Tag Archives: will

Wanted – MacBook 12inch

Hi all,

I will be in the market for MacBook 12 inch next month.
Cheap as possible please not fuss about condition as long as it works
Anyone thinking about selling soon ?
Happy to collected within reason as well.

Thanks

Location
Chichester

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For Sale – Antec ISK600M HTPC case and Intel bundle

I’ve had this case for a couple of years and has served me well. Will take matx mobos and full ATX PSU. Haven’t had problems with dual fan GPU’s but I suspect some very long, three fan ones may not fit. In very good condition with enough space for up to 9 2.5″ disks or up to 3 3.5″ & 3 2.5″.
Doesn’t come with a PSU but have a couple of 80+ Gold rates ones (SFX and ATX) if interested.

Bundle
Asus matx skt1150
Intel 4670k
8gb ddr3 (2x4GB) HyperX
£110

Location
Bristol
Price and currency
50
Delivery cost included
Delivery is NOT included
Prefer goods collected?
I prefer the goods to be collected
Advertised elsewhere?
Not advertised elsewhere
Payment method
BT

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For Sale – Intel i7-3770 3.4GHZ, 8Gb Ram, Nvidia GT 640, Corsair Case, 128Gb SSD, 1tb HDD, Wi-Fi

Per the title, for sale is my DIY desktop, as I have received a new laptop for christmas so this will no longer get used. Built many years ago but still going strong and still running fast. Operating system loaded onto SSD so super fast load times, all files saved onto 1tb hard drive. Great desktop at very cheap price!

Location
Manchester
Price and currency
200
Delivery cost included
Delivery is NOT included
Prefer goods collected?
I prefer the goods to be collected
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Cash or Paypal

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Wanted – MacBook 12inch

Hi all,

I will be in the market for MacBook 12 inch next month.
Cheap as possible please not fuss about condition as long as it works
Anyone thinking about selling soon ?
Happy to collected within reason as well.

Thanks

Location
Chichester

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Author:

Microsoft Teams to add smartphone walkie-talkie feature

Workers will soon be able to turn their smartphones into a walkie-talkie using Microsoft Teams. The feature is one of several Microsoft unveiled this week targeting so-called frontline workers, such as retail associates, nurses, housekeepers and plumbers.

The walkie-talkie feature will let groups of employees speak to each other by pressing a button in the Teams mobile app. The audio will travel over Wi-Fi and cellular networks, meaning users will be able to communicate with colleagues anywhere in the world. The feature will be available in private preview in the first half of 2020.

Many retailers, hospitals, airlines and hotels still rely on physical walkie-talkie devices. In recent years, startups like Orion Labs and legacy vendors like Motorola Solutions have begun selling smartphone walkie-talkie apps. Those mobile apps come with benefits like location tracking and integration with other business technologies.

Microsoft’s smartphone walkie-talkie feature is not innovative. But if it works well, the capability could help Microsoft boost adoption of Teams among workers who otherwise wouldn’t use the app. Microsoft has made targeting frontline workers a priority since late 2018.

In addition to the walkie-talkie app, Microsoft said Thursday it would add to Teams a task feature for creating and assigning small projects to employees. The system will give businesses a dashboard to track tasks in real time across multiple departments or store locations. It will launch in the first half of 2020.

Microsoft will also expand the scheduling capabilities of Teams by integrating the app with popular workforce management platforms by Kronos and JDA Software. Those integrations will let businesses keep existing scheduling software in place while giving workers the ability to swap shifts and request time off through Teams.

Microsoft is not the only collaboration vendor targeting frontline workers, said Rob Arnold, analyst at Frost & Sullivan. But Microsoft has a leg up on competitors because it can offer businesses so many complementary cloud services. Those include the customer relationship manager Dynamics 365 as well as e-commerce and Internet of Things (IoT) platforms within Microsoft Azure.

New identity and access features for Microsoft Teams

Additional features targeting frontline workers include SMS sign-in, off-shift access controls and shared-device sign-out. These features will roll out between now and the middle of the year. 

Workers will soon be able to sign into their Azure Active Directory account (which controls access to Teams) using only a mobile phone number. IT admins will decide which groups of employees use the method.

IT admins will also be able to prevent frontline workers from accessing Teams when they are not on the clock. Temporarily blocking access will help businesses comply with labor laws.

Finally, for Android, Microsoft will add an “end shift” button to shared mobile devices and tablets that will clear app logins and browser sessions. Purging that data will prevent employees from accessing information they shouldn’t.  

Collectively, the latest features show that Microsoft wants to take Teams beyond the 30% of corporate employees who work in offices, Irwin Lazar, an analyst at Nemertes Research, said. “I think Microsoft is aggressively trying to expand the reach of Teams.”

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Customer experience world catches up on CCPA regulations

The California Consumer Privacy Act went into effect Jan. 1 but will not be enforced until July 1. Those in the customer experience realms of sales, marketing, e-commerce and customer service who’ve already created GDPR compliance plans are a good chunk of the way to CCPA compliance, experts say.

CX teams who work for companies outside California may view CCPA compliance as a lower priority than GDPR, because it only represents one U.S. state. That is the case for a majority of clients of Blue Fountain Media, a New York-based digital agency specializing in marketing, e-commerce and overall customer experience, said general manager Brian Byer.

“This particular law isn’t going to be what drives the behavior across the entire United States,” Byer said. “Being a New Yorker, California is looked upon as being a little quirky, and once this becomes a federal mandate you will see a massive consumer effect. As of today, until somebody gets a massive fine, it’s going to be something consumers aren’t as cognizant of as, say, HIPAA compliance if they’re going to the doctor every week.”

Nationally, consumer data protection proposals are under consideration in Washington and Oregon as well, prompting some companies such as Microsoft to make CCPA compliance its national standard as it prepares for users to scrutinize cloud companies’ data-privacy practices as a patchwork of state laws may eventually lead to a national umbrella regulation.

CCPA regulations chart
CCPA regulations touch numerous teams involved with customer experience.

Differences, similarities to GDPR

For CX teams, protecting customer privacy under CCPA is similar to the European GDPR law, which took effect in 2018, in that a core principle involves consumers’ “right to be forgotten,” or requiring a company to delete their personal data.

The differences between the two laws are borne of the different mindsets of the European and California legal systems, said IDC legal analyst Ryan O’Leary. CCPA makes an exception for customer loyalty programs, which are not covered under the law, while the GDPR doesn’t. CCPA also puts more responsibility on consumers to opt out of their data use for commercial purposes, rather than the company that holds the data.

Another difference with CCPA is that it gives consumers separate control over sale of their consumer data, the extent of which will remain somewhat “up in the air” until regulators decide what will and won’t be enforced, O’Leary added. But California consumers, in effect, can tell a company to hold on to their data, but not to sell it.

If you’re not selling the data, but third parties you’re working with are leveraging your consumer data and going ahead and selling it, you could be held liable.
Ryan O’LearyAnalyst, IDC

“Businesses have to provide a clearly visible and worded opt-out link on their websites [for data sales],” O’Leary said, adding that cloud software platforms add more legal questions about who is responsible for data-selling violations — which can add up quickly, with fines of $7,500 per violation — for selling a consumer’s data after consumers have opted out. “If you’re not selling the data, but third parties you’re working with are leveraging your consumer data and going ahead and selling it, you could be held liable.”

That said, O’Leary added that he sees companies trying to limit the number of opt-outs — and therefore, the compliance load — by making it harder to do. Those can include benign “are you sure?” boxes, more onerous web forms, or even requiring consumers to call a contact center to opt out over the phone. It’s all legal, fitting in with CCPA’s mandate requiring companies to offer consumers two modes of contact for consumers to opt out of personal data retention.

What companies CCPA covers

Despite the fear of potential CCPA fines that could intimidate digital marketing and call center teams for mishandling consumer information, not every company is affected by the regulation. First, a company has to do business with Californians. Second, the law covers only companies that either do $25 million in gross revenue, receive personal information from at least 50,000 consumer or derive at least 50% of annual revenue from selling consumers’ personal information.

Some nonprofits may be excluded, according to Jackson Lewis attorneys Joseph Lazzarotti and Jason Gavejian in their analysis of the law, which also includes which data points that the law considers personal information, such as biometric data, education records and even “audio, electronic, visual, thermal, olfactory or similar information.”

For CX teams using cloud platform technology platforms, complying with CCPA and other potential consumer data-protection laws coming down the pike involves unifying consumer data and breaking down data silos — something they’re been working on already for business purposes, said IDC’s O’Leary.

“The first step in complying with these types of laws is to clean up your house and information governance practices,” O’Leary said. “We really need to stop thinking and working in silos. We need to start data mapping. There’s plenty of tools and consultants out there to help. … It will cost, but [consumer trust] is worth any cost to get a handle on your data, where it is and who has it.”

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How to Use Failover Clusters with 3rd Party Replication

In this second post, we will review the different types of replication options and give you guidance on what you need to ask your storage vendor if you are considering a third-party storage replication solution.

If you want to set up a resilient disaster recovery (DR) solution for Windows Server and Hyper-V, you’ll need to understand how to configure a multi-site cluster as this also provides you with local high-availability. In the first post in this series, you learned about the best practices for planning the location, node count, quorum configuration and hardware setup. The next critical decision you have to make is how to maintain identical copies of your data at both sites, so that the same information is available to your applications, VMs, and users.

Multi-Site Cluster Storage Planning

All Windows Server Failover Clusters require some type of shared storage to allow an application to run on any host and access the same data. Multi-site clusters behave the same way, but they require multiple independent storage arrays at each site, with the data replicated between them. The data for the clustered application or virtual machine (VM) on each site should use its own local storage array, or it could have significant latency if each disk IO operation had to go to the other location.

If you are running Hyper-V VMs on your multi-site cluster, you may wish to use Cluster Shared Volumes (CSV) disks. This type of clustered storage configuration is optimized for Hyper-V and allows multiple virtual hard disks (VHDs) to reside on the same disk while allowing the VMs to run on different nodes. The challenge when using CSV in a multi-site cluster is that the VMs must make sure that they are always writing to their disk in their site, and not the replicated copy. Most storage providers offer CSV-aware solutions, and you must make sure that they explicitly support multi-site clustering scenarios. Often the vendors will force writes at the primary site by making the CSV disk at the second site read-only, to ensure that the correct disks are always being used.

Understanding Synchronous and Asynchronous Replication

As you progress in planning your multi-site cluster you will have to select how your data is copied between sites, either synchronously or asynchronously. With asynchronous replication, the application will write to the clustered disk at the primary site, then at regular intervals, the changes will be copied to the disk at the secondary site. This usually happens every few minutes or hours, but if a site fails between replication cycles, then any data from the primary site which has not yet been copied to the secondary site will be lost. This is the recommended configuration for applications that can sustain some amount of data loss, and this generally does not impose any restrictions on the distance between sites. The following image shows the asynchronous replication cycle.

Asynchronous Replication in a Multi-Site Cluster

Asynchronous Replication in a Multi-Site Cluster

With synchronous replication, whenever a disk write command occurs on the primary site, it is then copied to the secondary site, and an acknowledgment is returned to both the primary and secondary storage arrays before that write is committed. Synchronous replication ensures consistency between both sites and avoids data loss in the event that there is a crash between a replication cycle. The challenge of writing to two sets of disks in different locations is that the physical distance between sites must be close or it can affect the performance of the application. Even with a high-bandwidth and low-latency connection, synchronous replication is usually recommended only for critical applications that cannot sustain any data loss, and this should be considered with the location of your secondary site.  The following image shows the asynchronous replication cycle.

Synchronous Replication in a Multi-Site Cluster

Synchronous Replication in a Multi-Site Cluster

As you continue to evaluate different storage vendors, you may also want to assess the granularity of their replication solution. Most of the traditional storage vendors will replicate data at the block-level, which means that they track specific segments of data on the disk which have changed since the last replication. This is usually fast and works well with larger files (like virtual hard disks or databases), as only blocks that have changed need to be copied to the secondary site. Some examples of integrated block-level solutions include HP’s Cluster Extension, Dell/EMC’s Cluster Enabler (SRDF/CE for DMX, RecoverPoint for CLARiiON), Hitachi’s Storage Cluster (HSC), NetApp’s MetroCluster, and IBM’s Storage System.

There are also some storage vendors which provide a file-based replication solution that can run on top of commodity storage hardware. These providers will keep track of individual files which have changed, and only copy those. They are often less efficient than the block-level replication solutions as larger chunks of data (full files) must be copied, however, the total cost of ownership can be much less. A few of the top file-level vendors who support multi-site clusters include Symantec’s Storage Foundation High Availability, Sanbolic’s Melio, SIOS’s Datakeeper Cluster Edition, and Vision Solutions’ Double-Take Availability.

The final class of replication providers will abstract the underlying sets of storage arrays at each site. This software manages disk access and redirection to the correct location. The more popular solutions include EMC’s VPLEX, FalconStor’s Continuous Data Protector and DataCore’s SANsymphony. Almost all of the block-level, file-level, and appliance-level providers are compatible with CSV disks, but it is best to check that they support the latest version of Windows Server if you are planning a fresh deployment.

By now you should have a good understanding of how you plan to configure your multi-site cluster and your replication requirements. Now you can plan your backup and recovery process. Even though the application’s data is being copied to the secondary site, which is similar to a backup, it does not replace the real thing. This is because if the VM (VHD) on one site becomes corrupted, that same error is likely going to be copied to the secondary site. You should still regularly back up any production workloads running at either site.  This means that you need to deploy your cluster-aware backup software and agents in both locations and ensure that they are regularly taking backups. The backups should also be stored independently at both sites so that they can be recovered from either location if one datacenter becomes unavailable. Testing recovery from both sites is strongly recommended. Altaro’s Hyper-V Backup is a great solution for multi-site clusters and is CSV-aware, ensuring that your disaster recovery solution is resilient to all types of disasters.

If you are looking for a more affordable multi-site cluster replication solution, only have a single datacenter, or your storage provider does not support these scenarios, Microsoft offers a few solutions. This includes Hyper-V Replica and Azure Site Recovery, and we’ll explore these disaster recovery options and how they integrate with Windows Server Failover Clustering in the third part of this blog series.

Let us know if you have any questions in the comments form below!


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Author: Symon Perriman

For Sale – Intel i7-3770 3.4GHZ, 8Gb Ram, Nvidia GT 640, Corsair Case, 128Gb SSD, 1tb HDD, Wi-Fi

Per the title, for sale is my DIY desktop, as I have received a new laptop for christmas so this will no longer get used. Built many years ago but still going strong and still running fast. Operating system loaded onto SSD so super fast load times, all files saved onto 1tb hard drive. Great desktop at very cheap price!

Location
Manchester
Price and currency
200
Delivery cost included
Delivery is NOT included
Prefer goods collected?
I prefer the goods to be collected
Advertised elsewhere?
Advertised elsewhere
Payment method
Cash or Paypal

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