s etc

Hi,
Its been a while & im having a clear out. All of the below parts are for sale to fund a new up to date GPU.

The below parts were in my system untill last week when i upgraded to a i7 9900k package and are all working 100%. The ram modules were ran together to give 12gb of ram at stock settings. The GPU is still in my system but if i get a sale i can run my monitor off the Mobo/ CPU.

  • i7 2600k CPU £45 + Postage SOLD TO URL
  • Gigabyte Z68X-UD3P-B3 Inc, OI shield stickers box manuals etc £40 + Postage
  • Corsair 2x 2GB DDR3 Ram £10 + Postage
  • Exceleram 2 x 4GB DDR3 Ram £20 + Postage
  • Powercolor Radeon R9 295 x2 Watercooled £260 + Postage
    (Still in my system but available for immediate despatch.) This GPU Is very long and as you can see barely fits in my case. it also requires 2, 8 pin power connections with 28amps each as per warning in the box.
  • Dell optiplex Computer with extra ram 5gb ram and gigabyte R4650 gpu, 250gb WD HDD £25 + Postage

The following parts are sold as untested however i dont have any reason to believe they would not work. Prices have been adjusted accordingly and a bundle deal would be availabe.

  • BFG 8800 GTS OC £5 + Postage
  • Palit 9800GT £7 + Postage
  • Cooler Master RS 460 PCAP A3 460W PSU £10 + Postage
  • Seagate Pipeline HD.2 500GB £7 + Postage
  • WD 320 GB HDD £5 + Postage

Prices are a guestimate based on Ebay and Google. Offers accepted.

Any questions let me know

Thanks

Go to Original Article
Author:

For Sale – i7 2600k, R9 295 x2, DDR3 Ram, 8800gts oc, 9800gt, coolermaster PSU, Gigabyte Mobo, HDD’s etc

Hi,
Its been a while & im having a clear out. All of the below parts are for sale to fund a new up to date GPU.

The below parts were in my system untill last week when i upgraded to a i7 9900k package and are all working 100%. The ram modules were ran together to give 12gb of ram at stock settings. The GPU is still in my system but if i get a sale i can run my monitor off the Mobo/ CPU.

  • i7 2600k CPU £45 + Postage SOLD TO URL
  • Gigabyte Z68X-UD3P-B3 Inc, OI shield stickers box manuals etc £40 + Postage
  • Corsair 2x 2GB DDR3 Ram £10 + Postage
  • Exceleram 2 x 4GB DDR3 Ram £20 + Postage
  • Powercolor Radeon R9 295 x2 Watercooled £260 + Postage
    (Still in my system but available for immediate despatch.) This GPU Is very long and as you can see barely fits in my case. it also requires 2, 8 pin power connections with 28amps each as per warning in the box.
  • Dell optiplex Computer with extra ram 5gb ram and gigabyte R4650 gpu, 250gb WD HDD £25 + Postage

The following parts are sold as untested however i dont have any reason to believe they would not work. Prices have been adjusted accordingly and a bundle deal would be availabe.

  • BFG 8800 GTS OC £5 + Postage
  • Palit 9800GT £7 + Postage
  • Cooler Master RS 460 PCAP A3 460W PSU £10 + Postage
  • Seagate Pipeline HD.2 500GB £7 + Postage
  • WD 320 GB HDD £5 + Postage

Prices are a guestimate based on Ebay and Google. Offers accepted.

Any questions let me know

Thanks

Go to Original Article
Author:

Do you know the difference in the Microsoft HCI programs?

While similar in name, Microsoft’s Azure Stack and Azure Stack HCI products are substantially different product offerings designed for different use cases.

Azure Stack brings Azure cloud capabilities into the data center for organizations that want to build and run cloud applications on localized resources. Azure Stack HCI operates on the same Hyper-V-based, software-driven compute, storage and networking technologies but serves a fundamentally different purpose. This new Microsoft HCI offering is a hyper-converged infrastructure product that combines vendor-specific hardware with Windows Server 2019 Datacenter edition and management tools to provide a highly integrated and optimized computing platform for local VM workloads.

Azure Stack gives users a way to employ Azure VMs for Windows and Linux, Azure IoT and Event Hubs, Azure Marketplace, Docker containers, Azure Key Vault, Azure Resource Manager, Azure Web Apps and Functions, and Azure administrative tools locally. This functionality gives an organization the benefits of Azure cloud operation, while also satisfying regulatory requirements that require workloads to run in the data center.

Azure Stack HCI offers optional connections to an array of Azure cloud services, including Azure Site Recovery, Azure Monitor, Azure Backup, Azure Update Management, Azure File Sync and Azure Network Adapter. However, these workloads remain in the Azure cloud. Also, there is no way to convert this Microsoft HCI product into an Azure Stack deployment.

Azure Stack HCI evolved from Microsoft’s WSSD HCI offering.

Windows Server Software-Defined products still exist

Azure Stack HCI evolved from Microsoft’s Windows Server Software-Defined (WSSD) HCI offering. The WSSD program still exists, but the main difference on the software side is hardware in the WSSD program runs on the Windows Server 2016 OS.

WSSD HCI is similar to Azure Stack HCI with a foundation of vendor-specific hardware, the inclusion of Windows Server technologies — Hyper-V, Storage Spaces Direct and software-defined networking — and Windows Admin Center for systems management. Azure Stack HCI expands on WSSD through improvements to Windows Server 2019 and tighter integration with Azure services.

Go to Original Article
Author:

The future of PowerShell begins to sharpen in focus

While predicting on the future of PowerShell, it helps to take a look back at its beginnings to see where it’s going as a cross-platform management tool.

Microsoft released PowerShell in 2006 as part of the Windows desktop and server versions released that year. The company added thousands of cmdlets over the years to expand the tool’s reach across the data center and into the cloud.

Microsoft’s embrace of Linux, due in large part to the number of Linux virtual machines running on Azure, steered the company to make a significant change with PowerShell in 2016. Microsoft ended development of Windows PowerShell in favor of a new tool called PowerShell Core, which would be an open source project to rework the utility as a cross-platform management tool for Windows, Linux and macOS systems.

A lot of features Windows PowerShell had were missing in the first PowerShell Core release in January 2018, mainly due to a switch in the underlying platform from the Windows-based .NET Framework to the cross-platform .NET Core. Jeffrey Snover, the inventor of PowerShell, has said the Windows edition will always have support but recommends IT pros learn how to use PowerShell Core, which is the version Microsoft uses to manage workloads on Azure.

SearchWindowsServer advisory board members shared their thoughts on the recent changes with the cross-platform management tool and their expectations for the future of PowerShell.

Recent releases broaden appeal beyond Windows admins

Reda ChouffaniReda Chouffani

Reda Chouffani: Many administrators who might have resisted moving away from familiar tools such as web interfaces or Microsoft Management Console have come to realize that despite the commands written in PowerShell, it is capable of automating some of the most complex and tedious activities.

At first, a lot of IT pros saw PowerShell just as another replacement to the traditional command line that ships with every Windows box. But once they dug deeper, they found how beneficial it was to use PowerShell commands to manage Exchange Server, Office 365, Skype for Business, Azure and a slew of other platforms.

Opening the PowerShell platform to non-Windows platforms after the version 5.1 release was a significant shift for Microsoft meant to encourage administrators who manage Linux to adopt PowerShell as their management and task automation tool.

Changes in the latest preview versions of PowerShell Core 7, which is based on .NET Core 3.0, include more management modules to extend the functionality. Another recent development is the return of the Out-GridView cmdlet to PowerShell Core. Many administrators used this cmdlet in Windows PowerShell to build GUIs for scripts. The PowerShell Core team was able to bring it back based on user feedback and support of WinForms and the Windows Presentation Foundation in .NET Core 3.0.

Azure is the gateway to get Linux users on board

Stuart Burns: There is no getting away from the fact that automation is growing in the world of IT. How that automation is achieved varies, but the one constant is scripting.

Stuart BurnsStuart Burns

Within Linux, Bash scripting, along with languages like Perl and Python, have been the go-to for the serious systems administrator. Microsoft had nothing in this space until relatively recently, in the form of PowerShell for non-Microsoft operating systems. It is a departure from the Microsoft of old, whereby Linux was seen as a second-class citizen, to put it politely.

PowerShell is a good scripting language, but it remains to be seen how popular it will become beyond Windows administrators. Linux administrators tend to stay with tools that do the job. Many have spent years honing their skills and scripts with Bash. They are not familiar with having upgrades forced on them. I know some administrators who run legacy versions of infrastructure mainly because it just refuses to break.

Microsoft’s embrace of Linux, due in large part to the number of Linux virtual machines running on Azure, steered the company to make a significant change with PowerShell in 2016.

Linux IT pros also have long memories. They don’t trust Microsoft for its anti-Linux stance from years ago when former CEO Steve Ballmer called Linux a cancer, which will take a very long time for them to forget.

Until the large Linux vendors support PowerShell as a first-class citizen, it’s not likely the community will have the motivation to give PowerShell a chance. For example, on the RedHat exam, there is a basic scripting requirement. There is no outside access — or time to download or install — PowerShell so the test-taker has to learn Bash to pass the exam.

One thing Microsoft does have in its favor is the ever-increasing uptake of Linux on the Azure platform. The functionality that PowerShell Core provides, while available in other languages as plug-ins, is definitely easier to utilize on Microsoft’s cloud platform.

Some admins need a little extra help to get started

Brian Kirsch: When Microsoft introduced PowerShell in 2006, administrators had a hard time finding a use for it because the scripting and command lines could only go so far at the time.

The key to PowerShell was its task automation framework over a new scripting format. It took many in IT by surprise and gave them capabilities they didn’t know they might need.

Fast forward to January 2018 and Microsoft took its first serious step to expand PowerShell beyond Windows. The release of PowerShell Core and Linux support expanded the capabilities of this automation tool. It was a big change, but, ultimately, a safe one for Microsoft. While releasing something along the lines of Active Directory for Linux could affect the Windows Server bottom line, making PowerShell cross-platform didn’t.

Brian KirschBrian Kirsch

Building a PowerShell bridge between environments might help make the language a staple of the data center across many platforms. With plug-ins from a variety of third-party platforms, including big vendors such as VMware, this has established PowerShell as the ideal language going forward. So, even if you were not using Hyper-V, you could still use PowerShell for VMware.

Where does Microsoft go from here? Bringing more features and extending the cross-platform capabilities will be a help, but the team should think about ways to make it easier to get the traditional Windows admin using PowerShell Core. In my experience, a lot of admins tend to modify code, not write it from scratch, so the ability to generate code from a wizard was a welcome addition. It might help if the PowerShell developers put together a visual modeling tool to stitch together snips of code for a larger view of a longer automation routine.

It might seem odd to use a graphical interface for something that runs on a command line, but it’s hard for the longtime Windows admin to hand over their GUI management in exchange for code, no matter how powerful it may be.

The Linux side lags too far behind

Richard Siddaway: PowerShell has become the standard automation tool for Windows administrators since its introduction. The announcement of PowerShell Core in 2016 brought with it a lot of uncertainty.

When compared to Windows PowerShell 5.1, the initial version of PowerShell Core, 6.0.0, had a number of functionality gaps. PowerShell Core had no workflows. It was missing cmdlets, such as the WMI cmdlets. Many of the Windows PowerShell modules, such as Active Directory, would not work with PowerShell Core.

Since the initial PowerShell Core 6.0.0 release, the PowerShell project team addressed many of these points:

  • Foreach-Object has a parallel parameter to provide some, if not most, of the functionality delivered by PowerShell workflows.
  • The PowerShell team reinstated missing cmdlets where applicable. For instance, the WMI cmdlets aren’t available in PowerShell Core, but they have been effectively deprecated in Windows PowerShell in favor of the Common Information Model cmdlets.
  • Most of the Windows PowerShell modules have been recompiled to work under PowerShell Core and Windows PowerShell. You can use the Windows Compatibility module to enable most of the rest of the modules to work with PowerShell Core. Some gaps remain, but they are shrinking.

There is little incentive for Windows administrators to embrace PowerShell Core because Windows PowerShell 5.1 does what most administrators need. Recent announcements from the PowerShell team indicate that PowerShell Core 7.x will ship alongside Windows PowerShell 5.1. This may actually reduce adoption on the new PowerShell version as many administrators will stick with what they know.

Richard SiddawayRichard Siddaway

Take up of PowerShell Core on Linux has been much more enthusiastic than on Windows. Ironically, this may hinder further adoption on the Windows side if PowerShell Core is seen as too Unix-centered. The main issue with PowerShell on Linux, especially for Windows users, is there just isn’t the breadth of cmdlets to match Windows.

To become a cross-platform management tool, the Linux side of PowerShell Core needs more cmdlets for systems management to match the level in Windows. A base install of Windows 10 comes with about 1,500 cmdlets while the PowerShell Core for Linux has about 350 cmdlets. At a minimum, administrators need cmdlets to manage network cards, IP addresses, storage, DNS clients, and task and job scheduling. The administrator should be able to issue the same command against any platform and get the desired results in a compatible format.

PowerShell as an open source project ensures future development, but it also comes with the risk that Microsoft could stop supporting it. The other issue is that many of the recent changes are best described as tweaks to address edge cases. There doesn’t seem to be an overall roadmap. The PowerShell team’s blog post regarding the PowerShell 7 roadmap — they plan to drop the “Core” part of the name with the GA release — is a bit of a misnomer because there is no indication of where PowerShell is going and what it’s trying to be. The team should resolve these issues to make it clear what the future of PowerShell will be.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Ecstasy programming language targets cloud-native computing

While recent events have focused on Java and how it will fare as computing continues to evolve to support modern platforms and technologies, a new language is targeted directly at the cloud-native computing space — something Java continues to adjust to.

This new language, known as the Ecstasy programming language, aims to address programming complexity and to enhance security and manageability in software, which are key challenges for cloud app developers.

Oracle just completed its Oracle Open World and Oracle Code One conferences, where Java was dominant. Indeed, Oracle Code One was formerly known as JavaOne until last year, when Oracle changed its name to be more inclusive of other languages.

Ironically, Cameron Purdy, a former senior vice president of development at Oracle and now CEO of Xqiz.it (pronounced “exquisite”), based in Lexington, Mass., is the co-creator of the Ecstasy language. Purdy joined Oracle in 2007, when the database giant acquired his previous startup, Tangosol, to attain its Coherence in-memory data grid technology, which remains a part of Oracle’s product line today.

Designed for containerization and the cloud-native computing era

Purdy designed Ecstasy for what he calls true containerization. It will run on a server, in a VM or in an OS container, but that is not the kind of container that Ecstasy containerization refers to. Ecstasy containers are a feature of the language itself, and they are secure, recursive, dynamic and manageable runtime containers, he said.

For security, all Ecstasy code runs inside an Ecstasy container, and Ecstasy code cannot even see the container it’s running inside of — let alone anything outside that container, like the OS, or even another container. Regarding recursivity, Ecstasy code can create nested containers inside the current container, and the code running inside those containers can create their own containers, and so on. For dynamism, containers can be created and destroyed dynamically, but they also can grow and shrink within a common, shared pool of CPU and memory resources. For manageability, any resources — including CPU, memory, storage and any I/O — consumed by an Ecstasy container can be measured and managed in real time. And all the resources within a container — including network and storage — can be virtualized, with the possibility of each container being virtualized in a completely different manner.

Overall, the goal of Ecstasy is to solve a set of problems that are intrinsic to the cloud:

  • the ability to modularize application code, so that some portions could be run all the way out on the client, or all the way back in the heart of a server cluster, or anywhere in-between — including on shared edge and CDN servers;
  • to make code that is portable and reusable across all those locations and devices;
  • to be able to securely reuse code by supporting the secure containerization of arbitrary modules of code;
  • to enable developers to manage and virtualize the resources used by this code to enhance security, manageability, real-time monitoring and cloud portability; and
  • to provide an architecture that would scale with the cloud but could also scale with the many core devices and specialized processing units that lie at the heart of new innovation — like machine learning.

General-purpose programming language

Ecstasy, like C, C++, Java, C# and Python, is a general-purpose programming language — but its most compelling feature is not what it contains, but rather what it purposefully omits, Purdy said.

For instance, all the aforementioned general-purpose languages adopted the underlying hardware architecture and OS capabilities as a foundation upon which they built their own capabilities, but additionally, these languages all exposed the complexity of the underlying hardware and OS details to the developer. This not only added to complexity, but also provided a source of vulnerability and deployment inflexibility.

As a general-purpose programming language, Ecstasy will be useful for most application developers, Purdy said. However, Xqiz.it is still in “stealth” mode as a company and in the R&D phase with the language. Its design targets all the major client device hardware and OSes, all the major cloud vendors, and all of the server back ends.

“We designed the language to be easy to pick up for anyone who is familiar with the C family of languages, which includes Java, C# and C++,” he said. “Python and JavaScript developers are likely to recognize quite a few language idioms as well.”

Ecstasy is not a superset of Java, but [it] definitely [has] a large syntactic intersection. Ecstasy adds lots and lots onto Java to improve both developer productivity, as well as program correctness.
Mark FalcoSenior principal software development engineer, Workday

Ecstasy is heavily influenced by Java, so Java programmers should be able to read lots of Ecstasy code without getting confused, said Mark Falco, a senior principal software development engineer at Workday who has had early access to the software.

“To be clear, Ecstasy is not a superset of Java, but [it] definitely [has] a large syntactic intersection,” Falco said. “Ecstasy adds lots and lots onto Java to improve both developer productivity, as well as program correctness.” The language’s similarity to Java also should help with developer adoption, he noted.

However, Patrick Linskey, a principal engineer at Cisco and another early Ecstasy user, said, “From what I’ve seen, there’s a lot of Erlang/OTP in there under the covers, but with a much more accessible syntax.” Erlang/OTP is a development environment for concurrent programming.

Falco added, “Concurrent programming in Ecstasy doesn’t require any notion of synchronization, locking or atomics; you always work on your local copy of a piece of data, and this makes it much harder to screw things up.”

Compactness, security and isolation

Moreover, a few key reasons for creating a new programming language for serverless, cloud and connected devices apps are their compactness, security and isolation, he added.

“Ecstasy starts off with complete isolation at its core; an Ecstasy app literally has no conduit to the outside world, not to the network, not to the disk, not to anything at all,” Falco said. “To gain access to any aspect of the outside world, an Ecstasy app must be injected with services that provide access to only a specific resource.”

“The Ecstasy runtime really pushes developers toward safe patterns, without being painful,” Linskey said. “If you tried to bolt an existing language onto such a runtime, you’d end up with lots of tough static analysis checks, runtime assertions” and other performance penalties.

Indeed, one of the more powerful components of Ecstasy is the hard separation of application logic and deployment, noted Rob Lee, another early Ecstasy user who is vice president and chief architect at Pure Storage in Mountain View, Calif. “This allows developers to focus on building the logic of their application — what it should do and how it should do it, rather than managing the combinatorics of details and consequences of where it is running,” he noted.

What about adoption?

However, adoption will be the “billion-dollar” issue for the Ecstasy programming language, Lee said, noting that he likes the language’s chances based on what he’s seen. Yet, building adoption for a new runtime and language requires a lot of careful and intentional community-building.

Cisco is an easy potential candidate for Ecstasy usage, Linskey said. “We build a lot of middlebox-style services in which we pull together data from a few databases and a few internal and external services and serve that up to our clients,” he said. “An asynchronous-first runtime with the isolation and security properties of Ecstasy would be a great fit for us.”

Meanwhile, Java aficionados expect that Java will continue to evolve to meet cloud-native computing needs and future challenges. At Oracle Code One, Stewart Bryson, CEO of Red Pill Analytics in Atlanta, said he believes Java has another 10 to 20 years of viability, but there is room for another language that will better enable developers for the cloud. However, that language could be one that runs on the Java Virtual Machine, such as Kotlin, Scala, Clojure and others, he said.

Go to Original Article
Author:

CIOs express hope, concern for proposed interoperability rule

While CIOs applaud the efforts by federal agencies to make healthcare systems more interoperable, they also have significant concerns about patient data security.

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services proposed rules earlier this year that would further define information blocking, or unreasonably stopping a patient’s information from being shared, as well as outline requirements for healthcare organizations to share data such as using FHIR-based APIs so patients can download healthcare data onto mobile healthcare apps.

The proposed rules are part of an ongoing interoperability effort mandated by the 21st Century Cures Act, a healthcare bill that provides funding to modernize the U.S. healthcare system. Final versions of the proposed information blocking and interoperability rules are on track to be released in November.

“We all now have to realize we’ve got to play in the sandbox fairly and maybe we can cut some of this medical cost through interoperability,” said Martha Sullivan, CIO at Harrison Memorial Hospital in Cynthiana, Ky.

CIOs’ take on proposed interoperability rule

To Sullivan, interoperability brings the focus back to the patient — a focus she thinks has been lost over the years.

She commended ONC’s efforts to make patient access to health information easier, yet she has concerns about data stored in mobile healthcare apps. Harrison’s system is API-capable, but Sullivan said the organization will not recommend APIs to patients for liability reasons.

Healthcare CIOs at Meditech's 2019 Physician and CIO Forum shared their thoughts on proposed interoperability rules from ONC and CMS.
Physicians and CIOs at EHR vendor Meditech’s 2019 Physician and CIO Forum in Foxborough, Mass. Helen Waters, Meditech executive vice president, spoke at the event.

“The security concerns me because patient data is really important, and the privacy of that data is critical,” she said.

Harrison may not be the only organization reluctant to promote APIs to patients. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association of 12 U.S. health systems that used APIs for at least nine months found “little effort by healthcare systems or health information technology vendors to market this new capability to patients” and went on to say “there are not clear incentives for patients to adopt it.”

Jim Green, CIO at Boone County Hospital in Iowa, said ONC’s efforts with the interoperability rule are well-intentioned but overlook a significant pain point: physician adoption. He said more efforts should be made to create “a product that’s usable for the pace of life that a physician has.”

The product also needs to keep pace with technology, something Green described as being a “constant battle.”

There are some nuances there that make me really nervous as a CIO.
Jeannette CurrieCIO of Community Hospitals, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Interoperability is often temporary, he said. When a system gets upgraded or a new version of software is released, it can throw the system’s ability to share data with another system out of whack.

“To say at a point in time, ‘We’re interoperable with such-and-such a product,’ it’s a point in time,” he said.

Interoperability remains “critically important” for healthcare, said Jeannette Currie, CIO of Community Hospitals at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. But so is patient data security. That’s one of her main concerns with ONC’s efforts and the interoperability rule, something physicians and industry experts also expressed during the comment period for the proposed rules.

“When I look at the fact that a patient can come in and say, ‘I need you to interact with my app,’ and when I look at the HIPAA requirements I’m still beholden to, there are some nuances there that make me really nervous as a CIO,” she said.

Go to Original Article
Author:

Hustle Up! Discover Microsoft Store resources for a better side hustle

While many are interested in starting a side gig, there is one group in particular that’s looking for ways to make extra money and improve business skills this time of year—higher education students.

With the arrival of a new academic year comes a diverse crop of achievement-minded students looking for innovative ways to gain invaluable on-the-go experience while earning much-needed income.

Considering student loans, single parenthood, increased costs of living, and more, the reality for today’s higher education students is that they need to earn money now, while expanding their professional know-how. They understand employers are looking for nontraditional employees with uniquely diversified expertise and specialties, and they don’t have the luxury of depending solely on internships anymore.

These students have found they can leverage their passions to start side hustles to turn a profit and gain hands-on knowledge that aligns with the theories they are learning in class.

In order to pinpoint the most advantageous resources and tips needed for a side hustle, Microsoft Store collaborated with Chris Guillebeau, a New York Times bestselling author and host of the Side Hustle School podcast.

“Side hustles are a great way to create options, which are important in today’s world. They’re a fast track to freedom and job security. Consider the purpose of an internship—experience. Why not get paid for your experience by learning to start an income-generating project?”
—Chris Guillebeau

The challenge for some people who build a side hustle is that they have amazing ideas to generate extra income, but need help managing their business operations. That’s where solutions like Microsoft 365 and other Microsoft Store resources can help.

Start to Hustle Up!

Hustle Up!, a mobile experience, was developed by Microsoft Store to help identify the right resources needed to amplify different kinds of side hustles. By answering a series of questions, Hustle Up! explores your side hustle aptitude, identifies your strengths and interests, and connects you with the best resources to help you on your way.

Each of the four Hustle Up! outcomes—Freelancer, Maker, Reseller, and Expert—were carefully crafted to match you with your top side hustle type and each highlight your professional skills along with top actionable tips from Chris Guillebeau. Tips include prime resources that help you maintain work, school, and life balance, such as:

  • For Freelancers, having the ability to get reviews ASAP is critical. Reviews matter a lot in business, especially when you are trying to stand out in an overly saturated market. Chris recommends that Freelancers gather real-time client feedback by creating surveys and polls using Microsoft 365 offerings.
  • Side hustlers who fall into the Expert category know how to adapt their knowledge to a product or service but can struggle trying to stay on top of all their clients’ various needs. To manage multiple asks and schedules, Chris advises Experts to keep track of their daily, weekly, and monthly tasks while on the go with OneNote.

Eager to learn and achieve more with your side hustle? Even more expert tips await! Try Hustle Up! to discover how to better your side hustle and visit Microsoft Store in person or online to uncover additional resources, fun and free workshops, and solutions that will amplify your entrepreneurial skills.

Go to Original Article
Author: Microsoft News Center

BI for mobile remains a challenge for vendors

While the demand for analytics software grows and vendors old and new race to come up with the next innovations, the majority of vendors’ research and development resources are being dedicated to desktop applications as opposed to BI for mobile devices.

A handful of vendors stand out as exceptions, but mobile apps remain largely underdeveloped by many others.

BI for mobile, simply, presents a conundrum for developers. Some have chosen to invest in mobile, attacked the challenge and made headway, while others have elected to just focus their attention on their desktop applications.

The problem is the screen.

Digestible data is largely visual — it’s charts and graphs, and often more than just one on a single dashboard. Once, it was numbers on a page, but that time is now in the distant past. 

Mobile screens, however, are tiny compared to computer screens. Recreating desktop dashboards doesn’t work particularly well on a mobile device. Recreating the analytic capabilities of desktop device, therefore, doesn’t work either.

Instead, the vendors who have developed successful BI for mobile apps have viewed phones and tablets as different entities than desktop computers, and they’ve created a different experience on their mobile apps.

“[The phone] is not an effective tool for doing data analysis,” said Donald Farmer, principal at TreeHive Strategy in Woodinville, Wash. “It’s an effective tool for conveying short, well-formatted, concise insights. The people who have done a good job … have focused on that. They pick out significant things to tell you on the phone in a format that works for a mobile device, but they’re not trying to give you an analytic tool on a mobile device – that wouldn’t be practical or helpful.”

[The phone] is not an effective tool for doing data analysis. It’s an effective tool for conveying short, well-formatted, concise insights. The people who have done a good job … have focused on that.
Donald FarmerPrincipal, TreeHive Strategy

Similarly, the vendors that have developed good mobile apps have developed their apps specifically for mobile devices, noted Mike Leone, a senior analyst with Enterprise Strategy Group in Milford, Mass.

“First and foremost, [a good mobile BI app is] one that is designed from the ground up for a mobile device,” he said. “I’ve seen all too often organizations try and port their applications and [user interfaces] to a mobile device and the results are underwhelming and in some cases unusable.”

The good and the bad

More than a decade ago, in 2008, Yellowfin introduced its first mobile app. The vendor updated it once, and it didn’t attract many users.

But, recently the vendor completely overhauled the app, instead of attempting to recreate the desktop experience, transforming it into a timeline that looks and acts much like social media feeds. The mobile interface now highlights what it deems to be the most pertinent information and presents it in a way mobile users can easily view it.

Yellowfin CEO Glen Rabie said that he realized BI for mobile could be effective only if “the content and experience being delivered are uniquely designed for mobile versus trying to force fit a dashboard desktop experience onto a phone.”

MicroStrategy, which started developing its app in 2009, is another vendor that’s invested aggressively in BI for mobile.

“For us, we’ve always been focused on intelligence everywhere, how to arm as many people as possible,” said Hugh Owen, senior vice president of product marketing at MicroStrategy. “Mobile opened up another opportunity to arm people who aren’t looking at BI on their desktop with BI.”

While some BI software vendors have invested in creating effective mobile apps, others have all but ignored mobile innovation or ineffectively tried to simply recreate the desktop experience on mobile devices.
While BI vendors have invested heavily in developing their desktop computing software, many have chosen not yet to make the same kind of investment in their mobile apps.

The vendor’s current BI for mobile capabilities enables clients to build custom apps. Retail customers, for example, are able to embed the ability to execute transactions.

Meanwhile, MicroStrategy offers HyperIntelligence for Mobile as part of its HyperIntelligence product line. The app, due to its augmented intelligence and machine learning capabilities, provides a level of contextual understanding and intuitively provides users with information cards.

“If you walk into a store, it gives you a card about the store without you asking,” Owen said. “It can look at your calendar, scan through words and invitations, and match it with cards and give you a push note. It’s proven to be a different approach, and it’s helped us stand out.”

Domo, according to Farmer, is another vendor that has learned how to adapt BI for mobile. So have Qlik and Oracle.

But there are many others that have struggled to develop an effective BI for mobile app and have “an unclear strategy with some mobile being done but nothing very exciting and nothing very compelling,” Farmer said.

Innovation

Despite the limits placed on BI for mobile by a phone’s miniscule screen, there remains room for growth.

Phones and tablets have unique capabilities that desktop computers don’t.

Among the features they possess that desktop devices don’t is GPS. And while desktop devices also have cameras, the cameras on mobile phones and tablets are, well, mobile, while the ones on desktops are rooted in place.

Thanks to GPS, for example, someone who has business in multiple locations can travel to a location and — using a well-designed BI for mobile app — get actionable data about that location delivered directly to their mobile device.

“A good mobile app leverages the physical appendages of the phone or tablet,” Owen said. “It’s aware of your location and takes advantage. It uses the camera to take a picture and scan a QR code or other bar code — you wouldn’t do that with a clamshell laptop.”

The next step in the evolution of BI for mobile, according to Owen, is becoming more proactive rather than reactive by using AI and machine learning and learning behavioral patterns.

“It’s presenting answers back to you before you know you need it,” he said.

Vendors will also need to address security as the development of BI for mobile apps progresses.

“All too often, workers will utilize their personal devices for work,” Leone said. “With security top of mind for virtually every organization, ensuring the right level of controls and governance are in place, not just based on a user, but based on the device, will be important going forward.”

Ultimately, however, mobile devices are tools to connect people so that they can converse. The vendors who view them for what they are and develop BI for mobile apps that take advantage of a mobile device’s unique powers are the ones who will set the pace for innovations.

“It’s not a device for deep contemplation and analysis — it’s a device to look at to glimpse to see what’s important — so a really good mobile app does two things,” Farmer said. “It enables the glimpse of what is important, and it enables the communication of that, because ultimately mobile devices are communication devices.”

Go to Original Article
Author: